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The Penticton Press Dec 7, 1907

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Array 9
HBsffWIff iJBsWWBI
VOL. 2.   No. 21.
PENTICTON, B.C., SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1907.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF
IIEAD  OFFICE, T0K0NT0
a viERCE
ESTABLISUED   1307
B. E. WALKER, President
ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager
A. H. IRELAND, Superintendent cf
Branches
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000
Rest.
5.000,000
113,000,000
Local and Personal
II. W.  Raymer,  of Kelowna,
.'���.pent Wednesday in Penticton.
Ripe strawberries were picked
on J.  R.   Mitchell's lot on the
Total Asset?,
Branches throughout Canada, and la the United States and England
A GENERAL BANKING 1USINL3S TRANSACTED
  86
FARMERS'   BANKING
Every facility afforded Farmers far thei* banking
bu.iness.    Sales Notea cashed or taken
for collection
BANKING BY MAIL.���Deposits may be made or withdrawn by
mail.    Out-of-town accounts receive every attention
loth ol
remoer.
Penticton Branch
J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
1 At
-*��-
^<^��"*^aB-��*"e55aii=-'S*'*li!s,to-
Are You
We can supply you with anything you require,
LUMBER, SHINGLES, SASH, DOORS, and
BUILDING PAPER. We also keep on hand
a large stock of Fluming Material. Try some
of our Vulcanized Rubber Roofing on your
outbuildings; it is the best. We keep Corrugated Carpet Felt to put under carpet.  Try it.
S. G. Smith Lumber Go. \
SSSES3S5
BARGAIN  SALE
-OF-
Ladies'   Blouses and  Skirls
For prices and quality see our window.
NORMAN HILL
The Up-To-Date Ladies and Gents Furnishei
I
Just received a select line of High Grade
Stock Saddles Suit Gases
Glub bags Trunks
Garriage Rugs Horse blankets
Extra values.   Inspect them
*  1.   KENT   &
SMITH STREET, PENTICTON.
OTCWJWSJ^WWJ^^IWSSSK^S&WJSK-
[^COMMERCIAL
| Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
| D1GNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors.                      3
�� If you ./ant a Stylish Outfit, this is the place to come.    You can always   ^
�� get teams just when you want them.    We make a specialty  of keeping   ^
�� good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack   horses.   Jd
lj We are also putting in Hay and Grain for sale, and as we buy  for cash   jj
���:
���:
we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit.
Special Attention To The Wants Of Commercial  Men.
Kae^attaK^is&^a^^s^:^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
3
\ THE PENTICTON LUMBE
\        SYNDICATE Ltd.
( DEALERS IN
�� ALL KINDS OF DRY
R BUILDING MATERIAL g
E FIR POSTS AND CORDWOOD
^ OFFICE and YARDS on MAIN STREET
'6
STRAWBERRY    PLANTS
For Fall Planting.   I have them in the following varieties:
Glenmary,  New York,  and  Magoon,
First-Class Plants.   Write for Prices.
D. Gellatly,
I
w
n
1
I
J. P. Burnyeat. C. E��� of Summerland spent several days in
Penticton this week.
Dry slab's for sale $3.50 a full
cord, A ft. lengths. Bring cash
with order, Penticton Lumber
Syndicate.
Notwithstanding the lateness
of the season frogs and grasshoppers have not altogether
taken to their winter quarters.
J. I). Campbell of New Westminster is at present assisting
Norman Hill. Orders are solicited  for cleaning and pressing
clothes.
IT. McNeill is putting up a
house on the front of his property on Ellis Street. It will be
used as a dwelling and private
school room.
There will be a general meeting of the Anti-Tuberculosis Society at the home of Mrs. C. A.
C. Steward at three o'clock next
Thursday afternoon.
The S. 0. Land Co. have four
hundred acres of land between
Three and Four Mile Creeks
ready to plant in fruit trees next
spring. This includes most of
that section.
Before purchasing your Christmas presents take a look at Gordon Harris' stock of jewelry,
watches, clocks and cut glass. A
watch for your best friend, a ring
for your'best girl���both useful
and ornamental.
G. H. E. Hudson and Jas. Edmonds have rented quarters on
Main Street for a photographic
studio and for the display of
photographs and photographic
postcards. Mr, Hudson will still
continue his studio at Kelowna.
The Hon. A. C. Stepney, of
England, and owner of the Stepney ranch at Enderby, spent
Sunday in Penticton. He has
just completed a trip through the
Western States embracing Ta-
coma, Los Angeles, and other
points of interest.
Geo. E. Winkler spent most of
the week in the vicinity of Hedley making arrangements for the
removal of an engine and diamond drill to Power Creek, on
Okanagan Lake, where he and A.
E. Thomas will immediately begin drilling for coal on their prospect.
W. H. T. Gahan, barrister and
solicitor, of Chilliwack, spent a
few days of the past week in
town. He is tired of the wet
climate at Chilliwack, and is
looking for a more favorable location, lie expects to he hack
about next February and may
settle hero,
G. A. Layton has bought out
the grocery store of E. Lee, on;
Main Street, and II. Oliver lias
moved his stock of beats and
shoes from Irs place on Fairview
Road to the same quarters. This
store should prove as good a
business location as there is in
town and Mr. Oliver should find
the change greatly to his advan- j
tage.
The Girls' Handicraft Club, of
Peachland, will  hold  a sale of
work in the Orange Hall, of that
place, on the afternoon of Tues-1
day, the 10th inst,    Tea will be
served during the afternoon and
evening, and the proceeds will be .
devoted to the Kelowna Hospital
fund.   It is hoped that the event
may be well   patronized.    Thej
girls of Peachland are doing a:
good  work,  and  their example:
might well be emulated by those
of other towns. I
A. E. Thomas this week
brought a quantity of coal in
from the Okanagan Lake pros-
1 ect and bud it tested for black-
smithing purposes by E. O. De-
long. Mr. Delong pronounced
the coal as good as any he had
us id from British Columbia
mines, and offered to place an
or ler for a quantity at once.
Among the peach orchards that
have made tho greatest growth
during the past summer is that of
A. P. Stevenson of Nelson. Man.
This orchard is on the flat about
two miles from town, and the soil
of the lot is of a rich sandy loam,
perfectly adapted to the growing
of an orchard. The trees look
as though they had been growing
four years rather than two.
The Sunday School officers held
a meeting on the evening of Friday, the 29th. alt. to arrange the
details in connection with the
holding of their Christmas tree.
il was finally decided that, as a
general Christmas free was to be
held on Christmas Eve, the Sunday School would not hold one
this year, but would hold a
Christmas entertainment on the
evening of Friday, the 20th. inst.
in Steward's Hall. Twenty-five
cents admission will be charged
adults, while children will be admitted free, the proceeds to be
devoted to the purchase of a library for the Sunday School. On
the following Monday evening a
dinner will be served the children
in the Methodist church.
The S. O. Land Co. have almost completed the road to Four
Mile Point on the east side of
Lake Skaha. The people of Okanagan Falls are very anxious to
have the road continued to that
town as it would greatly reduce
the distance between there and
Penticton. This road, as will be
understood, is in the Similkameen
electoral district, and is being
built from a special grant of
$2,500 by the Legislature for the
Penticton portion of the Similkameen. The Penticton portion
of the Okanagan received $1,000
this year from the government.
This has been spent in road improvement, besides which the
Land Co. expended $1,500 of
their own money in the same
work during the past summer.
Green Lake Prospect.
The Green Lake claims recently located by Harris Bros, are
situated about two and a half
miles south-west of Okanagan
Falls. The locations are made on
a quartz vein running east and
west and dipping to the north
about GO degrees. Its width at
the place where the locators are
at present prospecting it is seven
feet or more. A shaft was started on the "Green Lake" claim on
a strongly mineralized surface
cropping, and is now down close
I to 20 feet. With every foot of
i work done the character ( f the
; vein has improved in appearance
and the owners are much encouraged to continue development.
For the first 10 or 12 feet the fissure was largely filled with a
green hornblendic gneiss which
forms the foot and hanging walls;
but as greater depth is reached
this rock is less in evidence, giving place to a greyish white
quartz carrying iron pyrites, a
little chalcopyrite, and, in places,
small quantities of galena. The
iron is in small crystals, well disseminated through the quartz
matrix. Prospecting along the
vein has proved its continuity
for a considerable distance and
five claims in all have been located on its course. In places it
is much wider than where the
shaft is being sunk.
Should further work prove that
tho vein contains ore of a satisfactory grade it will make a valuable property. Water for milling purposes can be obtained from
Green Lake or, if necessary, the
ore could be taken to Okanagan
River with an aerial tram.
VICTORIA, *J>
$1.00 Per Year In Advancf.
Thursday Night's Debate.
The meeting of the Literary
land Debating Society on Thursday evening,  when the second
debate of the season took place,
was  very well  attended.     The
subject   under   discussion   was,
I "Resolved   that Carada has ar-
j rived at the period of her history
j when the duties and responsibil-
! ities of nationhood should be as-
Isumed," J. F. Tupper and Leon
Blatchford taking the affirmat-
: ive, and J. Barker and A. S. Mil-
; ler the negative. Interesting and
pointed addresses were given on
both sides, but at their conclusion, the judges, E.  W.  Mutch,
R. W. Hibbert. and G. F. Layton,
were unanimously of the opinion
that the affirmative had the best
of the argument.
Next Thursday there will be a
literary and musical evening,
when a number of papers will be
read on various literary subjects.
This should ensure a good attendance.
Dante c!t Penticton.
The inauguration ball given by
the Penticton Quadrille Club last
Friday evening may be pronounced an unqualified success.
The company numbered about
fifty and dancing was kept up
till about 3 a. m., enjoyable music being furnished by the excellent Kelowna Dance Orchestra.
The success of this first dance
was in a great measure due to
the President and committee of
tho club who were unceasing in
their efforts to make everyone
at home. Thanks is also due to
the ladies who provided the excellent supper that was served
during the interval. Among
those present from outside points
were noticed Miss McKenzie,
Miss Bassett, Messrs. Bassett,
Messrs. Arnott, J. Armstrong
and others.
The club has already made provision for the Christmas festivities in the form of a fancy dress
and masquerade ball to Le held
in Steward's Hall on Friday, the
27th. inst. at 9 o'clock p. m.,
and this we are assured will be
largely attended. Prizes will be
given for the best costumes. Mr.
L. H. Plummer is in communication with a large firm of costum-
ers and will be pleased to receive
the names of all desirous of obtaining costumes.
Woodmen of tlia World.
The first annual meeting of
Camp "Okanagan" of the Woodmen of the World was held on
Tuesday evening at Woodmen's
Hall, Ellis Street, the annual
election of officers taking place.
The following were elected for
the ensuing year:
Consul Commander John Power
Adviser Lieut. A. E. Thomas
Banker (re-elected) L. C. Barnes
Clerk " R. Wilton
Escort W. T. Corbishley
Watchman J. W. Musser
Sentry G. H. Keiffer
Managers: J. W. Edmonds, W.
F. H. Swinton, D. Galarneau.
The installation will take place
on the first Tuesday in January.
Farewell Party.
Weather Report
Compiled by the Dominion
Government Mcterological Observer at Penticton, for November:
Dato Max. Temp.       Mill. Temp.
1 57 ������',;
:> 57  II
Through the kindness of Mr.
and Mrs. Chas. Greer in throwing their house open for the occasion, a number of the friends
of Miss Hazel Lancaster were
permitted to bid her farewell at
a surprise party on Monday evening prior to her departure for
Seattle, where she will visit
friends and continue her musical
studies for a time.
Each guest brought a picture
or some article which represented
the title of some book, and the
first hour or so was spent in
guessing the names of the books
represented. Miss Lancaster and
Miss McKenzie each guessed an
equal number, and, upon drawing lots, the former received the
prize. Other games followed and
were kept up till 11 o'clock when
a dainty lunch was served. The
singing of "Auld Lang Syne"
brought the merry party to a
close and the guests departed,
feeling that they had spent a
most enjoyable   social  evening.
Besides Mr. and Mrs. Greer
and Miss Lancaster, there were
present Miss MacKinlay, Miss
McKenzie, Miss Rowe, Miss Kate
and Miss Ada Ede, Mrs. Nicholson, Miss Mutch, the Misses Florence and Bessie Thompson; and
j Messrs. Nicholson, Blatchford,
Rowe, Miller, Frank and Lloyd
Harris, Hibbert and Tupper.
Mr. Lancaster and family left
on Wednesday morning for their
former home in Yakima, Wash.,
going by way of Seattle. They
expect to return about the end
of February to reside hero permanently.
4....
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. .29
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. .117
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GREEN MOUNTAIN
NOTICE
During my absence in England I have
(riven T. Roadhouse Power of Attorney
to pay and receive all accounts.
W. E. Welby.
26	
27	
28	
29	
3U	
November
6	
15	
21	
23	
25	
28	
.,50
....39 ..
....481..
....47 ..
....501.,
. .1?;
..21
..37
. .37
..33
RAINFALL
... .04
... .01
... .03
... .02
... .05
... .06
Mrs. G. A. Clark spent last
week with friends at Okanagan
Falls.
Angus Smith has just built a
fine log stable on his place.
Mrs. R. L.  Allen  returned to
1 her home here on Tuesday.
The weather here is very mild,
(just freezing slightly at night
! though we are in a winter month.
Thos. Armstrong is busy completing a house be has had partly erected for some time.
Improvements are the order of
! the day through Maroon Valley.
Wm, Foster has also put up a
log stable recently.
NOTICE
FRUIT TREES-Well-grown stock.
Large quantity of apple trees for sale,
only few choice varieties grown : also
small stock of ornamental trees. Apply
for varieties and price to Manager,
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd.,
15-tf Vernon, B. C.
Shropshire
Lambs.
Of my own raising, will be sold
in Penticton every two weeks,
1 commencing on Friday the 13th
inst.
R. J. ARMSTRONG,
Keremeos, B. C. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. DECEMBER 7, 1907.
THE PENTICTON PRESS
ISSUED   EVERY   SATURDAY  AT
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
\V. J. CLEMENT.
COMMUNICATIONS?5
a-osjSjfc,? 3��S^^S��,352ft>.2S*e5fe*.*-^��JC:5ak��-&#-";*&a��e&"^^��.#*-
Subscription $1.00 Per Year
Advance.
in
��M .JJBBaWSA.'JiBMMaAK-.B
Druggist   HENRY MAIN   Stationer/| Penticton   Store
We do not hold onreelvei
opinions of    in
respon: ible for the
Bi ������ dt uU.
To tilt Editor of Thl Pentictoin Pbess:
j    The cemetery site is a question
ADVERTISING RATES ON ; which Bhouid interest all persons
APPLICATION.
Labor and Development.
A marked change has come
over the Canadian west within
the short space of two months.
A scarcity of lapor has suddenly
boon transformed into a sufficient
if not a surplus supply. Where
two months ago there was not
an idle man of any color or nationality, who wanted to work,
there are hundreds of white men
making their homes in Penticton,
and they should be interested
now. for now is the time to secure the property. In a previous
article on this subject it was
said: "Death is just as certain
as life." This should have read:
" There is nothing so uncertain
as lif'.', and nothing as certain as
death."
I think there is nothing which
speaks such volumes for the
faithful preservation of the memory of the departed   ones   as   a
*
*
5
f Penticton,
Headquarters
mas Goods
I carry a large stock of
JG3,   STATIONERY,   MAGAZINES,   POST   CARDS,
CONFECTIONERY AND FANCY GOODS.
Special care and attention to Prescription Work.
, >"^swS?l-��naB.*9-'����*��.*S**3&����^*-!��^to.#��'
*
i
I
t
/
B.C. /
,   .nicely kept cemetery; and, when
:"""i<1!1-" <';<'!'l">-ni"i.i  ;''  "Tltlr I was east, I understood the nec-
! essary   land   was   secured,  and
reduced wages,
The closing down of the mills1  ',';,, ',-,   ihn,.,r])t   in   rnin(]    t
in our own province.has thrown ^Varrangements for fifty Can-1 ��   THE   PENTICTON   PRESS   5��
a great many out of employmentj adian M   lflg   to   he,p   beautify
for the time being, or until they j fte d M part of my dona.
find work in other lines.   At the L^,   feeling that most of the
employment offices in Winnipeg ]e here woul(1 appreciate the
men for the logging camps are
taking employment at thirty dollars per month and board, or ten
dollars per month lower than a
year ago. A reduction of twenty-five cents per day is also reported on wages for men employed in track laying by the C.
P. R. in the vicinity of Winnipeg.
There arc not likely to remain
any large number of men out of
employment in the Canadian west
as the steady development of the
country will prevent such a condition from arising. However,
it is evident that the reign of
high wages is ended for some
time at least, and with their lowering should come a corresponding lowering of other commodities.
The abnormal development taking place throughout the west
during the past few years has
induced speculation and fictitious
values. This could not keep on
forever, and the banks brought |
about a timely halt by refusing
to advance money. This has resulted in a great deal of inconvenience on the part of individuals, but the country will be the
proper!
to the .
th��.' j
���ml
dear old Maple leaf.     Now let ]
there be no haggling in this mat- j
ter as to what church it will be, j
but let it be the peoples'  cemet- j
ery, and God will  pick out His
own at His coming.     Let there J
be a meeting called with as little
delay as   possible  and   let   this
matter be settled.    Have a committer1 appointed to secure tl
,y, and,   later on,  alt
mproving of it.
A. J. Alcock
NOTICE
Similkameen Land District. District
of Vale.
TAKE NOTICE that Messrs. Arnott
and lline, of Okanagan Kails, hutel-
keepers, intend to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land:���Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west coiner of and including
a small island at the south-east end of
Dog Lake ; containing one acre, more
or less.
WARWICK ARNOTT,
WILLIAM LAKER HEME.
Dated 21th September, 1907. 15-
NOTICE.
Similkameen Land  District.     District
of Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that W.  H.   Legge,
of Victoria, B. C, for  himself and  as
DO YOU WANT TO TAKE THE ONLY PAPER published in the
Southern Okanagan ?
Then subscribe for
DO YOU OWN PROPERTY" IN PENTICTON or at
any of the other towns in the district, or are you contemplating purchasing any ?   Subscribe for
32 THE PENTICTON PRESS 2��
It makes a point of publishing information of special
value to people living at a distance. The Press prints
the facts, and the facts only.
DO YOU WANT TO ADVERTISE in a paper that is
read in every home in the vicinity of Penticton and is
then sent away for friends to read ? Do you want to
advertise in a paper that has subscribers in all parts of
Canada, and in many other countries where the English
language is spoken ? Have you anything to sell ? Is
there anything you want .to buy? Have you any announcements to make ? Are you buying government
land or recording a timber or mineral claim? Advertise in
km THE PENTICTON PRESS W
IF YOU ARE A MERCHANT, carry a good bright
advertisement in a good bright paper. If you are a
professional man, your professional card should appear
in your local paper. If you are engaged in any kind of
mercantile, professional or mechanical pursuit, your
local paper should contain a standing announcement of
your presence. i
containing 80 acres, more or less.
WALTER H. LEGGE.
Oct. 17, 1907. 15-
better for it in the end. The rate ! a��ent for ����� H- Wilson, of Nahum,  B,
.,.,., ,      ,   , . j C, occupation rancher, intends to apply
at which real estate was advanc-, for permission to purchase the follow- j
ing was beyond all reason,  and j ing described land :-
Jt     .    , 7     .. ii Ii .  i        Commencing at a post planted at the
the fact was evident to all think- j north-west corner of  lot 8098,   thence I
ing people that the limit had been i n,"rtn 2" <*��*����; thence oast 40 chains; i
,     .    ���. , ,     ,   , thence south 20 chains; thence west  40   ���
cached.   The West may now look ; chains to point of commencement,   and i |
forward to a steady development
based upon actual values and
sound business principles.
The.Okanagan Valley, and probably British Columbia in general will experience the altered;   sixty day8  a7t~late we intend
Conditions to a much less   extent : applying to the Chief Commissioner  of
than tlio Wm��f-l-m'nc<-    iVir.   orl.v,;,.     Lands and Works for permission topur-
tnan tne wortnwest, the admir- chase I0 acre8 of ,and< in simiil;;im(,,.n
able climate and   productive   soil , Division of Yale, described as follows :-
limine- certain   to  maintain   land     Commencing at the north-west corner
oemg oeriain to maintain iana   f lot 190j grou   1( osoyoos; thence
values at   a   high   figure   partic- ! southerly along the west  boundary   of
ularlv ns th/> lnnrl io limltnrl   inrl I sili(l lot "30 nine hundred   feet;   thence
uiariy as the land is limited, and northerly following present shore line
SO many from the colder portions ; pf Doe; Lake six hundred feet more or
of the Dominion intending ultim-
NOTICE
DO YOU WANT'ANY PRINTING  DONE ?   We can
print you anything you like at the office of the Press,
less to the south boundary of lot 1HS),
group I, Osoyoos; thence northerly,
easterly, and southerly along souih
boundaries of lots 189 and 11)7, group 1,
Osoyoos, to point of commencement.
Purposes tor which required 'agricultural purposes.
W. T. SHATFORD.
inability to secure loans, but this Penticton, P,. C, Oct. 24th, 1907.     15-
ately to make their homes here.
The only drawback this section
will experience will be a check
to building operations due to the
will probably in the end be more
productive of good than evil.
The poor crops in the Northwest have somewhat retarded
the flow of immigrants Ibis season. Nevertheless even this fall
the population of the Okanagan
has been materially increased
from that suction.
NOTICE
lemg
the
While the Pacific coast is
drenched with rain and
Northwestern provinces are in
the grip of winter, the Okanagan
is still enjoying mild fall weather. Although there are occasionally a few degrees of frost
at night, there is still no snow,
and few evidences that we have
entered upon a winter month.
Come to the Okanagan.
Similkameen Land   District,    District
of Vale.
TAKE NOTICE that John J. Cochrane, of Mooso Jaw, Sask., occupation
Real Estuto Agent, inlendH to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land;
i lommi ncing ul P, 10. Jones' noi th
wesl cornel' pest, thence couth 40
chain.'-; thence east l'o chains; thence
north 40 chain ���; thence west ?J) chains
to point of commeuceinehl and containing SO acres, mora or less,
JOHN J. COCHRANE.
Agent, II. L. Jones.
Letter Heads, Note Heads, Envelopes, Bill Heads, Statements, Business, Professional and Visiting ���
Cards, Posters, Dodgers, Programs, Booklets,
or anything else where paper, type and ink are used.
All our type is up to date, and we are continually adding
new lines. We keep on hand a large stock of almost
every conceivable class of stationery in order that we
may be able to turn out exactly the kind of work required and at the shortest possible notice.
Are you going to
(g^GET MARRIED Z&
We can print your invitations or announcements at the
office of
THE PENTICTON PRESS
Dated Oct.
1907
16-
IgilS
FOR SALE
From France, Holland and
Japan.
Seeds   Trees
Plants
For Fall Planting.
Celiable Varieties at reasonable pi ices.
NOTICE TO HORSE OWNERS.
One Jersey Cull, 3 years, regis'ti red
pedigree. Will sell at bargain if
Wight at once.    Apply to
11. Al. AIcNEILL,
20-4 Penticton Dairy.
Please note that my  fruit  tree,
A   W   ANOTTR liavino- nnenori Inot grown from imported piece root
a. w. Amiuo na\ ing opened rafts but are budded on own growth
a first-class bakery in the city, �� seedling, from bearing trees,
opposite B. C. Hotel, solicits a \ Fertilizers, Bee Supplies, Spray
share ol patronage and by turn- Pumps, Spraying Material, Cut Flowing out a high class quality of iers- et1- , Oldest established nursery on
goods trusts to merit  favorable 'the maimand ol B- c-   Catalogue free.
notice,
sold.
Best quality of Bread
Fancy Bread and Cakes a Specially.
M. J.  Henry's  Nurseries,
(irecnliouses and Seedhouses
VANCOUVER B. C.
Veterinary Dentistry is practically new. Some of the many
symptoms of bad teeth are:
slovering, loss of flesh, weak
eyes, rough coats and many
other symptoms. If your horses
are troubled with , any of these
symptoms, be sure to have him
examined. I use only improved,
modern up-to-date instruments,
including a mouth speculum that
is unexcelled. Call and see me
about your horses at the Commercial Stables.
Dr. C. W. Cross,
VETERINARY DENTIST.
Established 40 Years.
Alfred 11. Wade, Prop.
Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, Groceries
and General Merchandize of all Soils
Agent for
Goods delivered through the town
PENTICTON,
GIANT POWDER CO.
OKANAGAN FLOUR MILLS CO.
Prompt attention to orders.
?E^r^g^r?*-<a^;g.E~re^^
\ r.A
;r^/
GOOD  BUTTER and EGGS
ARE A LITTLE SCARCE JUST NOW.
We always have our Butter sent to us by express,
direct from the producing centres. It does not stay
in a car with other Groceries two or three weeks
and get tainted. The price is no higher than for
other Butter. .....
Good Ontario Eggs ���arrived by express��� 35c. doz.
Red Star Grocery
/ Corner Main and Fairview. \
Just Arrived
A LARGE STOCK OF
J35 Wall Papers and Crockery fa
You can save money by buying
\yf�� these goods. >M
| The Penticton Furniture Store |
5   L. A. RATHVON
���Phone White I.
5 S?H5Sro*v^��^
CHAS. L. CARLESS
'Phone White 2.
g CONTRACTORS
| & BUILDERS
\ Good Workmanship and %
fc Satisfaction Guaranteed S
fe  PLANS and  SPECIFICATIONS FURNISHED 4
��        RATHVON & CARLESS       ^
^  A card will bring us to you. P. O. BOX 206  ��f
'i
���;
>JW^^^^^^^^C^^iW>V'^iW>\��>^>VT>V*><.^>VT>WT>VT>V'T>\''
g
i
Now is the time to place your order with the
OKANAGAN NURSERY COMPANY
For Fruit Trees for Fall Flanting.
We guarantee trees to grow if planted in the fall, or will replace any
that miss free of charge.     Come early and avoid the rush.     Send or
call for prices.   Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
OKANAGAN NURSERY CO.
LIMITED.
Capital Stock $50,000
Penticton,, British Golumbia.
R. H. ROBERTSON, President
THOS. TODHUNTER, Vice-Pres. E. CURTIS, Manager.
F. E. JONES, Sec-Treas.
\
��:itt2A��2��^^<l��2��2?^2��2��:^a��2^a��^a��:^2.��^2ft?2��:��s��2A22
M. C KENDALL
Notary Public and Conveyancer
A first-class Ten Acre Lot for $1,450.00.    Easy terms.
A 5-roomed House and Lot (right in town) $425.00 Cash.
1 Acre near town, planted, two year old trees, $700.00 Cash.
HOUSES TO LET
m
J . THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. DECEMBER 7, 1907.
e
CHAS. WERE
Accountant & Auditor,
Notary Public
PENTICTON, B. C.
F. E. JONES
Book Keeping & Accountant Work
Office Hours -- 9 to 6
Care of Okanagan Nursery Co.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
Notary Publk
KELOWNA,
B.C.
ALL KINDS OF
Needlework  Desired
Children's Bonnets & Clothing
a Specially.
C. MOULD, Winnipeg Street
J. R. CAMPBELL
ELECTRICIAN.
Dealer in all kinds of
Electrical Supplies,  Batteries
and
Gasoline Engine Parts
Terms   and   specifications   for    all
kinds of  Electric Wiring  and Bell
Work.
Agent for famous Brantford bicycles
Box 160 KELOWNA
D. W. Crowley
&Co.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Goods Delivered to any part of the
Town.
WE GIVE OUR PROMPT ATTENTION TO
MAIL ORDERS
C. E. HOUSER, Manager.
HARRIS
NURSERY COT.
Home Grown Fruit
Trees
Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits &c.
A  Specially   large   stock  of
Shade Trees and Budded
Aoples.
Penticton, B. C.
Fruit and
Confectionery
C. E. POMEROY.
OKANAGAN
COLLEGE
SUMMERLAND, B. C
A   CHRISTIAN   SCHOOL   for
young men and young women, situated amid surroundings beautiful and
inspiring and in a community of exceptional moral strength.
Regular course For University
Entrance.
Thorough Commercial course.
Special advantages for music.
Competent Instructors.
Well appointed building, tastefully furnished, heated with hot
water, provided with bath rooms and
improved sanitary arrangements.
Terms moderate.
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
This department, it is expected, will provide
facilities for work second to none in the
province. Prof. Aaron Perry, M. A., the organizer and late conductor of the Commercial
Department of Victoria High School, will
have charge of thin Department in the College. The success that has attended Prof.
Perry's efforts elsewhere guarantees the quality of the work to-be done in this Department.
PIANOFORTE DEPARTMENT
Miss Eunice Winn If red Haines will conduct
the work in pianoforte instruction. Miss
Haines is a pupil of prof. George Pratt Maxim, of Boston, a graduate with honors from
the Pianoforte Department of the School of
Music of Acadia Seminary, and winner in the
competition for musical composition adjudged
by Dr. Percy Goetschins of Boston, the specialist on Tone Relations. Miss Haines has
had successful experience in teaching and
comes highly recommendad by Principal De-
Wolfe, of Acadia Seminary.
VOCAL DEPARTMENT
The work in Voice Culture will be under
charge of Miss Kathrine Cleveland Davison of
Boston, an experienced Teacher, Choir and
Choral Class Director and pupil of Prof.Frank
E. Morse of Boston and Madame Gertrude
Franklin Salisbury, of the International
School of Music of Boston, Florence and Paris.
For further information apply to
E. SAWYER, M. A., Principal.
Y + + ++ +<<���<,+ ������������j.*** *+4*4..M H KiHHIH ��������������������� f+
I The Hound of the l
I Baskervilles t
^���s&3FL*&3ES&2
Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes.
BY A. CONAN DOYLE.
���f
I	
X Author ol "The Green Flag" an J "The Great Boer War"
+ C >pyilght (100.) by A. Conan Dnylc.
4
4
���
-f
���f
4
4
4
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���
"Halloa!" cried Dr. Mortimer, "what
is this?"
A steep curve of heath-clad land,
an outlying spur of the mnor. lay in
front of us. On the summit, hard and
clear like an equestrian statue upon
its pedestal, was a mounted soldier,
dark and stern, his rifle poised ready
over his forearm. He was watching
the ro:id along which we traveled.
"What Is this, Perkins?" asked Dr.
Mortimer.
Our driver half turned In his seat.
"There's a convict escaped from
Princetown, sir. I e's been but three
days now, and tl e warders watch
every read and every station, but
they've had no sl-rht of him yet. The
farmers about here don't like It, sir,
and tint's a fact."
"Well, I understand that they get
five pounds If they can give Information."
"Yes, sir, but the chance of five
pounds Is but a poor thing compared to
t'e chance of having your throat cut.
You see, it Isn't li'.ce any ordinary convict. This is a man that would stick
at "."thing."
"Who is he, then?"
"It is Selden, the Notting Hill murderer."
I remembered the case well, for It
was one id w'.'.ich Holmes had taken
an interest on account of the peculiar
ferocity of the crime and the wanton
brutality which had marked all the
actions of the assassin. The commutation of his death sentence had been
due to some doul'ts as to his complete sanity, so atrocious was his conduct. Our wagonette had topped a rise
and in front of us rose the huge expanse of the moor, mottled with gnarled and craggy cairns and tors. A cold
wind swept dowi: from it and set tr>
shivering. Somewhere there, on that
desolate plain, ws lurking this fiendish man, hiding in a burrow like a wild
beast, his heart full of malignancy
against the whole race which had
cast him out. If needed but this to
complete the grim su?rgestiveness of
the barren wsto the chilling wind and
the darkening sl;v. Even Baskerville
fell silent and pulled his overcoat
more closely aromd him.
We had left the fertile country behind and beieath us. We looked back
on it now, the slrnting rays, of a low
sun turning the streams to threads of
gold and glowir" on the red earth
new turned by the plough and the
bread tangle of the wood'ands. The
road in front of us grew bleaker and
wilder over huge russet and olive
slopes, sprinkled with giant boulders.
Now and then wo passed a moorland
cottage, walled ad roofed with stone,
with no creeper tn break Its harsh outline. Suddenly w looked down Into a
cup-like depression, patched with
stunted oi'-s anr' firs which had been
twisted and ben' by the fury of years
of storm. Two i igh. narrow towers
rose over the trees. The driver pointed
with his whip.
"Baskerville  Hall,"  said  he.
Its master had 'sen and was staring
wi'h flushed chee'-s and shining eyes.
A few minutes infer we had reach the
lod?e gat> s, a m ?',e of fantastic tracery in wroug!i* ircn, with weather-bitten pillars on either side, blotched with licheris. and surmounted
by the boars' heads of the Baskervilles. The lodge was a ruin
of black granite and bared ribs
of rafters, but facing it was a new
building, half constructed, the flr3t
fruit of Sir Charles's South African
gold.
Through the gateway we passed Into fie nvenue, ".''ere the wheels were
a.'-rain hir ':��� '��� fi nlrl the leaves, and the
old trees r' ������' their branch's in a sombre t'inne! over enr head. Baskerville
������'������.���. !���'������ il ;:k hi looked up the long
���������   : lo    '    're  the  house glim-
-vo m t'-'-ft a C    'at the farther end
v   :    If I he asked, In a low
:,   V w Alley Is on   the
,,i.. -
The young heir glanced round with
a gloomy face.
"It's no wonder my uncle felt as if
trouble were coming on him in such
a place as this," said he. "It's enough
io scare any man. I'll have a row at
electric lamps up here Inside of sU
months, and you won't know it again,
vvith a thousand candle-power Swan
am! Edison right here in front of ftie
ball door."
The ii��anue opened Into a broad expanse of turf, and the house lay beforo
us. In the fading light I could see that
Ihe centre was a heavy block of building from which a porch projected. Tho
whole front was draped in Ivy, with a
patch clipped bare here and there
where a window or a coal-of-arms
broke through the dark veil. From
this central block rope the twin towers,
ancient, crenelated, and pierced with
many loopholes. To right and left of
the turrets were more modern wings
of black granite. A dull light shone
through heavy mullloned windows, and
from the high chimneys which rose
from the steep, high-angled roof there
sprang a single black column of
smoke.
"Welcome, Sir Henry! Welcome, to
Baskerville Hall!"
A tall man had stepped from the
shadow of the porch to open the door
of the wagonette. The figure of a
woman was silhouetted against the yellow light of the hall. She came out
and helped the man to hand down our
"You don't mind my driving straight
home, Sir Henry?" said Dr. Mortimer.
"My wife Is expecting me."
"Surely you will stay and have some
dinner?"
"No, I must go. I shall probably
find some work awaiting me. I would
stay to show you over the house, but
Barrymore will be a better guide than
I. Good-bye, and never hesitate night
or day to send for me if I can be of
service."
The wheels died away    down    the
drive  while  Sir  Henry and  I  turned
I into the hall, and the    door   clanged
heavily behind us. It was a fine apartment in which we found ourselves,
large, lofty, and heavily raftered with
huge balks of age-blackened oak. In
the great old-fashioned fireplace behind the high ircn dogs a log-fire
crackled and snapped. Sir Henry and
I held out our hands to it, for we were
numb from our long drive. Then we
gazed round us at the high, thin window of old stained glass, the oak
panelling, the stags' heads, the coat-
of-arms upon the walls, all dim and
sombre in the subdued light of the
central lamp.
"It's Just as I Imagined It," said Sir
Henry. 'Is It not the very picture of
an old family home? To think that
this should be the same hall In which
for five hundred years my people have
lived. It strikes me solemn to think of
it."
I saw his dark face lit up with a
boyish enthusiasm as he gazed aDont
him. The light beat upon him where he
stood, but long shadows trailed down
the walls and hung like a black canopy
above him. Barrymore had returned
from taking our luggage to our rooms.
He stood In front of us now with the
subdued manner of a well trained servant. He was a remarkable looking
man, tall, handsome, with a square
black beard, and pale, distinguished
features.
"Would you wish dinner to be served at once, sir?"
"Is It ready?"
"In a very few minutes, sir. You
will find hot water in your rooms. My
wife and I will be happy. Sir Henry,
to stay with you until you have made
your fresh arrangements, but you will
understand that under the new conditions this house will require a considerable staff."
"What  new conditions?"
"I only meant, sir, that Sir Charles
led a very retired life, and we were
able to look after his wants. You
would, naturally, wish to have more
company, and so you will need change;,
in your household."
"Do you mean that your wife and
you wish to leave?"
"Only when it is quite convenient to
you, sir."
"But your family have been with us
for several generations, have they
not? I should be sorry to begin my life
here by breaking an old family connection."
I seem to discern some signs of emotion upon the butler's white face.
"I feel that also, sir, and so does
my wife. But to tell the truth, sir, we
were both very much attached to Sii
Charles, and his death gave us a shock
and made these surroundings very
painful to us. I,fear that we shall
never again be easy in our minds at
Baskerville Hall."
"But what do you Intend to do?"
"I have no doubt, sir, that we shall
succeed in establishing ourselves In
some business. Sir Charles's generosity
has given us the means to do so. And
now, sir, perhaps I had best show you
to your rooms."
A square balustraded gallery ran
round the top of the old hall, approached by a double stair. From this
central point two long corridors extended the whole length of the building, from which all the bedrooms opened. My own was in the same wing as
Baskerville's and almost next door to
it. These rooms appeared to be much
more modern than the central part ol
the house, and the bright paper and
numerous candies did something to
remove the sombre impression which
our arrival had left upon my mind.
But the dining-room which opened
out of the hall was a place of shadow
and gloom. It was a long chamber with,
a step separating the dais where me
family sat from the lower portion reserved for their dependents. At one
end a minstrel's gallery overlooked if
Black beams shot across above phi
heads, with a smoke-darkened ceiling
beyond them. With rows of flaring
torches to light it up, and the color
and rude hilarity of an old-time ban
quet, It might have softened; but now
when two black-clothed gentlemen gal
in the little circle of light thrown by
l shaded lamp, one's voice heenme
lushed and one's spirit subdued. A
dim line of ancestors, in every varlet.v
of dress, from the Elizabethan knight
'o the buck of the Regency, stared
down upon us and daunted, un by theii
silent company, We talked little, nun I
for one was glad when the meal wn:
over and we were able to retire In!
the modern blllt&rd-room and BfQOltO I
cigarette,
"My wo'd. It lin't. n very cheerfn
place," said Sir Henry. "I suppose uiu
can tone down to it, dui i ieei a mi
out of the picture at present. I don't
wonder that my uncle got. a little Jumpy If he lived all alone In such a house
as this. However, If It suits you, we
will retire early to-nlght, and ppi'linpti
things may seem moro cheerful in the
morning."
I drew aside my curtains before I
went to bed and looked out from my
window. It opened upon tho grassy
space which lay iu front of the hall
door. Beyond, two copses of trees
moaned and swung In a rising wind.
A half moon broke through tho rlftsi
of racing clouds. In its cold light I saw
beyond the trees a broken fringe of
rocks, and the long, low curve of the
melancholy moor. I closed the curtain,
feeling that my last impression was In
keeping with the rest.
And yet It was not quite the last. I
found myself weary and yet wakeful,
tossing restlessly from side to side,
seeking for the sleep which would not
come. Far away a chiming clock
struck out the quarters of the hours,
but otherwise a deathly silence lay
upon the old house. And then suddenly,
In the very dead of the night, there
came a sound to my ears, clear, resonant, and unmistakable. It was the
sob of a woman, the muffled, strangling gasp of one who Is torn by an uncontrollable sorrow, I sat up In bed
and listened Intently. The v.olse could
not have been far awav and was cor-
& CO.
Successors to
L. C. BARNES
Wftal ie��t your order for Christmas Groceries ?
We are prepared io supply you with the very best and freshest materials for
making your fruit cakes and plum pudding's. Read this list over and telephone in
your order and we will give it onr best attention.
.FIST ARRIVED���
New Peels- Citron, Orange,  Lemon.   New Vleena Figs in 1 lb. baskets
"   Australian Valencia Raisins. !'   Smyrna Figs in 1 lb. packages.
"   Malaga London Layers. "   5 Crown Figs by the lb.
New Persian Dates in packages and by the pound.
SPECIALS
Cranberries, Malaga Grapes, Cherries in Maraschino, C. & B.  Pickled Walnuts,
1 lb. Maderia Cakes, Christie's Plum Puddings,
Don't forget to order Celery for your Xmas dinner.   We have the finest that grows.
Telephone No. 25.
W. R. KING & CO.
iA8aas��u<rflrf^^t��rrST^^ i
tafnly In the house. For half an hour
I willed wilh every nerve on the alert,
hut th��re came no other sound give
!he chimney clock and the rustle of
the ivy on the wall.
CHAPTER VII.
The fre=h beauty of the following
morning did something to efface from
our minds the grim and grey impression which had been left upon both of
us by our first experience of Basker
ville Hall. As Sir Henry and I sat at
breakfast the sunlight flooded in
through the high mullloned windows,
throwing watery patches of color from
the cents of arms which covered them'.
The dark panelling glowed like bronze
in the golden ravs, and it was bard
'o realize that this was indeed the
chamber which had struck such a
?!oom into our souls upon the evening
before.
"I guess It is ourselves and not Ihe
nouse that we have to blame!" salt
the baronet. "We were tired with out
journey and chilled by our drive, so
we took a grey view of the place. Nov;
we are fresh and well, so it is all
cheerful once mere."
"And yet it was not entirely a question of imagination," I answered. "Hid
you, for example, happen to hear someone, a woman I think, sobbing in the
night?"
"That is curious, for I did when I
was half asleep fancy that I heard
something of the sort. I waited quite a
time, but there was no more of it, so
I concluded that it was all a dream."
"I heard it distinctly, and I am sure
that it was really the sob of a woman."
"We must ask about this right
away." He rang the bell and asked
Barrymore whether he could account
for our experience. It seemed to mi
that the pallid features of the butlei
turned a shade paler still as he listened to his master's question.
"There are only two women in tin
house, Sir Henry," he answered. "One
is the scullery-mald, who sleeps in
the other wing. The other Is my wife
and I can answer for It that the sounc'
could not have come from her." -
And yet he lied as he said it, for li
chanced that after breakfast 1 met Mrs
Barrymore in the long corridor witl
the sun full upon her face. She was i
large, impassive, heavy-featured worn
an with a stem set expression o
mouth. But her tell-tale eyes were rec
and glanced at me from between swol
len lids. It was she. then, who wept ii
the night, and if she did so her hus
band must know it. Yet he had taker
the obvious risk of discovery in dr
daring that it w:is not, so. Why had
he done this? And why did shp wee;,
so bitterly? Already round this pair
faced, handsome, black-bearded mat
there was gather! ig an atmosphere ol
mystery and of gloom. It was he who
had been the first to discover tho bod'.
of Sir Charles, and we had only hi;
word for all thp circumstances whic!
led lip l�� the old man's death. Was il
possible that it was Barrymore afte:
ail whom we had seen in the cab t-
Regent Street? The beard might well
have been the Mine. The<fcabman ha'!
described h somewhat shorter num. but
such an Impression might easily have
heen erroneous. How could I settle tin
point  for ev��i'? Obviously  the    fir.-
thing   In  do  WBS   Io  see   the Qrlmpe'
postmaster, and find whether the test
telegram had really bet n placed li
Biii'i'yinore's   own   hands.   Be   the   an
swer what It might, 1 should al least
hnvn something to report to Sherlock
Holmes.
Sir Henry had numerous papers tc
examine ftftir breakfast, so thai the
time was propitious for my excursion
j It was a pleasant walk of tour mlh :
along the edge of the moor, leadlnp
I mo at last to a small grey hamlet, li.
which two larger buildings, which
proved to be the inn and the house of
��� Dr. Mortimer, stood high above tho
[ rest. The postmaster, who was also
the village grocer, had a clear recollection of the telegram.
"Certainly, sir," said ho, "I had tho
j telegram delivered to Mr. Barrymore
exactly as directed,"
"Whq delivered It?"
"My boy here. James, you delivered
that telegram to Mr, Barrymore at the
Hail last week, did you not?"
"Yes, father, I delivered it."
"Into his ow'i hands?" I asked.
"Well, he we-, up in the loft at the
time, so that I could not put it into his
own hands, but I gave it into Mrs.
Barrymore's hands, and she promised
to deliver  it at once."
"Did you see Mr. Barrymore?"
"No, sir; I tell you he was In the
loft."
"If you didn't see him, how do you
know he was in the loft?"
"Well, surely his own wife ought to
'���now where he is," said the postmaster, testilv. "Didn't be cot the telca"i'.rn?
(To bo continued.)
BEN BAKER
BARBER    -     MAIN STREET
PRICES
Shave 15 cts
Face Massage 35 "
Hair Cut 35 "
''     Tonic, extra 10 "'
"     Singe, extra 25 "
Shampoo 25
Beard Trim and Hair Cut. .50 "
Bath   50 "
NORTH VANCOUVER
The Ambitious City,
With 36 miles of Water Frontage
And the best Harbor on the
Pacific Coast. Offers the best
opportunities for
Business or Investment.
A large list of Properties for
sale or exchange.
Call and see us, or write to
MARTINSON & CO.
Lonsdale Avenue,
North Vancouver.
E. J. F1NGH
Painter, Paperhanger
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a Specialty.
WALL PAPER Carried in Stock.
Box 196.       Main St.
South Okanagan Valley
Bureau of information of the South
Okanagan Valley and for a list of property tor sale, improved farms, Penticton T. S. Coy's lots, etc. Apply to
Win, Smyth Parker
General Real Estate Agent, who will
always cheerfully give prompt and best
attention to all inquiries from intending
investors.
PENTICTON, B. C.
STAGES
Fruit Trees
Home Grown Nursery Trees
Apples, Plums and Prunes
for sale for spring planting
For varieties and prices apply to
Manager,
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd
Vernon, B. C.
COLUMBIAN   COLLEGE.
IVJ3W   WESTMINSTER, H. ('.
Founded 1HD2. Incorporated 1893.
Provides a Christian home for students of both
nexes at moderate rates. Has a prepaiatory class
for junior students taking Public School work.
Does Hitfh School work, and prepares for Provincial teachers' examinations. Teaches all branches
of a Practical Business course, and confers Diplomas. Imparts a liberal education in its Collegiate
Course, and in the Ladles' Course for M.K. L.t and
M. h. A. In Theology confers the degree of B. D.
In University work can take students through the
complete Arts Course for the B. A. degree of Toronto University, with which the College Is in full
affiliation, In Science teaches the first year of
Toronto School of Science, and has a special Engineering work in this {Province, In Music, a
complete course in Theory, Voice Culture, and
Piano and Organ, in conjunction with theToronto
College of Music. Special instruction in Art and
Elocution, while all students are repuired to take
Physical Taiining with all the privileges of a well
equipped Gymnasium, For Calendar, address
Columbian College. 17-
Stflge leaves for Keremeos and Hedley at 7 a. m.
on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Returns
on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Stage leaves for Princeton every Tuesday at
7 a. m.
Stage leaves for Fairview and Oroviile on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a. m. Returns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at
6 p. m.
POST OFFICE.
Hours 9 a. m. to 6. p, m.
Registered Letter and Money Order wicket
closes 5 p. m.
Wicket opened for half an hour after mail Is
distributed.
Arrivals���Per Str, Okanagan: Daily except
Sunday 6 p. m.; Per stage from Hedley, Keremeos, Olalla, Green Mountain, Oroviile, Fairview,
and White Lake: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 6 p. m.
Closing���For boat and Btages: 9 p. m. daily except Saturday. For Monday's boat and stages:
8.15 p. m. Sundays.
C. P. R.TIME TABLE
SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH
Daily both ways except Sunday.
SOUTHBOUND   STATION    NORTHBOUND
1,2 a-m Sicamous  6.00p.m.
0.Z7   H     Enderby  4.48   "
8.R2    (     Armstrong  4.08   "
8.30   ti     ar Vernon lv 3^80   "
9.30   tt     lv Vernon ar.!!]2l30   "
9.45        ���ar...Ok. Landing ...lv...   215   "
1CI.00 p.m... ,lv... Ok. Landing .. .ar... .11.00 a.m.
IL10   ���    Kelowna  8.20   "
3-00   u    Peachland  7.25   "
4-45   |(    Summerland 6.30   "
6.00         Penticton 6.00   "
FOR SALE
Three Angora Cats.   For particulars
address   MRS. L. B. FARLEIGH,
18-4 Green Mountain.
FOR SALE.
A good, young, new milch cow in fine
condition.   Apply at Press Office. 18tf
WANTED
A situation on a farm.    Experience
in dairy work; can also handle team.
Apply ROBERT McKEE,
Penticton, B. C.
or Press Office. 18-4
C. P. K.
LAND FOR SALE
Agricultural and ttmber land for sale
for $1.00 per acre with $2.00 per thousand feet of lumber.
Houses to let.
J. R. MITCHELL,
District Agent
PENTICTON
& OROVILLE
STAGE
Via Fairview
Leaves Penticton Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., arriving at Oroviile the same day at 6 p. m.
Through Fare - $6.00
W. HINE and S. M. SNOW
FAIRVIEW. B. C.
G. H. KIEFf ER
GENERAL BLACKSMITH.
Horse Shoeing and Repair Work.
Give Me a Trial.
Very Best of Workmanship.
Artistic Hair Gut 35c
Easy Shave    -    15
and Hot Baths
-AT-
H. MURK'S THE PENTICTON TRESS, PENTICTON, P. C, DECEMBER 7, 1907.
sew ��������-rv��y��e--��wivir ft. pjui^��H7>fl
Tin- Pkiin Trulli Aboul Chestnut
Culture
Some twenty-five years ago,
when the Japanese chestnut was
introduced by California import-
era, and from thence taken across
the continent to New Jersey, it
produced nothing short of a horticultural sensation. The immense size of the nut; the dwarf
habit of the tree, which saves so
much orchard space; and its wonderful precocity (since it often
bears at two years from seed)
were hailed with glee by the
commercial grower. At first only
seedlings could be obtained, and
few of these. They brought
high prices. There was little
risk in using seedling stock since
93 per cent, of the trees grown
from Japanese seed will bear
good nuts but varieties must be
grafted.
THE BIGGEST NUT
For fifteen years the Japanese
chestnut's career took the ascending curve, but for the past
ten it has been gradually going
down, until to-day, while there
is a steady demand for the trees,
this species is no longer the favorite. The reason is not far to
seek. The quality of the nut is
poor and the public that once
clamored for big nuts has gone
back to the smaller European
and American varieties simply because they are so much sweeter.
However, the amateur who
wants a few chest nut trees merely as an interesting adjunct to
his garden may well plant some
of the Japanese. They are interesting trees, clean growers,
dwarf enough in habit never to
take up an embarrassing amount
of space, free from disease, with
good colored foliage, and they
bear when they are so absurdly
small that they are a constant
delight to the good folks who
must have a garden that is ever
"up and doing." Moreover,
they bear freely and regularly
and the nuts are sound and meaty
not bad when boiled, but uninteresting and flat when roasted
or eaten raw. There may yet be
a field for the Japanese in the
making of marons glaees or similar confections, but as yet it is
untried. The real hope of the
whole species lies in the improve-
mdnt of its quality by hybridizing.
THE MOST PROFITABLE SPECIES
As we go down the scale in
size we gain in flavor, and this
naturally brings us to the improved European varieties. The
European chestnut, commonly
known as the Spanish or French,
has not been known generally in
this country for more than seventy-five years. Before that
time it is doubtful if there were
more than a few isolated trees.
In this species we find better
flavor than in the Japanese chestnut; a smaller nut; a larger tree,
and reaso?iable earliness in maturing. An improved European
variety will not bear profitably
until four or five years from the
graft or from seed. Moreover,
it is not safe to propagate even
from the best seed, for seedlings
vary widely, in this respect being
far inferior to the Japanese.
However, it was, of course, by
seed that the Numbo and Paragon varieties came into existence.
It is a common error to call
Numbo, Paragon and Ridgely,
American chestnuts because they
originated in this country, but
they are distinctly of the European species. Numbo and Paragon were accidental seedlings
planted respectively by Moon and
Engle���both Pennsylvania growers. It is presumed that the
seed had been pollinated by the
American sweet chestnut.
The popularity of the European species is the greatest. It is
usually one of the varieties
named abuve that the street-corner Italian shakes over his glowing brazier. The tree of this
species is not so stately as the
native American and has a more
spreading habit of growth. It
grows rapidly but is more easily
affected by  a  certain  fungous
Any person or persons removing Timber or Wood of any kind from the property
of this Company without permission in writing, signed by the Managing Director
will be prosecuted.
The Southern Okanagan Land Go.
LIMITED.
disease that attacks the leaf than
any other species of chestnut.
The European is also superior to
the American in the size and
beauty of its nut.
THE SWEETEST  NUT
The native American chestnut
is first in flavor but lenst in size:
first in beauty of tree but last in
age of bearing. It produces
fewer nuts to the acre than either
the Japanese or the European.
But my heart goes out to it, for
it is surely good to eat. Furthermore, a well grown American
chestnut that has passed the
quarter-century mark is a gracious delight to the eye of the
lover of trees, and there is a
peaceful, dignified, impressive-
ness about a grove of old chestnut trees that is good to experience. The American chestnut
does not come into profitable
bearing before fifteen years. It
bears freely but not regularly.
The tree is too large for orchard
growth. The nut is a little too
small and has too much white
fuzz on it to be handsome in appearance, but its flavor is incomparable.
WHAT THE WORLD NEEDS
It is a shame and a disgrace to
American propagators that there
is not one named variety of the
American species under cultivation to-day. We should have, by
this time, a series of American
chestnuts, each one an improvement on the last, getting earlier
in time of bearing, following the
Japanese in habit of growth, and
slightly increasing the size of the
nut, but keeping its quality. A
very large nut is a positive detriment commercially. The public
does not want it and will not buy
it.
What we want is a chestnut
that will combine all the good
points of the Japanese in early
hearing, dwarf growth, regularity and size of crop, and freedom
from disease, with the sweetness
of the American nut. Until we
have such a nut, there will never
be great profits in commercial
culture.
ADVICE TO FARMERS & AMATEURS
All species of chestnut are easy
of cultivation. A light sandy
soil, well-drained, is best for
them, but they will grow on
heavy loam. They do not like
limestone soils. If a farmer has
a hillside to be protected from
washing down, or a water course
with high banks which need
trees, he has a favorable place
for chestnuts and may grow a
crop of nuts of appreciable value
and at the same time have the
advantage of the tree growth.
Until the hybridizers get to work
at the American chestnut,  the
money-making crops will come
from grafted or budded stock of
the best varieties of European
species. To secure stocks for
grafting sow the seeds in the
fall or tho seeds may be stratified
in sand and buried over winter
and sown in spring. For beauty
of tree and for the pleasures of
the palate, however, the American chestnut must be first choice.
-J. W. KERR in "The Garden
Magazine " for November.
HAVE SEEN THE
Sharpies Tubular Cream
Separator
Has no dripping oil.
No holes to dig out with hair pins.
Oil once a week.
No hot bearings.
Has an invention by which the handle
is thrown out of gear when you stop
turning, thereby not endangering one's
life or clothes.
To realize the superiority ot this
Separator
You Shouid See It.
C. W. CROSS,
REPRESENTATIVE.
EATON'S PRICES
Plus the Express
-AT-
H.OLIYER'S
SHOE STORE.
THE PENTICTON
DAI RY
Daily delivery of Fresh Milk to
all parts of the Town.
MILK 10c. PER QUART.
H. M. McNeill,     .    Prop.
NOTICE.
After 80 days I Intend to apply to the
Honorable tho Chief Commissioner of
Lands mid Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Beginning id a poet marked lot N.E.
41, thence north 40 chains, more or less,
to Indian reserve lands ; thence SO
chains, more or loss, west lo Osoyoos
Lake; thence southerly along shore to
west post of lot 41: thence east to
point of commenceme it.
:���!. AV. BROWN.
Osoyoos, B. C. Nov. 18th, 1907,
w. o. w.
Okanagan Cump No. 261.
Meats every Tuesday in the month at
H p. m. in Woodmen's Hall, Ellis St.
Visiting Sovereigns always welcome.
J. W. EDMONDS, C. C.
R. WILTON, CLERK
RICHARD II.
PARKINSON
British  Columbia Laud Surveyor
Hydrallc Engineer Architect
Office at Fairview. B.C.
HOTEL.  PENTICTON.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.     <
RATES $2.50 PER DAY
A. Barnes       - -       Prop.
PENTICTON. B.C.
To The Travelling Public.
If you want a good stable and
prime feed for your horses, call
on
LIVERY & FEED STABLE.
S. D. HINE,
FAIRVIEW, B.C.
Oalarneau &
McKenzie
BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
When  you   think   of   Building
Look us up.
ADOLPHUS GALARNEAU  W. A. MCKENZIE
At J. A. NESBI1TS
Smith Street.
Xmas    Cards,    Novelties,
and Decorations.
Go-Carts, Hand Wagons, Wheel-
Barrows,   Children's  Rockers,
Masks, Hockey Sticks,  Boys'
Sleighs, etc., etc.
1 Mason and  Risch   piano and
1 Bell organ for sale cheap.
ii. HARLOW
Dealer in
BUILDING MATERIAL: LIME,
LATH, CEMENT, HARD
WALL PLASTER.
Manufacturer of   Miracle
Cement Blocks
Which make a true hollow wall,
the strongest cement block wall
built.
The Miracle Block took the
Grand Gold Medal at the Lewis
and Clarke Centennial Exposition
at Portland, Ore. 12-tf
WANTED IMMEDIATELY
100 BUYERS
FOR
GASOLINE ENGINES
APPLY TO
S.T.Elliott
THE IMPLEMENT MAN
KELOWNA       -      -       B. C.
SAY,  BOYS !
Did you ever have to let a good bargain slip by because you had no money
saved up? If so, don't be caught again
but begin now to save $5 or $10 a
month in the B. C. Permanent Loan
and Savings Co., of Vancouver.
Jas. F. Tupper,   Local Representative.
**��*
OKANAGAN
���<+��}
!
| FRUIT LANDS j .
B And Residential Lots I   '
1 Fire and Life Insurance
i
j A. E. BENNETT, ���S%��2VL ,
PENTICTON.
Next Door to Post Office.
I
^a
DO YOUR
EYES
FEEL TIRED ?
Do you suffer from headaches ? These are two
of the results of eye-strain. Those spectacles may
not suit you the way they did once. Come in and
have your eyes tested free of charge; it may be of
great benefit to you.
HARRIS, The Jeweler
J
Shovels, Rakes, Hoes,
Barbed Wire, Poultry Netting,
SHELF HARDWARE, Etc.
PENTICTON HARDWARE CO.
RAMSAY'S CHOCOLATES
I have in stock the finest line of Ramsay's Chocolates in B. C. _ Look out for
my excellent stock of Christinas Chocolates, which will be here soon.    .   .   .
All kinds of Candies, Fruits and Confectionery. Everything in Tobacco lines.
Wy��F��i" ���HL��gt ���
C. E. Pomeroy.
sURBHHMM
Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
*
Keremeos, Hedley and Princeton Stage Connect with Steamer "Okanagan."
Makes connection with Great Northern R'y at Keremeos.
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,  and a general Draying
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.      Penticton.

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