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The Penticton Press Oct 31, 1908

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 X*A#k  *C?
^   *Cs
t ><2A*n^.��.A
s
^be   Jbenttcton
VOL. 3.   No. 16.
PENTICTON, B.C., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 31, 11)08.
(ojfr.00 Per Year In Advice
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
HEAD  OFFICE. TORONTO ESTABLISHED  1807
B. E. WALKER, President Paid-Up Capital, $10,000,000
ALEX. LAIRD, General KanaSer ;  Reserve Fund, -       5.CO0.O0O
Branches throughout Canada, and in the United States and England
BANK HONEY ORDERS
IIS Til AT THE   Ful.LOWING RATfcS;
55 nnd ui.' 'el        3 rer'.s
Cver 55 and net exceeding $10         6 cents
"   $10        " " $30       10 cents
"   $30        " " $50       15 cents
These Orders are payable al par al every office of a Chartered Bank in Canada
(Yukon excepted), and al the principal banking points in the United States. They
are negotiable at $4.90 i< the /,' slerling: in Great Hiitain ami Ireland.
They form an excellent rrchud cf reniitlirp small sums of money with safety and
at small cost, and may be obtained witnout delay. 111!
Penticton Branch     =    =    J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
<��i2��@����@^��<��^��
DUNCAN ROSS
Presents   Government   Side   of
Issue in Federal Campaign.
Makes Serious Charges Against
Bowser.
A. B. Campbell.
A. E. Kay.
9
Campbell �� Kay if
\$J (Successors to Penticton Lumber Syndicate)      \^n
i GET OUR PRICES BEFORE BUYING. ��
�� A NICE LOT OF DRY CLEAR LUMBER           W)
C\f ALWAYS ON HAND.                            %J,
��� Bill Stuff a Specialty.         &
rat ^m* tt ^m* tt <^m> tt ^m* t2t~mm~tt -^�� o^��w "^ t m
*f \V/E want the Cash Trade, and to  secure  it  will give  one  Photo ���>
1 ^A/     Coupon on our famous Cosmos Studios for every 25e.  purchase J
# Y T      (with the exception of our Weekly Bargains)   160 coupons will f
f entitle bearer to 12 Photos of himself, and 1 Enlargement free. f
JE.S.LAKE&C0.|
f MAIN   STREET   CASH   GROCERS. f
��     \\/���~1,l_, Ontario Cheese 18c per lb ���>
���j Weekly     as*    's-f-zuwej, ���.
/ Bargains   ��T"   :    EE:i I \M I
|fc Ciround Cloves.  10c jh
EU *mm, tt ^m* tt ^m* tf^Kr^W -^. 11 -����. tt <^m, 103
JUST RECEIVED
A large consignment of
Single and Double
Light and Heavy HARNESS
Express and Driving
KENT & SON
F
���:
���:
���:
���:
P> ^Pv ^w* ^> ^* "^^ '^* vta* vm7* *���> ^> vWk* v^* %*%���> *^? v^ *&a> *^s i^r *^ <^r> <T>WV> tiVvvV&i
COMMERCIAL
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
DIGNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors.
If you /ant a Stylish Outfit, this is the place to come. You can always
get teams just when you want them. We make a specialty of keeping
good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack horses.
We are also putting in Hay and drain for sale, and as we huy for cash
we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit.
Special  Attention  To The   Wonts Of  Commercial  Men.
��� "A> '^> 'A> 'A> 'A��A�� '-AN <,
'AX'AX2'A��'AX'AV'AZ'A)i'A��'A��'AVAii-'M'AV
.\ >A> /A. <A> ^A> <A> '.
Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
Stage Connects with Steamer "Okanagan" at Penticton, with Great Northern
Railway at Keremeos, and with stage to Medley and Princeton, Leaves at (ia.ri
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,  and a general Drayin^
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.       Penticton
Penticton Store
Alfred H. Wade, Prop.
Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, Groceries
and General Merchandize of all Sorts
A rent for    GIANT P0WDER co-
/\gCIIl lor      OKANAGAN FLOUR MILLS CO.
Goods delivered through the town. Prompt attention to orders.
PENTICTON,        -        - B.C.
i :HL$i3ZEx ma ������ ������ ���
Senator Bostock also Speaks.
Before a large gathering of
voters and others, among whom
were a considerable number of
ladies, Duncan Ross, Liberal candidate for Yale-Cariboo, and Senator Bostock dealt with the issues
that are before the public in this
campaign.
F. H. Latimer, president of
the Liberal association, acted as
chairman and in a few remarks
introduced the speakers.
Senator Bostock first addressed
the meeting speaking for about
twenty minutes. He commented
upon the return of the Liberal
party due to its policy of development since coming into power.
He touched upon the construction of the G. T. P. and the establishment of a closer steamship service with the Old Country as factors in the development
of the country. He could not
understand the criticism by the
Opposition of the cost of construction of the G. T. P., considering the immense benefit to be
derived from the road. The
country had enjoyed a period of
prosperity ever since the Liberals
had come into power and the outlook for the future was very
bri ?ht.
Previous to 1906 there had
been no railway commission in
Canada, and since its establishment ths commission had done
much to secure better rates. The
commission hai since been enlarged to include telegraph and
telephone lines.
Mr. Bostock then touched upon
the postal service, stating that,
although the rates had been reduced upon letters and newspapers, there was still a surplus
in that department. Rural mail
delivery was being introduced in
the east, and the system would
be extended.
The Government had done a
great deal for the benefit of the
mineral industry by the establishment of a department of
mines. The resources of the
province were now receiving advertising that would undoubtedly result in the bringing of capital into the province.
Mr. Ross in rising to speak
pail a tributs to the ladies
present adding that he only
wi shed that the ladies could vote
as he knew they would all vote
for him. He had been asked by
the ladies of the W. C. T. U. to
mike certain pledges but he had
refused to do so as he did not believe in pledging himself immediately before an election.
Some time was employed by
the speaker in answering remarks made by Martin Burrell.
Mr. Burrell had said that he had
neglected his duty to his constituents when the tariff, including
that on fruit, was being revised,
by leaving Ottawa and taking
part in the provincial campaign.
This was incorrect, as the tariff
had been revised in 1906 and the
provincial elections took place in
1907. Besides this he considered
.hat results had warranted his
taking part in the B. C. campaign, the number of Conservative members being reduced from
seven to four.
Mr. Ross was entirely in accord with the Aylesworth Election Bill, the provisions of which
the Opposition had succeeded in
compelling the Government to
modify. There were lots of
people who should have had the
opportunity of exercising the
franchise, bt t who were not on
the voters' list.   The bill would
j have given them that opportun-
i ity.   The lists were compiled at
I present   by   the officers of  the
i provincial governments. In Manitoba, British Columbia and  unorganized portions of Ontario the
Dominion   constituencies    overlapped the provincial constituencies,   the  boundaries  not  being
' identical.    Consequently the thin
red line had to be used in cutting
out names that were not entitled
; to vote in certain Dominion  constituencies.   The Aylesworth Bill
would have obviated  the   necessity for this.    He asserted   thai
two hundred and fifty names had
been struck off the voters' list at
Revelstoke,   and  the same  was
true of other places.    As this  is
a Dominion  election,   Mr.   Ross
thought the   Dominion  government should have the say  as  to
who should vote.
Tlie Opposition had stooped to
a campaign of scandal and had
not attempted to back up their
charges by evidence. The Conservatives had the same machinery for investigation as the Liberals had before 1890, and yet
the Liberals had proved their
charges.
Under Conservative rule the
Northwest had not been a fit
place to live in, and the people
were going out faster than they
were coming in. Under Liberal
rule the country was being rapidly settled. The Conservatives
had given away 35,000,000 acres
of land to the C. P. Ii., while the
Liberals had given away none.
The Conservatives had given
away timber lands without money and without price. The Liberals had never sold any except
to the highest tender in open
market. Both Sifton and Martin
had invested in lands in the
Northwest under Conservative
rule and had gone broke. Martin had come to B. C. broke, and
if Sifton had made money, it was
due to his good administration
enhancing the value of his
property.
Taking up the subject of better
terms for this province Mr. Ross
took a different view of the question from that usually advanced.
He said that the Conservatives
claimed that $19,000,000 was due
the province from the Dominion.
Since confederation, Mr. Ross
stated that this province had
paid into the Dominion treasury
$60,000,000 and had received
$65,000,000 in grants from the
Dominion. Consequently, instead of the Dominion owing the
province, the province was indebted to the Dominion to the
sum of $5,000,000. The question,
he thought, should be considered
from a federal point of view, and
that a larger grant from the
Dominion should be sought by
reason of the peculiar physical
conditions of the province. How
could we expect a grant for
the opening up of Okanagan
River, for railways, etc., if we
went after it with a club. We
should go after it by representing the advantages of opening
up the country.
The Oriental question was one
of long standing. The C. P. R.
had brought Chinese into B. C.
during its construction days.
The Conservatives had put a
head tax of fifty dollars upon
those entering Canada. The Liberals had raised this to five hundred dollars per head, which
meant, practically, exclusion.
Japan and Great Britain had
made a treaty of war, and Canada, not wishing to hamper the
imperial government, had trusted to making friendly terms with
.Japan whereby emigration should
be restricted. Mr. Ross then
proceeded to make a vigorous attack upon W. J. Bowser, Attorney General of the province,
whom he said had drawn up an
agrjement between Gotoh, a
Japanese employment agent, and
Nov fl- im
the c. P. R. to furnish the latter \Lpcal and-Personal 4
with    fifty    thousand   Japanese j   >��^*C7v�� C��
laborers.    Mr. Bowser had taken j *Stea^IA!,JL^-"^
the papers from his own office! ���Mrs* "^O'ivu la Ut present
and attached the name of the G. visitin* friends at Westbank.
T. P. instead of the C. P. R. and She Wl11 be absent a month-
had it published in the "Prov-| W. Arthur Battye, pianoforte
ince." This resulted in the re- tuner, will visit Penticton about
turn of the Conservative govern- the 10th November. Orders may
ment in the provincial election be left at Hotel Penticton.
which followed. Mr. Bowser at
the next session of the legislature had introduced a "Natal
Act" to  exclude  Orientals,   but
I
instead of the word "unlawful"
had written "lawful" The error
was not noticed until it was too
late, and then it was pretended
that the error was typographical.
A satisfactory arrangement had
since been made with Japan
through Mr. Lemieux, as agent
for Canada, by which Japanese
cannot come to Canada except
direct from Japan, and then
only in very limited numbers.
The Liberal party was pledged
to Oriental restriction.
In making his concluding appeal to the electors, Mr. Ross
said that it was the intention of
the Government to open Okana-
gtn River for navigation, and
that arrangements had been
made whereby a railroad should
be built from Nicola to Midway
via Penticton and Carmi. Arrangements had been made
whereby all the bills of the Midway-Vernon should be paid before a subsidy would be paid and
this was the only thing to occasion any delay.
The meeting broke up with
three cheers for Duncan Ross
followed by three cheers for
Martin Burrell.
The election will take place on
Nov. 12.
Rifle Associations Meet.
A team of eight marksmen
from the Penticton Rifle Association went to Summerland last
Saturday to try their skill in a
return match. Kelowna was to
hive sent a team down but was,
unfortunately, at the last minute
triable to do so.
Col. Holmes, D. O. C, of Victoria, was on the range and act-
e 1 as referee. In the first match
at the 200 and 500 yard ranges
Sammcrland won by 37 points.
This shows a great improvement
in the Penticton team's shooting,
is in the match held on the 10th
October Summerland had a lead
of 62 points. The scores were
as follows:
200 yards.    500 yards.
Summerland   221 215
Penticton        200 199
Li a friendly match at 600 yds.
Penticton beat Summerland by
15 points, the score being
Penticton        185
Summerland   170
Col. Holmes made his annual
inspection of the arms, ammunition, documents and accounts
of the Penticton Rifle Association on the 25th inst. After the
inspection he congratulated the
ollieers of the Association on the
progress made in one season.
Liberals Returned to Power.
The latest reports give the
Laurier government a majority
of 18 over all, with three places
yet to hear from. The returns
from the various provinces are
as follows:
Lib.
Ontario "X
Quebec 52
Nova Scotia 1-
New Brunswick 11
Manitoba  2
Saskatchewan  !���
Alberta    I
British Columbia 2
Prince Edward Island. '���'>
E. W. Mutch has been appointed deputy returning officer for
Penticton polling division and
L. C. Barnes for Penticton south.
Mr. and Mrs. Orr and family,
recently of Chilliwack but now
of Peachland, spent Tuesday in
Penticton. They are thinking
of coming here to reside.
Peachland L. O. L., No. 408,
will celebrate the 5th of November by a social in their hall. A
cordial invitation is extended to
all members and friends of the
order to be present and join in
making the event a success.
The Press is in receipt of a
sample copy of the handsome
litho of Premier McBride which
the Vancouver Province is offering as a premium with a year's
subscription to that paper at the
usual rate. The picture measures
18x24 inches and is as natural as
life.
St. Saviour's church is at
present receiving a much needed
improvement by way of an addition, the old building having
been sawed in two and an addition built between the parts.
We are glad to note that the
growth of the congregation has
rendered the addition essential.
A celebration will be held in
Penticton on the King's birthday
Nov. 9, under the auspices of
the Turf Club. There is expected to be a turkey shoot, a football match in the forenoon and
horse races in the afternoon,
while a concert is in course of
preparation for the evening. The
proceeds will be devoted to the
improving of the recreation
grounds.
A most successful dance was
given on Thursday night in Steward's Hall by the ladies of St.
Saviour's church. Between 70
and 80 were present and a most
e ljoyable evening was spent,
che dancing continuing until 3
a. m. The music was supplied
by Messrs. Lupton and Shaw of
Peachland. The committee expect to realize about $60 over
expenses.
The regular meeting of the W.
C. T. U. will be held in the Methodist church Thursday, Nov. 5th.
All ladies are invited to attend.
The officers have been appointed
for the balance of the year as
follows: Pres., Mrs. Rowe; Vice-
Pres., Mrs. Baker; Sec'y, Mrs.
F. Layton; Cor. Sec'y and Rec.
Sec'y (combined), Mrs. D. A.
Stewart; Supt. Juvenile Dept.,
Mrs. Thompson.
We have just received from
Great Britain a shipment of over
300 beautiful presentation books.
The public will find something
here suitable for all ages and
sexes. These will be sold at very
low prices, from 35c. to $1.00.
We would invite you to call and
select your proposed gift and
have it laid away for you, before
the sto:k is broken. Henry
Main, Druggist and Stationer.
(kin.
48
11
6
2
8
1
1
lnd.
0
l>
0
0
0
0
o
(I
0
The Liberal  maj<
parliament was Ui.
133
,-ity i
Some mischevious or thoughtless persons recently broke a large
number of bottles to fragments
on H. Murk's wharf, using them
for targets in shooting. The result is that the lake bottom is
littered with broken glass, utterly ruining the place for bathing
purposes. The citizens of Penticton have just reason to pride
themselves in their excellent lake
beach, and such actions are in-
n tic i rcvious excusable, whether on the part
, of man or boy.
/
83 THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. OCTOBER 31, 1908.
THE PENTICTON PRESS
ISSUED    EVERY    SATURDAY   AT
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
W. J. CLEMENT.
Subscription $1.00 Per Year in
Advance.    Foreign, $1.50.
Advertising Rates:
Transient Advertisements Not exceeding one inch, one insertion, 50c,;
for each additional insertion, 25c.
Lod^e Notices, Professional Cards, &c.
$1.00 per inch, per month.
Land and Timber Notices HO days, $5;
60 days, $7.
Legal Advertising-First insertion, 10
cents per line; each subsequent insertion, 5c. per line.
Reading Notices in Local News Column
15c. per line, first insertion; 10c. per
line, each subsequent insertion.
Contract Advertisements Rates arranged according to space taken.
All changes in contract advertisements must lie in the hands of the
printer by Tuesday evening lo ensure
publication in the next issue.
The Elections.
Now that the general result
of the Dominion elections is
known people will again settle
down to business and forget
their differences. Here in Yale-
Cariboo and a few other constituencies, however, we must wait
a couple more weeks before the
tension is entirely over. In
those constituencies, the contest now resolves itself into
one of personality rather than
one of party. The question is,
which is the better man, and
which would make the better
representative for the district';
Had the election in Yale-Cariboo
taken place at the same time as
the general elections, there can
be but one opinion as to whom
should be the member when the
House again meets.
Mr. Ross has offered no satisfactory explanation as to why he
insisted upon the election .'n
Yale-Cariboo being deferred, and
upon the platform during the
campaign, he has avoided the
question altogether. Whether
Mr. Ross did or did not purpose
ta take an unfair advantage of
his opponent is a question for
each voter to decide for himself,
b.it should Mr. Ross win, which
i 5 exceedingly doublful, in view
of the manner in which British
Columbia has pronounced itself
in three out of four constituencies, it can scarcely be considered a manly or fairly won victory.
Despite what has been said by
b )th sides during the campaign,
tie result of the elections has
been about as expected* with the
exception that the government
has been returned with a larger
mtjority than was expected by
even its most ardent supporters.
British Columbia has pronounced
itself strongly for the opposition.
Tnis will no doubt be regarded
by the government, as it is in
fact, the pronouncement of the
province upon the Oriental immigration, and better terms questions, those being the chief issues
put forth by the Conservatives.
A strong opposition from this
province will be more fruitful of
results in the next parliament
touching those matters than the
"solid seven" were during the
last. The Dominion will now
see exactly the attituce of this
province in regard to the questions.      	
PEACMLAND.
Mrs. Spofford, Provincial Organizer for the W. C. T. U, addressed a union congregation in
the hall Sunday evening. The
pastors of the several churches
took part, also the combined
choirs. Mr. G. K. Mitchell sang
in his usual good style "Where
is my Boy To-Night." At the
close a Local Option League was
formed with a very encouraging j
number of members.
The Girls' Handicraft Club met!
at Miss Urquhart's home Thursday, with a good attendance.
The Baptist Ladies' Sewing
Circle met at Mrs. Ritchie's home
Thursday afternoon.
Mrs. Campbell, of Westban!;,
is the guest of Mrs. Dorland.
School started again  Monday ���
morning with a full attendance, "
after a ten days'  enforced  holiday owing to the heating facilities not being in order.
Owing to the serious illness of
one of the young ladies of Peachland the party, which Mrs. A.
Towne was planning to have take
place Saturday to the "Pincushion," was postponed.
Ronald Elliott, eldest son of
Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Elliott, was
taken to the Kelowna hospital
Saturday, having a slight attack
of typhoid.
H. E. McColl is ill at present.
All hope for a speedy  recovery.
Miss Long and Miss Lane arrived from Calgary on Monday,
and will spend the winter at the
home of Mrs. H. Cossar. They
visited the lower lake points the
latter part of the week.
Mr. and Mrs. Orr and family,
of Chilliwack, have arrived to
spend the winter with us. We
are delighted to learn that Miss
F. Orr possesses a very fine
voice, which will be a pleasant
addition to the musical circle this
winter.
Annual
Clearance Sale
ALLEN GROVE.
Mrs. L. A. Clark returned
home last week from Keremeos.
R. L. Allen and wife spent
Sunday with H. Inglee of White
Lake.
Thos. Armstrong spent a few
days in Summerland  last week.
R. L. Allen has been appointed
Deputy-Returning Officer for the
poll to be held in this place at
the coming election for Yale-
Cariboo on Nov. 12th.
Rev. R. W. Hibbert, called on
a few of the people of this community recently.
W. J. Farleigh and wife called
on W. H. Crook, of Maroon Valley, on Sunday.
R. L. Allen and wife spent a
day recently with Angus Smith
of the market garden farm.
G. A. Clark was at Joe Brent's
on Shingle Creek on Friday.
We are about to enter upon our second year of business
in Penticton and being desirous of starting- our new year
with a clean stock, we are going to sacrifice all odd and
broken lines, and some lines we will clear out entirely.
Every department will be affected, and genuine bargains
will prevail. LOOK OUT FOR THE HAND BILLS.
W. R. KING
'Phone 25.
Ellis Street.
latoz
E333
��3,
JWss
.J
Weather Report.
Observations at Dominion Government Meteorological   Station
| at Penticton for  the month of
September, 1908 :
MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE
MINIMUM
TEMPERATURE
1	
...66 	
..51J
2..	
...70 	
.. 48
3
76
.. 45
4	
...90 	
.. 43
5	
...76 ..'	
.. 45
6	
...ni	
.. 44
7	
...74 	
.. 44
10	
...74 	
.. 48
11	
...78 	
.. 46
12	
...78 	
.. 46
13
74*
53
14	
...74 	
. 55
15	
...77J	
. 481
16	
...72 	
. 4(1
17	
...68 	
. 431
18	
...73 	
. 40
10	
...72 	
. 39
20	
...75 	
. 44
21	
... 71) 	
. 45
22	
...64 	
. 44
24..
25	
...71 	
. 32
26	
...68J	
. 42
27	
. 371
Ill)	
...74 	
. 51
Ill	
The total
rainfall was .88.
>%
^t**-  &2<f   ^6L&���� ^��HV*��
Galarneau &
McKenzie
BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
When  you   think   of   Building
Look us up.
ADOI.PIllJS GALARNEAU     W. A. MCKENZIE
JUST ARRIVED
Another car of
McLaughlin    Carriages
Also a
Car of Cockshutt  Goods
Comprising the following :���
Adams'   Log   Trucks,   Adams'
Teaming  Trucks,   Adams' one-
horse   Wagons    (low   wheels),
Adams' Lorries and Drays.
Cockshutt 3, 2, and 1-horse
Plows.
Cockshutt Drag and Lever and
Spring-Tooth Harrows.
Cockshutt Wheel Scrapers and
Drag Scrapers.
Cockshutt 1-horse Cultivators.
Cockshutt Potato Diggers.
Also Bolster Springs, Light and
Heavy Harness, Sharpies Cream
Separators, I. H. C. Gas Engines,
Ideal Pumping Plants, etc.
Call and Inspect our Stock.
S. T. ELLIOTT,
KELOWNA, B. C.
FREE !
riflffl^t^^jMUjm, '.iAMggnCT
Golden West Soap and
Golden West Washing Powder
FIFTY CENTS' WORTH   OF  SILVERWARE   FREE
WITH EVERY FIFTY CENT PURCHASE OFGOLDEN
WEST SOAP AND GOLDEN WEST
FALL - WINTER
THE OLD RELIABLE BARBER
ARTISTIC HAIR CUT . . 25 cts.
EASY SHAVE   .... 15 cts.
(with Kay Rum or Witch Hazel)
Shampoo 25    "
Beard Trimmed in style and
to suit the  face and  the
customer 25    "
Pace Massage 25    "
Baths, in the latest (> foot 2
inchps long, sanitary, porcelain-lined bathtub 35    "
H. MURK
At his NEW STAND alongside
the B. C. Hotel, Smith Street.
s
Winter
New Goods Just Opened
Ififlfi   PAIR;
[\)\j\jFall &   WL
Men's, Women's and Children's
Boots, Shoes,
-AND-
Rubbers.
VERY CLOSE CASH PRICES.
II. OLIVER'S
SHOE STORE, Opposite School.
WASHING  POWDER.
To obtain this Silverware, all you have to do is to purchase 50c.
worth of Golden West Soap (2 cartons) or Washing Powder; or
25c. worth of each, AND ASK YOUR GROCER for a Silver
Plated Teaspoon FREE (which is worth at least 25c.), then cut out
the coupon off the two cartons and send them to the Manufacturers
including 2c. for postage, and obtain another Silver Plated Teaspoon FREE.
In this way your
Golden West Soap and Golden  West
Washing Powder costs you
Nothing.
GET THE "SPOONEY" FEELING.
Address:   Premium Department,
Standard Soap Company, Limited,
Calgary, Alberta.
PENTICTON
& OROVILLE
STAGE
Via Fairview
Leaves Penticton Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., arriving at Oroviile the same day at (5 p. m.
Through Fare - $6.00
Arnott & Hine,
FAIRVIEW. B. C.
THE
Penticton Bakery
-FOR-
Good Wholesome Bread,
Cakes and Pastry.
GIVE US A TRIAL AND WE
WILL PLEASE YOU.
L. T. ROBERGE.
DIRECTORY.
CHURCH SERVICES
St. Saviour's Church, Fairview Avenue : Vicar.
Kev. J. A. Cleland. Celebration of Holy Communion the Ut and 3rd Sundays of the month
after 11 o'clock matins; the 2nd Sunday at 8 a.
in. Morning prayer at 11 a.m. Evensong at
7:30 p.m.
Presbyterian services each Sunday in Steward's
Hall at 11 a.m. or 7:30 p.m. Hev. Jas. Hood,
pastor.
Baptist services each Sunday in Steward's Hall,
at 11a. m. or 7:30 p.m. Kev. A. S. linker.
pastui.
Preabyt3rian  and   Baptist   services   alternate,
morning nnd evening*.
Method im services in church each Sunday at 11 a.
tn.  and  7:30 p.m.!   Sunday School 2:15 p.m.
I'lay r meotinjrs S p.m. on Wednesday.     Kev.
R. VV. Hibbert, pastor.
Youni- Peoples' Christian Union  meets  in  the
Methodist church every Tuesday at 8 p.m.
SOCIETIES
A. F. & A. M. meet in Mason's Hall. Main St.. 1st
Wednesday in each month at H p.m.
W. o. W. meetin Woodmens' Hall. Ellis St., 2nd
and lth Saturday in each month at X p.m.
I. O. O. P. meet in Odd   Fellows'  Hall.   Main  St..
every Monday at H p.m.
1.. O. I., meet in Woodmen's Hall 2nd and -lth
Friday in each month at h p. m.
School Hoard meets 1st Monday in each month
at X p.m.
Hoard ol' Trade Annual general meeting, 2nd
Wednesday in January of each year. General
quarterly meetings, 2nd Wednesdays iu Janu-
ury, April. July and October ut 8 p.m.
STAGES
Stage leaves for Keremeos, Hedley and Princeton, ai ii u. in. mm Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Returnson Mondays, Wednesdays und Fridays*
Stage leaves fur Fairview and Oroviile nn Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a. m. Returns on Mondays. Wednesdays und Fridays at
ti p, in.
POST OFFICE.
Hours 9 a. m. to (��. p. m,
Registered Letter and Money Order wicket
closes 5 p. m.
Wicket opened fur half un hour after mail is
distributed.
Arrivals-Per Str. Okana-ran: Daily except
Sunday li p. in.; Per staire from Hedley. Keremeos. Olalla. Allen drove, Oroviile, Fairview.
and White Lake: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays ut (J p. m,
Closing���For boat and stages: 8 p. m. daily except Friday and Saturday. On Friday 9 p. m..and
lor Monday's boat and stages:  8.45 p. in. Sundays.
C. P. R. TIME TABLE
SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH
Daily both wuys except Sunday.
SOUTH BOUND    STATION    NOKTH BOUND
7.3" a. m Sicamous  6.00 p.m.
6.27    "      Enderby  4.48   "
8.52   "    Armstrong  4.08   "
8.30    Jj    ...ur Vernon lv  3.30   "
0.30   "    ���Iv Vernon ar  2.30   "
9.45   "   ���ar...Ok. Landing ...lv  2.15   "
10.00 p. m ��� Iv... Ok. Landing,   .ar 11.00 a.m.
11-10   "      Kelowna  8.20   "
3.00   ||     Peachland  7.25   "
4.45   "    Summerland  6.30   "
6.00    "     Penticton  6.00   "
IIOTEE   PENTICTON.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.
RATES $2.SO PER DAY
A. Barnes        - -       Prop.
PENTICTON, B.C.
W. H. T. GAHAN
BARRISTER and SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
PENTICTON,       -       -       B.C.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
Notary Public.
KELOWNA, - - B. C.
Dr.CA.JACKSON
DENTIST
S. O. Land Company's   Block
PENTICTON, B. C.
'Phone II.
CHAS. WERE
Accountant & Auditor,
Notary Public
PENTICTON, B. C.
y.B-gs3T-^.TT-.^--::T.Bg^r.?^Ji^'r.j
Henrys Nurseries
Now growing in our Nurseries for the
fall trade:���
90,000 Peaeh, Apricot, Nectarines. Cherry,
Plum, Prune,   I'ear  nnd Apple ���in all
leading varieties.
100,000   Small   Fruits.
10,000   Ornamental   Trees  in   till   leading
varieties for B. C.
Strictly home grown and  nut subject to
damage from fumigation.
Stock of Bulbfl to arrive  in   August  from
Japan, France and Holland.
Bee Supplies, Spray Pumps, Seeds, Etc.
140 page Catalogue Free.
Office, Greenhouses and Seedhouse :--
3010 Westminster Road,
VANCOUVER,    -     B. C.
mwu��*iiMm,MiMM&mi&k*>a!m***
D. W. Crowley
&Co.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Goorts Delivered to any part of  the
Town on Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday.
WE GIVE OUR PROMPT ATTENTION TO
MAIL ORDERS
J. F. PARKINS, Manager. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. OCTOBER 31, 1908.
(V)
1?
= 5fe =
Plow Woman
j By ELEANOR. GATES,
.;���        Author of "The Biography of
'* Prairie Girl."
il ���
|J:J   Cnpyright. line, hu McClure.. PhWlT* <*
y. Company. ';
��� * ���>��� ���>��� ���> -H' ���!��� * ���!��� ���!��� ��� ������** ��>H- * ���;��� * ���!��� ��� I.
"Fraser," said  Lounsbury. "did you
hear that the colonel wanted an Interpreter?"
"Why���why���great Scott!"
"Exactly���great   Scott I"    The storekeeper set off again.
"Hold on!" Fraser caught his arm.
"Your scheme's all right, hut you can't
impress the man. lie's got to go of
his ewn accord."
"Il'm! That's so."
"What you suppose he'll say If yon
rush In there and ask him to please go
away on this long trip and leave your
friends serenely in possession of tho
land?"
"I wouldn't say 'please'-but you're
right. Let's take a look through that
window."
Fraser assented. Shoulder to shoulder they tiptoed forward and. keeping
out of the shaft of light viewed the
scene within.
It was a busy one and well bore out
the Inviting legend of the shingle sign.
Along the plank bar "the troopers"
were thickly ranged, smacking their
lips In "delight" over greasy glasses.
Beyond them was a squint eyed man
who trotted untiringly to and fro.
mixing nnd pouring. Nearer was the
stove, its angular barrel and widespread legs giving it the appearance
of some horrid fire belching animal.
An unbroken circle of men surrounded It, hats on. rawhide bottomed chairs
tilted back to an easy slant. From
their pipes and cigars smoke rose
steadily and hung, a blue mist, against
the sloping rafters of the roof.
There was little tajking in the circle.
Two or three were asleep, their heads
sagging on their necks with maudlin
looseness. The others spoke infrequently, but often let down their
chairs while they spat in the sand box
under the stove or screwed about in
the direction of the gaming table.
Amoug these was old Michael. ��� He sat
nearest the door, a checker hoard balanced on his knees, his black stub pipe
in its toothy vise. And when he was
not feeding the stove's flaming maw
with broken boxes, barrel staves and
green wood his blowzy countenance
was suspended over the pasteboards
he was thumbing in a game of soll-
'talre. >
The two outside went under the
shaft of light and peeped into the rear
of the room. There was Matthews.,
one of five at a square table. A cigar
box partly filled with coin and chips
was before him. In front of the other
players were other chip piles. About
the five, hanging over them, almost
pressing upon them, were a number of
troopers. Two or tWee were idle on-:
lookers. But the majority were foi-'
(lowing with excited interest every turn
of the cards. ,,
"Wretches being plucked of their
sood sir months' pay," whisperedJFr*-
ser. ,
"Looks like they're In for nil night*
Lounsbury returned.
But tho officer was pinching him.
"Sh!   See there!"
A half drunken trooper was Interrupting the game. He had reeled forward to the table aud seemed to be
addressing himself to Matthews, who,
as he answered, glanced up Indifferently. The trooper continued, empha-
Bizlng his words by raising u clinched
list aud striking the board a blow.
The chip plies toppled. He turned
to those about, gesticulating. A few
surrounded him. evidently bent on
leading hhu toward the door. Others
appeared to he coiitluuiug the dispute
with Matthews. But us tbe disturber
was pushed out they gradually subsided.
"I've got an idea," announced the
storekeeper. Aud he disappeared
around u corner.
When he relumed he was leading
the trooper and talking low to bim.
All three retired to the shadow of tbe
Willi.
Here there wus a colloquy.' First
Lounsbury held forth, next the trooper, piotesllugly. When the lleutenuut
broke In two phrases were frequently
repeated "to the guardhouse" and
"won't If you will."
At last the three went hack to the
window.
"UtVliember," cautioned the storekeeper, "we don't want all these shebangs stirred up."
"Needn't worry," said Fraser.   "Just
llsteu to thul I'Ullipus down the street."
The  disjointed   music  of  a   wheezy
accordion was rending the night   With
it sounded the regular stamp of feet.
Now the trooper rounded the corner.
A moment aud through the window
Lounsbury and the officer saw him enter the door.
He slipped down to u seat beside old
Michael. There lie stayed for awhile.
Whenever a brother trouper looked his
way he culled hhu up by the crooking
of a finger aud whispered to him. Before long a knot ol' men had again surrounded him. But this time their attention was all lor the table at the
rear of the room.
There the game was going on. Matthews' chip pile showed where the
winnings were gravitating. In the dim
light there wns a strained look ou tlie
fines of the players,
Deal after deal passed. Finally oue
of the live, having no more disks before him. pushed hack his chair and
gul  up.
As he slood. da/.ed and dismayed,
tlie trooper who had been ejected ap-
UeUI'eU at  liis side, chipped him  upon
the hack and spike. At their elbows
was tlie kiicit that had gathered ut the
sieve.
The next liniment the trooper turned
to the table and snatched the pack of
cards from Matthews' hand. He held
up one. pointing ut its back, snapped
ii down, pointed ut a second, theu
[ scattered the pack in the air.
Lounsbury and Fraser whipped
round the corner and iu through the
door.
An uproar greeted tbem. "Cheat!"
"Clean llllU out!" "Do bim like Soggy did!" Before them wus a jostle of
blue backs. Across these, on the farther side of the plank bar. they suw
Matthews facing the crowd. His left
band held the cigar box agaiust his
chest, his right was up and empty.
"Hold on. boys!" It was Lounsbury.
As If he hud caught a cue the foremost trooper-he who had been the
disturbing element-repealed the cry
and directed the eyes of his comrades
to the door.
There wus u sudden lull. The men
in blue wavered. Here nnd there u
revolver was covertly returned t��
place.
Lounsbury pushed forward to tho
stove. Fraser beside him. "Hold on.
buys!" lie said again and pointed at
Matthews. "Hold on���I've got u message for tbut man."
The lull became a dead silence. To
the troopers the sight of shoulder
straps was discomfiting, for the ollicer
at once became the personification of
the guardroom���chilly, poorly bedded
und worse provisioned, of all places
the one to be dreaded In raw weather.
To Matthews the Interruption wns welcome. His right hand slowly lowered
to join ils male.
"I'm going to ask you to call your
little differences with thnt gentleman
off." continued Lounsbury.
Matthews fairly blinked. The storekeeper's voice was soft, confidential.
Ingratiating.
"Mr. Fraser and I have come to say
that Mr. Matthews Is wanted to serve
as Interpreter for Colonel Cummings."
"Interpreter?" queried Matthews.
A bullet head made Itself visible
from behind a barrel. "Don't let him
bluff y'. Nick," called a voice.
The other looked round. "Shut y'
flytrap. Babe," he commanded.
' "Thank you." said Lounsbury pleasantly, "interpreter Is right. Two white
women are held as captives in an Uncaps pa camp somewhere west of here,
it's been learned that you understand
and speak the tongue. So we present
Colonel Cummings' compliments. He
would like very much to have a talk
'with you at Branuon."
It was a solution to Matthews. "Yes?
Yes?" be said approvingly, then hesitated In suspicion as he measured the
storekeeper.
, "Oh, I guess I don't want to he no
interpreter."' he said,
i Lounsbury smiled. "Just ns you say.
just ns you say. Boys"���cheerily���
; "sorry if I cut in at the wrong time,
i Don't let us stop your fun. Mr. Fraser
is not here officially."
j A murmur ran around. The disturbing trooper advanced toward Matthews aggressively.
��� Up went Matthews' band again.
���'.Ins' a minute." he said.
Tlif- trooper quieted.
'   Matthews turned to Fraser. mustering nn expression of Importance.
"Lieutenant" he said, "you give me
your word thte is so���that there t'.ln't
uo put up job about It?"
"Put up job?" Fraser reddened,
keeping a straight face with difficulty.
"I give my word." he said solemuly.
"that you're wanted as interpreter
��ud that I'll conduct you safely to
headquarters."
Matthews put down the cigar box
and saluted.
"Word of an officer," he said. "Is different And if I can do anythin'���
loug 's It 's ladies"���
He reached to a shelf for bis hat
CHAFTER XII.
HAT night, after Squaw Charley had come and gone. Dallas returned from the lean-to.
where she had fed and bedded Simon aud the team, to find Marylyn before tlie heurth. her face flushed
and wet with tears. Instantly, all concern, the elder girl knelt beside her.
"Marylyn." she begged, smoothing the
soft iinhralded hair spread out upon
ihe robe. "Marylyn. what's the matter?"
A  long sob.
"Why. dear baby, dou't you fret.
We're going to be ul I right. Dad'll
soon be back. Mr. Lounsbury's watching, and we won't lose the little home."
"Oh. It ain't that-It ain't that!"
weeping harder than before. "I'm so
unhappy!"
It was nn nnswer that smote Dallas
to the heart. Some trouble, heretofore
concealed, was threatening her slsterV
peace of mind. And she had not discovered It In time, had not prevented
It. hud not shielded her its she ought
"Marylyn. honey, tell me what's the
nutter."
The younger girl crept closer, screening her eyes.
Dallas lifted her into her arms. Her
cheek was feverish, her hands were
dry and hot.
Sudden terror seized the elder girl���
the old terror that had fastened upon
her through all the years of her mother's falling.
"Marylyu." she said huskily, "do you
feel that���that you're not us well as
you was? Are you afraid you'll be
sick like���mother?"
There wus an answering shake of
Ihe head.
Dallas pressed ber close, murmuring
her thankfulness, whispering broken
endearments. ��� Oh, Dai's so glad!
She couldn't stand It If her baby sister
was to suffer. Oh. honey heart honey
heart I"
But Marylyn wns not comforted.
"Listen," bade Dallas "In nl! your
life lane you ever asked me to do any.
tnmg tuat 1 didn't do. or to give you
anything that I didn't give if 1 could?
Ami now something's fretting you. I
can't think what it is. But you got to
tell me. and I'll help you out"
"No. uo!"
"I don't care what it Is, I won't
blame you. If It's something wrong-
why. It couldn't be���I'll forgive you.
You know that. Marylyu."
Again "No. no." but with less resistance.
"Tell me." said Dallas firmly.
Marylyn looked up. "You'll hate me
if I do," she faltered.
The elder girl laughed foudly. "As
If I could."
"You promise not to tell pa?"
"Course I promise."
"Oh. Dallas!" She buried her face
in her hands. "It's���it's that I-1 like
him!   I like him!"
A    moment    of    perplexity.    Then,
gradually.   It  dawned   upon  tbe  elder
girl whom the other meant.    In  very
| surprise her arms loosened their hold.
"You   do   hate   me,"   Marylyn   said
i plaintively.
"No,  honey, no���why should I  hate
I you?"    Her words were earnest    But
her voice���something  had changed  It
And she felt a strange hurt, n vague
hurt that seemed to have no cause.
Marylyn raised herself on nn elbow.
"He liked me���once," she suid. "He
showed it just us plain. It was right
bere���that day the cattle went by."
Dallas got up. She had begun to
tremble visibly. Her breath wns coming short, nn If she hnd lieen running
But the younger girl did not notice.
"He stayed nwny so long." she went
on. "Then, todny when he en me���you
remember, Dallas���he Just said a word
or two to me and laughed at nie because I was afraid. And���and I saw
that 1 was wrong, and I ���I saw���he
liked���you."
"Me!" Dallas turned. She felt the
blood come driving Into her face. She
felt that strange hurt ease and go iu
a rush of Joyful feeling. Then she understood the cause of It and why she
had trembled���why that day hnd been
the happiest of her life.
Of a sudden she became conscious
that Marylyn's eyes were upon her
with a look of pathetic reproach. She
began to laugh.
"Nonsense, honey!" she said. "Don't
be silly! Me! Why. he'd never like a
great big gawk like me!"
"But-but"-
"Me. with my red hair���you know It
is kinda red���and my face, sunburned
as a' Indian���hands all calloused like-
like a man's." She turued back to the
dusk through the window. "Oh. no,
not me!"
"But you looked so funny just now."
"Did I? Did I?" Dallas stammered
out her reason: "Well���well, that was
because���because I thought you wns
going to say It was n soldier." She
laughed nervously. "But it wns Mr.
Lounsbury you meant, honey, wasn't
it?"
The suspicion that had troubled the
mind of the younger girl was allayed.
"Why, Dallas, how could you think
such a thing about me! Like a soldier?
My, no! It was Mr. Lounsbury���but
he don't like me."
She got up and went to the foot of her
Ifather's bunk. When she reappeared
Jshe was carrying the soap box that
held her belongings. On the robe once
more, she took out and held up to the
light of the fire two books ana :��� strip
of beaded cloth.
The elder left the window and stood
beside  her.
"These are what he gave me." went
on . Marylyn, putting forward tho
books. "And this"���she showed the
bead work���"be asked me to make for
him. But today," mournfully, "he
didn't even speak of It."
Dallas leaned down and touched her
lips to the other's hair. "Baby sister,
what did you ex|>ect him to do? Hold
up a man with one hand and���and
reach out for a present with the other?"
Marylyn put away the box. "Anyway he don't like me."
"Like you? Why. he couldn't help
it There Isn't a sweeter, prettier girl
on the prairie than my little housekeeper."
"He called me the prairie princess."
j declared Marylyu, but with lingering
I doubt.
"Now,  that  shows."  said   the  elder
girl.    "Don't you  worry another sec-
| ond.  When he comes again you'll see."
So Dallas soothed and comforted her
I until she fell asleep, when she lifted
j her to her father's bed and covered
ber carefully. Then she drew aside a
swinging blanket to let tne firelight
I shine through ��� and saw lhat there
, were still teurs on her sister's face.
CHAPTER XIII.
HE medicine lodge of the Indians stood just within the
sliding panel of the stockade.
Thirty poles, their tops lash-
ei.' together so as to leave a smoke
holt', their bases spread to form a generous circle, supported a covering of
tanned buffalo hides senmed with
buckskin thongs. Here, barely an
hour after Matthews' arrival at Fort
Brannon, Squaw Charley entered hastily and thrust some red coals under
a stick pile at the center of tbe lodge
And at once, by tbe flickering light of
his fire, the warriors of the band entered the low entrance and seated
themselves In a semicircle.
W'he.n Colonel Cummings lenmed
that an Interpreter had beeu found he
promptly ordered the completion of
preparations for the Jamleson expedition und the calling of a council, unsatisfactory but necessary. The redskins jailed ,'n the stockade must know
both the object of the trip nnd his
terms, so that they, realizing their peril, would revea.l the whereabouts of the
winter camp oi  the hosliles.
His Interview with Matthews threatened a change hi his plans. The latter, having listened to the story of the
caotured women i\nd to the scheme for
I their rescue, astonished the command-
! ing officer by declining absolutely lo
j take tbe proposed journey.
"I'd like I' be obligin'." he said, "but
I I cau't go. I didn't know there was
J goin' f be any travelin". There's busi
J ness that'll keep me bere."
"Why, man." cried tlie colonel. "I've
made you a good offer!"
"1 ain't a-sayln' y' didn't,"  was the
| curt answer.
Colonel   Cummings   knew   to   whnt
I "business"   he   referred,   but   realized
I that a discussion of it would not aid
I in bringing the desired consent    lie
pretended to guess at reasons for the
refusal.
"There's scarcely a possibility of
trouble during the journey." he said
"Indians don't like to light In the
snow, especially when their families
are with them and their war ponies
are feeding on cottonwood bark. Besides, their bead chief will be sharp
enough to see that he'll have tn treal
and not light if lie wants to save (lie
necks of liis favorites. Then, ns far as
the safety and comfort ef my men are
concerned, everything Is being done
Better reconsider, Matthews."
"Can't do II."
Colonel Cummings left bis library.
where be had been talking, and sought
I.oiiusliury's advice. The two held a
short whispered conversation In tho
entry.
"Let me have a few words with him."
said the storekeeper. Matthews' bulking was not altogether a surprise.
Nevertheless It was a keen disappointment, He had hoped to be able to
send Squaw I barley across the river
soon   wilh   good   news.     "I.et   me  sec
bim.   Mayiie l can bring him around."
They entered the library.
"Matthews," began Lounsbury, "you
I might as well go along. If you slay
J you can't get a hold o' tbat claim "
He looked nt tlie colonel's clock. "It's
midnight. Your six months are up.
If you did have a chance it's gone
Possession 's nine points in law, and
Lancaster 's up at Bismarck nailing
the tenth."
If the storekeeper's blunt assertions
were of any particular interest to the
other he failed to show It. He occu
pled himself with finding a cigar, cutting it carefully and lighting it nt the
stove. Then he turned about to Colonel Cummings. liis glance as it traveled utterly ignoring Lounsbury.
"Not fo mention the risks you run
with tbe boys." added tbe slorokeopoi
easily, amused by the play of Indifference.
"Oh. I guess Shanly Town can take
keer of Itself." observed Matthews,
sending up smoke rings.
Lounsbury walked out.
There was but one thing left foi
Colonel Cummings to do: Ask this mar.
to interpret in tlie medicine lodge; that
at least tlie Indians might learn their
position. Knowing it, they might lie
prevailed upon to select one of their
own number to accompany the expedition and repeat the terms. The commanding officer, rather provoked at
Lounsbury. who. he thought had
harmed and not helped his cause, immediately suggested this course to
Matthews.
"I can parleyvoo for you there, nil
right." agreed Matthews patronizingly.
"But how you goin'?"
"You and I alone."
'Matthews stared. "Carry any guns?"
he asked.
"Not when I go into the stockade.
The Indians are without weapons.
And I like lo show them that I trust
them."
The other laughed. "You go t' tell
some redskins that tbey 's goin' f be
strung up and y' don't take no gnu.
Well, not for me, colonel!"
"Then we'll have a guard."
"O. K.    I'm with you."
A scout who understood the sign
language was dispatched to the stockade. And by the time the braves were
settled down before the blaze Colonel
Cummings, Matthews and a detail of
armed men were before the aperture
of the medicine lodge.
The soldiers wailed outside the big
wigwam, where tbey made themselves
comfortable by moving up and down.
Their commanding officer and the .interpreter went in. At their appearance
the warriors rose gravely, shook hands
and motioned the white men to laIke
seals upon a robe placed at Lame
Foot's loft hand. The air in the place
was already beginning to thicken with
klnnlklnlck and fire smoke. The mingled smell of tobacco and skins made
it nauseating. Colonel Cummings
would gladly have hurried bis errand.
But Indian etiquette forbade haste,
lie was forced to contain himself and
let the council proceed witli customary
and exasperating slowness.
The first step was (lie pipe. A young
Sioux applied a burning splinter to a
sandstone bowl and handed the long
stem to the medicine man. His nostrils filled he gave the pipe to Colonel
Cummings, from whom in turn it passed to Matthews. Standing Buffalo.
Canada John and thence along' tho
curving line of warriors. When all
had smoked the bowl was once more
filled and lighted, and once more it
was sent from hand to band. Not until this ceremony bad been repeated
many times did the council come to
speech.
But neither the commanding officer
nor his interpreter made the lirst address. Though the braves guesserl tllilt
something unusual hud brought about
an assembly al this hour and 'though
their curiosity on the subject was
childishly live, they surpassed their
captor in patience. Stolidly they looked on while Lame Foot rose to his feet
The war priest was not tho figure
that had led the band south after the
battle-not the haughty, stately brave
that the sentimentalist loves to picture, lie was feathered and streaked
as before. A stone mallet hung from
his belt. But be wore no string of
boars' claws. They had gone the way
of the sutler, which wns a tasty way.
Strewn  With  bright  labeled  bul  aged
'Improve your appearance "
BY WEARING A PAIR OF OUR
Artistically Fitted Rimless
Eyeglasses.
Correctly Fitted Lenses. Correctly Fitted Frames.
ISSUER OE MARRIAGE LICENSES.
HARRIS, The Jeweler
>m't.mMtwmn>nci^nvna.imi<mm\��^iiiMi'itv^m^gmmmWKMmimMWtTtwmmmM
M  C. KENDALL, (i. R. A1ASON.
Notary Public.
Kendall & Mason
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Large blocks with good water
rights, from $10.00 per acre.
10-acre lots wholly or partly
planted with trees bearing 1909.
10 acre lots near town, unim-
proved.
Acre lots, planted with fruit
trees or unimproved. Main St.
md other good locations.
FIRE AND LIFE INSURANCE.
HOUSES TO LET.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the .Superintendent of Provincial Police,
K. S. Husscy. of Victoria, for renewal
of a retail liquor license for the Hotel
Penticton,  located at Penticton, B. C.
AMOS BARNES.
Penticton, B.C., Oct. 27, 1908.
=FGR SALE���
30 WHITE LEGHORN PULLETS
40       " "       COCKRELLS
10 BLACK MINORCA
This stock, all thorough-bred, and
from hardy laying strain.
Secure one of these Cockrells to
improve your flock.
J. S. HEALES,
Penticton Cannery.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that, thirty
days after date, I intend to apply to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police,
F. S. Hussey, of Victoria, for renewal
of a retail liquor license for the B. C.
Hotel, located at Penticton, B.C.
W. H. TAPLEY.
Penticton, B. C, Oct. 28, 1908.
FOR SALE
Pure-Bred Buff Orpington Cockrells;
will be sold cheap if taken at once.
JNO. M. THOMAS,
16-2t Okanagan Falls.
FOR SALE.
HarriS
nursery CO.,
Penticton.
Beautify your lot with some
of our shade trees.
We have Elm, Ash, Maple,
Catalpa, Mulberry, Black Walnut, and Ash Leaved Maple.
Some perennial shrubs and
apple trees left.
C. P.
LAND FOR
SALE
Choice fruit lots, improved and
unimproved.
FIRE INSURANCE-The Sun of Lon-
lon, Eng., and Queen.    Why not insure
in the best; they cost no more.
Apply to
J. R. MITCHELL.
NOTICE
FRUIT TREES-Well-grown stock.
Large quantity of apple trees for sale,
inly few choice varieties grown : also
small stock of ornamental trees. Apply
for  varieties  and  price   to  Manager,
OLLSTRLAM ESTATE CO., Ltd.,
L5-tf Vernon, li. C,
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that GO dayi-
fter date i intend to apply to the Hon
hief CommiBHioner oi Lauds ana
',.,,���,- fora lease of the following fore-
a lure, viz.: < ommencing at the N. W.
orner of Lot 2, Block 89, Penticton.
fale Di.-i rict, thence northerly 346 feet
i ii at i hi) feel ;   lie nee  southeri,
,i feet; thi nre west 8U feet; contain
ne ,49 aens, more or less.
II. .1. MOORE.
September 4th, 1908. 9-9
t Pays to Advertise
canned Roods. And as for Ids em-
liroidered shirt, il v.as much soiled
nnd   worn,  and  he  had   sn  Rill lied   In
weight - through plentiful food aud
lack of exercise thai lie pressed out
upon ii deplorably wilh a bulging
paunch.
Pompously, but using no gestures or
Inflections, lie began a rambling,
lengthy account of liis past deeds of
valor. Prom these he Hint My swerved
to the recital of Ids people's wrongs,
lie climaxed after an interminable
amount of talking with a boast that
awakened the hearty approbation of
his sloven fellows. "We but wnlt for
the winter lo go," he said, "for iu the
spring we shnll have freedom. Our
brothers, who arc sly as foxes and
swift as hawks, will sweep down upon .'.he pony soldiers and slay them."
He sat down amid a chorus of "Ho,
ho!" The semicircle moved and bent
and nodded. It was plain that he had
expressed a common belief.
(.To Iil' eonlinueU.I
Cow, part Jersey, 6 years old, giving
about 10 qts. milk per day. Having no
use for same will sell reasonable.
Apply C. N. WILLIAMS,
16-1 Penticton.
ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE.
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF JOHN DAY, DECEASED.
NOTICE is hereby given that in pursuance of an order made herein in the
Supreme Court of British Columbia, on
the 24th day of September, 1908, Edward Thomas Day of Penticton, B. C,
was appointed administrator of the estate and effects of John Day, deceased,
who died at Penticton, B. C., on the
tenth day of August, 1908.
NOTICE is also hereby given that all
parties having any claims against the said
estate of the said deceased must send
in their claims duly verified, on or before the first day of November, 1908,
to the said Edward Thomas Day, of
Penticton, B. C, after which date the
said estate will be dealt with by the
said Edward Thomas Day in due course
of administration, having regard only
to the claims sent in prior to the said
lirst day of November, 1908.
Dated this 28th day of September,
A. D. 19U8.
W. H. T. GAHAN,
Solicitor for the said Administrator,
12-tf Penticton, B. C.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of Lands and
Works for a lease of the following foreshore, viz:���Commencing at the N. W.
corner of Lot 4, Block 39, Penticton,
Yale District, thence northerly 331 feet;
thence east 120 feet; thence southerly
140 feet; thence west 120 feet; containing .9 acres, more or less.
HENRY CONNER.
September 3rd, 1908. 9-9
NOTICE
.Notice is hereby given that we will
prosecute any person or persons found
trespassing or hunting without permission upon our properties at Three Mile
Creek. C.W.JOHNSON,
M. C. KENDALL,
10-13t JOHN STKUTT.
Penticton, Sept. 17, 1908.
NOTICE.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Henry Murk, of Penticton, barber, and owner of Lot 1, Block 39, according to registered map 513 deposited in Land
Kegistry Office in Kamloops, B.C., Intend to apply
lor permission to lease the foreshore and submerged land in front of said lot only, described' as
follows:
Commencing at a post planted at northwest
corner of Lot 1. Block 89, Map 613, Osoyoos Division, Yale District, deposited in the Land Registry Office in Kamloops, B.C.; thence northwest 364
feet to a post planted in 4 feet, of water in front
of above lot, in Okanagan Lake; thence northeast
111.7 foot to a post, planted in 4 feet of water, Ok-
amigan Lake; thence southeast 345 feet to the
northeast post of Lot 1. Block 39, Map 513, Penticton ; thence southwest 115 feet 4 inches to post of
commencement.
HENRY MURK.
Dated at. Penticton. B.C.. August 17, 1908. 8-9
COME AND SEE
BANKRUPT
NURSERY
STOCK
For sale at greatly reduced prices, a
large number of ornamental trees,
flowering shrubs and climbers, also a
few hundred 1 and 2 year old apple
trees left.
W. F. H. SWINTON,
Assignee.
Penticton, Oct. 29, 1908. 2 THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C., OCTOBER 31, 1008.
Additional Locals
Miss E. J. Yuill is having a
house built on her lot near C. F.
Layton's on Main St.
The Penticton Literary antl
Debating Society will hold its
first regular meeting for the season next Thursday evening in
Woodmen's Hall. There will be
a debate on "Resolved that taxes
should be levied upon land values
only, that is all improvements
should be exempt from taxation."
The affirmative will be led by
W. J. Clement and R. W. Hibbert and the negative by E. W.
Mutch and E. S. Lake.
COMMUNICATIONS
(We do not hold ourselves responsible for the
opinions of correspondents, I
To the Editor of Tin-: PBMTICTON Peess :
Wednesday of last week was
the 1013rd anniversary of Trafalgar, a victory of world-wide importance then, but seldom mentioned now.
Napoleon having made a formidable alliance with Spain, the
French and Spanish naval forces
were concentrated to cover the
transportation of a French army
to the British shores for the conquest of England. The admirals
of the combined fleets knew that
once at sea they must reckon
with Nelson and they deferred
the reckoning as long as possible.
When the two fleets did leave
port, Nelson promptly fell upon
them, and destroyed or captured
the greater part of their force,
the rest escaping by ignominious
flight. Nelson fell, but his work
was done. The invasion of England had become a dream for she
was now the undisputed sovereign of the sea.
Recalling these doings of long
ago, we are reminded of certain
moral principles involved in those
events and of abiding import
still. The principle of Order and
the principle of Liberty are alike
essential to the existence of civilized man upon the earth. Two
great actors on the world's stage
exhibited these principles in
their character and life. Napoleon was the embodiment of despotic power enforcing order.
Nelson represented individual
liberty, with public order safeguarded and maintained by constitutional government, under a
limited monarchy. The former
proved transient because destructive. The latter is thus far
enduring because eminently
fruitful of good.
"History is Philosophy teaching by example." We should,
therefore, test the tendencies of
the present by the experiences
of the past, and, if it be found
that law and order are set at
naught, while arbitrary restraints are being put upon individual liberty, we cannot but
conclude that agencies are at
work in this fair land of the
same character and tendency as
those which brought such dire
disaster upon rich and powerful
communities over a century ajjo.
The Revolution of 175!) was a
revolt against brutal oppression,
but when a frantic mob wrested
supreme power from a besotted
kingship, the change was for the
worse. A community may do
without liberty for six months
but it cannot do without order J
for as many hours. The enemies ]
of order are, therefore, at war'
with liberty. norland.
BEAUTIFUL
STATIONERY
IN   HANDSOME   BOXES
Not cheap stationery in
gaudy styles	
If you get it here it is
right in every way.   .    .
The Southern
Q
Land
Company, Lii
LANDS
"Our Irrigation system having been completed for
the Lake Skaha benches we are now offering under this
water system some 300 acres in five and ten acre tracts,
at $100.00 to $150.00 per acre.
On the Penticton benches we still have for sale
irrigated about 160 acres, at from $100.oo to $125.oo per
acre. All our bench lands are admirably adapted for
fruit.
On the Penticton flats we have open clean meadow
suitable for small fruits, vegetable and hay, at $150. oo
per acre.
Uncleared land suitable for fruit (but stoney and
wooded) $5o.oo to $loo.oo per acre.
Uncleared land quite free of stone,  suitable for
hay or garden stuff, $loo.oo per acre.
Terms on all the above one quarter down, one
quarter each year with interest at 6 per cent, on deferred
payments.
ACRE LOTS
In Penticton and on Okanagan Lake Beach $3oo.oo
to $15o.oo.       On Lake Skaha Peach $loo.oo.
TOWN LOTS
We have a great many excellent buys in town
property (business and residential). Anything we show
you will advance in value 5o per cent, within a year.
Get in now, you can make money and take no chances by
purchasing our lands.
FRUIT LAND F
S'.YML',
J. R.
MITCHELL'S
Bargain
List
10 Acres, 1 1=2 Miles from Town, about 3 acres planted in spring
1907, trees two years old.    Price, only $1,600.   Fenced.
10 Acres, 1 mile from town; over 300 trees in third year, will be
in bearing next year; peaches, cherries, apples, plums, &c.
Price, only $2,200.   Fenced.
18 Acres, 10 below main ditch ; 8 acres planted, in 3rd year; a
very choice property.   Only $3,800.    Fenced.
18 Acres, 10 below main ditch; 9 under good cultivation. Only
$3,ooo.   Fenced.
14 Acres, 10 below main ditch; 5 1=2 acres planted, 232 peaches,
6o apricots, 226 cherries, 17 apples, one year. A choice lot.
Only $3,5oo.
40 Acres in block or lot, for hay or small fruits ; very central
at very low price.
10 Acres on Main Street, good hay land, only $2,100.
OFFICE,
PENTICTON, B. C
As recommended by the Provincial Fruit Inspector, in concentrated form, in 1, i, and \
gallon cans, with full directions
for use. These mixtures are
put up by the R. C. Soap
Works Co., Victoria, in conformity wiLh the formulas recommended by the Provincial
Fruit Inspector. The undersigned has been appointed sole
agent for these goods in the
Penticton district and will
have a full supply of Winter
Spray and Whale Oil Soap in
stock in time for winter spraying.
For particulars apply to
J. A. NESBITT,
Ellis Street,      Penticton, B.C.
> llilll IIHIWII llllllll IIMIIMHO ���> ���>
i p�� ����� *^fc tt "^fci tt ^m tt ^mt> tit ^m. tt ^m. tt *m* o^����.oq
1M GROWERS ATTENTION!)
: ,��� *
I The Fraser Valley Nurseries /
Prices
25c. 50c. and
75c.
Neat Tablets in cloth
textures with envelopes.
Visiting Cards.    .
Main's    Pharmacy.
NOTICE
Take notice that H. Harlow, of Penticton, mason, sixty tlays after date
intends to apply to the Honorable Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works fo ,.
a lease of the following foreshore, viz ���
Commencing at Northwest corner of
lot X, block 39, Penticton, Yale Distr ct
thence Northerly 34U feet; thence '.'.J
210 feet; thence Southerly .171 w.
containing 1.7 of an acre, more or l0SB'
for a cement factory. '
LO-fl II. I1AKJ.OW
September 12, 1908.
LIMITED
BURNABY LAKE
Comprising 52 Acres. Capital $100,000.
We have all kinds of Fruit Trees for sale as follows:
2 Year Old :   5,500 Cherries; 1,700 Apricots; 3,600 Plums; 5,860 Peaches;
800 Crabs ; 7,825 Apples ; 950 Pears.
1 Year Old :-l,600 Crabs; 112,000 Apples ; 2,550 Pears,     100,000  Small
Fruits of all kinds.
We invite inspection We never substitute,
Homo-Grown Stock.    No more danger of trees being destroyed at  Per ;
of Entry. Prices quoted on application. All trees planted in t' ,J
Fall which die are replaced free, and in Spring at half price.
Sale   of   Mineral   Claims for Unpaid Taxes in the
Kettle River Assessme it District, British Columbia.
I hereby give notice that on Monday, the 2nd day of November, 1908, at
the Court House, Fairview, B., ('., ut the hour of ten o'clock, in the forenoon, 1
shall sell by Public Auction, I ie t'rown Granted Mineral Claims hereinafter set
out, for the delinquent taxes thereon, as set out in the list herein, being unpaid
at this date, together with ' ,ie costs and expenses of advertising, unless the
amount due is sooner paid ;
m
��� ,( pardon
od
!'. Hurrah, t-t nl ,
E. II. Thurston
lv II. Thin   tP
J, I). Breei*
j. n. Bror   .
Lemon P   ���|' Mining Coi
'*"'','       .HI,,,,   	
\nl*   to Harris	
','��� '     Devlin ���
J1   .tiBh Lion (1'iM Mining G
ntlsh Lion Gold Mining Ci
A. E. Asheroft, otal 	
W. Elaon 	
I 	
J. J. JONES, President.
C. F. SPROTT, Vice-President.
P. E. J0.NES, Secretary-Treasurer.
G. E. CLAYTON, Dire -tor
L. C. HILL,
F.   J. HART,
ILocal Agent
JOHN STEUART
P. O. Box 33, Summerland,
Kf
.tf
.tf
.tf
.tZf
.tf
.tf
B.C.
E. J. FINQH
Painter, Paperhanger
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a Specialty.
WALL PAPER Carried in Stock.
Box 196-       Main St.
Subscribe for
The Pent, ton Press
THE
\
���5
V
I
)
i I J. I'. Kelly, etal .
J.    II. W. Yates	
)
-- lMT T     r^r^O.I'l^   Ranges, Cooking Stoves,
= j 1< A.J-^-Li   V jrUtl Mr* Heating Stoves.
TO   HAND General     -    Hardware
VV. li. Thomas
S. M. Johnson, et al .
S. M. Johnson, eta] .
Chas. Phipps, et nl
William Kintz, el al.
Name of claim
Bo ton	
It. A. liarli m   ..
Carmi 	
Independence, ..
Oro Kino	
Lemon.   	
Hunter	
Highland Chief,.
War Basle	
, British 	
. British Lion... .
, Mucin	
Jewell   	
Jumbo Fraction.
. Ml. Adams	
Nickorson	
. Myrtle	
. Logan, 	
. Henrietta 	
. Queen of Sheba .
Lot
Taxes Duo
Costs
A
Number
$ 8 00
2845
$2 00
2857
1 50
2 0(1
2862
13 "(I
2 00
11 Ml
12 7.r.
2 III)
1448
12 75
2 00
750
la no
2 00
2S 1)
9 00
2 00
8846
13 (io
2 Oil
1870
12 75
2 00
11W7
t:i (ii)
2 00
11ISK
11) 50
2 00
2X47
12 25
2 00
2786
9 III)
2 00
man
1 75
2 00
.j        1446
4 75
2 1)0
1933
18 (10
2 00
1654
12 (10
2 (10
27!W
12 75
2 00
.1        27111
12 50
2 00
.1        8127
1 75
2 00
Total
Amount
Due
$10 00
8 50
15 1)0
11 75
II 75
15 (10
11 00
15 00
14 75
15 Oil
12 f1
14 6
11 io
3 76
6 75
15 00
14 CO
14 75
14 60
8 75
Fairview, B. C, October 2nd, 1008.
13-4
H. A. TURNER,
Deputy Assessor and Collector,
Kettle River Assessment District
Penticton Fjairy
Daily delivery of Fr  ,sh Milk to
all parts of th'   . Town.
12 quarts fo,- $1.00, ca.sh n,o ,thly in ,���,,������,,,
Tickets, 11 quarts for *l.or cllsh ,��� mlv,mL���
If accounts are run. 10 q\
arts for $1.00.
H. JH. McNeil
Prop
PENTICTON HARDWARE CO.
NOTICE
FOR SALE
two
Notice is hereby given that we will prosecute      Business block on Main Street;
any person or persons found hunting; or trespass-   storey with two  compartments   down
ing upon our properties.
S-18
W. M. GILLESPIE,
1). GILLESPIE,
W. .1. GILLESPIE,
Y C. KITLEY.
JOHN PRATHER.
stairs and ball upstairs, $2,500.    Lot 63,
seven and one-half  acres on  Fairview
Road, $2,200.       J. D. McDonald,
12-tI Potlatch, Idaho.

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