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The Penticton Press Jun 27, 1908

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Array ^4   aA ���  '
Xlbe   J>enticton
VOL. 2.   No. 50.
PENTICTON, B.C., SATURDAY, JUNE 27, 1908.
$1.00 "Per-^ear-Ik- Advance
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
HEAD  OFFICE, TORONTO
ESTABLISHED   1807
B. E. WALKER, President
ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager
A. H. IRELAND, Superintendent cf
Branches
Paid up Capital, %\ 0.000,000
Rest, - - - 5.000,000
Total Assets, -  113,000,000
BANK MONEY ORDERS
ISSUED AT THE FOLLOWING RATLS :
$5 and under       3 cents
Over  $5 and not exceeding S10   .      6 cents
"    $10       " " $30    10 cents 87
"    $30        " " $50    15 cents
These Orders are payahle at par ;it any office in Canaan oi a Chartered Bank
(Yukon excepted), and at tin.* principal banking points in Ihe I'nitcd Stales.
They are negotiable at $.|.<)<> to the �� sterling In Great Britain and Ireland,
They form an excellent method of remitting small sums of money with  safety
and at small cost, and may be obtained without delay at any office of the Bank
Penticton Branch
J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
Z'
Main's Pnharnfnacy
Main Street, Penticton.
V.	
���^
I*
ONE WORD REGARDING STATIONERY:
We have always carried a full line of Stationery, and always
intend to.   And we can give you a better assortment and
better values than any one else in town.
r.  a
WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF PRESCRIPTION WORK
n��  'A
nqEJ^wngnBanssicBitaaaaiMtitn
Id
PURE
MAPLE  SUGAR
AN13  SYRUP
Just received, from New Brunswick, 400 lbs..
Maple Sugar and a supply of Syrup.
GUARANTEED PURE.     . At Eastern Prices.
LAYTON'S.
JUST RECEIVED
A large consignment of
Single and Double
Light and Heavy
Express and Driving
HARNESS
KENT ��& SON
\ COMMERCIAL
\
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Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
DIGNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors.
If you /ant a Stylish Outfit, this is the place to come. You can always
get teams just when you want them. We make a specialty of keeping
good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack horses.
We are also putting in May and Grain for sale, and as we buy for cash
we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit.
Special  Attention  To The  Wants Of  Commercial  Men.
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Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
Stage Connects with Steamer "Okanagan" at Penticton, with Great Northern
Railway at Keremeos, and with stage to Hedley and Princeton, Leaves at 6 a.m
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,  and a general Draying
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.       Penticton.
Penticton Store
Established 40 Years.
Alfred It Wade, Prop.
Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, Groceries
and General Merchandize of all Sorts
Agent for
Goods delivered through the town
GIANT POWDER CO.
OKANAGAN FLOUR MILLS CO.
Prompt attention to orders.
PENTICTON,
L	
B.C.
DOMINION DAY
July 1 st, 1908
Athletic  Events
Value of Prizes
100 Yard Dash 1st $10 00   2nd $5 00
Half Mile Relay Race         12 00
Running High Jump  5 00 3 00
Running Long Jump  5 00 3 00
Fat Man' Race  5 00
Tug of War (6 on each side)         10 00
BOYS' RACES-Under 16
100 Yard Dash 1st $ 3 00   2nd $2 00
Sack Race  3 00 2 00
Three-Legged Race  3 00 2 00
BOYS' RACE-12 and under
50 Yards 1st $ 2 00   2nd $1 00
GIRLS' RACE-Under 16
50 Yards 1st $ 3 00   2nd $2 00
GIRLS' RACE-Under 12
50 Yards 1st $ 2 00   2nd $1 00
NAIL DRIVING COMPETITION-Ladies any age
Competitors to drive 9 nails 1st $ 3 00   2nd $2 00
Aquatic  Sports
Starting at 9 a. m.
SCULLING AND CANOE RACES
Men's Single Sculling    1st $
Men's Double Sculling	
tjLadies' Single Sculling	
Mixed Double Sculling	
Boys' Single Sculling (under 16) 	
Family Boat Race (1 rowing and 2 others)
Canoe Race, Single	
Canoe Race, Double	
Canoe Race (no paddles)	
SWIMMING RACES
Men's 100 Yards (open) 	
Boys' 50 Yards (open)	
Men's Half Mile 	
Greasy Pole	
50 Yards in Clothes (coat, pants, shoes, hat)
Hunt the Seal	
Diving for Plates	
High Dive	
Value of Prizes
00
00
00
00
3 00
00
00
00
2nd $3 00
3 00
2 50
3 00
1 50
3 00
5 00
Sailing Race (handicap)
Water Polo	
10 00
500
10 00
Ham
300
500
5 00
5 00
15 00
5 00
5 00
2 50
2 00
RULES GOVERNING AQUATIC SPORTS
Boat Racing and Swimming���3 entries for 1 prize;   4 entries
and over for 2 prizes.
Sailing Race���3 starters.
All swimming competitors to wear two-piece bathing suits.
Horse  Races
Prizes
One Mile (open) $50 00
Half Mile (open-2 in 3)   50 00
Tandem Race, \ mile (ride one and drive one)  15 CO
Hurdle Race, \ mile (5 hurdles)  20 00
Ladies' Hurdle Race, �� mile (5 hurdles)  25 00
Boys' Pony Race, \ mile (under 14 hands)  15 00
Cowboy Race, 400 yards (open)  20 00
Klootchman's Race, \ mile  5 00
Association   Race,   \  mile   (Members  of   Association.
Owners up)   20 00
Racing to start at 2 p. m.
Entry fee, 10 per cent, of purse.
The Committees reserve the right to change the order of
any events or to declare off any not filling to their satisfaction.
Don't forget the Ball in Steward's Hall at 9 p. m.
The Association's Refreshment Booth on the fli nnnn���if r
Local and Personal
C. A. C. Steward visited Kelowna this week.
R. Anderson intends handling
Summerland bread in future.
Watch Steward's window for
prizes of athletic sports.
J. Partridge is having a substantial addition built to his
blacksmith shop on Smith street.
Meals will be served at all
hours of the day on the First of
July in the room now occupied
as an office by W. H. T. Gahan. -
R. Anderson.
Subscribers to the prize fund
for the First are requested to
send their contributions to J. W.
Edmonds, the secretary, by Monday evening.
Mrs. Wm. Huycke, after spending several months with her husband's parents, Mr. and Mrs.
H. Huycke, of Penticton, returned to her home in Winnipeg
on Friday.
The residents on Ellis St. will
be glad to learn that the provincial government has refunded
the money expended by citizens
in putting a bridge across Penticton creek on that street.
The long looked for Small
Debts Court has been established.
Magistrates J. R. Mitchell and
I. M. Stevens, have been given
Small Debts powers for Penticton and a radius of ten miles.
The large list of events to take
place on Dominion Day will
necessitate their running off with
no delays. If entries are not
made promptly in any of the
events, they will be called off.
Mr. Welbridge, 6t Macclesfield,
Eng., who has been looking over
various parts of the province
with a view to settling here,
spent a day with Corbishley
Bros., old acquaintences, last
week,
J. H. McKenzie, of Osoyoos,
and formerly of Penticton, left
on Friday for the Dominion Fair
at Calgary. He will later proceed to his old home in Pictou,
N. S. where he will spend two
or three months.
Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Rathvon
left on Friday for the Calgary
Exhibition. After remaining a
couple of weeks in that city,
Mrs. Rathvon will spend three
or four monthg with her parents
at Fort Saskatchewan.
Don't forget that an excursion
will be run from Kelowna,
Peachland, ' Summerland and
Naramata to Penticton on the
First of July. The rate will be 8
fare and a third return. The
Kelowna Brass Band will attend.
Don't miss the trip.
W. II. Scott, of Blind River,
Ont. and brother, M. J. Scott, of
Jamaica, arrived on Monday.
W. H. Scott spjnt several weeks
in Penticton last summer when
he and another brother made
i extensive purchases of fruit
lands both for themselves and
W. H. Scott.
The syringa bushes along Mairi
St., about a mile from town, arc
a beautiful sight at present.
The unocc. -:dd Indian reservation has the appearance of an
orchard in spring, with the
masses of large white fragrant
blossoms completely enveloping
the clumps of bushes.
W. W. Rogers, who had been
at Vancouver on business in connection with the erection of a
large hotel on the lakeshore, returned on Monday. Mr. Roger's
partner, Mr. Whiting, will visit
Penticton within a few days and
go fully into the matter. If
things are satisfactory, a fifty
thousand dollar tourist hotel will
be put up.
H. V. Agnew has under construction on Ellis St. what should
prove a very handsome and durable house when finished. The
basement will be of cement, and
the corners and around the openings cement blocks, while the
walls will be stone veneered.
The Ladies' Guild of St. Saviour's Church held a very successful strawberry festival on
the lawn at the residence of B.
T. Gahan Thursday evening.
Besides the refreshments o+!
strawberries, ice cream, fruits
and cake there was a musical
programme which was enjoyed
by an unusually large gathering.
A walk through the grounds
of the Okanagan Nursery Co.
would well repay for the trouble
at present. Besides a quantity
of flowering spirea which is in
full bloom, there are four long
rows of Japanese honeysuckles���
climbing and upright���also in
full bloom. These honeysuckles
are remarkable for the size of
their blossoms and the variety of
the color and shade in'their composition. The company announce
that they intend putting these
plants on the market at reduced
prices next fall.
The churchwardens of St.
Saviour's Church desire to thank
all those ladies and gentlemen
who assisted in making the social
given on Thursday evening such
a success. Thanks are especially
due to Mrs. B. T. Gahan for the
use of her house and grounds; to
those who helped in making the
musical programme the great
treat it was; to the ladies who
furnished the cakes, candy,
lemonade, ice cream, etc., and to
Mrs. L. C. Barnes for the very
beautiful roses, the sale of which
materially helped to swell the
total takings which amounted to
over $50.
The Fraser Valley Record, published at Mission Junction by J.
A. Bates, formerly publisher of
the Cumberland News, is the
latest addition to the list of British Columbia newspapers. The
Record is a four column, eight
page paper, and the first number
contains a general write-up of
the district. The large advertising patronage the paper is receiving from the outset shows
that the business men of The
Mission are enterprising and up-
to-date, and that they appreciate
the value of a paper in the building up of their community. We
are glad to note that the journal
will be a financial success from
the beginning, as it is impossible
for an editor to keep up his enthusiasm, and make a literary
success of his paper, and thus do
his best for the community for
which he is laboring, when he
cannot make both ends meet.
OKANAGAN FALLS
The Murray Comedy Company
ga.ve an entertainment at the
Alexandra Hotel last Saturday.
It, afforded great amusement to
i a large and appreciative audience. Mr. Murray stated that
it was the largest house to which
he had played in the Okanagan.
Land is selling at a good price
I in this neighborhood. Mr. Y.
! C. Kitley recently sold 20 acres
to Sergeant Phillips, of Wetaski-
win, Alberta, and refused a cash
offer of $3,000 for 10 acres near
his house.
Mr. E. Bullock Webster is
fencing his lot on the lake front.
Mr. Steward, of Pentictcn,
visited the town lately.
A very large grape-vine leaf,
measuring 12 inches by 13, was
picked on Mr. Cordy's ranch at
Vaseaux Lake.
Good and welcome rains have
fallen during the past week.
rt
\ *��
THE PENTICTON PRESS
ISSUED   EVERY   SATURDAY  AT
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
W. J. CLEMENT.
Subscription $1.00 Per Year in
Advance.
Advertising Rates:
Transient Advertisements���Not exceeding one inch, one insertion, 50c.;
for each additional insertion, 25c.
Lodge Notices, Professional Cards, &c.
$1.00 per inch, per month.
Land and Timber Notlces-30 days, $5;
60 days, $7.
Legal Advertising���First insertion, 10
cents per line; each subsequent insertion, 6c. per line.
Reading Notices in Local News Column
15c. per line, first insertion; 10c. per
line, each subsequent insertion.
Contract Advertisements���Rates arranged according to space taken.
All changes in contract advertisements must be in the hands of the
printer by Tuesday evening to ensure
publication in the next issue.
Value of Incorporation.
Incidents during the past few
weeks have brought home to the
paople of Penticton as never before the desirability of municipal
organization. Anything of a
public nature at present has to
be taken up by a few of the public spirited citizens, and any expenses attached thereto have to
be borne by those who are generously disposed. There can be
no complaint upon this score as
the residents of Penticton have
ever contributed cheerfully and
liberally towards anything for
the public good. But it is this
very fact that renders incorporation the more desirable. If a
road requires grading, if there is
a sidewalk to be laid, or any
other public work done, the
funds for the purpose have often
had to be raised by voluntary
contributions. Under incorporation the expenses of such improvements would be borne by
the property that was benefitted
by them, whether the owners
were resident in Penticton or
not. By this means people
would not feel that they were
contributing unduly towards the
public welfare, and a spirit of
progress and enterprise would
thus be fostered.
Perhaps one of the strongest
arguments in favor of incorporation is that people take a deeper
interest in matters of which they
possess absolute control. In the
unincorporated state, the people
are practically wards of the government, and. although they contribute towards the revenue of
the province, have little or
nothing to say about its expenditure. If anything is required it
is usually necessary to practically
go on the knees and beg for it,
and then, probably, wait until
after two or three sessions of
parliament before the request is
granted. What is everybody's
business is nobody's business
and matters of the utmost im-
psrtance, such as the securing of
a cemetery site, are allowed to
drag along as though nobody had
any interest in them. Penticton
requires a head, a man or body
of men to whom the citizens may
look for the handling of such
affairs, and such a head may be
found only by municipal organization.
It has been quite noticeable
that the class of people whom it
is wished, especially, to attract
as settlers have not come in
large numbers. We refer to the
retired wealthy. A few such
have come, stayed awhile and
gone away again, probably to
the coast. Why is this? Is it
because the coast climate is
superior to that of the Okanagan or that nature has been more
lavish in bestowing favors upon
that portion of the province ?
No person in the Okanagan will
admit that. The cause must
then lie in the modern conveniences of that place���better
sidewalks, better roads, electric
lights, waterworks, parks, and a
host of other things. The way
to get wealthy people to settle
here is to make the place beautiful, attractive and convenient.
Those people want, not only cli
mate and rest, but enjoyment
arising from modern conveniences, and they are willing to
pay for it. Incorporation is essential in order to bring the
place up to date. Nature has
done all it can towards making
Penticton the very Eden of Canada, and it is now up to the
people to do their part.
We have, heretofore, contended that taxes will not, necessarily, be increased by incorporation,
but even if they were it would be
poor business to object to incorporation on that ground. Every
I citizen should leave no stone un-
i turned to make Penticton the
most important town of the interior of British Columbia. Taxation cannot be effected, however, for 1909 as the assessment
for next year will be made in the
latter part of the present year.
The first of next January would
be a good time to have incorporation date from, and as it will
require practically six months to
put it through now is the time
to start in.
THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. JUNE 27. 1908.
|p��HW��Wfii. Lr~.  '.  B.'taWB!!.Tg"7--,'i-.TJ^yrT?gS.l^RBBflnil
Okanagan Camp No. 261.
OF
Meets  2nd  and  4th  Saturday  in   the
month at 8 p. m. in Woodmen's Hall.
Ellis St.
Visiting Sovereigns always welcome.
JOHN POWER, C. C.
R. WILTON. CLERK
IK )TEL. I��i:.\ti< :t<>x.
easonable
aj3Jti^22HESfc����nSiiE2l__v.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.
RATES $2.30 PER DAY
A. Barnes        - -       Prop.
PENTICTON. B.C.
Commencing Saturday, June 20th, we
will put on sale the goods enumerated
below. Every department will be affected
by this sale and many articles not men=
tioned here will be included.
*f
.t->-
News.
Assist your editor in making
the local paper interesting by
s?nding hi.n in all the local news
you can. People coming and
going, sales of property, or public improvements, as well as
hundreds of other things, all
make interesting reading, and
help to advertise the country.
Do not object to having your
npme appear in print. "No man
liveth to himself," is literally
true, for when an outsider reads
what is being done in your community, he gains a definite idea
about the place and knows that
its citizens are neither dead nor
asleep. Tell the editor what you
or your friends are doing or intend to do. He is doing his level
best for the town; then help him
out. If you know something
which you consider of importance, do not blame the editor if
it does not appear in print. His
time is limited and he cannot
call personally upon everybody
and coax news out of them; you
should have told him about it.
Do not hide your light under a
bushel and then get cross because the editor overlooks you.
Do not expect telegraph despatches of world news published
in your local paper when there is
no telegraph communication;
besides if there were would you
be willing to contribute sufficiently towards the support of the
paper to enable him to pay the
price. People get only what they
pay for. The editor's wings
have not yet budded, so he cannot fly around the country after
news. It costs money for him
to travel as well as it does you,
and his bank account isn't any
larger. Therefore, we beg, we
beseech, we implore our readers
to send us in all the local news
they can. Help us to make a
bright, readable paper that will
do justice to the future capital of
the Okanagan.
I
*
.0����w0^��  GROCERIES  t-^tt^m^tf^tf
SUGAR==This is preserving time and the economical buyer will appreciate this low price especially at this season. While our present stock
lasts the price will be $1.30 for 20 lb.  sack;   $6.50 for 100 lbs.
1
HAMS  18c
ROLLS   17c
DRY SALT PORK  15c
BACON   20c
CHOICE DAIRY BUTTER,  1  pound
bricks     25c
SUNNY MONDAY SOAP, 3 bars for   25c
(this is less than the cost of this
high-grade laundry soap)
5 Cartoons WHITE SWAN, GOLDEN
WEST, or ROYAL CROWN
SOAP for    1.00
BISCUITS-Huntly & Palmer mixed
Tea Biscuits per lb     15c
"Alexandra" 2 pkts for     25c
McCormack's   Cream   Sodas   in
.    bulk, per lb      10c
Molasses Snaps per lb     10c
RAISINS, per package     10c
CURRANTS       "             10c
TEA���Victoria Cross,  regular  price
50c.; sale price per lb     40c
Good Tea in bulk at     30c
OGILVIE'S "GLENORA" FLOUR -
501b. sack    1.70
100       "        3.35
SCHRAM FRUIT JARS. We'are sole
agents for Penticton. No more
fruit jar troubles. Pints $1.10,
Quarts $1.35, Half Gallons $1.60,
per dozen.
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To Protect Fish.
The new Dominion regulations
relative to the fishing industry
in British Columbia contain a few
clauses of special importance to
inland waters.
The taking of trout of all kinds
is prohibited from November
15th to March 25th following,
except in the waters of the interior of the Province of British
Columbia east of meridian 120,
west longitude, where the taking
of trout of all kinds from November 15th to May 1st following is prohibited.
No kind of netting is allowed
in fresh water lakes and on non-
tidal waters.
Salmon under three pounds
must be returned to the water.
Trout under three pounds cannot be bought, sold or exposed
for sale in the Province.
The latter clause has an important bearing upon fishing in
Okanagan Lake. Heretofore, a
number of fishermen have been
capturing and selling fish of a
pound or less in weight, to the
depletion of the lake of one of
its chief attractions to sportsmen
and pleasure seekers. We are
glad to note that this can now be
put an end to, and a substantial
improvement of Okanagan Lake
as a fishing ground will be the
result.
CLOTHING
All our Men's
Suits, odd Pants
and Vests at far
less than Eastern
prices.
If you have de=
layed buying a
Summer Suit
now is your time
to secure one of
these elegantly
tailored gar=
ments at al=
most manufac=
turer's      prices.
CLOTHING
We have a fine range of styles
aiad patterns, and you will be fully
satisfied with a suit of
BROADWAY CLOTHING
Tailored by professional tradesmen
and a fit and finish to them not
found elsewhere.
STAGES
Stage leaves for KeremeoB at 6 a. m. ��n Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Returns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Stage  leaves for Princeton every Tuesday at
7 a. in.
Stage leaves for Fairview and Oroviile on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a. m. Ke-
turnson  Mondays,  Wednesdays and Fridays at
-9 p. Ml.
POST OFFICE.
Hours y a. m, to 6, p, m.
Registered Letter and Money Order wicket
closes ;") p, in.
Wicket opened for half an hour after mail ih
: distributed.
Arrivals���Per Str. Okanwran: Daily except
Sunday 6 p. m.; Per stage from Hedley. Keremeos, Olalla. Green Mountain. Oroviile, Fairview,
I and White Lake: Mondays, Wednesdays and   Fri-
! days at (i p. in.
Closing���For hoat and Stages: 9 p. m. daily except Saturday. For Monday's boat and stages:
8.46 p, in. Sundays.
C. P. R. TIME TABLE
SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH
Daily both ways except Sunday.
SOUTH BOUND    STATION    NORTH BOUND
7.80 a. m	
(i.27    "    	
8.52   "    	
i   8.80   "   ,,..ai
9.30   "    ....lv
9.45   "   ���ar...0k. Landing .'. .lv.
! Iii.no p.m....IV... Ok. Landinpr.   ar.
11.10   "   .
3.00 " .
I 4.45 " .
!   (i.00    "     .
Sicamuus .
... Enderby...
. .Armstrong ..
.... Vernon....
... .Vernon....
.Ok. Landing .
. Ok. Landing.
6.00 p.m.
4.48 "
4.08 "
3.30 "
2.30 ���'
2.16 "
.11.00 a.m.
Kelowna  8.20
. Peachland  7.25
. Summerland  fi.30
.. l'entietun  0.00
SHIRTS
We have just received a nice
assortment of English Shirts, manufactured by the well-known shirt
makers of Welsh, Margetson & Co.
These we have marked at prices
ranging from 75 cents to $1.00 less
than coast houses ask for them.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
IVOTICE is hereby given that the reserve, notice
*" of which appeared in the British Columbia
Gazette, dated February 21st, 1907, respecting a
parcel of land reserved for Cemetery purposes
and comprising ten acres adjoining Lots 2,821
and 277, Osoyoos Division of Yale, has been cancelled so far as it relates to land lyinp: to the south
of the northern boundary of Lot 1,004 (S.> Similkameen Division of Yale District.
RORT. A. RENWICK,
Deputy Commissioner   of   Lands and   Works,
Lands and Works Department.
Victoria, R. C, 7th May. 19J8. 44-3m
NOTICE.
Osoyoos Land District. District of
Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that Frederick Richard Gartrell, of Summerland, in the
province of British Columbia, farmer,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described   land:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of lot 2555, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 20 chains,
thence west 20 chains, thence south 20
chains, to place of bcginning,containing
10 acres.
Located on the 28th day of May, 1908.
46-5    Frederick Richard Gartrell
NOTICE
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Dry Goods
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3
Nearly all lines! of  Dry Goods will be sold at prices to  reduce  the W
Pall goods will soon be on the way and summer goods must go. V
j CHUM'S ENGLISH PRINTS-2yds for 25c. J
f      Dress Muslins in single dress lengths, all at a small advance on cost, f
* Velma Silk in Waist length patterns at 50c. a yard.
�� slock
t
I
f
Ladies' Hose, Belts, Gloves, Veiling, all at reduced prices.
.tf^^tf^^-tt "nnfc! 0-n^.p ^^ tf*^.tt ���^n*. t ��-"��nw*��-
HARDWARE
/
Good Building Paper, per roll .'.     90.c
Tar Paper, per roll  $1.10
I
6 foot Wire Netting for less  than price
usually charged for 5 foct, per roll. .$5.CO
In the matter of the Land Registry
Act and in the mattei of the title to
Lots 26 and 27, Block 14 (Map 269),
Town of Penticton.
WHEREAS the Certificate of Title
of William Guynup being Certificate of
Title No. 1148a to the above hereditaments has been lost or destroyed and
application has been made to me for a
duplicate thereof.
NOTICE is hereby given that a duplicate Certificate of Title to the above
hereditaments will be issued at the expiration of one month from the date of
the first publication hereof unless in
the meantime valid objection to the
contrary is made to me in writing.
W. H. EDMONDS
District Registrar of Titles.
Land Registry Office, Kamloops, B. I'.,
May 27th, 1908.
LOST
One bay mare ; weight about 1,100
lbs.; little mane; brand K on right
shoulder; $10.00 reward.
JAMES GRANT,
47-tf. White Lake, B. C.
WANTED.
For a  Progressive,   Non-Tariff  Fire
Insurance Company, an active agent at
Penticton and Summerland.     Apply to
COLUMBIA AGENCIES, L'T'D,
Revelstoke, B. C.
Tents at greatly reduced prices.
3ES:
2C3
W. R. King & Co.
THE ELLIS STREET STORE.
'PHONE 25.
%0^BtmmmmWmWmmmm3mWEmKmW^emmmWa3mCZE
NOTICE
FRUIT TREES���Well-grown stock.
Large quantity of apple trees for sale,
only few choice varieties grown : also
small stock of ornamental trees. Apply
for varieties and price to Manager,
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd.,
15-tf Vernon, B. C.
C. P. R.
LAND FOR
SALE
���'!.!��'WyW'��|iT
txal
Choice fruit lots, improved and
unimproved.
FIRE INSURANCE-The Sun of London, Eng., and Queen.    Why not insure
in the best; they cost no more.
Apply to
J. R. MITCHELL. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. JUNE 27, 1908.
A Rock in the Baltic
By  ROBERT  BARR,
yiulhor of
"The Triumphs of Eugene Valmont." "Tekla," "In the Midst of
Alarms,"   "Speculations of John Steele,"   "The Victors,"   Etc.
Copyricht.   1D06,  by   Robert   Barr.
By Arrangement with The Authors and Newspapers Association of New York.
i demanded tne nuius oi an American citizen. That doomed me. I
was sent, without trial, to the Trogz-
mondoff In April of this year. Arriving there 1 was foolish enough to
threaten and say my comrades had
means of letting the United States
government know and that a battleship would tench the Jailers of the j
rock better manners.
"The cells hewn In the rock are
completely dark, so I lost all count of
time. You might think we would know
night from day by the bringing In of
our meals, but such was not the case.
The Jailer brought In a large loaf of
black bread nnd snld It was to serve
me for four days. He placed the loaf
on n ledge of rock about three feet
from the floor which served ns both
table nnd bed. In excavating the cell
this ledge had been left intact, with a
bench of stone rising from the floor
opposite. Indeed so ingenious bad been
the workmen who hewed out this
room that they carved a rounded stone
pillow at oue end of the shelf.
"I do not know how many dnys I
hnd been in prison when the explosion
occurred. It innde the whole rock
quiver, and 1 wondered whnt had happened. Almost immediately afterward
there seemed to he another explosion,
not nearly so harsh, which 1 thought
���was perhaps an echo of the first.
About an hour later my cell door was
unlocked, and the jailer, w'th another mnn holding a lantern, came In.
My third loaf of black bread was partly consumed, so 1 must have been in
prison nine or ten dnys. The jailer
took the loaf outside, and when he re-
'turnod I asked him what had happened. He answered in a Rimy fashloh
thnt my American warship had fired
nt the rock and that the rock had struck
back,   whereupon   she   sailed   uwaj
crippled."
Dorothy, who had been listening Ir.
teutly to this discourse, here interrupted with:
"It was an English warship that fired
the shell, and the Russian shot did not
come within half a mile of her."
The sailor stared at her In wide eyed
surprise.
"You see, I have been making Inquiries," she explained. "Please go
on."
"I never heard thnt It wns nn English ship. The jailer sneered nt me
aud said he wns going to send tne nfter
the American vessel, as I suppose ho
thought it was. I reared by his taking
away of the bread that it was Intended to starve me to dentil and was sorry
I had not eaten more at my last meal.
I lay down on the shelf or rock and
soon fell asleep. I wns awakened by
the water lapping around tne. The cell
was intensely still. Up to this I had
always enjoyed the company of a little
brook thnt ran along the side of tbe
cell farthest from the door. Its music
had now censed, ntxl when I sprang up
I found myself to the waist iu very
cold water. I guessed at once the use
of the levers outside the cell iu the
passage which I bad noticed in the
light of the lantern on the day I entered the place, and I knew now why it
wus that the prison door was not pierced by one of those gratings which enable the Jailer lu the passage to look
Into the cell any time of night or day.
Prisoners hnve told me that the uncertainty of an inmate who never
knew when he might be spied upon
added to Ihe horror of tlie situation,
but the watertight doors of the Trogsi-
uioiKlolT are free from this feature und
for a very sinister reason.
"The   channel   In   the  floor  through
which the water runs when the cell is
empty  and  the  tunnel  nt  the  celling |
through  which the water (lows  when ;
the cell Is full give plenty of ventlla-
tlpn, no matter how tightly the door'
may be closed.    The water rose  very !
gradually until it reached the top out-1
let. then its level reiual I stationary,
1 Honied on the top quite easily, with
as little exertion ns wns necessnry to
keep me ill thnt position. If 1 rnlsod
my head, my brow struck the celling.
The next cell to mine, lower down,
was possibly empty. I heard the water pour into it like u little cataract
The next cell above and Indeed all the
cells In that direction were flooded like
my own.
"Of course It was no trouble for mo
lo keep afloat. My only danger was
that the intense coldness of the water
would numb ui'y body beyond recovery.
Still I had been accustomed to hardships of Unit kind before now in the
frozen north. At last the gentle roar
of the waterfall censed, nnd I realized
my cell wns emptying Itself, When I
reached my shelf again. I stretched my
limbs buck and forth as strenuously
as I could aud as silently, for 1 wished
no sound to give any hint that 1 was
still alive, if. indeed, sound could penetrate to the passage, which Is unlikely. Even before the Inst of the water
had run away from the cell I lay
Btretehed out nt full length on the
floor, boiling I might hnve steadiness
enough to remain death quiet wheu
the men came in with the lantern. I
need have had no fear. 'Hie door was
onened, one of tlie men picked me up
\,j the heels and, using my legs as If
they were the shafts of a wheelbarrow, dragged me down the passage to
the place where the stream emerged
from   the  last  cejl   upil   OjU>. Uilfl   tor
rent he flung me. There wns one swift,
brief moment of darkness, then I shot,
feet first. Into space nnd dropped down,
down, down through the air like a
plummet Into the arms of my mother."
"Into what?" cried Dorothy, white
nnd breathless, thinking the recital of
these agonies had turned the man's
lira in.
"The Baltic, madam, is the Finland-
er's mother. It feeds him lu life, carries him whither he wishes to go. and
every true l'inlunder hopes to die In
her arms. The Ilnlllc seemed nlmost
wurm niter whnt I had been through,
and the tnste of the suit on my lips
wus good. It wns n beautiful starlight
night In May. ami I Hunted around tbe
rock, for I knew that iu u cove ou the
eastern side, concealed from nil view
of the sea. lay a Finland fishing boat,
a craft lhat will weather any storm,
and here In the water was a man who
knew how to handle It. Prisoners are
landed on the eastern side, and such
advantage is taken of the natural conformation of this precipitous rock that
n inun climbing tbe steep zigzng stnir-
wny which leads to Ihe inhabited portion Is hidden from sight of any craft
upon the water even AWi or 500 yards
away. Nothing seen from the outside
gives any token of habitation,
"The fishing boat, I suppose, is kept
for cases of emergency, that the governor may comniuulcate with the shore
If necessary. I feared it might he
moored so securely that I could not unfasten it. Security hnd made them
careless, and the boat wns tied merely
by lines to rings in the rock, the object
being to keep her from bruising her
sides against the stone rather than to
prevent any one takiir: her away. I
pushed her out Into the open, got quietly inside and floated with the swift
tide, not caring to raise a sail until I
was well out of gunshot distance.
Once clear of the rock 1 spread canvas
and by daybreak was long out of sight
of laud. I tnntle for Stockholm, nud
there being no mark or name on the
boat to denote that it belonged to the
Russian government I ha 1 little di.li
culty in selling it. 1 told the author!
ties what was perfectly true���that 1
was a Finland sailor escaping from
t'le tyrant of my country nnd anxious
to get to America. As such events nre
happening prnrtlcally every week along '
'he Swedish coast I was not Inter
Vrcl with and gofenniigh money from
��h<> snle of the  boat tn enable me to
/.less lu/seli well and take passage to
England, aud from there first class to
New York on a regular liner.
"Of course I could have shipped as
n sailor from Stockholm easy enough,
but I was tired of being tt common
sudor nnd expected, if 1 was respectably clothed, to get n better position
than would otherwise lie the case.
This proved true, for crossing the
ocean I became acquainted with Mr.
Stockwell. aud he engaged me as mate
of his yacht. That's how I escaped
from the TrogzniondofT. madam, and
I think no one but a Flnlander could
have done It."
"I quite agree with you." said Dorothy. "You think these two men 1 have
been making Inquiry about have lieen
sent to the TrogzmondofT'r"
"Tho Russian may not lie there, madam, but the Englishman Is sure to
be there."
"Is the cannon on the western side
of the rock?"
"1 don't know, madam. I never saw
the western side by daylight. I noticed nothing on the eastern side as I
was climbing the steps to show thnt
nny cannon was on Ihe Tfogssmondoff
nt all."
"I suppose yon had nn opportunity
of finding out how ninny men gnrrlson
the rock."
"No. madam, I don't think the gnrrlson Is large.    The place Is so secure
steamer stood out. and I wns landed
In tlie cove I spoke of nt the foot of
the stairway."
������It wouldn't be possible to bring n
steamer like the Walrus nlongside the
rock, then?"
"Tt would be possible In calm weather, but very dangerous even then."
"Could you find that rock If you were
In command of a ship sailing the Baltic?"
"Oh. yes, mndnm."
"if twenty or thirty determined men
were lnnded on the stnirwny, do you
think they could cnpture the garrison?"
"Y'es. if they were landed secretly,
but one or two soldiers nt the top with
repenting rifles might hold the stnirwny ngnlnst an nruiy while their ammunition lasted."
"But if a shell were fired from the
steamer might not the attacking company get inside during the confusion
among tlie defenders?"
"That Is possible, madam, but a private steamer firing shells or. Indeed.
landing a hostile company runs danger
of meeting tlie fate of a pirate."
"You would not cure to try It. then?"
"1? Oh. I should be delighted to try
It If you nllow me to select the crew.
I ran easily get aboard the small arms
nnd ammunition necessary, but I um
not so sure nliout the cannon."
"i'ery good. I need not wnrn you to
be extremely cautious regarding those
you take Into your confidence. Mean-
While I wish you lo communicate with
the official who is authorized to sell
the yacht. 1 am expecting a gentleman tomorrow in whoso nnme the vessel will probably be bought, nnd I nm
hoping he will accept the captaincy
of it."
"Is he cnpnhle of filling (hat position,
madam?   Is he a sailor?"
"lie was for many years captain in
the United States navy. 1 offer yon
the position of mate, but 1 will give
you captain's pay und a large bonus In
addition If you faithfully carry out
my plans, whether they prove successful or not. I wish you to come here nt
this hour tomorrow with whoever is
nuthorized to sell or charter the steamer. Y'ou may sny I nm undecided
whether to buy or charter. I must consult Captain Kempt on that point."
"Thank you. madam. 1 shall be here
this time tomorrow."
"0?ic of the men piehed  me up hy the
heels."
thnt It doesn't need many men to guard
IL Prisoners are never taken out for
exercise, and, as I told you, they are
fed but once In four days."
"How large a crew can the Walrus
carry?"
"Oh, ns many as you like, mndnm.
The yacht Is practically an ocean
liner"
"Is there any landing stage on the
e.Tdeni side of the rock?"
���True tluillv     nine,     madam.     The
CHAPTEU XIII.
P"~~"lRIXCE   IVAN   LERMOXTOFF
came to consider the explosion
one of the luckiest things that
��� had ever occurred In his workshop.    Its happening so soon after he
reached St. Petersburg ho looked upon
as particularly fortunate, because this
gave him time to follow the new trend
of thought along which his mind had
been deflected by such knowledge as
the unexpected outcome of his experiment had disclosed to him.    Tho material he had used as a catalytic agent
was  a  new substance  which  he  had
road of in a scientific review and  lie
bad purchased a small quantity of it
lu London.    If such a minute portion
produced results so tremendous, he hp
gan to see that a  man  with ttu ap-
pureutly innocent material In his waistcoat pocket might probably be able to
destroy a naval harbor, so long as water  aud   sltone   were   in   conjunction.
There   was  nlso a  possibility  tbat  a
small  quantity  of ozak.  as tbe stuff
wns  culled,  mixed   with   pure  wuter,
would form u reducing ngent for limestone nnd perhaps for other minerals.
Which would work much quicker than
if the liquid wns merely  impregnated
with carbonic acid gas.    He endeavored  to purchase some ozak from  Mr.
Kruger,  the  chemist  ou  the  English
quay,  but that good   mail   had  uever
heard of it, und a day's search  per-
suuded him that it could not be got In
St.  Petersburg, so the prince induced
Kruger  to order half a   pound of  it
from London or Paris, in which latter
city it had been discovered.    For the
arrival of this order the prince waited
with such patience as he could cull to
his command aud visited poor Mr. Kruger every day lu the hope of receiving
it.
One afternoon he was delighted to
hear that the box bad come, although
il had not yet been unpacked.
"I will send It to your house this
evening,", said the chemist. "There
nre a number of drugs iu the box for
your old frleud Professor Potkln ot
the university, nnd he Is even more
impatient for his consignment than
you nre for yours. Ah. bore lie is,"
nnd as he spoke the venerable Potkln
himself entered the shop.
lie shook hands wnrmly with LermontofT, who hnd always been a favorite pupil of his, and lenrned with
interest thnt he hnd lately lieen to
England and America.
"Cannot you dine with me this evening at half pnst 5?" asked the old mnn.
"There nre three or four friends coming to whom 1 shnll be glad to introduce you."
"Truth to tell, professor," demurred
the prince. "I hnve a friend staying
with me. nnd I dou't just like to
leave him alone."
"Bring him with you. bring him with
you." snld the professor, "but In nny
case be sure yon come yourself. I
shall be expecting you. Make your
excuses to your friend If he does not
wish to endure what he might think
dry discussion, because we shnll talk
nothing but chemistry and politics."
The prince promised to be there
whether his friend came or no. Tho
chemist here interrupted them and told
the professor he might expect Ills materials within two hours.
"And your package." he said to the
prince, "I shall send about the same
time. I have been very busy and can
trust no one to unpack this box but
myself."
"Y'ou need not trouble to send It,
and In any case I don't wish to run
the risk of having It delivered at a
wrong address by your messenger. I
ennnot nfford to wnlt so long ns would
be  necessnry  to duplicate  the order.
(Tc be continued.)
CUT FLOWERS
Rose Blooms, good range of colors,
high-grade stock. ll)c. each; $1.00 per
dozen, postpaid.
JOHN GELLATLY',
50-4 Gellatly, B. C.
1000 CORDS  OF   WOOD.
We can supply you  with  good  pine
and fir.    Leave your orders at the Commercial Stables.
17-tf DIGNAN & WEEKF.
0
STRAYED
On to my premises, on or about June
1, a two-year-old Jersey bull, dark
color; small slit in left ear; no brand.
Owner is requested to prove property,
pay expenses and take away.
H. NcNEILL,
49-tf Ellis St., Penticton.
Please.'
The housewife knows her
Coffee Is Good
When cups are passed
back for a second filling.
We sell that
kind  of
er
W. H. T. GAHAN,
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary Public.
MURK   BLOCK,
PENTICTON,       .       -       B.C.
���Phone 17.
Dr.C.A.JACKSON
DENTIST
S. O. Land Company's   Block
PENTICTON, B. C.
'Phone II.
PENTICTON      C()ffee
& OROVILLECR0WNBRANI)W,10[ER0MI)
STAG E *ava alM' ^oc'ia = ^c- "*���
Via Fairview 3 lbs. fOf $1.00.
CHAS. WERE
Accountant & Auditor,
Notary Public
PENTICTON, B. C.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
Notary Public.
KELOWNA,        - - B. C.
Leaves Penticton Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:80 a.m., arriving at Oroviile the same day at 6 p. m.
Through Fare - $6.00
W. HINE and S. M. SNOW
FAIRVIEW. B. C.
McCormack's
Chocolates
-AND-
. LOWNEYS CHOCOLATES.
ICE    CREAM
FRUIT,   AND
CONfKTIONERY.
TOBACCOS & CIGARS
Always on hand.
C. E. POMEROY.
��.-.,��� ���-^r*iK.**4&lMtom"fr-^.*.'*JHM'-
CLEARING SALE
OF
HOOTS **  SHOES
AT  COST
Now is the lime
Red Star
Grocery
HOME SEEKERS
READ!!
Acre Lot on Beach Avenue,
Penticton. The best location a-
vailable on the most beautiful
beach on Okanagan Lake ;   price
$300.
:o:
Two One-Half Acre Lots commanding: beautiful view of Okanagan Lake ; good soil;   available
water supply ;   93<t x 280 ft.  in
dimension; planted in peach trees
this spring.     Price,   corner lot,
$600 ; inside lot, $500.
:o:
Corner Building Lot in residential section ; pleasant surround- j j
ings; a good buy.   Price, $500.
:o:
Seven   Roomed   House,    well!
H.    OLI\^EIi.    finished ;    lawn seeded   down ;
_ j corner lot;   excellent   location,
good   view,   and   very   pleasing
surroundings.   Price, $2,500.
:o:
Eighteen Acres on Main Street
3 miles from town, $1,800.
Apply
ICE   CREAM
Shniit, Confectionery, Pipes antl
3o6accos.
R. ANDERSON.
II. MURK
EASY SHAVE       �� -       25c.
ARTISTIC HAIR-CUT   -       -  35c.
-Aicent for-
VERNON STEAM LAUNDRY
Extra fine work guaranteed.
Kierstead & Steele
Builders and Contractors
ALL KINDS OF JOB WORK
IN OUR LINE.
.   A Card Will Find Us.    .
M. T. Kierstead - R. Steele
PKNTTCTON, 1$. C.
-TO-
Get a Motor for
your Boat or Launch
J. R. Mitchell,
B.C.
I handle the goods.   Write for Cata-! PcfltlCtOfl =
logue and prices on the size you require, j *
B. L. HATFIELD,
SUMMERLAND, B. C.   U LUKE I 1 vJ    cIDO
THE
Mccormick
Penticton Dairy
Daily delivery of Fresh Milk to
all parts of the Town.
12 Quarts for $i.oo.    Mowers, Rakes,
Special prices fof quantities given Tedders and Binders
i^r;*^^*^
HarriS
nursery co.,
Penticton.
Beautify your lot with some
of our shade trees.
We have Elm, Ash, Maple,
Catalpa, Mulberry, Black Walnut, and Ash Leaved Maple.
Some perennial shrubs and
apple trees left.
D. W. Crowley
��SCo.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Goods Delivered to any part of  the
Town.
WE GIVE OUR PROMPT ATTENTION TO
MAIL ORDERS
C. E. HOUSER, Manager.
on application.
(Don't delay, send in your orders
Butter, Fresh Cream, Buttermilk, Ilow)
Skimmed Milk, to order. Tnc two bcst makcs on Eartn
For sale by
S. T. ELLIOTT,
KELOWNA, B. C.
H. M. McNeill,
Prop.
TELEPHONES.
Dwellings���Individual Lino , .$8.00 per month.
-Party Lino  1.60
Business ��� individual Lino . 2.Jjo
Party Lino  8.00
Free Installation within three-quarters mllo
nf office, when one year contract given.
Outside three-quarters mile, arid cost *>f
labour to install.
When no oontraett or contract for loss than
one year ariven, cost of labour to install Is
charged at time of installation.
C. F. LAYTON,     -      Local Agent.
Lakcshore Telephone Co.
Henrys Nurseries
Now growing in our Nurseries for tho
fall trade:
!X),000 Teach, Apricot, Nectarines, Cherry,
Plum, Prune,  Pear and Apple���in all
leading varieties.
100,000   Small   Fruits.
10,000   Ornamental   Trees  in   all   loading   |
varieties for ti, ('.
Strictly home grown and not  Hubjoct to   J
damage from fumigation. I
Stock of Bulbs to arrive in August from
Japan. France and Holland.
Bee Supplies, Spray Pumps, Seeds, Etc.
140 page Catalogue Free.
Office, Greenhouses and Seedhouse:-- I
3010 Westminster Road,
VANCOUVER,    -    B. C
nnnnn^mnnnnnwni mi inun ���B
Galarneau &
McKenzie
BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
When  you   think   of   Building
Look us up.
ADOLPIIUS GALARNEAU     W. A. MCKENZIE
RATHVON n& CARLESS
CONTRACTORS
AND
BUILDERS
Plans,  Specifications  and   estimates
Furnished for all Kinds of Work.
Subscription $1.00 Year.
Just received at
J. A.  NESBITT'S
ELLIS STREET
An assortment of
GRAY ��*. SON'S
Democrats, Buggies
Carts, Etc.
L. A. RATHVON,
'Phoni; Wli'ile I
CHAS. I.. CARLESS,
'Phone wiiite i
E. J. F1NGH
Painter, Paperhanger
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a Specialty.
WALL PAPER Carried in Stock.
Box 196.        Main St. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B. C, JUNE 27, 1008.
PEACHLAND.
The reception given Rev. Mr.
Nixon, the Methodist minister,
in the hall Monday evening, 15th,
was well attended, and was enjoyed by all present to the full
extent. The program was impromptu. C. G. Elliott gave in
a few apt remarks the object of
the gathering, and was followed
by an instrumental duet by Mr.
and Mrs. Mitchell. Speeches by
Rev. Mr. Jones of the Baptist
Church, Mr. Callendor, and Rev.
Mr. Whyte of the Presbyterian
Church. Mr. Bacon then gave
as a solo. "Sky Lark," which
was sung in his usual good style.
Mr. Ferguson gave a speech
which was followed by Mr. Nixon's remarks of appreciation, in
which he stated that the event
was a thorough surprise to him,
lie having announced from the
pulpit Sunday the social which
i lie K. 1.. of the Church was
giving and extended to all a cordial invitation, Mrs. Vivian and
Miss Sharp then sang "Whip-
poor-will," accompanied by Mrs.
Douglas. After luncheon "Blest
lie the Tie which Binds" was
sung, and the benediction pro-
nounced by Rev. Mr. Whyte.
Mrs. Dimoch, who cut her
hand badly last week, went to
Kelowna for treatment, returning tlie same day.
T.Moore, of Summerland,drove
up Sunday, 14th, and was accompanied on his return by his
sister, Mrs. Gordon, of Gilbert
Plains, Manitoba.
Mr. Crawley, lately of Nova
Scotia, has purchased Mrs. 0. H.
Pollard's ten-acre lot on the
second bench, consisting of about
five acres of an orchard.
Mr. Cossar is erecting another
cottage on his property.
II. T. Logan, of Manitoba College, Winnipeg, came last week
to spend his vacation with his
parents.
Miss Needham entertained the
members of the Girls' Club,
Tuesday evening, 16th, at her
home, in honor of Miss Fleming,
who left the following morning
for Medicine Hat to take a
position as stenographer. She
will be missed very much among
the young people and takes with
her their very best wishes.
Mrs. J. L. Vicary is enjoying
a visit from her sister, Miss Bell,
of New Zealand. Miss Bell owns
considerable property on the
second bench, and it is hoped by
her many friends that she may
reside here.
The women's weekly prayer
meeting met at Mrs. Urquhart's
home Tuesday afternoon, 16th,
with a full attendance present.
Mrs. Smith, of Vancouver, is
visiting at the home of her aunt,
Mrs. L. I). McColl.
Miss Kennedy arrived last
week from Dryden, Ont., to
spend the summer months with
her sister, Mrs. C. G. Elliott.
Jas. Moore celebrated his birthday Saturday, 13th, by bidding a
party of about twenty-five to his
home at the Lambly Ranch,
where a real jolly time was
spent.
New potatoes are now on the
market.    Fine size, too.
SUMMERLAND.
T. E. Moore, his wife and
children, and Mrs. Davidson, left
on Wednesday morning for a
month's visit with friends and
relatives in Winnipeg. Tommy
has been identified with the Summerland Supply Co. for the past
six years without a rest and well
deserves a holiday.
Each teacher and professor of
Okanagan College will spend the
holidays in the place of his or
her choice. Prof, and Mrs. A.
Perry and Miss E. Haines have
gone back to the old province,
Nova Scotia; Miss K. C. Davison,
after completing a few weeks
visiting in Valley points, will
spend the remainder of her vacation with friends in California;
Prof, and Mrs. Denton have
made the wise   choice   and   will
The Southern Okanagan Land
Company, Limited
LANDS
Our Irrigation system having been completed for
the Lake Skaha benches we are now offering under this
water system some 300 acres in five and ten acre tracts,
at $100.00 to $150.00 per acre.
On the Penticton benches we still have for sale
irrigated about 160 acres, at from $100. oo to $125. oo per
acre. All our bench lands are admirably adapted for
fruit.
On the Penticton flats we have open clean meadow
suitable for small fruits, vegetable and hay, at $150.oo
per acre.
Uncleared land suitable for fruit (but stoney and
wooded) $5o.oo to $loo.oo par acre.
Uncleared land quite free of stone,  suitable for
hay or garden stuff, $loo.oo per acre.
Terms on all the above one quarter down, one
quarter each year with intsrest at 6 per cent, on deferred
payments.
ACRE LOTS
In Penticton and on Okanagan Lake Beach $3oo.oo
to $45o.oo.       On Lake Skaha Beach $4oo.oo.
TOWN LOTS
We have a great many excellent buys in town
property (business and residential). Anything we show
you will advance in value 5o per cent, within a year.
Get in now, you can make money and take no chances by
purchasing our lands.
remain in Summerland, while
Principal Sawyer is busy establishing things on his fruit ranch.
Prof. A. G. Campbell is staying
here for the present, but we understand he intends leaving in a
few weeks for Chicago, 111.,
where he will take a post-graduate course.
B. L. Hatfield, whose family
arrived a few days ago, was congratulating himself on the safe
arrival of his household goods
this week, but while hauling
them from the wharf to his house
on the hill, one of the horses became unmanageable through the
breaking of some of the harness,
and a load containing furniture
and dishes was thrown over the
bank and considerable damage
done.
This week it is our solemn duty
to report the death of one beloved
in our community, Mrs. W. J.
Robinson, whose spirit took its
flight on Friday afternoon of last
week. There are left to mourn
her departure a husband and
four children. The funeral was
held at the home on Monday last,
the remains being taken to
Peachland on the launch "Naramata" for interment.
Some Investments Worth Considering
3 acres in a block, ready to
cut up into 32 lots, for $1,600
3 acres on the flat, for . . 1,500
1 acre, cultivated, on Fair-
view Road, for . . . 800
�� acre, on Fairview Road, 400
Beach acre (2 weeks only) 650
Town Lots
Two lots, cleared, fenced, $ 300
Two lots, Ellis Street, for 265
Lot on Winnipeg Street (\
acre) for 400
2\ acres, situated on beach
"(terms) for     .      .      .$1,250
Ten acre lots, planted and unimproved.
Many nice ranches with good
water rights.
HOUSES TO RENT
M. C. KENDALL,
Real Estate Agnet and Notary Public,
PENTICTON, B. C.
Fire Insurance
Phoenix of London
Liverpool & London & Globe
British America
Atlas Guardian
Canadian
Westward Ho!
Though late from the presses
the June issue of Westward Ho !
with its splendid stories and illustrations is by far the best
number yet turned out. Cy War-
man has a capital story 'The
Heathen,' and Roy Horniman, an
equally well known magazine
writer contributes an amusing
phantasy of the future entitled
'No Ball.' Miss Irene MacColl a
young British Columbian writer
who is rapidly making a name
for her fiction has a sweet though
sad story in 'As She Sowed.'
'The Reef of Landell's Woe,' by
N. Tourneur and 'The Brothers'
by Ruben Rambler are two good
pieces of fiction. In the travel
department this month's magazine introduces Mr. Frank Burnett of Vancouver, who contributes an illustrated article on
'The Ruined Cities of Ceylon.'
'Indian Legendry,' 'The Log of
the Mineola,' 'Photographic
Notes,' 'Country and Suburban
Gardens,' are all of local interest
and the excellent series of
sketches on the various districts
of the province under the heading 'Potential Canada' speak well
for the enterprise of the publisher in exploiting the possibilities of the West. Next month
Westward Ho! commences its
third volume and announces as a
special feature a sketch of Sir
Wilfrid Laurier by the editor in
his department, 'Men I Have
Met.'
Wi
EDD1NG
P
RESENTS
We carry a beautiful stock of Wedding
Presents   in   cut   glass   and    silver.
Large assortment of high grade
.    WEDDING RINGS
. Engagement Rings
To suit the purse.
ISSUER OF MARRIAGE LICENSES.
HARRIS, The Jeweler
FREE !
IIBWW.lKRJttVVKmiW'-^^VA!":'.*:
I Okanagan Nursery Company, :<
:<
LIMITED,
PENTICTON,
B. C.
CAPITAL  ��P50,000.
We are now ready for Fall orders in Nursery Stock, especial advantages offered to local customers.
Improve and enhance the value of your property by planting from our selection of ornamental trees,
shrubs, and climbing vines.
An inspection of our grounds and stock is cordially invited.
OFFICE, MAIN STREET.
I
SI IELF   11AR] )WA RE
Saws, Axes, Wedges, Striking Hammers, Table and
Pocket Cutlery.
PENTICTON HARDWARE CO.
gl����^nfc.���� ��^�� tt ��n��h. it *mm tit ^m* tt -^n*. t* -n*�� P^n��,��m
J Real Estate Snaps )
���J SINGLE 71GRES In the choicest residential part *
J of Penticton, worth $1,000 ; for sale for a few days at J
f $500 Gash. [
�� Also some choice 50 foot loLs at a bargain. ��
I Apply I
P. O. BOX 234,
.tf
.tf
.tf
.%Zf
Penticton, B. C.
.tt ���^na. tt^^tt ��^�� t i
Golden West Soap and
Golden West Washing Powder
FIFTY CENTS' WORTH   OF  SILVERWARE  FREE
WITH EVERY FIFTY CENT PURCHASE OF GOLDEN
WEST SOAP AND GOLDEN WEST
WASHING POWDER.
To obtain this Silverware, all you have to do is to purchase 50c.
worth of Golden West Soap (2 cartons) or Washing Powder; or
25c. worth of each, AND ASK YOUR GROCER for a Silver
Plated Teaspoon FREE (which is worth at least 25c), then cut out
the coupon off the two cartons and send them to the Manufacturers
including 2c. for postage, and obtain another Silver Plated Teaspoon FREE.
In this way your
Golden West Soap and  Golden  West
Washing Powder costs you
Nothing.
GET THE " SPOONEY " FEELING.
Address:   Premium Department,
Standard Soap Company, Limited,
Calgary, Alberta.
WM.   HAUG,
Wholesale and Retail
MASONS'   SUPPLIES . .
PORTLAND CEMENT, HARD WALL
PLASTER, COAST  LIME
and COAST LATH
Orders by mail promptly attended
to.
BOX 16G   -   KELOWNA, B. C.
THE
Penticton Bakery
-FOR-
Good Wholesome Bread,
Cakes and Pastry.
GIVE US A TRIAL AND WE
WILL PLEASE YOU.
L,. T. ROBERGE.

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