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The Penticton Press Apr 10, 1909

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Array ixJ^ ,.( ^J^9^4
/
Zhe   penticton
&
reee
VOL. 3.   No. 39.
PENTICTON, B.C.. SATURDAY. APRIL 10, 1909.
$1.00 Per Year In Advance
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO.
ESTABLISHED 1867
B. E. Walker. President. i Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000
Alexander Laird, General Manager.   Reserve Fund,    -     6,000,000
Branches throughout Canada, and in the United States and England.
SAVINGS    BANK    DEPARTMENT
Deposits of $1 and upwards are received and interest allowed at
current rates.     Accounts may be opened in the names of
two or more persons and withdrawals made by
any one of them or by the survivor.
Penticton Branch     -    *    J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
Local and Personal
Those having friends visiting them
will confer a favor by acquainting the
Press with the fact. All other local
news thankfully received.
x        A. B. Campbell. A. E. Kay.      sf)
% Campbell & Kay S
KILN DRIED LUMBER
,>. Put   in   Your   Flume   Orders j^
7g Now. j|
��*��+����-
��*��-
(A LIST OF SAFES/
i aaa���na���s t v, i��� 111 ��� i
[ SAFE Harness and Boots       (
/ SAFE Trunks and Suit Cases /
j SAFE Agricultural Implements
[ SAFE Wagons and Buggies
f SAFE Insurance Companies
i
i
/ The Penticton Saddlery S^g��� /
Penticton is all right. If you
can't boost, don't knock.
Don't forget the Fire Brigade
ball on Monday 12th inst.
Williams Jubilee Singers Monday 19th inst. Steward's Hall.
Mrs. J. F. Tupper returned
from Armstrong on Wednesday.
Born, on Sunday, 4th inst. to
Mr. and Mrs Jas. Mohoney, a
son.
Born, on Monday, 5th inst. to
Mr. arid Mrs. A. H. Wade, a
son.
Resident Engineer Aylmer,
of Revelstoke, came in on Monday.
It is about time work had begun on the Okanagan River
bridge.
Miss E. Ellis of Victoria, is
at present visiting Mr. and Mrs.
A. H. Wade.
Seats now on sale at Steward's
for Williams' Jubilee Singers.
Come early.
Band of Hope and Boys' Club
concert, Steward's Hall, Friday
the 16th inst.
Is it not about time that steps
were being taken to prepare for
the First of July sports?
Keremeos must be a prosperous
town. Its local newspaper has
twenty columns of advertisements.
The Executive of the Fire
Brigade should hold a meeting
and turn over the equipment to
the council.
The council have mado a
great improvement in the vicinity of the Bank of Commerce by
grading Nanaimo Ave.
Mrs. G. B. Harris and her
daughter, who are staying with
Gordon Harris, will be 'at home'
Tuesday next, afternoon and
evening.
The Keremeos Trumpet, not
wishing to have it implied that it
toots its own horn, has changed
its name to the The Keremeos
Chronicle.
Don.t forget the entertainment to be given by the Band of
Hope and the Penticton Boys'
Club, in Steward's Hall, April
16th, 8 o'clock.
The Easter services at St.
Saviour's church will be as follows: 8 a. m., Holy Communion;
11 a. m., Matins and Holy Communion; 7.30 p. m., Festal Evensong.
I have met Williams' Jubilee
Singers on several Chautauqua
platforms. They are ladies and
gentlemen of culture and also
great singers and entertainers.
���Capt. Richmond Pearson Hob-
son.
Rev, A. F. Baker has been conducting evangelical services in
the Baptist church during the
past week. He has been assisted
in the song portion of the services by Hugh A. McLean, of
Calgary.
It is estimated that there will
be one hundred thousand Americans settle in Alberta and Saskatchewan during the coming
summer. Surely they will crowd
some of the half frozen North-
westerners this way.
The Council are making preparations to install a number of
gasoline street lights. Would it
not be a good plan to feel the
pulse of the community with regard to an up-to-date electric
lighting system ? According to
. ��� our way of thinking, electric
$7$yfryfry*^^l^^^^?��>*y*j\\ ����** can't come too soon.
(SAFE did you say ? Yes, if your
# cash is SAFE, you are SAFE
j     in dealing; with us.
\ Our prices and rates are without exception the LOWEST
.%*���
-*��-
-*��-
-*c<+��#-
-����-
D COMMERCIAL
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
'i
��� ?
1            Livery, Feed and Sale Stable j|
g                       DIGNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors. jj
fl    If you vant a Stylish Outfit, this is the place to come.   You can always j(
t>    get teams just when you want them.    We make a specialty  of  keeping 4,
C    good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack  horses, 'a
tl          WT n   ii v<i   ulufi   r\ii + + irwr   1*1    T-I <j��r   ��j fi/1   llt<a in    r/lW   aula      in A   ou   hjq   l.i. i/      f/\��      / K 7 7
We are also putting in Hay and Grain for sale, and as we buy  for  cash   )a
we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit. J
Special  Attention  To The  Wants Of Commercial  Men. ;J
l%'M^AMfAM>AMfAM��AM*AM��A^��AM��A*A^AM*AA*AM*AM��A^A^AM��AM*A^A^A^*AM\*AM\*AM?AM.*AA
Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
Stage Connects with Steamer "Okanagan" at Penticton, with Great Northern
Railway at Keremeos, and with stage to Hedley and Princeton. Leaves at 6 a.m
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,  and a general Draying
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.       Penticton.
Sr
\HATS    HATS    HATSf
>:
a
Any kind or quality.
A fine assortment of LADIES' READY-TO-WEAR
LADIES' PANAMA, MEN'S PANAMA.   CHILDREN'S
SAILORS in straw and linen.
A brand new stock of Ladies'  Belts,  Collars and Fancy
Frillings.
Having More Room in our New Quarters we are V
Prepared to Show our Stock to Better Advantage.  5
The Football club took only
one boat to Kelowna on Good
Friday, the engagements with
the Maud More having been cancelled owing to applications for
tickets not being made in time
to assure a sufficient crowd.
Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Shatford
returned on Friday of last week
after spending several months in
eastern Canada, the United
States, Mexico and the West
Indies. They were accompanied
on their trip by S. C. Smith, of
Vernon.
Don't forget the Grand Masquerade Ball on Monday night
12th inst. Tickets $2.00 ladies
free. Prizes will be given for the
best ladies' fancy dress costume,
best men's fancy dress costume,
best comic costume, ladies', best
comic costume, men's.
The Keremeos Trumpet has
completed the first year of its existence, looking healthy and
prosperous, for which we extend
congratulations. The last issue
is a special number on irrigation,
and comprises ten pages with
numerous half tone cuts.
"Pirates of Penzance," by
the Kelowna Choral Society, on
Thursday, the 22nd inst., in
Steward's Hall. This play if
highly recommended by i
Penticton citizen who saw it
played at Kelowna. We have in
mind the successful presentation
of "Pinafore" by Kelowna talent
about a year ago.
There will be a meeting held
in the room above the S. O. Land
Co's offbe on the evening of Wednesday, the 21st inst. for the
purpose of organizing a local
brach of the provincial Farmers'
Institue. All interested are requested to attend while every
person engaged in farming is
especially urged to be present.
A. P. Stevenson, who arrived
by a recent C. P. R. excursion
from Manitoba, states that
tickets were sold to Victoria,
Vancouver and points in the
boundary country for $25, yet
he had to pay $32.20 to Penticton. Surely this is discrimination against the Okanagan
with a vengeance. Board of
Trade get busy.
Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Stevenson,
of Dunston, Man., spent the past
week in Penticton looking over
their property.    Mr. Stevenson,
who is a successful apple grower
of Manitoba,   owns one of the
finest young  peach orchards in
| this vicinity.   He and his family
1 expect to come here later to reside.   Mr. Duncan, also of Dun
ston, accompanied Mr. and Mrs.
1 Stevenson on the trip.
Mr. and Mrs. G. V. Zinkan
who recently purchased property
here and have been enjoying a
few weeks of Okanagan weather, left this week for Southamton
where they will remain a short
time prior to returning to Skag-
away Alaska, where Mr. Zinkan
has charge of the Canadian customs office. They intend to
return to Penticton later to cultivate their fruit lot. Mr. Zinkan
says that Penticton combines the
scenery of Alaska with the climate of California.
NORMAN   HILL,
The Ladies' and Men's Furnisher,
MAIN STREET.
8
I
>!
Municipal Council.
Regular meeting, held Thurs-
lay, April 1st. Present, the
leeve, and Councillors Murk,
Power, Barnes and Hatch. Min-
ites of last meeting read and
dopted.
A letter was read from the
manager of the Canadian Bank
of Commerce with regard to borrowing money on the note of the
municipality.
Power-Hatch, that the Reeve
xnd chairman of the finance committee wait on the manager of
the Bank in order to discuss the
matter.
A letter from the Anti-Tuberculosis Society was read and
jrdered to be acknowledged, and
laid over for future disposition.
Letters from Western Lighting
Agency, and Moore & Co., re
street lights was read.
Hatch-Barnes, that the clerk
be instructed to write the R. M.
Moore Co. to send one No. 134
lamp complete with post as a
sample, and, if found satisfactory, a further order for six
lamps to be given.
The cemetery committee reported progress in regard to
selection of a cemetery site.
The chairman of the board of
works reported that the drain on
Ellis street had been completed ;
also culvert on Main street; and
progress on work of improving
sidewalk on Main street and lake
shore drive.
Hatch-Barnes, that the report
of the board of works be adopted.    Carried.
Barnes-Power, that the Trades
License By-Law be reconsidered,
finally passed, and ordered to be
sealed.    Carried.
Barnes-Hatch, that the Parks
and Recreation Grounds Regulation By-Law be reconsidered,
finally passed, ordered to be
signed and sealed.    Carried.
The chairman of the board of
works brought up the question
of grading Ellis street and sub-
miltad an estimate of cost of
same.
Hatch-Power, that the clerk be
instructed to notify the Chief
Commissioner of Works that the
council withdraw their application for a water record on Okanagan Falls, and that the expense
already incurred be paid. Carried,
Hatch-Barnes, that the meeting adjourn until Saturday night.
Carried.
On resuming on Saturday the
council went into committee of
the whole on the Fire Protection
By-Law, Public Morals By-Law,
and Cemetery Regulations By-
i Law, and on the Reeve resuming
j the chair, they were read a third
time and passed.
Jenks   McCully.
On Wednesday evening, April
7th, a quiet wedding took place
at the home of Mr. C. F. Layton.
when Miss Mary E. McCully,
youngest daughter of Capt. J. W.
McCully of Great Village, N. S.,
was married to Mr. Max V.
Jenks, son of Mr. H. C. Jenks
of Parrsboro, N. S.
Miss McCully, gowned in white
silk, wearing a bridal veil, and
carrying a shower boquet of
white carnations and ferns, was
given away by her brother-in-
law, Mr. Layton. The ceremony
was performed by Rev. A. F.
Baker mid house decorations of
wild flowers, the contracting
parties standing on a mat of
spring flowers beneath a bell of
yellow lilies. Miss Ruth Layton.
a niece of the bride, as maid of
honor, was dressed in white organdie with pink ribbons, and
carried a boquet of pink carnations. The nephew of the bride,
Master Mace Layton, served as
ring-bearer.
After the ceremony dainty refreshments were served.
The gifts to the bride were
numerous and beautiful.
Mr. and Mrs. Jenks are visiting the Okanagan towns, after
which they will return to Penticton for a short visit before proceeding further.
The Press joins with the
many friends of the bride in Penticton in wishing the happy
couple a long, happy, and prosperous married life.
Weather Report.
Observations at Dominion Government Meteorological Station
at Penticton for the month of
March, 1909 :
DATE
1..
2..
3..
4..
5..
6..
7..
8..
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19...
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
31.
MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE
 46   	
 44J	
 48  	
 50 	
 46 	
 43 	
 43 	
 481	
 46J	
 52J	
 53 	
 57J	
 55 	
 52 	
 551	
 52J	
 471	
 47 	
51 	
Bli	
511	
52 	
251	
571	
651	
MINIMUM
TEMPERATURE
 28
 35
 35
 23
.52
.61
.61
.55
.57
.60
21
20
20
22
28
33
33
27
27
25
25
35
241
27
25
22
22
241
24
28
28
27
28
40
38
45
25
FOR SALE.
Two Hundred and Sixty-Three Acres;
about 30 acres can be cultivated and
watered ; over k mile lake frontage ;
2 acres six year old bearing orchard; 6
additional acres cleared for crop ; 2
springs at house ; wharf 170 ft. long ;
good log house; 6 chicken houses; good
stable 16x16 with hay loft and shingled
roof ; lean-to 16x16 ; good corral ; good
root cellar where nothing froze this
winter; first water right on Shoot
Creek for 100 inches ; unlimited range
for stock ; 5 miles from Naramata ;
wagon road will be built this year or
next; one of the most delightful locations in the Okanagan. Last year the
owner was asking ten thousand for
place but as he has something else in
sight now, he will sell for six thousand.
This is a bargain.
Apply for particulars at the PRESS
office, or to F. G. ANDERSON,
Summerland, B. C.
Farmers' Institute.
W. J. Clement, Esq.,
Penticton.
Dear Sir, I beg to acknowledge receipt of your letter of
31st ult., requesting on behalf of
some of the members of the
Osoyoos Farmers' Institute, that
a separate Institute be formed
for Penticton and vicinity. Your
request is viewed favorably, but
before permission will be given
to establish an Institute with
headquarters at Penticl'0 , it is
necessary that the Department
should be assured that there is
sufficient support behind the
movement to make the proposed
Institute a strong one. It should
start out with not less than forty
or fifty members. I forward you
herewith a copy of the Farmers'
Institute Act, in which you will
find the proper steps required to
be taken. Trusting to hear frcm
you further in this respect,
I have the honor to be, sir,
Your obedient servant,
R. M. Palmer,
Deputy Minister of Agriculture.
The total rainfall was .38 inches.
LOST
Between Hotel Penticton and my ranch,
a Ladies' Gold Watch.     Finder will be
suitably rewarded.
39-tf W. T. SHATFORD.
EGGS FOR SETTING
From thorough-bred  Brown   Leghorn
stock; good laying strain; $1.50 per 13.
MALCOLM CAMPBELL.
39-2 Penticton.
EGGS FOR HATCHING
Pure-bred White Leghorn ;  $1.50 per
selting.      Apply
39-4 W. D. LANCASTER.
WANTED
A Light Wagon  for farm use.     One
that will carry about a ton.
Address BENTLEY
39-1 Summerland.
FOR SALE
Two tons gcoi Onions.   In good condition.   Apply P. F. SIZE,
Penticton, B. C.
NOTICE
Get your name on the voters' list. It
will cost vou nothing. Applv at the
Press office.       W. J. CLEMENT,
Commissioner, THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. APRIL 10, 1909.
THE PENTICTON PRESS
ISSUED   EVERY   SATURDAY  AT J
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
W. J. CLEMENT.
Subscription $1.00 Per Year in
Advance.   Foreign, $1.50.
Advertising Rates:
Transient Advertisements ���Not exceeding one inch, one insertion, 50c;
for each additional insertion, 25c.
Lodge Notices, Professional Cards, &c.
$1.00 per inch, per month.
Land and Timber Notices-30 Hays, $5;
60 days, $7.
Legal Advertising���First insertion, 10
cents per line; each subsequent insertion, 5c. per line.
Reading Notices in Local News Column
15c. per line, first insertion; 10c. per
line, each subsequent insertion.
Contract Advertisements���Rates arranged according to space taken.
All changes in contract advertisements must be in the hands of the
printer by Tuesday evening to ensure
publication in the next issue.
Farmers' Institute.
We publish in another column
a communication from the Deputy Minister of Agriculture relative to the organization of a local
branch of the Provincial Farmers' Institute.
We are glad to note that the
Department of Agriculture views
with favor the organization of
Institutes embracing less territory than was formerly the custom. The Osoyoos Farmers' Institute, with its head office at
Kelowna,,embraces so much territory that it is impossibls to do
effective work. Owing to improper local organization, excellent addresses on fruit growing
and other subjects have been delivered in Penticton to not more
than a dozen hearers, and at
times the meetings have had to
be cancelled altogether. The organization of a local branch of
the Institute would change all
this. It would have its own
secretary and other officers resident at this point. These would
be in direct communication with
the Department, and due notice
would be given of all meetings.
Apart from the fact that the'
Department furnishes free literature to the members of the Institute, and that travelling lecturers are provided free of cost,
profitable meetings could be held
by the local branch itself, and
matters of interest to local growers discussed. At present there
is no educative organization of
local fruit growers at Penticton
although a Fruit Growers' Association, which never held a meeting, was formed some two years
ago. Besides its educative work,
the Farmers' Institute is in a
much better position even than
the Board of Trade to impress
upon the government and the
railway company the requirements of the fruit growers.
Every farmer and fruit grower
should not fail to be present at
the organization meeting on
Wednesday, the 21st inst.
Dominion Timber Reserves
Mr. A. Knechtel: Inspector of
Dominion Forest Reserves, has
written an account of these reserves, which has been published as Bulletin No. 3 of the Fores-
tary Branch of the Interior.
Mr. Knechtel writes: "The
Dominion Forest Reserves are
intended to preserve and produce
a perpetual supply of timber for
tlie people of the prairie, the
homesteaders' needs being
considered of first importance.
They are not intended to furnish wood for the lumber trade.
Hence the policy of the Department is favorable to small mills
rather than to large ones
which need large tracts of forest
and manufacture lumber beyond
the needs of the settlers."
The areas of the different reserves are summarized as follows:���. -u
Manitoba (6 reserves) 3575J
sq. mis;
Saskatchewan (4 reserves) 740
sq. mis;
Alberta (6 reserves) 9702 sq.
nils;
British  Columbia  (10  reserves)
2295 sq mis.
Grazing will be allowed, under
certain restrictions, on those
portions of the reserves that are
adobted for this purpose. Grass
should not be allowed to go to
waste, the Inspector thinks.
Besides, grazing may even be
desirable on portions of the reserves, as the cattle will consume
the grass and peavine, which, if
dried, would be very inflammable. Besides the cattle, in going to water, make paths which,
narrow as they are, serve to
check any fire that may come
along that way and give lines
from which a back-fire may be
started.
The fire problem in the West
Mr. Knechtel shows to be one of
special difficuly, much more so
even than in the East. The
number of rainy days and the
amount of rainfall is show to be
much less in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba than in
Ontario. The velocity of the
wind, moreover, is about twice
as great in Winnipeg as in Toronto. The reserves are under constant patrol summer and winter.
Only two fires of any consequence occured in 1908. Of
these one in "The Pines" reserve
burned over 22 square miles but
destroyed no merchantable timber; the other, in the Turtle
Mountain Reserve, burned over
28 square miles, mostly covered
with grass. Both fires, however,
damaged large quanities of
young growth. Various methods employed to prevent fire,
such as the burning of file lines
and the plowing of fire guards
are mentioned. Roads through
the reserves and along their
bondaries are also being contracted, largely with this end in
view. One hundred and fifty
miles of such road were made
last year.
Experiments are being made
with a view to reforesting areas
on the reserves that have been
denuded by fire; sowing is favored rather than planting.
The species of timber growing
oil the reserves, with their average size and condition, are stated
and an approximate estimate
given of the timber on the different reserves. The estimates
total as follows:���
For Manitoba reserves, 602,-
933,000 bd. ft. of saw-timber
and 6,250,000 cords of fuel wood;
For the Saskatchewan reserves,. 55,000,000 bd. ft. of saw-
timber and 690,000 cords of fuel
wood;
For the Alberta reserves, 3,-
402,000,000 bd. ft. of saw-timber
and 54,220,000 cords of fuel wood;
For British Columbia reserves,
600,000,000 bd. ft. of saw-timber
and 6,000,000 cords of fuel wood.
The saw-timber cut from
the year ending 31st, March,
1909, totalled about 42, 751,325
board feet and the cordwood
105,943 cords.
The regulations for homesteader's permits for cutting on
the reserves are given in full.
Proposed regulations for portable
mills (the only kind to be allowed
on the reseaves) are also given.
The use of the reserves as
pleasure resorts is rlso noted.
The Bulletin is illustrated with
a number of good cuts. It may
be obtained by addressing R. H.
Cambell, Sperintendent of Fores-
tary, Ottawa, Ont.
DIRECTORY.
SEEDING TIME
PENTICTON
Seeding time is here and we are
prepared to supply your wants.
We have the Tools.
Rakes,
Hoes,
Spades,
Spading Forks,
Trowels.
We have the Seeds.
In Seeds we have a big line of the
most favorite varieties, selected by
the best seed houses in Canada.
Our stock extends to the field varieties, both vegetable and grass seeds.
Our prices in most cases same as the
seed houses and by buying from us
you save the transportation charges.
mmmiji-! ft^r.ff.a^fliiikaagLV.TVTsr'a
Poultry Netting
In 3 ft., 4 ft., 5 ft. and 6 ft. widths. Chicken Wire in the 3 ft. with
Mesh 1 x 1.
Screen Doors, and Screen Wire by the yard.
���i���i -1  H���paa^ngggBa
Barbed Wire
Special quotations on large quantities.
Hay and Feed
A car of each now on the way.       Feed is a good buy just now, as it is sure to
advance in price.
|    Population. ��(hj.   Area. 7,044 acres.    Maximum
temperature 1038, 96H F.;   minimum temperature
1908, ��� MtF.   Incorporated into a District Munici-
! pality Jan I. 19 9.    Located at suuth end of Ok-
j anugan Lake.    C mimunicutiun by C. P. R. Steam-
1 era on Okanagan Lake    Wagon road connects
, with SuuunerUnd on  west side of lake and all
polnta to the north ;  also with Naramata on east
I side of lake. Okanagan Palls, Fairview and Boundary country to the south, and all Similkameen
'��� points to the southwest.    The mildest climate in
i snada east of the coast.   Public school with four
departments.     Nursing Home.    Two nurseries.
; Chief industry, the growing of fruit, more particularly peaches and other tender kinds.    Twelve
hundred acres planted.    Excellent boating and
I bathing* In the summer.     Beautiful scenery.     A
��� sunny climate.    An ideal place to spend either the
! summer or winter months.
!     For business places see our advertising- columns.
MUNICIPAL COUNCIL
I Meets Thursday evenings in Council Room, Smith
���treet     A.   H.   Wade.   Reeve.     Chaa.   Were.
SCHOOL BOARD
j meets 1st Monday in each month at 8 p.m. R.
Wilton, Sec'y-Treas,
BOARD OF TRADE
j Annual general meeting;, 2nd Wednesday in January of each year. General quarterly meetings, 2nd Wednesdays In January, April. July
and October jit 8 p.m. Affiliated with Okanagan Hoards of Trade. J. J. Hunter, Pres.;
VV. F. H. Swinton, Sec'y.
CHURCH SERVICES
St. Saviour's Chinch, Fairview Avenue : Vicar.
R.-v. J. A. Cleland. Celebration of Holy Communion the 1st and 8rd Sundays of the month
after 11 o'clock matins; the 2nd Sunday at 8 a.
ni. Morning' prayer at 11 a.m. Evensong at
7:110 p.m.
Presbyterian services each Sunday in church at
11 a.m. ��ir 7:80 p.m.    Rev. Jus   Hood, pastor.
Baptist services each Sunday in church, at 11 a.
m. or 7:30 p. re.   Rev. A. F. Baker, pastor.
Presbyterian and Baptist services alternate,
morning; and evening".
Methodist services in church each Sunday at 11 a.
m. and 7:*) p.m.; Sunday School 2:45 p.m.
Prayer meeting's 8 p.m. on Wednesday. Rev.
R. W, Hibbert. pastor.
Young Peoples' Christian Union meets in the
Methodist church every Tuesday at 8 p.m.
SOCIETIES
A. F. & A. M. meet in Mason's Hall, Main St., 1st
Wednesday in each month at hi p.m.
W. O. W. meet In Woodmens' Hall, Ellis St., 2nd
and 4th Saturday in each month at 8 p.m.
I. O. O. F. meetin Odd  Fellows'  Hal!.  Main St.,
every Monday ut IS p.m.
L. O. L.  meet in Woodmen's Hall 2nd and 4th
Friday in each month at 8 p. m.
STAGES
Stage leaves for Keremeos, Hedley and Prince-
: ton, at 6 a. in. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Returns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Stage leaves for Fairview and Oroviile on Tues-
��� lays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a. m. Re-
; turns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at
i 'i p. m.
POST OFFICE
Hours 9 a. m. to ti. p. m.
Registered Letter and Money Order wicket
closes 5 p. m.
Wicket opened for half an hour after mail is
distributed.
Arrivals���Per Str,   Okanagan:    Daily   except
Sunday6 p.m.;   Per stage from Hedley,  Keremeos,   Olalla,  Allen   Grove,   Oroviile, Fairview,
and White Lake: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fri-w
days at 6 p. m.
Closing���For- boat and stages: 8 p. m. daily except Friday and Saturday. On Friday 9 p. m..and
tor Monday's boat and stages: 8.45 p. m. Sundays.
��� ^sis��uton4i^ ��� -ff--w.nnra.tfW'' ������>
Alabastine
Now is the time to brighten up, and there is nothing better for interior tinting
than Church's Alabastine.   We have it in all colors, at 50c. a package.
C. P. R. TIME TABLE
SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH
Daily both ways during summer except Sunday.
Str. Okanagan leaves Penticton 6 a. m.
Train arrives at Sicamous 6.15 p. m.
Train leaves Sicamous 9.25 a. m.
Str. Okanagan arrives at Penticton 6 p. m.
ngTMS
ZE25H
W. R. King & Co.
Phone 25. Ellis Street.
EaauBflBBBasaaa
Trees Trees Trees
-FROM-
Layritz Nurseries,
Victoria, B. C.
We have a fine stock of all the leading
varieties on hand.
All stock is propagated  from  fruiting
trees rendering practically no risk
regarding untrueness to name.
GIVE US A TRIAL - OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT.
Write for catalogue
and price list to our local representative
A. E. BOYER,
Kl<:i,OWNA,       -        B. C.
It Pays to Advertise
for the Spring Trade
cppr\c For the Farm,
3LLU3 Garden, Lawn,
or for the Conservatory.
Tested stock
From the best growers in England,   France,   Holland,   United
States and Canada.
Fruit and Ornamental Treps,
Small Fruits,       English Hollies,
Grown in the only part of the
American continent not infested
with the San Jose scale. Our
trees do not have t,o be fumigated
and consequently damaged.
M. J. HENRY,
Greenhouses  and Seedhouses--
3010 Westminster Road,
Vancouver, B. C.
\A/ E    PRINT
SALE BILLS
AND   PRINT   THEM   RIGHT
When You Want pri��ting: y��u
wantgood printing. That's the kind we do, and at the
,'.ght prices. Give the home printer the
came chance you would ask for the home
merchant���trade at home.
M. C. KENDALL,
Notary Public.
G. R. MASON.
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INSPECT
OUR   LISTS  FOR   BARGAINS  IN   RKAI.TY
Such as :
10 acres on main ditch $1,600.
10 acres, 5 in two year old trees, $2,400.
10 acres in bearing orchard, $4,800.
Fruit land in Penticton District is going to be the most
sought for in Canada.
6 acres on Townsite, $400 per acre.
23 acres, ideal locality for sub-division, $2,6oo.
These will nett you 25% per annum on the outlay.
Town Lots $25o to $l,ooo.
KENDALL & MASON.
HOTEL  PENTICTON.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.
RATES $2.50 PER DAY
A. Barnes       - -       Prop.
PENTICTON. B.C.
W. H. T. GAHAN
BARRISTER and SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
PENTICTON,      -       -       B.C.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
Notary Public.
KELOWNA,        - -        B. C
Dr.CA.JACKSON
DENTIST
S. O. Land Company's   Block
PENTICTON, B. C.
'Phone II.
CHAS. WERE
Accountant & Auditor,
Notary Public
PENTICTON, B. C.
The Brown Brothers Company
Nurserymen,   -   of Ontario
Are extensive growers of all kinda of Fruit. Trees, Shrubft, Roues, and Ornamental Trees, and
the members of the firm are all practical nurserymen of 25 years experience, and have built up
tho most successful and extensive business of the kind in Canada.
The growing Of the stock, as well as every other detail in connection with the work, is
personally superintended by the individual members of the firm, and they work on the plan that
the best is none too prood for their customers.
We have made large shipments of trees into the Okanagan Valley and can give the names
of the largest planters in that district, who have planted our stock successfully, if desired.
Our trees are grown in the famous Niagara district, in Ontario, in a climate very similar
to that of the Okanagan Valley, and our trees are consequently better suited to the needs of
planters there, than are the Coast stock, being more hardy in the wood, with a more abundant
supply of fibrous roots, which count for much in making an investment In an orchard a safe and
permanent one.
We shall be pleased to hear from prospective planters, with a view to supplying them wilh
the best grade of trees, true to name.
We wish to secure the services of a good reliable man to represent us at Penticton and
vicinity, and will make liberal terms to the right party, for all, or a part of his time.
Write for terms, prices, etc., to
CHAS. L. TROTTER, Manager,
Brown Brothers Company, Nurserymen, Ltd.,
1125 8th Ave., Vancouver, B. C.
Nursing Sister
f.A.HANCOCK,A.N.S.R.
C M. B., London, England.
Patients nursed in their own homes
or in the
NURSING HOME ON FAIRVIEW ROAD.
Terms :���$2 to $3 per day.
Telephone 33.
Harris
nursery co.,
Penticton.
Beautify your lot with some
of our shade trees.
We have Elm, Ash, Maple,
Catalpa, Mulberry, Black Walnut, and Ash Leaved Maple.
Some perennial shrubs and
apple trees left. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. APRIL 10, 1909.
The Spoilers
By REX E. BEACH.
��
Copyricht.       I C 0 5.      by      llei      E.      Heocli.
Bnt onee Hank���that's hi* real name
undertook to fry some slapjacks and in
givin' tbe sklllel :i heave, tbe dongh lit
among liis forest primeval, jest back
of liis ears, soft side down. Hani; polluted the gulch wilh laugwidge which
uo man bad ought to keep lu himself
without it was fumigated. Dlsrepplta-
bleness oozed out through him like
swe-t through a.i l?a pll her. an' rlnee
then he's lieen known as Slapjack
Siinius an' has kept his head shingled
smooth as a gun Liar'l. lie's a gooil
miner, though. Ain't none heller���an'
square as a die."
Sluicjng had begun on the Midas.
Long sinuous lengths of canvas hose
wound dowu the creek bottom from
the dam, like gigantic serpents, while
the roll of gravel through the flumes
mingled musically with tbe rush of
waters, tin; tinkle of tools and tho song
of steel on rock. There were four
"string:" of boxes abreast, and the
heaving line of shovelers ate rapidly
into the creek bed. while teams with
scrapers splashed through the tail races
n an atmosphere of softened profanity.
Iu the big white tents which sat uncle
from the bluffs, titty nieu of the night
shut were asleep, for there is no respite here���no night, no Sunday, no
h.Ut. during the hundred days iu which
i!il" nortbland lends herself to pillage.
The mine lay cradled between wonderful, mossy, willow mottled mountains, while above aud below the gulch
wjj dotted with tents aud huts, uud
everywhere, from basin lo hill crest,
men dug nnd blasted, jiuully. patiently,
while their tracks grew daily plainer
over tlie face of this inscrutable wilderness.
A great contentment filled the two
partners ns they looked ou this scene.
To wrest from reluctant earth her
richest treasures, to add to the wealth
of the world, to create���here was satisfaction.
"We ain't robhin' no widders an'
orphans doin' it, neither," Dextry suddenly remarked, expressing his partner's feelings closely. They looked nt
each other and smiled with thnt rare
understanding that exceeds words.
Descending into the cut, the old man
filled a gold pan with dirt taken from
under the feet of the workers and
washed It In a puddle, while the other
watched his dexterous whirling motions. When he had finished they
poked the stream of yellow grains into
a pile; then, with heads together,
guessed its weight, laughing again delightedly, in perfect harmony and cou-
lentment.
"I've been wnltin' a turrlble time fer
this day." said  the elder.    "I've suf-
I
"/'dc been waitiu' a turrlble time fer
this (/ui/."
fered the plagues of prospectin' from
the Mexlcos to the Circle, an' yet I
don't begretcb It none now that I've
struck pay."
While they spoke two miners struggled with a bowlder they had unearth,
ed and, having scraped and washed It
carefully, staggered back to place it ou
the cleaned bedrock behind. One of
them slipped, and It crashed against ,-i
brace which held the sluices In place.
These boxes stand more than a man's
height above the bedrock, resting on
supporting posts nud running full of
iviitcr. Should ii sluice fall the rushing stream carries out the gold which
das lodged In the rifiles and floods the
bedrock, raising havoc. Too Inte the
ourtners saw the string of boxes sway
and lieud ai (In joini, men, bel ore
they could reach ihe threatened spot
to support II. Slapjack Kininis. wilh a
shriek, plunged flapping dowu into the
cut and seized llie Hume His grant
height stood liini in good stead now,
for where the joint ha 1 opened water
poured forth in a cataract. He dived
under the breach unhesitatingly and.
stooping, lifted the line as near to Its
former level as possible, holding the
entire burden upon bis naked pate.
He gesticulated wildly Tor help,
while over him poured the deluge of
icy. muddy water. It entered his gaping waistband, bulging out his yellow
trousers till they were fat nnd full and
the seams were bursting, while his
yawning boot tops became as boiling
springs. Meanwhile he chattered forth
profanity In such volume that the ear
ached under It ns must hnve ached tlie
heroic Slapjack under the chill of the
melting snow He was relieved quickly, however, and emerged triumphant,
though blue and puckered, his wilderness, of whiskers streaming like limber
stalactites, bis boots loosely "squish
ing." while oaths still poured from him
i In sucb profusion that Iiexlry wills-
I pered:
"Ain't be a ring tailed wonder? It's
plumb solemn an' reverent the way he
makes them unturned cuss words sit
up an' lies: It's a privilege to be present.   That's a gift, tbat Is."
"You'd better get some dry clothes,"
thev suggested, and Slapjack proceeded a lew puces toward the tents, nob-
Ming as though treading on pounded
glass
"Ow-w!" he yelled. "These blasted
bouts Is full of gravel."
Me sealed himself nud tugged nt his
foot till the boot enme away with a
sucking sound; theu. Instead of emptying the accumulation at random, he
poured the contents Into Dextry's empty gold pan. rinsing It out carefully
The other boot he emptied likewise
They held a surprising amount of sediment, because the stream that had
emerged from the crack iu the sluices
had curried with it pebbles, snnd aud
all the concentration of the riffles ut
this point. Stnndii.g directly beneath
the cataract, most of It had dived fairly into bis inviting waistband, following down the lines of least resistance
into his boot legs nud boiling out nl
tlie knees.
"Wash thnt." he said. "You're apt
to get a prospect."
With artful [lasses Pextry settled it
In the pnn bottom nnd washed away
th�� gravel, leaving a yellow glittering
pile which raised a yell from the men.
who hnd lingered curiously.
"He puns $40 to the boot leg," one
shouted.
"How much do you run to the foot.
Slapjack';"
"He's a reg'lar free milling ledge."
"No. he ain't: he's too thin. He's
nothing but a stringer, but he'll pay to
work."
The old miner grinned toothlessly.
"Gentlemen, there ain't no better
way to snve fine gold thnn with under
currents nu' blanket riilles. I'll have
to wash these garments of mint' an'
clean up the soapsuds 'cause there's a
hundred dollars In gold dust cllngln
to my person this minute." He went
dripping up the bank, while the men
returned to their work singing.
After lunch Dextry saddled his
broncho.
"I'm goin' to town for a pulr of gold
scales, but I'll be back by supper; then
we'll clean up between shifts. She'd
ought to give us a thousand ounces the
way thnt ground prospects." He loped
down the gulch, while his partner returned to the pit. the Hushing shovel
blades nnd the rumbling undertone,of
the big workings that so fascinated
him.
It wns perhaps 4 o'clock when he
was aroused from his labors by a shout
from the bunk tent, where a group of
horsemen had clustered. As Glenlster
drew near he saw among them Wilton
Struve. the lawyer, nnd the big, well
dressed tenderfoot of the Northern.
McNamara. the man of the heavy
hand. Struve straightway engaged
bim.
"Say. Olenlster, we've come out to
see nbout the title to this claim."
"What nbout  It?"
"Well. It was relocated about a
month ago."    He paused.
"Yes.    What of that?"
"Galloway has commenced suit."
"The ground lielongs to Dextry and
me. We discovered It. we opened It
up. we've complied with the law, und
we're going lo hold It." Glenister
spoke with such conviction nnd bent ns
to nonplus Struve. but McNamara. who
bad sat his horse silently until now.
answered:
"Certainly, sir; If your title Is good
you will be protected, but the law
has arrived In Alaska nnd we've got
to let It take Its course. There's no
need of violence-none whatever���but.
briefly, the situation Is this: Mr. Galloway bus commenced action against
yon. the court has enjoined you from
working and lias appointed me ns receiver to operate the mine until the
suit Is settled. It's an extraordinary
procedure, of course, but the conditions are extraordinary In this country.
The season is so short thai it would be
unjust to the rightful owner If the
claim lay Idle all summer, so to avoid
that I've been put in charge, with Instructions to operate It and preserve
the proceeds subject to the court's order. Mr. Voorhees here is the United
States marshal. He will serve the
papers."
Olenlster threw up his hand in a gesture of restraint.
"Hold on! Do you mean to tell me
that any court would recognize such a
claim as Calloway's?"
"The law recognizes everything. If
his grounds are no good, so much Ihe
better for you."
"You can't put In a receiver without
notice to us. Why. good Lord, we never henrd of a suit being commenced.
We've never even been served with a
uiininons. nnd we haven't had a
���hunce to argue In our own defense."
"1 have Just suld that tills is a remarkable state of affairs and unusual
ictlon had to be taken." McNumuiu re
plied, lint tlie young miner grew ex-
������I ted.
"Look here, this gold won't get
iwuyi l*'s safe In tlie ground. We'll
Mock off w*rk and let the claim Me
Idle till the thing Is settled.    You can't
really expect us to surrender possession of our mine on the mere allega
tion of some unknown man. That's
ridiculous. We won't do it. Why.
you'll have to let us argue our case
at least before you try to put us off."
Voorhees shook his bead. "We'll
have to follow Instructions. Tbe thing
for you to do is to uppeur before tbe
court tomorrow and have the receiver
dismissed. If your title is as good as
you say it Is, you wou't have any trouble."
"You're not the only ones to suffer,"
i odded McNamara.    "We've taken |ios-
session of all tlie miues below bere."
He nodded down the gulch.    "I'm an
ollicer of the court aud under bond"���
"How much?"
"Five thousand dollars for eacb
claim "
"What? Why. heavens, man. the
poorest of these mines is producing
that much every day!"
While he spoke Olenlster was rapidly debating whnt course to follow.
"The place to argue this thing Is before Judge Stillnian." snld Struve, bnt
with little notion "f the conflict goin-.'
on within Olenlster. The youth yearned to light, not with words nor quibbles nor legal phrases, but with steel
and blows. And he felt that the impulse was as righteous ns It was natural, for he knew this process was unjust, nn outrage. Mexico Mnlllns'
warning recurred to him. And yet-
Up shifted slowly as he talked till his
hack wns to the door of the big tent.
They were watching him carefully, for
all their apparent languor nnd looseness in saddle; then, as he started to
leap Within and rally his henchmen,
his mind went hack to the words of
Judge stillnian and his niece. Surely
that old man was on the square. He
couldn't be otherwise with her beside
hlin. believing lu him, and u suspicion
of deeper [dots behind these actions
was groundless. So far all was legal,
he supposed, with lib' scant knowledge
of law though Ihe methods seemed
unreasonable. The men might be doing what they thought to be right
Why be the first to resist? The men
on the mines below hud not done so
The title to this ground wns capable
of such easy proof thut be and Dex
need have no uneasiness. Courts do
not rob honest people nowadays, he
lirgped, and, moreover, perhaps the
girl's words were true; perhaps she
would think more of him if he gave up
the old fighting ways for her snke.
Certainly armed resistance to her uncle's lirst edict would not please ber.
She had snld he wns too violent, so he
would show her he could lay his snv-
agery aside. She might smile on him
approvingly,.and that wns worth taking u chance for. Anyway It would
mean but a few days' delay in the
mine's run. As he reasoned he heard
a low voice speaking within the open
door.    It wns Slapjack Simula.
"Step aside, lad. I've got the big un
covered."
Olenlster Raw the men on horseback
snatch at their holsters nnd Just In
time leaped nt his foreman, for the old
man hud moved out Into the open, a
Winchester ut shoulder, his cheek cuddling the stock, his eyes cold and narrow The young man flung the barrel
up and wrenched the weapon from his
hands.
"None of thnt, Hank!" he cried
sharply. "I'll say when lo shoot." He
turned to look Into the muzzles of
guns held in tlie hands of every horseman���every horseman save one, for
Alec McNamara sat unmoved, his
handsome features, nonchalant and
amused, noddiug approvul. It was nt
biiii that Hunk's weapon had been
leveled.
"This Is bad enough nt the best.
Don't let's make it any worse," said
he.
Slapjack Inhaled deeply, spat with
disgust and looked over bis boss incredulously.
"Well, of all the different kinds of
blame fools." he snorted, "you are tbe
kindest!" He marched past the mnr-
shal nnd his deputies down to tbe cut.
put on bis cont nnd vanished down the
trail toward town, not deigning a
backward glance either at tbe mine or
at the mnn unfit to tight for.
CHAPTEH VII.
L\TE In July it grows dark as midnight approaches, so that the
many lights from doorway nnd
* window seem less garish nnd
strange than they do a mouth earlier.
lu the Northern there was good business doing. The new bar fixtures,
which had cost a king's ransom or
represented tlie one night's losings of
a Klondike millionaire, shone rich,
dark and enticing, while the cut glass
sparkled with Iridescent hues, reflecting in u measure tlie prismatic moods,
the dunclng spirits of the crowd thnt
crushed past, halting ut Hie gambliug
games or patronizing the theater iu
the rear. The old bur furniture,
brought down by dog team from "up
river," wus established ut the rear extremity of the long building. Just inside the entrance to the dance hall,
where patrons of the drama might,
with a modicum of delay aud iueon
venieuce. quaff as deeply of the bea
ker us of the ballet.
Now. however, the show had closed,
the hall bnd been cleared of chnirs
und canvas, exposing a glassy, tempting surface, nnd tlie orchestra had
moved to the Rttisre. They played n
rollicking, blood stirring twostep, while
the floor swain with dancers.
At certain Intervals the musicians
worked feverishly up to a crashing
crescendo, suuuorted by the voices of
lie u,Ulcers, until all joined at the top
iote in a yell, while the drummer
lri'd a forty-four Colt Into a box of
vet sawdust beside his chair���all in
dine, nil lu tlie swinging spirit of tbe
line.
The men, who were mostly young,
lanced like college boys, while the wo-
nen,  who  were  nil  young  and  good
ancers, floated through the uiensures
villi the ease of ruse leaves ou a suin-
il'.er stream.    I'aces were flushed, eves
FOR SALE.
Bronze Turkey eggs for hatching $2. ���
25 per setting of 11 eggs. Call on or
send to
C. F- RANDOLPH
36-4 Penticton B. C.
FOR SALE
Lots 22 and 23, Block 9, corner Main
St. and Fairview Ave., Penticton.
Price $1,000; $500 cash, balance terms.
38-4 P. O. CLAASSKN,
Box 1412, Edmonton. Alta.
NOTICE
Now is the time to buy your Tomato
Seed.   Canning varieties a specialty.
Send for catalogue of seeds and fruit
ROSEFIELD NURSERY,
32-8 Gellatly, B. C.
Furniture Bargains
At STEWARD'S
Having rented part of my store, I need more space.
In order to get this I am offering
LIBERAL DISCOUNTS FOR TWO WEEKS.
Call in and be convinced.
NOTE ���We will duplicate the prices of any responsible mail order
house, or do better, if possible.
Picture Framing a Specialty.
Phone No. 9.
were bright, and bin rarely a voice
i sounded that was not glad Most of
the noise came from tie.' men. and. al
though one caught here and there u
bint of haggard lines about the girlish
faces and gliinp \:\ occasional eyes
thut did not smile, yet us a whole tlie
scene was one of genuine enjoyment.
Suddenly the music ceased, aud the
couples crowded to the liar Tile women look harmless drinks, llie men mostly whisky. Rarely was the choice of
potations criticised, though occasionally some ruddy eschewer of sobriety insisted that bis lady "take tlie same."
avowing that "hootch," having been
demonstrated beneficial In his case.
was good for her also. Invariably the
lady accepted without'dispute, and Invariably the man failed to note her
glance nt the bartender or the silent
substitution by that capable person of
ginger nle for whisky or of plain water for gin. In turn tlie mixers collected $1 from each mnn, flipping to the
girl n metnl percentage check, which
she ndded to ber store. In the curtained boxes overhead men bought bottles I
with foil about the corks, and then j
subterfuge on the lady's part was idle. !
but. on the other hand, she was able to !
pocket for each bottle a check redeemable at $5.
A stranger straight from the east
would have remarked first upon the
good music, next upon the good looks
of the women nnd then upon the shabby clothes of the men. for some of
them were in "mukluk." others In
sweaters with huge iuitinls nnd winged emblems, und all were collarless.
Outside in tlie main gambling room
there were but few women. Men
crowded in den-' masses about the
faro layout, the wheel, craps, the Klondike game, pnuglngl and the card tables. They talked of business, of
home, of women, bought and sold
mines and bartered all things from
hams to honor, The groomed aud
clean, the unkempt and filthy jostled
shoulder to shoulder, equally affected
by the license of the gold fields and the
exhilaration of the new. The mystery
of the north bad touched them all. The
g'.nd, bright wine of adventure filled
their veins, nnd they spoke mightily of
things they had resolved to do. or recounted with simple diffidence the
strange stories of their accomplishment.
The Rronco Kid. familiar from Atlin
to Nome us the best "bank" dealer 0:1
the Ynkou. worked the shift from 8 till
2. Hi- was u slender man of thirty,
dexterous in movement, slow to smile,
soft of voice and known us n living
flame among women. He hud dealt
the biggest games of the early days
and hud no enemies. Yet, though
many called bim friend, tbey wondered
,'nwurdly.
It wus a strong piny the Kid had
tonight, for Swede Sam of Dawson
ventured many stacks of yellow chips,
uud he was a quick, aggressive gambler. A Jew sat at the king end with
ten neatly creased $1.00(1 bills before
bim. together wilh piles of smaller currency, He adventured viciously and
without system, while outsiders to the
number of four or Hve cut In sporadically with small bets. The game was
difficult to follow, consequently the
lookout, from bis raised dais, was leaning forward, chili in baud, while the
group was hedged about by eager onlookers.
r'aro Is a closed book to most people,
for Its Intricacies are confusing. Lucky
is be who has never persevered In solv-
Ing its mysteries nor speculated upon
the "systems" of beating it. I-Toni
those who have learned It. the game demands practice, dexterity and cool
uess. The dealer must run the cards,
watch tbe many shirting bets, bundle
the neatly piled checks, figure light
uinglike the profits and losses. It was
his unerring, clocklike regularity l;i this
that had won the Kid his reputation.
This night tils powers were taxed. lie
dealt silently, scowllugly, bis long white
lingers nervously caressing the cards.
This preoccupation prevented his no
tlclng the rustle uud stir of a newcomer who bud crowded up behind him
until he caught the wondering glances
of those In front uud saw that the
Israelite wns staring past him, his
mouey forgotten, his eyes beady nud
shurp. his ratlike teeth showing lu a
grin of admiration. Swede Sum glared
from under his unkempt shock uud felt
uncertainly toward tlie opeu collar of
his flannel shirt where a kerchief
should hnve beeu. The men who were
standing gazed at the newcomer, some
with surprise, others with u half smile
of recognition.
Bronco glanced quickly over his
shoulder, nnd ns he did so the breath
caught In his throat, but for only an
instant. A girl stood so close beside
bim that the luce of her gown brushed
his sleeve. He was shuffling nt the
moment nnd dropped a card, then nod
ded to ber, speaking quietly as be
stooped to regain the pasteboard:
"Howdy, Cherry?"
(To be continued.)
-GARDEN   TOOLS-
Lawn Sprinklers.        Rubber Hose.        Sheet Packing.
White Lead, Oil, Mixed Paints, Agate Wall Finish.
BRUSHES FOR EVERY PURPOSE.
PENTICTON   HARDWARE  CO.
I     MONEY TO LOAN    )
fi
Finish, enlarge, or improve your home?   T
\W/\ tf/Wi ttfrtnl- l"/\   Own your home instead of paying rent?   J
uo you want to zszzw���     \
I
1
1
Finish, enlarge, or improve your home?
Own your home instead of paying rent?
Build a house on your lot?
Improve your lot ?
Pay off an existing encumbrance ?
If so, the easiest and best way is to secure a loan from the
B. G. PERMANENT
LOAN & SAVINGS GO.,
Of Vancouver, ' 'The Great Company of the Great West.''
Their rate is 9 per cent.; loans are repayable monthly at a minimum
rate of $1.25 for each $100 borrowed; Interest stopped on each $100 of
the principal repaid.
For full particulars watch this space, or see
JAS. E. TUPPER,      Agent and Collector.
fA.NA/A^
~*'A��m-
��*��-
S. GRAY
Wishes to announce that he is opening a
Photographic Studio
In the Rowcliffe Block
KELOWNA
-ABOUT MAY lst-
Twenty-five years' experience in Portraiture has enabled him to attain success in this branch.   The
latest styles in mounts will be kept in stock.
THE
PENTICTON DAIRY
Daily delivery of Fresh Milk to
all parts of the town.
H. JVL McNeill,    .     Prop.
E. J. FINGH
Painter, Paperhanger
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a Specialty.
WALL PAPER Carried in Stock.
MAIN STREET.
SowSutton'sSeeds
Write to-day for catalogue.
| The Brackman-Ker Milling Co., Ltd.,
30tf Vancouver, B. C.
NOTICE
Similkameen Division of Yale District.
Take Notice that Alexander Henry
Steven, of Summerland, in the province
of British Columbia, occupation Accountant, intends to apply for permission to purchase tho following described
lands: ���
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of lot number 104 S,
thence south 80 chains; thence west 20
chains; thence north 80 chains; thence
east 20 chains to the point of commencement, and containing one hundred and
sixty acres, more or less.
ALEXANDER HENRY STEVEN.
Summerland, 24th March, 1909.
FOR SALE
Business block on Main Street; two
storey with two compartments downstairs and hall upstairs, $2,500. Lot 63,
seven and one-half acres on Fairview
Road, $2,200. J. D. McDonald,
12-tf Potlatch, Idaho.
JUST ARRIVED
Another car of
McLaughlin    Carriages
Also a
Car of Cockshutt  Goods
Comprising the following :���
Adams'   Log   Trucks,   Adams'
Teaming Trucks,   Adams' one-
horse   Wagons   (low   wheels),
Adams' Lorries and Drays.
Cockshutt 3, 2,   and  1-horse
Plows.
Cockshutt Drag and Lever and
Spring-Tooth Harrows.
Cockshutt Wheel Scrapers and
Drag Scrapers.
Cockshutt 1-horse Cultivators.
Cockshutt Potato Diggers.
Also Bolster Springs, Light and
Heavy Harness, Sharpies Cream
Separators, I. H. C. Gas Engines,
Ideal Pumping Plants, etc.
Call and Inspect our Stock.
S. T. ELLIOTT,
KELOWNA, B. C.
SPRING & SUMMER
HATS
NEW  STOCK  WILL   BE
OPENED
The 1st of March.
Samuel St. Onge. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C., APRIL 10, 1909.
��� .��-*
PEACHLAND.
Mr. and Mrs. Robinson, who
have been spending the winter
with their daughter, Mrs. Seaton,
returned to their home in Brandon, Man,, on Thursday morning.
Miss Leone Morrison returned
from Summerland on Saturday
morning.
Mrs. R. C. Lipsett, of Summerland, is in town visiting her
sister, Mrs. J. B. Robinson.
Messrs. Eyre and Cuthill are
erecting a building on Beach
Avenue where they will in future
carry on a flour and feed business.
Miss Adelaide Hayward, of
Naramata, is in town, the guest
of her sister, Mrs. Jack Wright.
Mr. and Mrs. H. McCall have
moved into Dr. Aitkins' house
on his ten acre lot.
Rev. T. N. Ritchie has gone to
Calgary on a business trip. He
intends to be away about ten
days.
Miss Candace McDougald was
a passenger to Summerland on
Friday night, returning Tuesday
mor nine.
M. N. Morrison is improving
the appearance of his place by
grading and terracing.
Mrs, Thompson Elliott entertained the Ladies' Aid on Tuesday afternoon.
Mr. C. G. Elliott journeyed to
Summerland on Monday night to
get some of his horses out of the
pound there. Not being able to
return till the next day at noon,
his place in school was filled by
Rev. J. J. Nixon.
Miss McDougald. of Summer-
land College, returned to her
home here to spend the Easter
holidays with her mother.
On Tuesday evening a farewell
social was given to Mr. Murray,
who is leaving for Banff to spend
the summer. Every one regrets
that the health of Mr. Murray
will not permit him to stay and
c mtinue his duties as principal
of the school. Addresses were
given by representatives of the
various institutions and were re-
s londed to in a feeling and able
minner. Mr. Murray left on
Siturday's boat, and intends
spending a couple of days at
Kelowna and Vancouver before
resuming his journey.
Miss S. Sharpe, who has been
i 1 the Kelowna hospital, returned
on Monday night much improved
in health.
X x
SAtfc*,; 7Ac Jf.'.,,' ,:>/:f>  sf..-s*T,
/���', .-r.ff. a .??,',������ </i:z-
���ry,
No other so-called High Grade Tea is
half so satisfying as RIDGWAYS-over
seventy years' reputation for quality
und flavor. '
for Sale by A. H. WADE.
WINDEMERE
NURSERIES
Wilmer, B. C.
HAVE LIMITED NUMBER OF
HARDY
APPIJG TREES
Prices==
"A" GRADE    =    25c.
"B" GRADE    -    20c.
F.O.B. Golden.
All Stock True to Name.
ADDRESS ALL ORDERS AS ABOVE.
CHAS. I BURTCH
Butcher
WHOLESALE   ar.d   RETAIL
Goods delivered to any part
of the town daily.
Prompt attention given to mail
ORDERS.
Phone 21. P. 0. Box 20?.
The Southern Okanagan Land
Company, Limite
LANDS
Our Irrigation system having been completed for
the Lake Skaha benches we are now offering under this
water system some 300 acres in five and ten acre tracts,
at $100.00 to $150.00 per acre.
On the Penticton benches we still have for sale
irrigated about 160 acres, at from $100. oo to $125. oo per
acre. All our bench lands are admirably adapted for
fruit.
On the Penticton flats we have open clean meadow
suitable for small fruits, vegetable and hay, at $150. oo
per acre.
Uncleared land suitable for fruit [but stoney and
wooded] $5o.oo to $loo.oo per acre.
Uncleared land quite free of stone, suitable for
hay or garden stuff, lloo.oo per acre.
Terms on all the above one quarter down, one
quarter each year with interest at 6 per cent, on deferred
payments.
ACRE LOTS
In Penticton and on Okanagan Lake Beach $3oo.oo
to $45o.oo.       On Lake Skaha Beach $4oo.oo.
TOWN LOTS
We have a great many excellent buys in town
property (business and residential). Anything we show
you will advance in value 5o per cent, within a year.
Get in now, you can make money and take no chances by
purchasing our lands.
A   MAN
Who does not carry Fire Insurance is not a business man,
but a very poor speculator. WE represent the strongest
Companies in the world.
In case of death are you satisfied as to the future
welfare of your family ? Can they carry your assets on
until such time when they can be disposed of at the figure
you value them at present? Or is it to be a case of forced
sale and loss of money ? Let us show you how to protect
them.
The Records of the Royal Life Insurance Co., of
London, England, are unsurpassed by Consols.
MONEY   TO   LOAN.
KENDALL & MASON.
Eggs For Hatching
From Northup's Prize
Winning Laying Strain
SINGLE COMB
BLACK MINORCAS
This Pen, that is headed bv a prize-
winning male, imported, from the
above strain, is not any experiment, but have proven their egg-
producing qualities in size and
number.
LIMITED NUMBER OF SITTINGS
FOR SALE AT
$2.00   -   3 for $5.00.
Be Satisfied with only the Best
J. S. HEALES.
-6V
ri
�� MUSIC HATH CHARMS
To soothe the savage breast, but
SOVEREIGN   BRAND   CLOTHING
is the best thing to cover it with.
OUR
Sovereign Brand Spring Suits
Are attracting a great deal of attention from both men and women.
The men have particularly noted that the
Material and Workmanship
Put into these suits
Are of the Highest Class
And that they are the
Most reasonably priced Suits in town.
The women recognize that a Sovereign Brand suit is the most attractive thing
a man can get himself into.
The suits that are attracting the most attention are not the highest priced.
They are marked at $20 and are equal to $30 suits
They are certainly handsome and are sure to be all sold before the season
gets properly started.
Do you use
The Loose Leaf System
There are many other lines to choose from, both
two and three=piece suits, with prices ranging
from $7.25 to $23.50 per suit.
COME TO EXAMINE AND COMPARE.
YOU ARE ALWAYS WELCOME.
A. H. WADE
i General Merchant. Phone 6.
Of Book-keeping ?
The PRESS is making preparations to meet all
requirements of the trade in that line.
We keep on hand a large stock of Stationery
and are prepared to print anything from a visiting
card to a full sheet poster.
Our prices are as low, and, in many instances,
lower than those of reputable printing firms at the
coast.
Work done promptly, and satisfaction guaranteed.   Get your orders in as early as you can.
Advertising
Hundreds of copies of the PRESS are sent out of
town every week. People at a distance size up the business interests of a place by the advertising columns of the
local paper. It is the only way they can do it. We are
at present advertising all the churches, secret societies,
Municipal Council, School Board, Board of Trade, stage
routes, pest offlc e hours and C. P. R. time table, free of
charge, and wou Id gladly advertise every business firm in
town the same v. 'ay, if we could, but we cannot do it because it takes mi ��ney to run a paper. It costs more to
carry an advertis aneirt in the PRESS than in the post
office, but we are cc nvinced that the PRESS will give the
better returns. We are doing everything in our power to
forward the inteL\5st& of the town, and guarantee to turn
out the very be? t paper that can be turned out with the
financial support received.
Circulation
There ar'a only two or three people anywhere in the
district who ai e not subscribers for the PRESS. What
wouldn't we sa orifice if they could only be added to our
list ? The subs sription is one dollar per year. It is worth
that to light the fire with.
Th c Penticton Press
��-*WiW..**,.        U. i    I   -ii q1 -

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