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The Penticton Press Oct 24, 1908

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Array '
**A~ s
^be   Jbenttcton
OCi  2d 1908        J
f
��
VOL. 3.   No. 15.
PENTICTON, B.C., SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1908.
$1.00 Per Year In Advance
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Iir.\r>  OFFICE, TOKONTO ESTABLISHED  1807
B. E. WALKER, President I  Paid-Up Capital, $10,000,000
ALEX. LAIRD, Central Manager j  Reserve FlUld, -       5.000,000
Branches throughout Canada, and in the United States and England
BANK MOftlEY ORDERS
ISS *ED AT THE  FuLLOWINQ RATES;
$0 i.nd u: uer       3 cents'
Over 55 and not exceeding $10         6 cenis
"   $10        " " $30       10 cents
"   $30        " " $50       15 cents
These Orders ;ire puy.ibiu al pur at every I'filce cf a Chartered Bank in Canada
(Yukon excepted), and at the principal banking points in the United Slates. They
are negotiable at $4.1)0 tc the �� sleiling in Grout Biitain and Ireland,
They form an excellent rrrihod cf remittirp small sums of money with safety and
at small cost, and may be obtained without delay. 116
Penticton Branch     *    -    J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
A. B. Campbell. A. E. Kay.      (��J]
">[ Campbell & Kay I
(Successors to Penticton Lumber Syndicate)      (jj)
%    WELL, HOW ABOUT IT ?    %
^f  We think you are doing fairly well, still don't >*/
^f stop at that. te*
jj   We Have Lots of Building Material Left Yet. rm
ca�� ^�� tt ^m. tt ^m�� tt ^mm. tit ^+m tt 'mm. tt ^m* tt ^m* t tm
* WlE want the Cash Trade, and lo secure it will give one Photo ��
a \a/ Coupon on our famous Cosmos Studios for every 25c. purchase J
B ** (with the exception of our Weekly Bargains) 150 coupons will ff
f entitle bearer to 12 Photos of himself, and 1 Enlargement free. I
|E.S.LAKE&Co.j
f MAIN   STREET  CASH  GROCERS. f
* *
ii     \lf����|.|.. StiltWafers 25c per tin r
* WGGKIV Graham Wafors 25c per tin f* I       *
k      ' ' vvni j Cambridge Wafers asc uer tin I   n.L     1
J D ��� - :~_ ,, Oatmeal Wafers 25c per tin I    Jill J
f tSar^ainS Royal Crown Soap 20c per pkt I J] .Ml ff
f ���-�������*��� S                " Golden West Ammonia Powder.... ltc for 2 pitta VWCJII f
��� Lolden West Soap 20c per pkt t
Wt ^m* tt ^m* tt ^m* tt <*m. tzt ^m* tt 'mm, ������ ^^ tt ^m�� <E3
JUST RECEIVED
A large consignment of
Single and Double
Light and Heavy HARNESS
Express and Driving
KENT & SON
W* ^5 *M ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^** ^^ vc^^^ ^^ ^K ^W* ^^ ^^ ^K ^K ^^ ^K ^K ^K
COMMERCIAL
Livery, Feed and-Sale Stable
DIGNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors.
If you /ant a Stylish Outfit, this is the place to come. You can always
get teams just when you want them. We make a specialty of keeping
good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack horses.
We are also putting in Hay and Grain for sale, and as we buy for cash
we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit.
Special  Attention To The   Wants Of  Commercial  Men.
'A\ ^A% *M ^A% AM.\ A*\ A*\ *JA A��\ A\ AA\ gAS /A> f�� \ A^\ fAN ^A\ /A%/A^ /A> A^\ *AS fA> ^A^ *j\ <KA>
Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
Stage Connects with Steamer "Okanagan" at Penticton, with Great Northerr
Railway at Keremeos, and with stage to Hedley and Princeton. Leaves at (i a.n
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,  and a general Drayinp.
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.       Penticton.
i
i
Penticton Store
Alfred It Wade, Prop.
Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, Groceries
and General Merchandize of all Sorts
A -rent for     GIANT P0WDER Ca
A^ent lor    okanagan flour mills co.
1
Goods deli "'ered through the town.
PENTICTON,
Prompt attention to orders.
:rsnTJ
ajaaasanaH
B.C.
THE POHTICAL ISSUES.
Martin Burred Addresses Large
and Appreciative Gathering.
Scores Government for Dishonest
Practices.
Despite the unfavorable weather conditions Steward's hall was
well filled on Monday evening
when Martin Burrell discussed
the political issues. A. H. Wade,
the president of the local Conservative association, performed the
duties of chairman, and, after a
few introductory remarks, invited opposition speakers to the
platform. Geo. E. Winkler responded for Chas. Bunting, the
Socialist candidate, and then the
chairman called upon Martin
Burrell to address the meeting.
Mr. Burrell in beginning his
speech said that this was the
most interesting election since
1836 when the present government had come into power. The
Liberals were appealing to the
country without a policy, with
the exception that the Government had stolen a few planks
from the Conservative platform.
The finishing of the Grand Trunk
Pacific could not be considered a
policy. As regards free mail delivery the Conservatives had
first brought the subject up in
the House, but the Liberals,
among whom were Mr. Lemieux
and Mr. Ross, had opposed it.
The same was true of the new
election act and the civil service
reform bill, but the government
had shorn the measures of their
most effective provisions. Mr.
Burrell dwelt upon the necessity
of having an honest, zealous and
capable set of civil servants.
Pull, not merits, was now the
determining factor in promotion
an:l this was driving out the best
men. Great Britain had reformed her civil service fifty
years ago and the Unite j States
hers twenty years ago. Canada
was away behind both countries.
Mr. Burrell had come out as a
candidate largely because the
Conservative party had a man at
its head of the stamp of Mr.
Borden who was pledged to a
thorough civil service reform.
The Conservative party had
been defeated at the previous
eleition upon a policy of government ownership of the Grand
Trunk Pacific. That defeat was
the greatest of mistakes as subsequent developments had proved. The Government had said
that the road would cost the
people of Canada only thirteen
million dollars. It had already
cost 147,000,000 and the people
of Canada were under a cash obligation for 192,000,000. The
country had paid $5,600,000 for
the construction of the Quebec
bridge and it was now a mass of
twisted iron.
The speaker went on to give
numerous  details   incidental   to
the construction of the G. T. P., j
the way the   Government pro-1
posed financing the enterprise, j
etc.     Mr.  Borden had insisted |
that as the people of Canada had
guaranteed three fourths of the
stock in the company the Govern-!
ment should own that amount of ]
the stock, but Mr. Ross and his I
party had voted it down.     The j
Conservatives   ha'd   worked   to!
have   construction  work begun
at this end of the line simultan-1
eously with  the east,   but four!
years had elapsed before a pick i
had touched B. C.
Mr. Burrell next took up the
question of Japanese Immigra-|
tion outlining the situation from
its inception, and explaning how:
theJGovernment had practically;
turned over the control of im- j
migration to the Japanese government by accepting unreservedly   the   British  treaty  with
Japan.    Mr. Ross had not op-!
! posed the adoption of that treaty
: an 1 British Columbia had got
jover four thousand Japanese
I laborers as a consequence.
Dealing with the Election Bill
Mr. Burrell ventured to say that
neither Duncan Ross nor any
other Liberal candidate would
touch upon the question. On
account of the vigorous fight put
up by Mr. Borden the Liberals
had not been able to perpetrate
upon Canada one of the most iniquitous measures ever introduced. The Liberals had introduced the system of provincial
franchise, but this act would
have abolished the system as far
as British Columbia, Manitoba
and Western Ontario were concerned.
After holding the undivided
attention of his hearers for over
an hour, Mr. Burrell gave place
to Mr. Winkler who addressed
the gathering for twenty minutes in the interests of Charles
Bunting, the Socialist candidate.
Mr. Winkler pointed out that,
while there was lots of money in
the banks, and crops were good,
there was yet an immense army
of unemployed. This was due
t~> the capitalistic system. The
Socialists wanted the people to
own the trusts and thus abolish
the evil.
Mr. Burrell then continued his
address, speaking for another
hour. The Conservatives had
not abandoned the principles of
government ownership. They
also stood for better terms for
this province. Mr. Ross stated
that British Columbia had already
received five million dollars more
than it was entitled to. This
was unpatriotic, and Mr. Ross
was not borne out by Wm. Mc-
lnnis, J. A. McDonald, Laurier,
the provincial Premiers, Winston
Churchill or the Imperial Government.
Touching upon the fruit question he said that the tariff on
fruit was an important matter.
Apples coming from the States-
into Canada paid forty cents
Juty per barrel, while those going from Canada to the States
oaid seventy cents. Our peaches
paid two cents a pound against
me cent on the American product coming into Canada. He
believed that the fruit industry
should have legitimate, fair, protection the same as other industries. Canada imported three
million dollars' worth of fruit
from the States duty free, while
only half a million dollars' worth
paid duty. When the question
of the revision of the tariff had
come up in the House, Ross was
outting into provincial politics
and neglecting his duty at Ottawa.
The great issue at the present
election was the moral question.
Canada wanted honest men. It
would be folly not to admit that
there were honest Liberals, but
Laurier had not proved heavy
enough to hold down the lid of
the public treasury. During the
Conservative administration,
when charges were made, they
were probed to the bottom, but
the Liberal government had
balked investigation. To back
up this remark he cited many
cases such as the Atlantic Trading Co., the Arctic Expedition,
and timber and land deals.
Before closing Mr. Burrell
touched upon the question of the
postponement of the election in
Yale-Cariboo. The Conservative
government had always managed to have the election brought
off on the same date as the other
elections. Mr. Ross had opposed
this plan hoping to ride to office
on the result of the elections'
throughout the Dominion. There
was no room for excuse on the
ground that the constituency was
large and there was not time to
make the necessary arrangements, as it was possible to get
to the utmost limits of the riding
with the ballots, boxes, etc., and
make all other arrangements in
ten days' time.
Mr.   Bun-ell's   remarks   were
characterized   throughout   by n
I tone of sincerity,   fairness and
moderation, and  the  impression
i he made upon his hearers was |
decidedly favorable.    The meet-1
ing was brought  to a close by!
three cheers   for  the Conserva-1
tive candidate.
PARKER WILLIAMS
Outlines   Socialist   Propaganda.
A Higher Type of Socialism.
The Socialist meeting held on
Thursday evening was in a measure a disappointment to the very
representative assemblage that
gathered to hear the issues put
forth by the party discussed by
Chas. Bunting, the Socialist candidate for Yale - Cariboo, and
Parker Williams, the Socialist
member for Newcastle in the
provincial legislature. Mr. Bunting was unavoidably absent so
that the burden of the meeting
fell upon Mr. Williams. The
chair was taken by Geo. E.
Winkler who spoke for twenty
minutes prior to introducing the
speaker.
Mr. Williams addressed the
meeting for one and three-fourths
hours, his remarks being charac
terized throughout by clearness
and force coupled with fairness
and moderation. He argued
that the condition of the working
.lass was worse now than it had
been since the end of the 17th
century, while the best period
had been in the 13th century.
Socialism, he declared to be on
the one hand an interpretation
of history and on the other the
applying of that knowledge to
the moulding of the future.
Socialism would not interfere
with a person working as an individual, but advocated the common ownership of the means of
production where numbers of individuals were concerned. It
stood for production for use and
not for profit. He illustrated
how the perfection of machinery
ind the formation of trusts were
cheapening and simplifying production at the same time throwing large numbers out of employment, and yet not cheapening
the product to the consumer.
The capitalist class alone profited.
The party had been accused of
disloyalty, but this was not true
for he and the other Socialist
members had taken the oath of
loyalty to the king and constitution. They had a difference with
Lieut.-Gov. Dunsmuir upon other
grounds. The Canadian constitution stood for government by
majority and that was enough
for him. Socialism did not oppose Christianity but interpreted
it differently to some of the
Churches. It stood for the home
while capitalism stood for the
destruction of the home.
"The Holy City" at Steward's Hall,
Friday, Oct. 30tn.
Grace Bonner, the impersonator and ventriloquist, gave an
entertainment in the Methodist
church on Wednesday evening
under the auspices of the Young
Peoples' Union. On account of
the lack of advertising the attendance was rather small, but Miss
Bonner proved herself an artist I
in her line. Tho presentation
of the various chactcrs in "Esmeralda" was especially cleverly'
dond.
FOR SALE.
Sawing outfit.
engine; dray; saw.
for $260.   Apply
Circular saw ;  6 h.p.
Cost $5(10; will sell
II. HUYCKE.
Local and Personal
Fresh celery at King's.
Peachland, as well as Penticton, is taking steps to incirpor-
ate.
Pratt's Astral Oil $4.00 a case
at King's.
"The Holy City," Steward's
Hall, Friday, the 30th inst.
D. A. Stewart returned from
Winnipeg the latter part of last
week.
W. E. Welby returned Tuesday
after spending a week or two at
Vernon.
Arthur Rowe returned Tuesday
evening after spending a few
days at Kelowna.
J. W. Thompson this summer
grew a potato that weighed five
and a half pounds.
J. Lochore is making arrangements for the erection of a house
on his property on the bench.
The date of "The Holy City"
has been changed from Thursday
the 29th to Friday the 30th inst.
Remember, the Ladies' Aid
of the Methodist church give a
birthday social on the evening of
Nov. 4.
Mrs. D. A. Stewart went to
Vernon Wednesday morning to
attend a convention of the W. C.
T. U.
Mrs. Herbert Acheson, of Saskatoon, Sas., is at present visiting her sister, Miss B. Fowler,
of Penticton.
W. H. T. Gahan, barrister and
solicitor, left for Kamloops Thursday on business in connection
with the incorporation of Penticton.
Mrs. G. B. Harris and daughter Miss Ethel Harris, left on
Wednesday after spending several weeks with Gordon Harris in
Penticton.
Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Ellis, of
Victoria, the Penticton pioneers,
spent from Friday to Monday
with Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Wade
in Penticton.
At the local rifle shoot last
Saturday the gold button was
won by L. C. Barnes, the silver
by A. S. Miller and the bronze
by F. H. Latimer.
There will be a three cornered
rifle shoot at Summerland to-day
between the Summerland, Kelowna and Penticton teams. Col.
Holmes, of Victoria, will referee
the match.
The dance to be given by the
ladies of St. Saviour's church
will be held on the evening of
the 29th inst. instead of the 30th
inst. Tickets, gentlemen, $1.50;
ladies 50cts.
On Thursday. 22nd inst. Mrs.
F. H. Latimer presented the
Editor with a fine red rose from
her garden. Although the rose
grew in the open it bore no evidence of frost.
Duncan Ross, Liberal candidate for Yale-Caridoo and present representative for the constituency in the House of Commons, will address the electors
in Steward's Hall, Penticton,
next Tuesday evening, the 27th
inst.
The party of C. P. R. engineers under H. E. C. Carry, who
have been working all Summer
between Nicola and Penticton,
have at last reached this point
via Trout Creek. They have
moved their camp from Trout
Creek point to near the bridge on
Fairview Road and will complete
the intervening portion of the
railway survey in a few days.
FOR SALE.
A number of Young Pigs.    Apply
15-1 1). W. CROWLEY & CO. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. OCTOBER 24, 1908.
THE PENTICTON PRESS
Kirkby-McLaughlan.
ISSUED    EVERY    SATURDAY   AT
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
W. J. CLEMENT.
Subscription $1.00 Per Year
Advance.    Foreign, $1.50.
m
Advertising Rates:
Transient Advertisements���Not exceeding one inch, one insertion, 50c.;
for each additional insertion, 25c.
Lodge Notices, Professional Cards, &c.
$1.00 per inch, per month.
Land and limber Notices���30 days, $5;
60 days, .ST.
Legal Advertising First insertion, 10
cents per line; each subsequent insertion, 5c. per line.
Reading Notices in Local News Column
15c per line, first insertion; 10c. per
line, each subsequent insertion.
Contract Advertisements Kates arranged according to Bpace taken.
All changes in contract advertisements must lie in the hands ol' the
printer by Tuesday evening to ensure
publication in tlie next issue.
Prohibition in Kansas.
Hon. C. W. Trickett, assistant
attorney-general of Kansas, has
recently made the following
statement with regard to the
closing of saloons in Kansas City
and the effect thereof :
This city is the metropolis of
Kansas, with a population of
about 100,000. The inhabitants
are largely wage-earners, and
represent every nationality. We
are located on the border, only j
an invisible line separating us
from Kansas City, Missouri. The
city ranks fifth in the list 'of
manufacturing cities of the
United States.
One year ago there were 256
saloons in this country, 200 gam- j
bling dens, and about 60 houses
of social evil.    To-day there is I
not a saloon, no open gambling''
den, nor a disorderly house.     It i
is the largest city in the world
without these dens of vice,   and i
as we have now existed about
twelve months without them,  it
affords a living example of the
fact that a large city can grow
and prosper without such evils.
At the commencement of the
contest a large number of our
people thought it would ruin
bisiness and destroy our pros-
perity, but it has stimulated
business in all lines. I	
Our population has increased September
at a greater rate than ever be-i
fore. jDATE
The deposits of the banks have
A large number of friends and
invited guests assembled at the
Presbyterian church, Wednesday
morning at 10 o'clock, to witness
the marriage of Annie, eldest
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John
McLaughlan, to Mr. David Kirk-
by, formerly of Winnipeg, but a
resident of Peachland for the
past number of years. Rev. Mr.
| Whyte, pastor of the church,
performed the ceremony.
The Girls' Club, of which the
| bride was an active member since
its organization, decorated the
church beautifully with chrysanthemums, yellow and white (the
club colors), ferns and palms.
At a few minutes after ten the
groom arrived, accompanied by
Mr. L. Affleck, who acted as
groomsman, and was followed by
the bride charmingly dressed in
cream silk, veil, wreaths of or-
inge blossoms, carrying a magnificent boquet of cream roses,
and leaning on the arm of her
father. She was followed by
.VIiss Robina McLaughlan, the
bride's sister, as bridesmaid.
The wedding march was most,
effectively played by Mrs. Whyte.
After the ceremony the bridal
party, including the bride's
sister, Mrs. Taylor, who drove
up from Summerland with Mr.
Taylor and children, repaired to
the home of the bride's parents,
where a splendid repast was
spread.
They boarded the Str. Okanagan at 4:45, going by the lower
country route via Oroviile to Se-
1 attle, Rellingham and other
coast cities. They expect to return the latter part of November.
The large number of presents,
costly specimens of silverware,
cut glass, and china, showed the
esteem in which the young
couple are held. The groom's
present to the bride was a pearl
sunburst, and to the groomsman
and bridesmaid er.ch a pretty pin,
in token of the event.
DIRECTORY.
Annual
Clearance Sale
CHURCH SERVICES
.St. Saviour's Church, Fairview Avenue ��� Vicar
Rev. J. A. Cleland. Celebration nf Holy Communion the 1st and Srd Sundays of the month
: ., "<'1'"'k matin*: the 2nd Sunday at 8 a
m. Morning prayer at 11 a.m. Even.sonir at
7:j0 p.m.
Presbyterian services each Sunday in Steward's
Hall at 11a.m. or 7:30 p.m. Kev. Jas. Houd
pastor. ��� '
each Sunday in Steward's Hall,
7:30 p. in.     Key.  A. S.  Baki
Baptist service
at 11 a. in.i
pastor.
Presbyterian and   Baptist
morning and evening.
MetlKKli.it services in church each Sunday at 11 a.
m   =...! ?::{u p.m.;   Sunday School 2:45 p.m.
rayer meetings K p.m. (>n Wednesday.    Kev.
er,
services   alternate.
I'i
We are about to enter upon our second year of business
in Penticton and being desirous of starting our new year
with a clean stock, we are going to sacrifice all odd and
broken lines, and some lines we will clear out entirely.
Every department will be affected, and genuine bargains
will prevail. LOOK OUT FOR THE HAND BILLS.
W. R. KING & Co.
'Phone 25.
Ellis Street.
"."BHJ*1   n.^ i'.; M'JH!'.'*"'/.-'*".*1"*'
m
���CBS
Weather Report.
Observations at Dominion Government Meteorological  Station
at Penticton for  the month of
1908:
MAXIMUM
TEMPERATURE
MINIMUM
TEMPERATURE
dollars.
Our   public  institutions  have
had to employ additional clerks.
The attendance in our public
schools has increased largely, and
we have had to employ eighteen
additional teachers. The teachers inform us that this increase
is largely of boys and girls of
from twelve to sixteen years of
age. who prior to the closing of
the saloons were compelled to:
assist in supporting the family, j
by reason of the father spending
his wages for drink.
The charitable institutions report a reduction of more than
two-thirds in the demand for aid.
The juvenile court, which has
the care of dependent children,
had but two applications in the
past eight months, while prior to
the closing of the joints from
eight to eighty-eight children
required aid and assistance each uging g reljable egg {qq��
m��n. ��� ,       ,   . ���    ,     Kent has purchased from one
Prior to   the  closing  of   the ,,_   ,eadin{f   poultryrnen   in
2 70 	
..511
, 48
45
4 90  	
5 76  	
6 77J	
7 74  	
8                  73
43
45
44
44
49
0 (15 	
10 74 	
11 78  	
12 78 	
43
48
, . 46
.   46
13 74J	
14 74  	
15 77��	
l(i 72 	
17 (18 	
1!)                  72
. . 53
55
.. 48J
40
431
39
20 75 	
21 70  	
22 64  	
44
45
44
. 371
25                  71
26 681	
42
38
:il	
. 391
. 371
51
The total rainfall was .88.
Don't Keep Hens
X,
TV*
���?��<&
but make the hens keep you by
to the closing of the
joints we sent from fifteen to
twenty-five young men  to   the
reformatory every year.   In the market for twenty years and hag
twelve months since closing we '
have sent but two.
I.
_       of
the   leading   poultryrnen   in A-
merica a valuable recipe for egg
food.    This food has been on the
given   general    satisfaction    to
mv j. ,.     i those who have used it through-
Ihe expenses for Prosecuting out the United Stateg and g*
. ada. The same people have
bought it year after year because
lit has proven to be the most
| profitable egg producing food
they have found, by keeping
their hens laying all winter when
eggs are high; and when this
food is given breeding fowls
their  eggs   have shown  better
criminals have been reduced
$25,000 per annum. Expense for
the police force has been reduced
as much more.
NOTICE
JUST ARRIVED
Another car of
McLaughlin    Carriages
Also a
Car of Cockshutt  Goods
Comprising the following :���
Adams'   Log   Trucks,   Adams'
Teaming  Trucks,   Adams' one-
horse   Wagons    (low   wheels),
Adams' Lorries and Drays.
Cockshutt 3, 2, and 1-horse
Plows.
Cockshutt Drag and Lever and
Spring-Tooth Harrows.
Cockshutt Wheel Scrapers and
Drag Scrapers.
Cockshutt 1-horse Cultivators.
Cockshutt Potato Diggers.
Also Bolster Springs, Light and
Heavy Harness, Sharpies Cream
Separators, I. H. C. Gas Engines,
Ideal Pumping Plants, etc.
Call and Inspect our Stock.
S. T. ELLIOTT,
KELOWNA, B. C.
FREE
T
Golden West Soap and
Golden West Washing Powder
FIFTY CENTS' WORTH   OI?  SILVERWARE  FREE
K. \V. Hibbert! pastor.
: Young  Peoples' Christian Union   meets  in   the
Methodist church every Tuesday at 8 p.m.
SOCIETIES
A. F. & A. M. meet in Mason's Hall. Main St., 1st
Wednesday in each month at H p.m.
W, Q, \V. meet in Woodmens' Hall, Ellis St., 2nd
and lih Saturday in each month at 8 p.m.
I. O. O. F. meet in Odd  Fellows' Hall,  Main St..
every Monday ai 8 p.m.
I., p. L. meet in Woodmen's Hall 2nd and 4th
Friday in each month at k p. m.
School Hoard meets 1st Monday in each month
at S p.m.
Hoard of Trade-*Annual general meeting. 2nd
Wednesday in January of each year. General
quarterly meetings, 2nd Wednesdays in January, April, July and October at 8 p.m.
STAGES
Stage leaves for Keremeos, H��Hlley and Princeton, at (J a. ni. on Tuesdays. Thursdays and Saturdays. Keturnson Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Stage leaves for Fairview and Oroviile on Tuesdays. Thursdays and Saturdays at &80 a. m. Returns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at
6 p. m.
POST OFFICE.
Hours 9 a. m. to fi. p. m.
Registered Letter and Money Order wicket
closes 5 p. m.
Wicket opened for half an hour after mail is
distributed.
Arrivals���Per Str, Okanagan: Daily except
Sunday (i p. m.; Per stage from Hedley, Keremeos, Olalla. Allen Grove, Oroviile, Fairview,
and White Lake; Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 0 p. m.
Closing���For boat and stages: 8 p. m. daily except Friday and Saturday. On Friday 9 p. m..and
for Monday',-; boat and stages: 8.45 p. m. Sundays.
C. P. R. TIME TABLE
SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH
Daily both ways except Sunday.
SOUTH BOUND    STATION    NORTH BOUND
Sicamous  6.00 p.m.
. Enderby  4.48
Armstrong  4.08
.ar Vernon......lv  3.30   "
7.30a. m..
6.27
8.B2
8.30
8.80
9.45
10.00 p. m
11.10 "
3.00 "
4.45 "
6.00 "
lv.
.ar..
.lv..
...Vernon ar 2.30
,Ok, Landing .. .lv 2.15 "
Ok. Landing .  ,ar 11.00 a.m.
.. Kelowna  8.20 "
. Peachland  7.25 "
Summerland  6.30 "
. Penticton  6.00 "
HOTEL,  PENTICTON.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.
RATES $2.50 PER DAY
A. Barnes       - -       Prop.
PENTICTON, B.C.
W. H. T. GAHAN
BARRISTER and SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
PENTICTON,      -       -       B C
WITH EVERY FIFTY CENT PURCHASE OF GOLDEN
Notice is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner nl' Lands and
Works for a lease of the following fore-   e    i.:ijj i    i ���   i     i    i   ,
shore, viz.:   Commencing at the N. w.  fertility and chicks hatched from
corner of Lot 2, Block 81),  Penticton, ; them have been more hardv
District, thence northerly 346 fee1"      ���- ���   -
Yale
thence east 60 feet; thence southerly
!i II feet; thence west lit) feet; containing .49 acres, more ur less.
II. .1. MOORE.
September lth, 1908, g o
This food is now made at the
"Lake View Poultry Yards."
Try it. Money refunded if not
satisfactory.
Okanagan College
SUMMERLAND, B. C.
The Pall Term will begin on
Wednesday, Sept. 23, 1908
College Matriculation, junior and
senior; Commercial Course ; Stenography and Typewriting; Vocal
and Instrumental Music.
For   further  particulars   address
the Principal,
Everett W. Sawyer.
Summerland, B. C.
WEST_SQAP_AND GOLDEN WEST
WASHING  POWDER.
To obtain this Silverware, all you have to do is to purchase 50c.
worth of Golden West Soap (2 cartons) or Washing Powder; or
25c. worth of each, AND ASK YOUR GROCER for a Silver
Plated Teaspoon FREE (which is worth at least 25c), then cut out
the coupon off the two cartons and send them to the Manufacturers
including 2c. for postage, and obtain another Silver Plated Teaspoon FREE.
In this way your
Golden West Soap and Golden  West
Washing Powder costs you
Nothing.
GET THE "SPOONEY" FEELING.
Address:   Premium Department,
Standard Soap Company, Limited,
Calgary, Alberta.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
Notary Public.
KELOWNA,        - - B.
Dr.C.A.JACKSON
DENTIST
S. O. Land Company's   Block
PENTICTON, B. C.
'Phone II.
CHAS. WERE
Accountant & Auditor,
Notary Public
PENTICTON, B. C.
II. MURK
EASY SHAVE      - -       25c.
ARTISTIC HAIR-CUT   -      ���  25c.
Shaving Tickets 6 for $1.00.
C. P. R.
LAND FOR
SALE
mpr
red.
PENTICTON
& OROVILLE
STAGE
Via Fairview
Leaves Penticton Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., arriving at Oroviile the same day at 6 p. m.
Through Fare - $6.00
Arnott & Hine,
FAIRVIEW. B. C.
THE
Penticton Baker
-FOR-
Good Wholesome Bread,
Cakes and Pastry.
GIVE US A TRIAL AND WE
WILL PLEASE YOU.
L. T. ROBERC i E.
Choice fruit lots,
unimproved
FIRE INSURANCE-The Sun of London, Eng., and Queen.    Why hot insure
in the best; they cost no more.
Apply to   .
.1. R. MITCHELL.
Galarneau &
McKenzie
BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
When
you   think  of
Look us up.
Building
ADOLPHUS GALARNEAU  W. A. MCKENZIE
NOTICE
FRUIT TREES-Well-grown stock.
Large quantity of apple trees for sale,
only few choice varieties grown : also
small stock of ornamental trees. Apply
for varieties and price to Manager,
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd ,
15-tf Vernon, B. C. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. OCTOBER 21, 1908.
���: :��� :������:���** ���:��� :��:������:��� *���:������:���**���:���
SAe
Plow Woman
By ELEANOR. GATES.
Author of "The Biography of ��,
Prairie Girl "
Cnvurtght. ling. I,,i McClure, PhllliiM A
Company.
*********+****************
At the shuck Dallas, too, was pondering���over a strange contrariety. Their
home was in (lunger, perhaps their
very lives. Yet tbe day hud fulfilled
ils promise of the morning��� it was the
happiest in Iter life!
The ramshackle ferryboat was firmly wedged in a drydock of Ice on the
western side of the Missouri. As
Lounsbury passed it, with his horse
1 illo'.vlnx plucl;:'v h rp-���adeucle fashion, lie shouted for old .Michael. Bat
long before the river hud Hooded, when
it was edging and covering only iu the
least swift places, the pilot had made
I his final crossing, run the wheezy
steamer nose-on agftlUBl the bank and
deserted her. So the storekeeper received no answering halloo, lie was
disappointed. It was desirable to embroil as few as possible In the Lancaster dispute. Old Michael, already a
factor, was needed to act the picket-
to fire a miming signal If Matthews
left Shanty Town.
i A substitute wns found at the stables. The storekeeper as he rushed
away after disposing of his mount
came upon Lieutenant Fraser busily
roachlng his own riding animal, a
flighty buckskin cayuse that no one
else cared to handle and that was affectionately known iu barracks as the
"she devil." The men had met before, around the billiard table at the
sutler's, and Lounsbury had set the
young olllcer down for a chivalrous
but rather chicken hearted youngster,
who had chosen his profession unwisely. So, his story told, tlie storekeeper
was altogether surprised at Fraser's
epirited enthusiasm and quick response.
"I've nothing to do, old man," he
said as they went toward the parade
ground. "I can help us well as not.
So just take your time. I'll watch
for you."
"I hardly think our man 'II show his
nose before dark. But I can't leave
the way open"���
"Don't fret."
They parted at the flagpole, the West
Fointer going down to the river and
Lounsbury hurrying off In the opposite direction.
Colonel Cutnmines' entry and recep
lion   rooms   woiv   ito    led    when   the
storekeeper en ��eore of oitt
fers    wi'i-o   ��� i    in    llttlp
groups talking' excitedly, nut Louns-
Lu/y was too anxious and distraught
to notice anything unusual. lie hurried up to a tall, sad faced man whose
mustache, thin and coarse, drooped
sheer over his mouth, giving him the
look of a martyred walrus.
-���Can I see the K 0.. Captain Oliver?" he asked.    "It's important."
"I'll find out." answered the captain.
"But 1 dou't believe you can. He's
up to his ears." lie disappeared Into
the next room.
Lounsbury bowed to several officers,
though he scarcely saw them. He
heard Oliver's low voice, evidently announcing him, then the colonel's.
"Yes, bring him iu," cried the latter.
"Maybe he'll  know."
The storekeeper entered without
waiting. Colonel Cummings stood in
the center of the room. It was the
room kuown as his library, iu compliment to a row of dog eared volumes
that had somehow survived many a
wet bivouac aud rough march. But It
resembled a museum. In the corners,
on the walls beneath the bulky heads
of buffalo and the branching antlers
of elk, there were swords, tomahawks,
bows and arrows, strings of glass
wampum, cartridge belts, Indian bonnets, drums and shields aud a miscellany of warlike odds and ends. Today
the room was further littered by maps,
which covered the table, the benches
and Ihe whole length of au army cot.
Over one of these hung the colonel,
making Imaginary journeys with the
end of a dead cigar.
lie turned*swiftly to Lounsbury and
caught him by tlie shoulders. "John,"
he said before the other could speak.
"I need an Interpreter. You've been
about here for years. Do you kuow
one'/"
"There's Soggy, that i'hll Kearny
fellow"-
The colonel gave a grunt of disgust.
"In Jail at Omaha," he said. "Played
cards with a guloot who had some
aces In his boot tops.   Plugged him."
"What's the matter with your Hees?"
��� "That's just It! You see, that bunch
of Sioux out there"���he jerked his
head toward the stockade���"helped in
a bit of treachery two summers ago. I
Rounded up some friendly Iiocs ut a
dance and sculped 'em. So -there's
poison for you! lu this business on
hand I couldn't trust even my head
scout." He began paring tlie door.
"Anyway, slgu language, when there
are terms to be made and kept, isn't
worth u hung!"
"I wish I could suggest a mnn," said
Lounsbury. "Knot Is. colonel, I'm terribly worried myself. I came to ask
you for help in some trouble" ���
The old soldier threw up his hands
"Trouble!" he cried ' Why, I'm simply daft with it: Look at that!" He
pointed to the farthest side or tlie
room
It was dimly lighted. Lounsbury
stepped forward and peered down-
then recoiled us startled ns if he hnd
happened upon souielhiug dead. On
the floor w;-,s n man. n man whose
back v.as bee! rounding and whose
arms au I legs were hugged up against
^
K
liis n'i<!')m��ii nnd chert Torso n���1
limbs were alike, frightfully Khriiukeu;
���he hands, mere claws l.ounsblli.v !
could not see ihe face Hut the liuir
was uncovered, and it wus the balr
thnt made him "goose flesh" froui
head to heel it was white���not the I
while of old uge, wilh glancing lints
���( silver or yellow, bill the dead while
of un agony thai hud withered it lo
ihe roois. Circling it und separating
Ihe sculp fnun the face und neck ran
n narrow fringe that wus still brown,
us if. changing in n night ii had lurked full time for completion
l.oiinsbiir.v   could   not   take   his  eyes j
from the huddled shape    Colonel Cum-
Lnuiisbury stepped   forward and peered
down.
mings paused beside him. "This morning," he said, speaking in an under
tone, "a sentry signaled from beyond
the barracks. Two or three men took
guns and ran out. They round this.
His clothes were stiff with ice. He
wus almost frozen, though he had been
traveling steadily. He was utterly
worn out and was crawling forward
ou his hands anil knees." The rugged
sleeves nnd trousers, stained darker
from the wounds on elbows and knees,
were mute testimony. "He couldn't
see," continued the colonel. "He was
snow blind. They laid him out on a
drift nnd rubbed him The surgeou
did the rest. He begged to see me.
They brought him in. and he told bis
story It's nn old one. You've beard
it But it's always new too. This Is
frank .lumieson. n young"���
i. i,��� heard his name the man stir-
n;l, stral.y.'lteiicd his legs und let fail
liis arms,    lie looked up
"Young!" gasped Lounsbury. "Good
God!" The face was aged like the
hair!
���Inmleson struggled weakly to his
feet, using the wall to brace him.
Colonel Cummings hastened across
and lent the support of an arm. "Xo,
uo," he protested. "Y'ou mustn't talk.
You're too weak."
But .lamieson did not heed, "You
nn Interpreter?" he asked in a rasping
whlspor.
"You're too weak"���
"Xo, I ain't; no. 1 ain't. If he'll go
with us I'm strong enough. Why, I
shoveled snow ou the special to Bismarck���that's how they let me ride���
nnd skating home 1 didn't stop to
rest"���
"Y'es, yes, my boy, we know."
"1 walked and walked���straps broke
���I forgot to tell you���that's why I had
to. But it didn't do any good���it didn't
do any good! When I got there"���
As if to shut out some terrible sight he
screened his eyes with one palsied
hand and sank buck limply into Colonel Cummings' arms. Lounsbury
swept the cot clean of mnps, and they
laid him there.
"Ills father was dead," said the commanding officer��� "dead and naked,
sculped, mutilated, full of arrows and
rllle bulls. The house and barns were
burned."
"Any women?"
"Two���gone."
.lumieson put out Ills arms. "My
mother!" he cried imploringly. "My
poor little mother!"
Lounsbury knelt beside bim, feeling
shaken und hull' slett.
"If I could only u' been there! But
I wns 'way oir nt st. Paul. I knew
something wus wrong when the letters
stopped."
"But you must buck up, Jnmleson,"
snld the colonel, "so you can help us."
"1  will; oh, I  will!"
"llow'd you get down here?" said
Lounsbury.
"I didn't eat for a long time. I was
crazy. .The snow blinded me, nnd I
wns hungry. But I didn't leave the
river. I knew enough for that. They
found me."
"You think the women are alive,
colonel?" nsked ihe storekeeper.
"Undoubtedly, aud with the other
halt' ol' the very bund we've got bere���
somewhere np in the Big Horn country." He took a turn up and down
the room.
"May  I ask your plan?"
"We are in line shape to talk terms
to the captors. I'll send a command
to them, demanding the women. If
they are not surrendered I'M hang
lour ol' the redskins I've got here-
Lame Foot, the medicine man. and
Chiefs Standing Buffalo, Canada John
and Shool-at-the-Tree- all ringleaders.
Theu the rest of the band Will lie put
on a reservation. If the Jamlesou women nre alive and they send 'em in [
won't hang the chiefs."
"When 'II the command start?"
"Three hours after we gel .in interpreter. I've sent woi I up lo Custer at
Lincoln But the delay! Think what
it means to those women!"
"It wns nbout two women that I
wished to speak." said Lounsbury. Ik-
felt apologetic, however, tlie one danger wus so trICIng beside the other.
Colonel Cummings listened. "Those
girls had better come here." he said
as the storekeeper finished. "Then
they'd be safe enough | remember
seeing one of 'em the day we got hack.
She wus a fine looking young woman."
������There nre two arguments against
their coining, sir I'or legul reasons
it's best they should not vacate the
shuck or lenve the claim."
"I  see."
"And. ngnln. the fnther Is well, he's
rnther sore nbout the war."
"Y'ou don't sny!"
"So, if you could give tne a couple
of men to take my place now nnd then
during the night -the situation is temporary, you see. the fnther 'II lie back
in a few days."
"There are very strong reasons
ngaiust my acting in the matter. I'm
here to keep au eye on the Indians.
The settlers are expected to go to the
civil authorities when they have quarrels. Now. I'd like to mix up wilh
Shanty Town, for Instance. Our guard,
room Is jammed with men who've
been drugged over there with vile
whisky. Yet I can't 1 can only punish my men."
"I know that's so."
"Of course I shan't see defenseless
women suffer"���
Lounsbury wns phpied. "Not altogether defenseless, colonel. But I can't
stay at the shack"���
"True, true. Why not ask Mrs. Martin, Major Appleton's sister, to go over?
Then you might guard from the barn.
If they have one."
"That's a splendid suggestion, sir.
It would solve tbe difficulty."
"I'd be glad to s|>eak to Mrs. Martin
about It" He thought a moment, passing n hand over his clean shaven face.
"Y'ou'd have to be relieved even then.
John. I should think."
"Not at all."
"But you might In tbat case"��� He
drew Lounsbury close and spoke with
his lips In the storekeeper's ear. "But
you understand." he said aloud ns be
concluded, "that 1 know nothing about
it If I bear of it I shall be very dispensed���very."
Lounsbury wns wringing bis hand
and ready to bolt
"All the snme. John. I wish the civil
nuthorities could get at the man."
"I wish so too." He leaned over
.lamieson.
"Good luck!" said Colonel Cummings,
going back to his maps.
"Thank you."
And just at thnt moment, ns Louns
bury swung round on his heel, there
rang out from the river a single pistol
shot It echoed sharply ngnuist the
barracks and went dying away upon
tho bluffs.
CHATTER XL
w-��i ir.ASEK'fi shot drew many oyea
to the river-for id the Winter time any occurrence,
however trifling, oould get Instant attention of the lonesly garrison.
Troopers In various stages of dress
came tumbling out upon the long porch
at barracks. Others looked- from the
many windows of the big frame structure. The washerwomen and their
hopefuls blocked the doorways of
"Clothespin row." Officers everywhere
���nt headquarters, at tl�� sutler's, In
their homes���and their wives and families up and down the "Hne" remnrked
the signnl. But when Lounsbury
brought up beside Kraser, and the two
seemed to be occupying themselves
with nothing in particulnr, the onlookers laid the shot to an overveuture-
some water rnt and so withdrew from
their points of rantnge.
"What Is It?" was the storekeeper's
first breathless demand.
The young officer, hands on hips,
nodded straight abend. "You see those-
willows just below the cut?" he nsked.
"Well, there's a queer black bunch in
'em."
"Yes.   Is It a man?"
"I think so."
"Moved?"
"Not yet."
"Come nn then. Maybe he's aiming
for the coulee mouth, so's to sneak up
to the Lnncnsters' from behind."
They chnrged away across the mile
of ice.
"If It's Matthews why didn't he wing
me ns I went by?" panted Lounsbury.
"Look, look!" cried Fraser. "Now,
he's moving!"
They stopped to loosen their revolvers, nfter which they stnrtcd ngnlu,
cautiously.
The tops of the willows were slinking. Presently they spread outward,
and the "black bunch" lengthened.
Then It emerged and was resolved
into n blanketed Indian.
"Charley!" exclaimed the officer. As
he spoke the outenst, shouldering a
bundle of sticks, began to climb the
cut.
The two men looked at each other
and burst into a In ugh.
"Fraser," snld Lounsbury, "did you
ever hear of the fellow that stalked n
deer all day and then found it was n
speck on his glosses?"
"That's one on me." admitted the
lieutenant sheepishly. "I knew nobody
hnd come out of that door���but you
see we were in the stable awhile."
" 'Charley'���thnt squaw Indinn tbey
told me about, eh? Pretty good tn
them."
"Y'es. From what I understand
they're pretty good to him."
They followed leisurely and took up
n stand In the cotton-woods above the
landing to discuss the situation. At
the very outset Lounsbury determined
uot to speak of the plan tbat Included
Mrs. Martin's nld. the rebuff he had
suffered from the section boss baring
decided him against it.
"By George," he said regretfully, "I
wish when I had Matthews covered
thnt I'd just marched him up the coulee and on to Clark's!"
"Good idea.   Too bad you didn't."
"But I'll tell you this: Fin not goin;;
to stay out here nil night just to shoo
him off. I've a good mind to happen
In down there, sort him out and do the
marching act anyhow."
"Now. look here." reminded Eraser,
"that wouldn't do. Y'ou don't want to
kill Matthews, and you don't want to
lie killed. It 'd be one or the other if
you poked your nose in there."
"What do you advise?''
"Lie low till you see a good opportunity.   1 lliink the chap'Il come out."
"But suppose be doesn't?"
"You'll have to stay here, that's all.
I'll divide the watch with you."
"Ob, I don't like to ask you to do
that old mnn. We ought to be able
to think up some kind of a scheme."
The sun wns fast declining. Soon il
disappeared behind tbe river bluffs.
when the boom of the evening gun
swelled the last note of "retreat."
Eraser sighed. The trumpet had
suggested a certain dire possibility,
"I don't care for tlie cold." he declared, "but- but"���ruefully���"do you
suppose the K. O. 'II give me more
ithnn n month in quarters for this?
There's Hint dunce at the major's next
weelc. I'd like awfully to go. If I'm
under arrest I can't. And who'll feed
my horse nnd my rnttlesnnkesV"
"Some sassy sergeant 'II shoot your
fiend of a nag," said the storekeeper,
"and the rattlers 'II be requested to
devour one another. When that's
ever I'll break it gently to you (mil
you must lie mum) thnt the K. O. is
disciplining you simply to keep his
face. He knows���suggested it himself
-that I'm to be helped out by some of
yoiT fellows."
"Well, that's better." returned Eraser, relieved. And while they walked
back nnd forth he launched into a
defense of his pets.
" 'Fiend of a nag.'" he quoted.
"Why. Buckskin's a tactician. Knows
whnt the trumpet says better thnn I
do."
Night settled swiftly. Despite Lounsbury's prophecy the temperature wns
not unbearable. The wind died with
the clow in the west, leaving the air
so still tbat, to tin- watchers among
tlie trees, sounds from Brnnnon mingled distinctly with the near laughter
nnd talk of Shanty Town. No moon
rnse. Only a few stars burned theii
fnint way through the quickly bidden
'rents of the sheltering cloud covering
thnt. knitting here, breaking there,
ngain overlapping In soft folds before
nn urgent sky breeze, swagged low
above the ground.
With darkness the two left the grove
for the ledge upon which wns Shnnfy
Town and stationed themselves where
tliey could si ill see whoever went in
[or out of the 'J'rooper's Delight. Mnt-
Ihews did not appear. Numerous men
In uniform did They mud" noisy exits nnd went lirnwliie: nlong to other
shanties. They skulked out of th��
willows, flitted across the bit of snow
cTustecf bench below the saloons and
scrambled up to hurry in.
When two hours or more had gone
by tho storekeeper grew impatient He
walked buck nnd halted in the inky,
shadow of the wall down which Nick
Matthews .hnd tobogganed. From there
he pointed to a shaft of light that was
falling upon the north side of the second shanty in the street. It was from
an uncurtained south opening in the
first.
"Y'ou see that?" asked Lounsbury.
"Well, I'm going over there lo look in.
How do we know he hasn't given us
the slip some way?"
"Let's be "careful," said the lleuten-
atu. "A proper amount of caution
isn't cowardice. If you're seen the
whole pack'll set on you."
"I will be careful, but I'm not going
to"-
"That's all very nice, only you must
consider the stripe of mnn you're deul-
Ing with"���
"1 enn roll n gun. Eraser."
"But, Jupiter! This chap isn't going
to fight you in the open. He'll use Indian tactics���fact Is, he was raised
among 'em."
"What's that?" nsked Lounsbury.
"Raised among 'em, I said���with tlie
Sioux."
"Speaks the tongue, then?" For some
reason the storekeeper seemed strangely agitated.
"Why, yes."
At lhat Lounsbury was off. making
straight fo'r the entrance of the building they had been watching.
I IMPROVE YOUR APPEARANCE
BY WEARING A PAIR OF OUR
Artistically Fitted Rimless
Eyeglasses.
Correctty Fitted Lenses.
Correctly Fitted Frames.
ISSUER OF MARRIAGE LICENSES.
HARRIS, The Jeweler
Steward's  Hall
- One Night Only -
ct. 30
WILLIS & C0SGR0VE
Clarence Bennett's great Biblical
Drama
"The Holy City"
With
HAROLD NELSON as Marius,
A Roman Soldier, assisted by-
Frederick Clarke
And a Metropolitan Caste.
THE MOST   SUBLIME   FLAY   EVER
WRITTEN.
Endorsed by the Clergy, Press
and Public.
Beautiful   Scenic and   Lighting
Effects.
PRICES   -   $1.00 and 75 Cents.
ON   SALE   AT    STEWARD'S
FURNITURE STORE.
At  C. KENDALL, 0. R. MASON.
Notarv Public.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
Large blocks with good water
rights, from $10.00 per acre.
10-acre lots wholly or partly
planted with.trees bearing 1909.
10-acre lots near town, unimproved.
Acre lots, planted with fruit
trees or unimproved. Main St.
tnd other good locations.
FIRE AND UK INSURANCE.
HOUSES TO LET.
���FOR SALE=
30 WHITE LEGHORN PULLETS
40       " "       COCKRELLS
10 BLACK MINORCA
This stock, all thorough-bred, and
from hardy laying strain.
'���ecure one of these Cockrells to
improve your flock.
J. S. HEALES,
Penticton Cannery.
CLEARING SALE
OF
HOOTS iSi. SHOES
AT  COST
II. OLIVER
They tiptoed forward,
Fraser  went  tearing  nfter nnd not
far from  the door managed lu stun
him.
"For    heaven's    nuke."    he    gasped,
"what's struck vou?V
IXu Uc continued.)
D. W. Crowley
&Co.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Goods Delivered tn nny part of  the
Town on Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday,
WE QIVE OUR PROMPT ATTENTION TO
MAIL ORDERS
.1. F. PARKINS, Manager.
FOR SALE
One dozen Aylesbury Ducks.   Apply,
Box ii, Penticton.
Subscription $1.00 Year.
ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE.
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE
OF JOHN DAY, DECEASED.
NOTICE is hereby given that in pursuance of an order made herein  in   the
Supreme Court of British Columbia, on
the 24th day of September,   1908.   Ed-
[ ward Thomas Day of Penticton, B. C.,
i was appointed administrator of the  es-
I tate and effects of John Day, deceased,
who died at Penticton,   B.   C.,   on  the
tenth day of August, 19(18.
NOTICE is also hereby given that all
parties having any claims against the said
estate of the said deceased must send
in their claims duly verified, on or before the first day of November, 1908,
to the said Edward Thomas Day, of
Penticton, B. C, after which date' the
said estate will be dealt with by the
said Edward Thomas Day in due course
of administration, having regard only
to the claims sent in prior to the said
first day of November, 1908.
Dated this 28th day of September,
A. D. 1908.
W. H. T. GAHAN,
Solicitor for the said Administrator,
12-tf Penticton, B. C.
FOR SALE
Brown Mare, 4 years old, broken
gentle to saddle and single harness.
Price $55.00.     KENDALL & MASON.
CLEARANCE SALE
At reasonable figures for cash or approved notes: ���1 Work Team, 2,800 lbs.;
1 3-year-old Filly, about 1,100 lbs.;
Wagon and Rack, Disk and Tooth Harrows, Cultivator and sundry agricultural tools and implements.
W. F. H. SWINTON,
13-2 Penticton.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that 60 days
after date I intend to apply to the Hon.
Chief Commissioner of .Lands and
Works for a lease of the following foreshore, viz :���Commencing at the N. W.
corner of Lot 4, Block 39, Penticton,
Yale District, thence northerly 331 feet;
thence east 120 feet; thence southerly
340 feet; thence west 120 feet; containing .9 acres, more or less.
HENRY CONNER.
September 3rd, 1908. 9-9
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that we will
prosecute any person or persons found
trespassing or hunting without permission upon our properties at Three Mile
Creek. C. W. JOHNSON,
M. C. KENDALL,
10-13t JOHN STRUTT.
Penticton, Sept. 17, 1908.
NOTICE.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Henry Murk, of Penticton, barber, and owner of Lot 1, Block 39, according to registered map 613 deposited in Land
Registry Office in Kamloops, B.C., intend to apply
for permission to lease the foreshore and submerged land in front of said lot only, described as
follows:
Commencing at a post planted at northwest
corner of Lot 1, Block 39. Map 518, Osoyoos Division, Yah; District, deposited in tne Land Registry Office in Kamloops, B.C.; thenee northwest 3til
feet to a post planted In 4 feet of water In front
of above lot. in Okanagan Lake; thence northeast
U1.7 feet to a post, planted in 4 feet of water. Okanagan Lake; thence southeast 846 f-*et to the
northeast post of Lot 1, Block 89, Map 618, Penticton ; thenee southwest 66 feet ���! inches to post of
commencement,
HENRY MURK.
Dated at Penticton. B.C., August 17, 11)08. S-'J
Harris
nursery co.,
Penticton.
Beautify your lot with some
of our shade trees.
We have Elm, Ash, Maple,
Catalpa, Mulberry, Black Walnut, and Ash Leaved Maple.
Some perennial shrubs and
apple trees left.
The Old Reliable Barber
Artistic Hair Cut 25 cents
Easy Shave (with Bay Rum
or Witch Hazel) 15    "
Shampoo 25    "
Beard Trimmed in style and
to suit the  face and  the
customer 25    "
Face Massage 25    "
Baths, in the latest 6 foot 2
inches tone;, sanitary, porcelain-lined bathtub 35    "
H. MURK
At his NEW STAND alongside
the 15. C. Hotel, Smith Street. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C., OCTOBER 21, 1908.
PEACHLAND.
Mrs. John McLaughlan spent
Saturday in Kelowna.
The furnace has not been in
working order in our new school,
consequently, on account of the
dull wet weather during the past
week, school has been closed.
Miss Matheson, our primary department teacher, spent ,from
Saturday until Tuesday with her
parents at Armstrong.
W. R. Bartlett spent Tuesday
and Wednesday here, and attended the Socialist meeting in the
Hall on Tuesday evening, at
which there was a big turnout.
Mr. Bunting, Socialist candidate
for Yale-Cariboo, gave an interesting address.
Mrs. Alex. Miller returned last
week from a month's visit with
her daughter, Mrs. A. V. Crisp,
at Vancouver.
D. Leckie, of Kelowna, spent
Tuesday evening in town on
business.
The Messrs. Crawley, of Nova
Scotia, who have spent the past
few months here, left for Vancouver where they have secured
positions.
Last Thursday our foot-ball
boys played the Kelownaites and
were beaten. The Lorna Doon
conveyed the team to and from
Kelowna. A jolly party of young
people accompanied them and
were chaperoned by Mrs. W.
Lupton.
Grant Lang has purchased the
cottage and orchard of Mr. Needham and will take possession immediately.
Sunday evening about 9.30 A.
W. Angus, our confectioner, suffered a heavy loss when his
buildings, including shop, bakehouse, and entire stock of groceries, confectionery and cooking
apparatus, was destroyed by fire.
A bucket brigade was soon at
work after the alarm was given
but nothing could be done. He
carried insurance, and may in
the near future rebuild, which is
sincerely hoped by the community.    ���
The fourth Demorest Medal
Contest was held in the Presbyterian church on the 15th inst,
when the following programme
was enjoyed by a large audience,
Rev. Mr. J. J. Nixon acting as
chairman :
Hymn, "Rescue the Perishing."
Prayer, by Rev. Mr. Whyte.
Chairman's address.
Quartette   by   Mesdames   McColl   and
Mitchell and Messrs. McColl and Mitchell.
Recitation No. 1 "The College Oil Cans,"
by Miss B. Seaton.
Solo by Miss Candace McDougall.
Recitation No. 2, "The Stray Sunbeam"
by Miss Rena Elliott.
Instrumental Solo by Ur. Nash.
Recitation  No.   3,   "The    Daughter's
Sacrifice" by Miss 0. Ferguson.
Solo by Mrs. Campbell.
Recitation No. 4, "A Little Child Shall
Lead Them" by Miss H, Callendar.
Ladies' Quartette, "'Tis Midnight" by
Misses Matheson, Pope,   Keyes,   and
Silver.
Instrumental Duet  by  Mrs.   Mitchell,
and Miss Keyes.
The judge's decision was given
by Dr. Nash to the effect that
No. 3 won. Miss Olive Ferguson
was then requested to step forward and was presented with the
medal by Rev. Mr. Whyte. Each
of the contestants did well, and
great credit is due Miss Steele
who has had them in training for
tlie past month or so. Each of
the four were presented with
charming shower boquets by Mr.
Davidson, and the audience was
dismissed with the National
Anthem.
r���--m<r-
Henrys Nurseries
Now tfrowi,,;*-in our Nurseries for the
fall trade :-
90,000 Peach, Apricot. Nectarines, Cherry,
JMuni, Bruno,   Bear  and Apple���In all
leading varieties.
100.000   Small   Fruits.
10,000   Ornamental   Trees  in   all   leading
varieties for B. C.
Strictly home ��rown and  not subject to
damage from fumigation.
Stock of Bulbs to arrive In August from
Japan. France and Holland.
Bee Supplies, Spray Bumps, Seeds, Etc.
MO page Catalogue Free.
Office, Greenhouses and Seedhouse :--
3010 Westminster Road,
VANCOUVER,    -    B. C.
���B������3
The Southern Okanagan Land
Company,
LANDS
Our Irrigation system having been completed for
the Lake Skaha benches we are now offering under this
water system some 300 acres in five and ten acre tracts,
at $100.00 to $150.00 per acre.
On the Penticton benches we still have for sale
irrigated about 160 acres, at from $100.oo to $125.oo per
acre. All our bench lands are admirably adapted for
fruit.
On the Penticton flats we have open clean meadow
suitable for small fruits, vegetable and hay, at $150.oo
per acre.
Uncleared land suitable for fruit (but stoney and
wooded) $5o.oo to $loo.oo per acre.
Uncleared land quite free of stone, suitable for
hay or garden stuff, $loo.oo per acre.
Terms on all the above one quarter down, one
quarter each year with interest at 6 per cent, on deferred
payments.
ACRE LOTS
In Penticton and on Okanagan Lake Beach $3oo.oo
to $15o.oo.       On Lake Skaha Beach $4oo.oo.
TOWN LOTS
We have a great many excellent buys in town
property (business and residential). Anything we show
you will advance in value 5o per cent, within a year.
Get in now, you can make money and take no chances by
purchasing our lands.
FRUIT LAND FOR SALE
c=
-SSE
an
J. R.
MITCHELL'S
Bargain
List
10 Acres, 1 1=2 Miles from Town, about 3 acres planted in spnng
1907, trees two years old.   Price, only $1,600.   Fenced.
10 Acres, 1 mile from town; over 300 trees in third year, will be
in bearing next year; peaches, cherries, apples, f Hums, &c.
Price, only $2,200.   Fenced.
18 Acres, 10 below main ditch ; 8 acres planted, in 3rd year; a
very choice property.   Only $3,800.    ^enced.
18 Acres, 10 below main ditch; 9 under good cultivation. Only
$3,ooo.   Fenced.
14 Acres, 10 below main ditch; 5 1=2 acres planted, 232 peaches,
6o apricots, 226 cherries, 17 apples, one year. A choice lot.
Only $3,5oo.
40 Acres in block or lot, for hay or small fruits ; very central
at very low price.
10 Acres on Main Street, good hay land, only $2,100.
OFFICE,
PENTICTON, B. C.
Spray Mixtures!!
As recommended by the Provincial Fruit Inspector, in concentrated form, in 1, ��, and J
gallon cans, with full directions
for use. These mixtures are
put up by the B. C. Soap
Works Co., Victoria, in conformity with the formulas recommended by the Provincial.
Fruit Inspector. The undersigned has been appointed sole
agent for these Roods in tbe
Penticton district and will
have a full supply of Winter
Spray and Whale Oil Soap in
stock in time for winter spraying.
For particulars apply to
J. A. NESBITT,
Ellis Street,      Penticton, B.C.
\mmmmmwauMamwmmamn�� ��
NOTICE
I The Fraser Valley Nurseries /
LIMITED
BURNABY LAKE
Comprising 52 Acres. Capital $100,000.
We have all kinds of Fruit Trees for sale as follows:
2 Year Old:   5,500 Cherries; 1,700 Apricots; 3,500 Plums; 5,850 Peaches;
800 Crabs ; 7,825 Apples ; 950 Pears.
1 Year Old :-l,600 Crabs; 112,000 Apples ; 2,550 Pears.    100,000   Small
Fruits of all kinds.
We invite inspection We never substitute.
Home-Grown Stock.    No more danger of trees being destroyed at  Port
of Entry. Prices quoted on application. All trees planted in the
Fall which die are replaced free, and in Spring at half price.
G. E. CLAYTON, Director.
L. C. HILL,
F.   J. HART,
J. J. JONES, President.
C. F. SPROTT, Vice-President.
F. E. JONES, Secretary-Treasurer.
Sale   of   Mineral   Claims for Unpaid Taxes in the
Kettle River Assessment District, British Columbia.
1 hereby give notice that on Monday, the 2nd day of November, 190fl, at
the Court House, Fairview, 11. C, at the hour of ten o'clock, ill the forenoon, I
shall sell by Public Auction, the Crown Granted Mineral Claims He/einafter set
out, for the delinquent taxes thereon, as set out in the list herein, being unpaid
at this date, together with the costs and expenses of advertising, uidess the
amount due is sooner paid :
Nani'1 <if peri
nSNONSod
of Claim
Number
Tuxes Duo       Costs
!\ Darrah, fl ul	
!���;. II. Thurston	
K. II. Thuraton	
J. I). Braeio	
.1. 1). Breeze	
Lemon Gold Mining Co.
OVKMI M( Mull	
Payette Hanis  .
.1. It. Devlin	
British Lion Gold Mining; Co
British Lion Gold Mining Co
Boston	
B. A. (Traction,
Carmi	
Independence, .
Ore Pino	
Lemon	
Hunter	
Highland Chief.
War Karl,'	
British	
British Lion..,.
Local Agent
Take notice that H. Harlow, of P jn-
ticton, mason, sixty days after d ate
intends to apply to the Honorablp Q liof
Commissioner of Lands and Wtolcg for
a lease of the following fores'.|���re' vjz_.
Commencing at Northwest corn' BT 0'f
lot 8, block 89, Penticton, '/ale Dis trict
thence Northerly 3-10 ter.fr, thence ' Easj.
-1'J leet; thence Southerly 471 feet'
containing 1.7 of an >\Cve, moro or less*
.'or a cement factory.
,   "'-'' '   H. HAI 1/ )W.
September 12, VMH.
fcS-w
JOHN STEUART
P. O. Box 33, Summerland, B. C.
tf
.tf
.tf
.tZf
.tf
.tf
.tf
*
E. J. FINQH
Painter. Paperhan&er
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a Specialty.
WALL PAPER Carried in Stock.
Box 196.     JWain St.
Subscribe for
The Penticton Press
THE
Penticton Dairy
Daily delivery of Fresh Milk to
all parts of the Town.
12 quarts for $1.(10, cash monthly in advance.
Tickets, 11 quarts for $1.00, cash in advance.
If accounts are run, 10 quarts fur $1.00.
H. M. McNeill,
Prop.
A. K. Ashcroft, et al  Hacla.
W. Elsen Jewell   	
J. I'. Kelly, et ul lumlio Fraction .
II. W. Yates  Mt. Adams	
W. H. Thomas  Niokerson	
S. M. Johnson, etal  Myrtle	
s. M. Johnson, et al Logan	
Chas. Phipps, et al Henrietta 	
William Kintz, et al Queen of Shebe .
Fairview, B. C, October 2nd, 1908.
13-4
28-tr,
2367
2862
Mill
MIS
76u
28 il
2846
1X70
1!W
1088
2847
2785
3128
1145
1IM3
1054
2703
2704
3127
$ 8 III)
$2 00
11
2 00
18 no
2 00
12 75
���/  -
12 75  :
- 00
18 oo
2 00   1
9 00
- 00
13 00
2 00
12 75
2 00
13 00
2 00
10 50
2 00
12 25
2 00
0 00
2 00
1 75
2 00
4 75
2 OO
13 00
2 0O
12 (JO
2 00
12 75
2 00
12 50
2 00 ���
1 76
2 00   1
Total
Amount
 Due
$10 00
8 50
15 00
14 75
14 75
15 00
11 00
15 00
14 75
15 00
12 FO
14 6
11 lo
8 75
ti 75
15 00
14 HO
14 76
14 60
3 75
H. A. TURNER,
Deputy Assessor ar.i; C >Uector,
Kettle River Assess  lent District
l^AT T     riOOim   Ranges, Cooking Stoves,
r i^J^JU   <j*U<J U7^ Heating Stoves.
TO  HAND General     =    Hardware
PENTICTON HARDWARE CO.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that we will prosecute
any person or persons found hunting or trespassing upon our propi rties.
W, M. (IILI.KSI'IE.
I). GILLESPIE,
VV, J. GILLESPIE,
Y. C. K1TLEY,
8-18 JOHN PUATHEK.
FOR SALE
Business block on Main Street; two
storey with two compartments downstairs and hall upstairs, $2,500. Lot 68,
seven and one-half acres on Fairview
Road, $2,200. J. D. McDonald,
12-tf Potlatch, Idaho.

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