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The Penticton Press Feb 8, 1908

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Array 'h^.c
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VOL. 2.   No. 30.
PENTICTON, B.C., SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
.00 Per Year In Advance.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
llF.Afl  OFFICE, TORONTO
ESTABLISHED 1807
B. B. WALKER, President
ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager
A. H. IRELAND, Superintendent of
Branches
Paid-uo Capital, $10,000,000
Rest, - - - 5,000,000
Total Assets, - 113,000,000
OSOYOOS TO THE FRONT
Old British Columbia Town Once
More Assuming Importance.
Branches throughout Canada, and In the United Statss aid England
A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
86
FARMERS'   BANKING
Krery facility afforded Farmers for their banking:
business.    Sales Notes cashed or taken
for collection
BANKING  BY  MAIL.���Deposits may be made or withdrawn by
mail.    Out-of-town accounts receive every attention
Penticton Branch    -    *    J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
\ Are You Bui/ding ?
I
.t A
!
We can supply you with anything you require,
LUMBER, SHINGLES, SASH, DOORS, and
BUILDING PAPER. We also keep on hand
a large stock of Fluming Material. Try some
of our Vulcanized Rubber Roofing on your
outbuildings; it is the best. We keep Corrugated Carpet Felt to put under carpet. Try it.
!
I S. G. Smith Lumber Go. V
f  ^ ������"���> ��W tf^m^t* "tmm tvf^artr^^tt*^*** Misw      1
CLOTHING
Now is the time to select your Spring Suit.     Our samples
have just arrived, and we can furnish you with
a Tailor-made Suit from
$20.00 up.
. . . GIVE US A CALL BEFORE BUYING. . . .
NORMAN HILL
KENT  &   SON
Manufacturers and Dealers in
Stock Saddles, Bridles,
Schapps, Spurs,
And general riding equipment.
5Ww����������w���*"AT/W>TO���m��Ty>T��TATA'
K1K*
COMMERCIAL
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
DIGNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors.
If you vant a Stylish Outfit, this is the place to come. You can always
get teams just when you want them. We make a specialty of keeping
good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack horses.
We are also putting in Hay and Grain for sale, and a; we buy for cash
we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit.
Special Attention To The Wants Of   ommerclal  Men.
fj^^y^^^^^^g^i^^^^^^^^Eis^s^isM&liis&islsviis^/sK^
& i
| THE PENTICTON LUMBER |
p        SYNDICATE Ltd.        jj
fe OFFICE and YARDS on MAIN STREET $
i !
> 4
><AVAWAVAV#\> fAVAVAVAVAH
>>;
Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
Keremeos, Hedley and Princeton Stage Connect with Steamer "Okanagan."
Makes connection with Great Northern R'y at Keremeos.
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,  and a general Draying
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.      Penticton.
After the lapse of many years,
Osoyoos, which was the head
office of the government for all
the Okanagan and Similkameen
districts when British Columbia
was a crown colony, is again
showing signs of life; and, although it will probably never a-
gain assume the importance in
the roll of events which it did
| in the Caribo" mining days, it is
quite certaii' to become one of
the moat important points in the
Southern Okanagan.
The town, or rather townsite,
of Osoyoos is situated on the
west side of Lake Osoyoos about
one and a half miles north of
the International Boundary Line.
At this point the lake, which is
about twelve miles in le"gtb,
narrows into a neck and hei a is
a bridge which gives connection
with the country on the east side
of the lake.
Five years ago the customs office was removed from Osoyoos
to Fairview, but was replaced
two years later. The government office which was also
moved to Fairview has not been
removed, but another office has
been opened at Osoyoos. The
government has built a new office, an j, about a month ago,
completed corralls and stables
for the inspection of live stock
being brought t.jross the line.
The provincial government maintains a resident cnstable in the
person of Wm. Haynes, and application is being made to the
Dominion government to re-open
the post-office. The old Haynes
house which was for yoars the
head officii for all the district is
also being repaired.
Leslie Hill, who three years
ago. bought out the Haynes
home?tead, last year put out ten
or fifteen acres of fruit trees and
is getting ready to put out. twenty acres more during the coming
spring,
The S. O. Land Co. recently
bought the property of Frank
Richter on the west side of the
lake around the townsite with
the exception of six acrey, and
Mr. Frhter recently bond id his
two huna/ed acres on the east of
the lake to p- American company who will divide it up.
T'.iere are a number of important mining claims on Kruger
Mountain in the vicinity of Osoyoos, the most valuable being the
Dividend Mine, which report
says iu about to be purchased by
a New York mining company.
To give an idea of the climate
of Osoyoos, which is said to be
the mildest in the interior, Leslie Hill has plowed all winter
with the exception of three or
four days;.
A small boat capable of carrying twenty passengers plies the
lake between its northern end
and Oroviile seven miles to the
soutn, through which town the
Great N< t cnev 1 Railway run.1..
Hottl accommodation is furnished by Messrs. McKenzie ana
Guiney. 	
The Literary.
The interest attached to the
Penticton Literary Society is increasing weekly. At this week's
meeting the Woodmen's Hall was
filled almosl to the full extent of
its seating capacity. The subject for debate was, " Resolved
that the employment of women
in commercial, industrial and
professional pursuits is detrimental to the nation." The affirmative was taken by Messrs.
Weeks, Agnew, and Winkler,
and the negative by Messrs. Wilton, Harris and Cleland. The
judges   were   Mrs.   Thompson,
Miss Mutch and Mr. Campbell.
At the conclusion of the argument a vote of the audience was
taken and a majority thought
the affirmative had the best case.
The decision handed in by the
judges was unanimously in favor of the negative. Mr. Clement, who had been appointed
critic, in summing up the debate,
was of the opinion that while the
negative said many complimentary things about women, they
failed to deal with the subject in
hand. He, therefore, thought
that the affirmative made the
stronger presentation of the subject and were entitled to the decision.
The meeting next Thursday
will be literary. Three papers
will be read on England, Ireland,
and Scotland, while the program
is to be interspersed with singing
and recitations.
There is one thing quite noticeable in all of the debates. The
judges and audience in most
cases in giving their decisions
are governed by their own
opinions rather than by the
merits of the debaters. This
should not be the case for often
debaters champion a side contrary to their own convictions,
and contrary to the convictions
of the audience. The Literary
Society is merely for the training
of speakers, not for the settling
of public questions. Therefore,
when the speakers on the unpopular side put up the best
arguments and present the subject in the best manner, they
have a right to the decision.
NURSERY STOCK SALE
PUBLIC MEETING
Will Dicuss Operation of Cannery
A public meeting will be held
in the Woodmen's Hall over
King's store on the evening of
Wednesday, the lath mst. The
meeting is being called under
the auspices of the Fruit Growers' Exchange and the Board of
Trade to discuss the cannery
question. Whether the cannery
:s to be sold or operated during
the coming season will be the
chief item of business, and suggestions from anybody regarding the matter will be welcome.
If the cannery is to be operated, it will be necessary to raise
more capital, as the Exchange
was very much handicapped last
season through insufficient funds
to handle the business. How
the ad itional capital is to be
raised is the problem. Everybody welcome.
Weather Report
Compiled
by   the    Dominion
Government
Meterological
Ob-
server at Penticton, for January,
1908:
Date
Max
. Temp
Min.
Temp.
1	
..38 ...
...33
2	
..39 ..
.    35
8...
4	
5	
..46J...
...291
6	
..41  ...
...31*
7	
..40 ..
...29
9	
..44 ...
...27
10	
..40 ...
...32
11	
..33 ...
...28
1?....
..43 ...
28
H	
...18
U.
33
23
15	
..33 ..
...26
17...
35
28
18...
31
19	
..41 .
20	
..49 ...
...251
21	
..38 ..
...18
22	
..32 ..
...22
23	
..39 ..
r. .is
24	
..37 ..
...21
25	
..38J...
...21
26	
..40 ...
...20J
27	
..40 ..
...14
28	
..34 ..
...16
29	
..84 ..
...221
30	
..33 ..
... 41
31	
..27 ..
... 8
January
Rain
Snow
1	
..32
2	
..01
5	
..08
8	
..04
14	
....11
19	
.31
28	
...  .5
Okanagan  Nursery  Co.   makes
Sale of over $15,ooo Worth
of Nursery Stock.
What is probably the largest
sale of nursery stock ever made
by one firm in British Columbia
is now being put through by the
Okanagan Nursery Co. of Penticton. The purchasers are the
Fraser Valley Nursery Co., of
Burnaby, near New Westminster, and the nursery stock will
aggregate between fifteen and
sixteen thousand dollars. The
order embraces nearly every
variety of fruit tree specially adapted to the province, and delivery of the stock will be made
during the coming spring.
E. Curtis, Manager of the Okanagan Nursery Co., and F. E.
Jones the Secretary, who have
put through the deal, are very
sanguine as to the nursery business in the Okanagan.
Local and Personal
Our Forest Area.
Canada's forest area has been
variously estimated at from eight
hundred million to three hundred
million acres. The latter is the
latest estimate, and was given
by Dr. B. E. Fernow, the recently appointed Dean of the Faculty
of Forestry at the University of
Toronto. He is one of the best
authorities on forest subjects on
the continent, and for years was
head of the United States Bureau
of Forestry. His estimate, he
thinks, "will cover the commercially valuable timberland area,
actual and potential." At this
estimate the forest area of Canada is "not much more than one-
half of the commercial forest
area of the United States."
Mr. R. H. Campbell, Superin-
tepdent nf la."-*-, a,i uie JUO-
mmion Government, gives a
rather larger estimate. He has
calculated the forest area of the
Dominion at about 535 million
acres, divided as follows :���
ACRES
British Columbia 182 million
Man., Sask., Alta. and unorganized territories 180
Ontario  40 "
Quebec 120 "
New Brunswick      71    "
Nova Scotia     5 "
"Inexhaustible" used to be a
favorite word to describe Canada's forests. But the drop from
the old figvre of 800 million acres
to the more recent ones given
above shows clearly that the
more Canada's forest wealth is
investigated, the less are people
inclined to use that word. Great
as this wealth may be, it is for
Canada to husband her resources,
and make her forests a permanent asset. In order to do this,
she must carefully protect her
forests and see to their being reproduced, that a future supply of
timber may be ensured from
them. This would mean the
careful management of these
lands on scientific ani business
principles, and these it is that
the forestry movement is seeking
to introduce throughout the Dominion.        	
On Thursday, Feb. 4th. about
twenty-four young ladies and
gentlemen met at Mr. J. Graham's rink for a skating party
given by Miss Pearl Prather.
While the bonfires burned brightly the skaters went merrily
round until about the midnight
hour. Lunch was served by Mr.
and Mrs. Graham. All united in
praises of the event. Fairview,
Myers' Valley and Okanagan
Falls were all represented.
A SNAP
For the person who baa faith in the growth of
Penticton. Two Rood corner lots, only a block
from Post Office and center of town for W75.00.
Lots No. 1 and 30, block 25. old townsite survey.
AKTHUR K. GRANT.
30-4 May wood P. O.. B. C.
See E. O. DeLong's ad. in this
isiue.
J. F. Rowe returned from
Moosejaw on Wednesday.
E. W. Mutch left on Tuesday
tD attend the Fruit Growers' Convention at Revelstoke.
Rev. J. A. Cleland gave a very
impressive address at the Young
Peoples' Union on Tuesday evening.
Ring up the central telephone
oilice for standard time. The
office gets the time every day
from  Kelowna.
J. Barker has started a class
which meets on Friday evenings
at W. J. Clement's house for
the study of French.
Don't forget the concert to be
given by the Quadrille Club on
tne evening of Friday, the 14th
iast.   A treat is anticipated.
For two or three days this
week the ice man was busy, but
the thaw on Thursday put an end
to his operations for the present, at least.
Clark R. Christie and Miss
Annie Christie, of Fraser, Idaho,
arrived from Spokane on Friday
on an extended visit with their
brother, A. J. Christie.
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Docking
and children, Jas. Docking, and
Miss Docking drove in from Summerland on Thursday morning
returning in the afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. I. M. Stevens
will arrive from England about
the middle of the present month.
Their hsndsome new residence
on Main St. is about completed.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Curtis, who
have been resident in Penticton
fm> nWui lwo years, left for the
coast last Saturday. Mr. Curtis
will be foreman for the New
Westminster branch of the Okanagan Nursery Co.
Last Saturday was one of the
coldest days experienced in Penticton this winter, yet a resident
on that day brought a live butterfly into the Press office. We
will not assert that the insect
was captured out of doors.
An Orange Lodge is to be
started in Penticton. Any members who wish to unite should
secure their certificates and give
in their names to Chas. E. Hou-
ser. Also those wishing to become members should intimate
their desire to do so.
A flock of nearly twenty white
swans made a very pleasing
sight on Tuesday, remaining on
the lake not far from shore for a
considerable time. It is rarely
that these birds are seen, especially in such large numbers.
However, they make occasional
visits to the Okanagan and they
are fortunately protected by the
government.
Frank Mahoney, eldest son of
Mr. and Mrs. John Mahoney, on
Tuesday sustained what came
very near proving fatal injuries.
While leading a horse to water
the animal kicked him in the side
of the head, the shoe cutting a
deep gath through his cheek.
The boy was unconscious for
quarter of an hour but is making
satisfactory recovery.
Dr. C. W. Cross met with a
painful accident on Saturday
of last wesk. While ascending
the stairs to his room he slipped
and fell to the foot. He was
stunned by the fall, but, upon
being carried to his room and Dr.
White summoned, he recovered
consciousness. It was thereupon
discovered that his shoulder
blade had been broken. The
Doctor, however, is making satisfactory recovery. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
THE PENTICTON PRESS
ISSUED    EVERY    SATURDAY   AT
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
\V. J. CLEMENT.
Subscription $1.00 Per Year in
Advance.
extending over any considerable
period of time. As long as the
country can furnish practically
free homes to millions who are
sure to succeed if they are industrious, it cannot be otherwise
than prosperous.
ADVERTISING RATES ON
APPLICATION.
A   Victory  for Temperance.
The results of the recent local
option campaign in Ontario are
certainly very   encouraging  to j atrocities for which southern and
The Assassination.
King Carlos of Portugal and
the crown prince have been assassinated, Dictator Franco has
been driven from office, and a
boy of ninteen, who barely escaped death by the bullets of the
assassins, now sits upon the
throne.   Another one   of those
i��J3EE����i
I HENRY MAI N,1|Penticto
I te -'
aaEss-g^jsgsEsssaa
*e
Druggist
Stationer
I cairy a full line of
Drugs, Stationery, Toilet Articles, Fancy Goods,
Post Cards, Books, Magazines,
Imported Cigars, Lowney's Chocolates.
WE ARE CAREFUL. *\
I
��� j
I
f    f WE ARE PROMPT.
Established 40 Years.
fred H. Wads, Prop.
Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, Groceries
and General Merchandize of all Sorts
Agent for
GIANT POWDER CO.
OKANAGAN FLOUR MILLS CO.
temperance reformers. Out of
fifty-five municipalities which
voted upon the question the bylaw passed in thirty-one. The
failure to carry tiie remaining
twenty-four was; in most cases,
due to a three-fifths vote being
required. The by-law was repealed in only four municipalities. Ninety-five licenses are cut
o'T as a result of the vote, and
there are fourteen more dry
towns.
Whatever may be said as to
the justice or injustice of the
three-fifths vote, it is quite certain that when once the by-law
is passed it will be likely to stay,
as a three-fifths vote will be necessary to accomplish its repeal.
The thirty-one municipalities are
therefore a decided gain, while
the chances of carrying most of
the remaining municipalities in
the not distant future are very
good.
Temperance sentiment is gaining very rapidly not only in Canada, but in the United States and
Great Britain as well. More and
more the opinion that intoxicants
are not only unnecessary, but
that their sale is a menace to the
state, is being borne in upon the
masses. When public opinion
gets strong enough, the liquor
business will pass out of existence as one of the last relics of
barbarism.
British Columbia has, as yet,
no local option law, and we are
rather surprised that no
have  been   taken    to    V>qvp    one
brought before the Legislature
at its present session. We are
satisfied that, if the people of
this province were given an opportunity of expressing themselves upon the liquor question,
there would be many of the
towns and municipalities that
would declare in favor of its exclusion.
H^rJ  Times.
Despite the cry of hard times
heard on all sides the building
permits issued in Vancouver during the month of January were
double the value of those issued
during tho same month on any
previous year. The crops of the
prairie provinces produced twenty million dollars more than last
year, and development work is
going on everywhere both there
and in British Columbia.
True, the larger business interests are finding it difficult to secure loans, but this is due almost
entirely to scare, and is no fault
of promoters of enterprises. The
banks which have invested the
money of Canadian depositors
o itside of this country are probably more to blame than anybody else.
However, the condition of affairs as they now exist, is the
very best thing that could happen the country. * People were
almost going mad with speculation, while property, wages, and
the cost of living were getting
far beyond normal. Things have
received a check, but meanwhile
development goes on apace. The
coming summer will undoubtedly
bo a prosperous one, and, as for
the Southern Okanagan, we look
for the most extensive developments in its history to that date.
The boundless natural resources of Western Canada, which are
attracting immigrants from all
parts of the worldand necessitating development work upon a
large scale render it impossible
for the country to suffer from
panic or commercial depression
eastern Europe have become noted has been committed. While
the royalty of Great Britain may
walk at liberty almost unguarded,
the crowned heads and royal
families of the southern and
eastern portions of the continent
are unsafe even under whole
corps of the most vigilant guards.
King Carlos attempted to rule
with an absolute hand and the
attempt cost him his life. It has
been said that the reason for
his dismissing parliament and
taking no steps to have another
elected, together with his appointment of Franco as Dictator,
was to get rid of the grafters in
politics from whom the kingdom
has been suffering. It is a long
time since the nations of Europe
began their existence as separate
states, and yet they have made
little progress in the way of responsible government. The
crowned heads have been unable
to conceive the principles of limited monarchy, or have been totally unable to entrust their subjects with a share in the administration of government, while
the people, on the other hand,
have conceived no means of reforming the government except
by destroying the rulers.
One is led to question as to the
cause of this condition of affairs.
Is there something constitutionally wrong about the make-up of
the Latin and Slavonic races,
which renders them incapable of
steps Self government,  puts a small
value viDon human life, or renders the individual mairreruiii m
the rights and liberties of others?
It is undoubtedly true that the
people of the great Teutonic race,
the Germans, Scandanavians and
British have from time immemorial been to a large extent self
governing, have possessed free
institutions, and have had high
ideas regarding the rights of individuals. This has been evidenced by the limiting of the
power of the monarchs of the
various states, the breaking a-
way from the Church of Rome,
and the recognition that the
state exists for  the   individual
rather than the individual for the
state.
In view of these facts, it is
fortunate that Canada has been
drawing her immigration to a
very large extent from the Teutonic nations of Europe, people
who will appreciate our liberal
institutions and assist in building
up in this great country a nation
that is strong, free and enduring. However, much care is
necessary on the part of our immigration department that the
scum of European peoples be not
encouraged to our shores. The
country is large, but there are
plenty of people of our own race
to settle it, and settlement from
that source ensures permanency.
SAVE
WRITING
LETTERS
To distant friends by sending them
The Penticton Press
A subscription only costs
ONE   DOLLAR   PER   YEAR
And the paper makes a specialty of furnishing information
Of Interest to
Outsiders.
The Press has been largely instrumental
in bringing many settlers to Penticton;  so
If vou want your friends to come
here send them the paper.
Now is also a good time for you to subscribe
or to renew your old subscription.
It Pays to Advertise
In a paper that is widely circulated. The
Penticton Press is read by practically everybody in the district;    consequently good
Results are Assured
To advertisers who use its columns. The
merchant who gives most attention to his
advertising is the one who will eventually
do the leading business.
a
Kierstead & Steele
Builders and Contractors
ALL KINDS OF JOB WORK
IN OUR LINE.
.   A Card Will Find Us.    .
M.T.Kierstead - R.Steele
PENTICTON, B. C.
This is the season to lay in a stock  of
JOB   PRINTING
For the coming year.
AFTER FEB'Y 10, 1S08.
Hair Cutting   -    -    35c.
Shaving     -     -     -    25c.
BEN BAKER
HENRY MURK
The Penticton Press
Constantly carries a large stock of Stationery to choose from, and is
Up-to-Date In All lis Work
We guarantee satisfaction
or no pay. Prices moderate.
Goods delivered through the town.
PENTICTON,
Prompt attention to orders.
B.C.
x   Australian Creamery
Butler
Try It. It's Good.
Red Star Grocery
G. Claassen & Son.
o
13    A COMPLETE !
Just Arrived.
I The Penticton furniture Store
C. A. C. STEWARD.
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HOKIKULT
E. J. CLAYTON and C. M. JOHNSTON will shortly
open up a store on Main Street as Nurserymen,
Seedsmen and Florists.
SPECIALTIES
Farm and Garden Seeds, Bulbs, Cut Flowers,
and Horticultural Sundries.
Sole Agents in
B. C. for
DANIELS BROS.-SpedsmentoH. M. King  Edward VII.���Norwich, England.
RICHARD  SANKEY & SON,
Nottingham.
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Now is the time to place your order with the
OKANAGAN NURSERY COMPANY
For Fruit Trees for Fall Planting.
We guarantee trees to grow if planted in the fall, or will replace any
that miss free of charge.     Come early and avoid the rush.     Send or
call for prices.    Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
OKANAGAN NURSERY CO.
LIMITED.
Capital Stock $50,000
Penticton, British Qolumbia.
R. H. ROBERTSON, President
THOS. TODHUNTER, Vice-Pres. E. CURTIS, Manager.      ��
F. E. JONES, Sec-Treas. ��
LAYTON'S
THE MAIN STREET GROCERY
SATURDAY SPECIALS :
3 lbs. Best Tea $1-00     15 lbs. Granulated Sugar $1.00
3 lbs. Best Coffee $1-00     1 box No. 1 Apples $2.00
NO OLD STOCK.
OUR WATCHWORD :   " Highest quality at the lowest price possible."
LAYTON'S
WHERE  YOU   GET THE  BIG   $$   WORTH.
HOUSES TO LET
Several Acre Lots���planted
MONEY TO LOAN
M. C. KENDALL
Real Estate agent, Notary Public and Conveyancer
AGENT FOR
PHCENIX of London
LIVERPOOL & LONDON & GLOBE: and ATLAS
Fire Insurance Companies. 0
THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
DrCAJACKSON
DENTIST
S. O. Land Company's  Block
PENTICTON, B. C.
CHAS. WERE
Accountant & Auditor,
Notary Public
PENTICTON, B. C.
F. E. JONES
Book Keeping & Accountant Work
Office Hours - 9 to 6
Care of Okanagan Nursery Co.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
Notary Public.
KELOWNA,        - -        B. C.
W. H. T. GAHAN,
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary Public.
S. O. Lund Co. Block,
PENTICTON,      -       -       B.C.
FRUIT,   CONFECTIONERY,
Full Line of
ENGLISH  CIGARETTES AND  TOBACCOS
C.   E.   POMEROY.
J. R. CAMPBELL
ELECTRICIAN.
Dealer in all kinds of
Electrical Supplies,  Batteries
and
Gasoline Engine Parts
Terms  and   specifications  for   all
kinds of Electric Wiring and Bell
Work.
Agent for famous Brantford bicycles
Box 160 KELOWNA
OKANAGAN
COLLEGE
SUMMERLAND, B. C
A CHRISTIAN SCHOOL for
young men and young women, situated amid surroundings beautiful and
inspiring and in a community of exceptional moral strength.
Regular course for University
Entrance.
Thorough Commercial course.
Special advantages for music.
Competent Instructors.
Well appointed building, tastefully furnished, heated with hot
water, provided with bath rooms and
improved sanitary arrangements.
Terms moderate.
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
This department, it is expected, will provide
facilities for work second to none in the
province. Prof. Aaron Perry, M. A., the organizer and late conductor of the Commercial
Department of Victoria High School, will
have charge of this Department in the College. The success that has attended Prof.
Perry's efforts elsewhere guarantees the quality of the work to be done in this Department.
PIANOFORTE DEPARTMENT
Mtss Eunice Winnifred Haines will conduct
the work in pianoforte instruction. Miss
Haines is a pupil of Prof. George Pratt Maxim, of Boston, a graduate with honors from
the Pianoforte Department of the School of
Music of Acadia Seminary, and winner in the
competition for musical composition adjudged
by Dr. Percy Goetachins of Boston, the specialist on Tone Relations. Miss Haines has
had successful experience in teaching and
comes highly recommendad by Principal De-
Wolfe, of Acadia Seminary.
VOCAL DEPARTMENT
The work in Voice Culture will be under
charge of Miss Kothrlne Cleveland Davison of
Boston, an experienced Teacher, Choir and
Choral Class Director and pupil of Prof.Frank
E. Morse of Boston and Madame Gertrude
Franklin Salisbury, of the International
School of Music of Boston, Florence and Paris.
For further information apply to
E. SAWYER, M. A., Principal.
Artistic Hair Gut
Easy Shave
and Hot Baths
-AT-
H. MURK'S
HARRIS
���jnursery eery.
Home Grown Fruit
Trees
Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits &c.
A  Specially   large   stock  of
Shade Trees and Budded
ADples.
Penticton, B.C.
I The Hound ol the f
x +
t Baskervilles!
Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes.
BY A. CONAN DOYLE.
Author of "The Green Flag" and "The Great Boer War" X
+
���
+
I
���
4
C ipyrlght (100!) liy A. Conan Doyle.
�����������+������+���+.+4 ��� ��� +iJJ ��� ��� f �� ��� �����������������+������������+++�����+���������������������������
cried, with many chuckles. "1 have
brought off a double event. I mean to
teach them In these parts that law is
law, and that there is a man here who
docs not fear to invoke It. I have established a right of way through the
centre of old Mlddleton'l park, slap
across It, sir, within a hundred yards-
of his own front door. What do you
think of that? We'll teach these magnates that they cannot ride rough
shod over the rights of the commoners, confound them! And I've closed
the wood where the Fernworthy folk
used to picnic. These Infernal people
seem to think that there are no rights
of properly, nnd t!:at they can swarm
where thoy like with their papers and
their bottles. Both cases decided, Dr.
Watson, and both In my favor. I
haven't had such a day since I had Sir
.lohn Morland for trespass, because he
shot In his own warren."
"How on earth did you do that?"
"Look II up in the books, sir. It will
repay reading���Frankland v. Morland,
Court of Queen's Bench. It cost me
��200. but I got my verdict."
"Did It do you any good?"
"None, sir, none. I am proud to say
that I had no interest In the matter.
I act entirely fro n a sense of public
duty. I ha\e no doubt, for example,
that the Femwor:hy people will burn
me In effigy to-night. I told the police
last time they did it that they should
stop these disgraceful exhibitions. The
County Constabulary is in a scandalous state, sir, and It has not afforded
me the protection to which I am en
titled. The ca3e of Frankland- v. Re-
glna will bring the matter before the
attention of the public. I told them that
they would have occasion to regret
their treatment of me, and already my
words have come true."
"ITow so.'' I asUe-d.
The old man put on a very knowing expression.
"Because I could tell them what
they are dying to know; but nothing
would induce me to help the rascals in
any way."
I had been casting round for some
excuse by which I could get away
from his gossip, but no-w I began Ic
wish to hear more of it. I had see ���
enough of the contrary nature of thr
old sinner to understand that an"
strong sign of interest would be the
surest way to stop his confidences.
"Some poaching case, no doubt?"
said I. with an Indifferent manner.
"Ha, ha, my boy, a very much more
Important matter than' that! What
about the convict on the moor?"
I started. "You don't mean that you
know where he Is?" said I.
'I may not know exactly where he
Is but I am quite sure that I could help
'Iwra. Joyous," saiu ,, s�� ; ,\>oC i.'v/ir,
this long and inconclusive Interview,
"you are taking a very great responsibility and putting yourself in a very
false position by not making an absfr
lutely clean breast of all that you
know. If I have to call Jn tlie aid of
the police you will find how seriously
you are con:promi iSd. If your position
Is innocent, why did you In the first
Instance deny ha'.ing written to Sir
Charles upon that date?"
"Because I feaved that some false
conclusion might be drawn from i��.
and that I might find myself Involved
in a scindal."
"And why were you so pressing that
Sir Charles should destroy vour letter?"
"If you have read the letter you will
know."
"I did not say that I had read all
the letter."
"You quoted some of It."
"I quoted the postscript. The letter
had, as I said, been burned and It wa���;
not all legible. I ask you once ag-iln
why it was tbat you were so pressing
that Sir  Cnarles should  destroy this
letter  which he received ou the do..'
of his death."
"The matter Is a very private one."
"The more reason why you avoid a
public Investigation."
"I will tell you, then. If you havj
heard anything of my unhappy history
you will know that I made a rash mar.
rift^e and had reason to regret It."
"I have heard so much."
"My life has been one Incessant
persecution from a h'tsbnnd whom 1
abhor. The law Is upon his side, and
everv day I am faced by the possibility that he may for'-c me to live
w,f*,"hl"\ M the time tbat 1 wrote this
letter to Sir Charles I had learned that
there was a prospect of my regaining
my freedom If certain expenses could
be met. It meant everything to me���
peace of mind, happiness, self-respect
���everything. I knew Sir Charles's
generosity, and I thought that if he
heard the story from my own lips he
would help me."
"Then how Is it that you did not
go?"
"Because I received help In the Interval from another source."
"Why, then, did you not write to Sir
Charles and explain this?"
"So I should have done had I not
seen his death In the paper next
morning."
The woman's story hung coherently
together, and all my questions were
unable to shake It. I could only check
it by finding If she had, Indeed, Instituted divorce proceedings against her
husband at or about the time of the
tragedy.
It was unlikely that she would dare [the police to lay their hands on him.
to say that she had not been to BaskervIUe Hall If she really had been, for a
trap would be necessary to take her
there, and could not have returned to
Coombe Traeey until the early hours
of the morning. Such an excursion
could not be kept secret. The probability was, therefore, that she was telling the truth, or, at least, a part of the
ruth. I came away baffled and disheartened. Once again I had reached
hat dead wall which seemed to be
t'lilt across every path by which 1
rled to get at the object of my mission. And yet the more I thought of
the lady's face and of her manner the
more I felt that something wa3 being
held back from mo. Why should she
' trn so pale? Why should she flght
���T'inst every admission until It was
:'orced from her? Why should she have
i>een so reticent at the time of the
f'-agedy? Surely the explanation of all
'his could not be as Innocent as she
would have me believe.    For the mo-
jf'-it I could proceed no farther In
.'hat direction, but must turn back to
that other clue which w.is to be sought
for among the stone huts upon the
moor.
And that was a mo t vague direction. I realized it as I drove back and
loted how hill after hill showed traces
���f the ancient people. Barrymore's
mly indication had been that the
tranger lived in one of these aban-
'oned huts and many hundreds of
'.hem are scattered throughout the
length and breadth of the moor. But I
'���'ad my own experience for a guide
ilnce It had shown me the man himself standing upon the summit of the
Hack. Tor. That then should be the
centre of my search. From there I
.hould explore every hut upon the
noor until I lighted upon the right
one. If this m��n were inside It I should
Ind out from Ms own lips, at the point
-if my revolver If necessary, who he
was aid why he had dogged us so
'ong. He might slip away from us in
���he crowd of Recent Street, but It
would puzzle him to do so upon the
lonely moor. On the other hand, If I
should find the hut and its tenant
should not be within It I must remain
there, however long the vigil, until he
���eturned Holm��s bad missed him in
London. It would Indeed be a triumph
for me If I could run him to earth,
whore my master had failed.
Luck had been -against us again and
again in this Inquiry, but now at last
It came to my aid. And the messenger
of good fortune was none other than
Mr. Frankland, who was standing,
grey whiskered and red-faced, outside
the gate of his garden, which opened
on to the high road along which I
traveled.
"Good-day, Dr. Watson," cried he,
with unwonted good humoi1, "you must
really give your horse3 a rest, and
come in to have a glass of wine and to
congratulate me."
My feelings towards him were far
from being friendly after what I had
heard of his treatment of his daughter,
but I was anxious to send Perkins and
the waggonette home, and the opportunity was a good one. I alighted and
sent a message to Sir Henry that I
should walk over In time for dinner.
Then I followed Frankland Into his
dining-room.
"It Is a great day for me, sir���one
of the red-letter days of my life." he
Has it never struck you that the way
to catch that man was to find out
where he got his food, and bo trace It
to him?"
He certainly seemed to be getting
uncomfortably near the truth. "No
doubt," said I; "but how do you know
that he Is anywhere upon the moor?"
"I know It because I have seen with
my own eyes the messenger who takes
him his food."
My heart sank for Barrymore. It
was a serious thing to be In the power of this spiteful old busybody. But
his next remark took a weight from
my mind.
"You'll be surprised to hear that hia
food Is taken to him by a child. I see
him every day through my telescope
upon the roof. He passes along the
same path at the same hour, And to
whom should he be going except to
the convict?"
Here was luck Indeed! And yet I
suppressed all appearance of Interest.
\ child! Barrymore had said tbat OCT
unknown was supplied by a boy. It was
on bis track, and not upon the convict's, that Frankhnd had stumbled. If
I could get his knowledge it. might
save me a long and weary hunt. But
Incredulity and Indifference were
evidently my strongest cards.
"I should say that It was much more
likely that it was the son of one of
the moorland shepherds taking ont his
father's dinner."
The least appearance of opposition
struck fire out of the old autocrat. His
eyes looked malignantly at me, and his
grey whiskers bristled like those of an
angry cat.
"Indeed, sir!" said he, pointing out
over the wlde-stretchlng moor. Do yon
see that Black Tor over yonder? Well,
do you see the lower hill beyond with
the thornbrush upon It? It Is the stoniest part of the whole moor. Is that a
place where a shepherd would be likely to take his station? Your suggestion, sir, Is a most absurd one."
I meekly answered that I had spoken
without knowing all the facts. My submission pleased him and led him to
further confidences.
"You may be sure, sir, that I have
very good grounds before I come to an
opinion. I have seen the boy again and
again with his bundle. Every day, and
sometimes twice a day, I have been
able���but wait a moment, Dr. Watson.
Do my eyes deceive me, or Is there at
the present moment something moving upon that hill side?"
It was several miles off, but I could
distinctly see a small dark dot against
the dull ��reen and grey.
"Come, sir, come!" cried Frankland,
rushing upstairs. "You will see with
your own eyes and Judge for yourself."
The telescope, a formidable Instrument mounted upon a tripod, stood
upon the fiat leads of .the bouse.
Frankland clapped his eye to It and
gave a cry of satisfaction.
"Quick, Dr. Watson, quick, before
he passes over the hill I"
There he was, sure enough, a small
urchin with a little bundle upon bis
shoulder, tolling slowing up the hill.
When he reached the crest I saw the
ragged uncouth figure outlined for an
Instant against the cold blue sky. He
looked round him, with a furtive and
stealthy air, as one who dreads pursuit. Then he vanished over the hill.
"Well! Am I n&htT"
"Certainly, there    is    a    boy    wn'o
seems to have some secret errand."
"And what the errand is even a
county c< �� table could guess. But not
one word shall they have from me, and
I bind you In secrecy also, Dr. Watson. Not a word! You understand!"
"Just as you wish."
"They have treated me shamefully
���shamefully. When the facts come
out in Frankland v. Regina I venture
to think that a thrill of indignation
will run through the country. Nothing
would induce nip to help the police In
any way. For all they cared it might
have been me, instead of my eflipy,
which these rascals burned at th��
stake. Surely you are not going! Yon
will help me to empty the decanter in
honor of this great occasion!"
But I resisted all his solicitations
and -succeeded i-n dissuading him from
his announced intent'on of walking
horn? with me. I kept the read as long
is his eye was on me, and then 1
struck off access the moor and made
'or the stony hill over which the boy
had disappea-ed. Everything wa" forking In my favor and I swore that It
should not be through lack of energy
or perseverance'that I Bhonld miss the
chance which Fortune had thrown In
my way.
The sun was already sinking when
I reached the summit of the hill, and
the long slopes beneath me wete all
golden-green on one side and grey sha
dow on the othpr. A h-aze lay low upon
the farthest sky-line, out of which jut
ted the fantnstic shapes of Bolllver
and Vixen Tor. Over the wide expanse
there was no sou'd and no movement.
One great grey bird, a gull or curlew,
soared aloft in the blue Heaven. He
and I seemed to be the only living
things between the huge arch of the
sky and the desert beneath it. Th?
barren scene, the sense of lone'lness,
and the mystery and urgency of my
task all struck a chill into my heart
The boy was nowhere to be seen. But
down beneath me In a cleft of the hills
there was a circle of tho old stone
huts, and in the middle of them there
was one which retained sufficient, roof
to act as a screen against the weather.
My heart leaped within me as I saw it.
This must be the burrow where the
stranger lurked. At last my foot was
on the threshold of his hiding place���
his secret was within my grasp.
As I approached the hut, walking
as warily as Stapieton would do when
with poised net he drew near the set
tied butterfly, I satisfied myself that
the place had Indeed been used as a
habitation. A vague pathway among
the boulders led to the dilapidated
opening which served as a door. All
was silent within. The unknown might
be lurking there, or he might be prowl
itip: on the moor. My nerves tingled
with tbe eense of adventure. Throwing
aside my cigarette, I closed my ham1
'ipon the butt of my revolver and
walking swiftly up to the door, I looked in. The place was empty.
But. there were ample signs that 1
bad not come upon a false scent. This
was certainly where the man lived.
3ome blankets rolled in a waterproof
lay upon that very stone slab upon
which neolithic man had once slumbered. The ashes of a fire were heaped in
a rude grate: Beside it lay some cooking utensils and a bucket half-full of
water. A. litter of empty tins showed
that the place had been occupied for
aome time, and I saw, as my eyes became accustomed to the chequereu
iight, a pannikin and half-full bottle
nt spirits standing In y^e corner. In
ihe middle of the hut-a"' flat stone served the purpose of a table, and upon
ais stood a small cloth bundle���the
same, no doubt, which I had seen
through tho telescope .upon the shout
ler of the boy. It contained a loaf of
bread, a tinned tongue and two tins of
ureserved peaches. As I set it down
again, after having examined it, my
eart leaped to see that beneath it
'here lay a sheet of paper with writing
:pon it. I raised It, and this was what
J read, roughly scrawled in pencil: ���
"Dr. Watson has gone to Coombe
Tracpv "
(To be continued.)
F^ARM wanted
Anyone having a good farm for salt
in Western Canada may find cash buyei
by writing at once, giving price and description, to BUYERS* CO-OPERATIVE COMPANY. Minneapolis,
28-4t Minnesota, U.S.A
If You Want Good Work
Done Go To
E. O. DeLONG
The Old Reliable. !
Corner of Smith and Ellis Sts ;
PENTICTON, B. C.        |
RATHVON &CARLESS
CONTRACTORS
AND
BUILDERS
Plans,  Specifications  and   Estimate;
Furnished for all Kinds of Work.
L. A. RATHVON,
'Phone White i:
CHAS. L. CARLESS
'Phone White 2
Lake View Poultry Yards
FRESH EGGS FOR SALE
f| PURE-BRED WHITE
LEGHORNS
11 EGGS FOR HATCHING
��   $1.00 to $1.50 per setting.
I. KENT, Propr.    %
ngg&u
Carload Flour and Feed
FLOUR & CEREALS
Royal Household Flour
491b. sack $1.95
Mount Royal Flour 49 lbs...  1.85
Gk'nora Flour 49 lb sack.... 1.75
All of the above made from No.
1 Manitoba Hard Wheat.
Rolled OaU 80 lb. sack $4.00
40       "        2.10
20       "        1.10
8       "       45
Oatmeal       10       "       55
PEED
Oats per ton $36.00
Feed Wheat 120 lbs  1.75
Bran             100 lbs  1.60
Shorts           100 lbs  1.75
Barley Chop 100 lbs  1.75
Barley and Oat Chop  1.35
'Phone 25.    W. R. KING & CO.    Ellis Street, i
Your Eyes
Tested Free
Come in and have it done
Now
HARRIS, The Jeweler
SHELF   HARDWARE
Saws, Axes, Wedges, Striking Hammers, Table and
Pocket Cutlery.
PENTICTON HARDWARE CO.
NORTH VANCOUVER
The Ambitious City,
With 36 rniles of Water Frontage
And the best Harbor on the
Pacific Coast. Offers the best
opportunities for
Business or Investment.
A large list of Properties for
sale or exchange.
Call and see us, or write to
MARTINSON & CO.
Lonsdale Avenue,
North Vancouver.
South Okanagan Valley
Bureau of information of the South
Jkanagan Valley and for a list of property for sale, improved farms, Penticton T. S. Coy's lots, etc. Apply to
Wm. Smyth Parker
General Real Estate Agent, who will
always cheerfully give prompt and best
attention to all inquiries from intending
investors.
PENTICTON. B. C.
STAGES
Stage leaves for Keremeos and Hedley nt 7 a. m.
on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Returns
on Mondays. Wednesdays and Fridays.
Stage leaves for Princeton every Tuesday at
7 a. m.
Stage leaves for Fairview and Oroviile on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a. m. Returns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at
G p. m.
POST OFFICE.
Hours 9 a. m. to 6. p, m.
Registered Letter and Money Order wicket
closes 6 p. m.
Wicket opened for half an hour after mail is
distributed.
Arrivals���Per Sir, Okanagan: Daily except
Sunday 6 p.m.; Per stage from Hedley, Keremeos, Olalla, Green Mountain, Oroviile, Fairview,
and White Lake: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 6 p. m,
Closing���For boat and Btages: 9 p.m. daily except Saturday. For Monday's boat and stages:
8.45 p. m. Sundays.
C. P. R. TIME TABLE
SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH
Daily both ways except Sunday.
SOUTH BOUND
7.80 a. m	
6.27   "    	
8.62   "    	
8.30   "   ....ar..
9.80   "
9.45
NOTICE TO HORSE OWNERS.
Veterinary Dentistry is practically new. Some of the many
symptoms of bad teeth are:
Covering, loss of flesh, weak
jyes, rough coats and manj
)ther symptoms. If your horses
ire troubled with any of these
symptoms, be sure to have him
ixamined. I use only improved,
nodern up-to-date instruments,
ncluding a mouth speculum that
s unexcelled. Call and see me
tbout your horses at the Commercial Stables.
Dr. C. W. Cross,
VETERINARY DENTIST.
10.00 p.m...
11.10' " ...
3.00 " ...
4.45 " ...
6.00   "   ...
STATION    NORTH BOUND
Sicamous  6.00 p.m.
. Enderby  4.48   "
Armstrong 4.08   "
..Vernon lv.... 3.80   "
Iv Vernon ar 2.30   "
ar...Ok. Landing ...lv 2.15   "
 lv..     __^^
lv... Ok. Landing...ar 11.00a.m.
..Kelowna 8.20   "
.Peachland  7.25   "
Summerland  6.30   "
. Penticton 6.00   "
Shropshire   Lambs
If mutton raises or you want a treat,
orders mailed at Penticton on or before
Monday will be delivered Friday at
Welby s express office, Penticton, prepaid.
Front quarter 16 cents.
Hind quarter 19   "
Half carcass 17   "
Whole carcass 16   "
R. J. Armstrong,
FOUNTAIN RANCH,    KEREMEOS.
G. H. KIEFFER
GENERAL BLACKSMITH.
Horse Shoeing and Repair Work.
Give Me a Trial.
Very Best of Workmanship.
ALL THREE FOR S2.00 THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B. C, FEBRUARY 8, 1908.
IK������r>H?4X--C��C--2��*0>aiL! *v^^J3����a0e*5Ei9I5KiBCaME��H��^r23iic��5SXHC
rifSTORiCAL CORNER.
Stories of Frederick the Great.
Frederick the Great was much
addicted to the habit of taking
snuff and to save himself the
trouble of carrying it in his
pockets he had a snuff-box placed
in each of his apartments. One
day he saw from his room one of
his pages who, thinking he was
not seen and being anxious to
have a pinch of snuff from the
royal snuff-box, unceremoniously
dip his fingers into the box standing on the mantel-shelf of the
neighboring room. At first the
Idng said nothing, but at the end
of an hour he culled the page
and telling him to bring his snuffbox invited the inquisitive youngster to take a pinch. "How do
you like it 1" said His Majesty.
" It is splendid, Sire." "And
I!i is snu ff-box ? " ' 'Magnificent,
Your Majesty." "Well then,!
you had better take and keep it,
for I tiiink it is too small for
both of us."
Another time Frederick rang
the bell but no one came. He
opened the door and found his
page sound asleep in an armchair, He advanced towards him
an J was goinjr to awaken him
when he perceived part of a
letter sticking out of his pocket.
As he was curious to know what
it was about, he took it out of
his pocket and read it. It turned
out to be a letter from the boy's
mother in which she was thanking him for having so kindly sent
her part of his wages to relieve
her in her distress. She concluded the letter by saying that
God would bless him for the filial
love which he had shown towards
her. When the king had rer.d
the letter he took a purse of
money which, with the letter, he
slipped into the boy's pocket and
then gently returned to his room.
Shortly after he rang so loudly
that the page awoke and came
towards the king. "You have
been sleeping soundly," said
Frederick to him. The page tried
to excuse himself, and in his embarrassment put his hand in his
pocket. He found the purse,
drew it out and was quite overcome with surprise and alarm.
I fe turned deathly pale and looking at the king burst into tears
without being able to utter a
single word. "What is the matter?"- said the king. "Ah!
Sire," said the young man falling
on his knees, "someone is trying
to ruin me ; I know nothing
about this money that I find in
my pocket." "My friend," said
Frederick, "God often sends us
blessings while we are asleep;
send that to your mother and
assure her that I will take care
of both her and you."���From the
German, by J. Barker.
e Southern Okana
Company, Limi
Still have a few of those Main Street Lots left.
Martin Street and Eckhardt Avenue Lots going fast.
:Now is Your Time to Get in on the Ground Floor;
Choice Fruit Lots on the Bench.
A Limited Quantity left.
PRICES RIGHT.
inquire of the MANAGING DIRECTORS,
POMONA
(We three)
PEACHLAND.
There was an important meeting of the shareholders of the
Peachland Trading Co. Wednesday evening.
Mrs. and Miss Perry of Manitoba are here for a six weeks'
holiday.
The Girls' Handicraft Club
met at Miss Needham's home
Thursday afternoon,
Mr. C. G. Elliott supplied in
the Methodist Church Sunday
morning.
Several robins have seen here
during the last week.
Mrs. (Dr.) Robertson who was
thrown from her buggy a week
ago and sustained severe injuries is recovering slowly.
Mrs. J. N. Gummow and her
daughter Olive spent the week
end very pleasantly at Kelowna,
the guests of Miss Mawhinney
.J. McKinnon is pruning Mr.
Burgess' orchard.
Thos. Guy cut his foot badly
last week while splitting wood.
It is doing as well as can be expected.
Subscription $1.00 Year.
(At the bungalow of Larry Shannon.) "Here we are again."
"A very good day to you, Johnny, and Tom; much honor to my
humble home. Refreshments?
No, well to work then. We have
rioted the large areas of fruit
land waiting for culture. We
have counted the great cost of
clearing, ditching, piping, planting, also the large profits assured
to the fruit grower who will put
brain and muscle into his work.
Turn we now to some special
points in detail. Johnny, you
have data of irrigable land within three miles to begin with."
"Yes Larry: there are 5000
acres at least, which will cost for
purchase, clearing, stoning.
plowing, fluming and planting
$150 per acre or $750,000; value
thus improved, $250 per acre;
profit, half a million dollars. Only
a wealthy man or a strong company could undertake the whole
enterprise, but 500 persons could
do it very well. Some would
want 20 acres; many would get
along with 5 acres and prosper.
It has been proved often that a
good living can be gained on five
acres or less. The irrigation
works, however, would call for
co-operation on a large scale."
"I can see," said Tom, "how
hundreds of working men could
thus help themselves into comfort and wealth. Take only ten
families, near neighbors, holding
lots which average five acres
each, bought on time at a low
rate of interest. They may have
scant belongings but if they have
come to this country "on purpose," the mother and kids can
run the house, raise garden truck
and small fruits, keep some
fowls, possibly a pig, and, like
the fowls, scratch for a living.
The man will find profitable work
with resident fruit growers at
which work he can not only keep
the wolf from the door, but gain
experience in raising fruits, large
and small, for use and profit."
"Multiply this case by 500,"
said John, and the labor problem
will be solved. Such workers will
not go on strike or hold up their
employer for a big advance of
wages simply because the fruit
crop must be promptly gathered
or totally lost. The real worker,
having a personal interest in his
own orchard will soon reckon
himself among the brotherhood
of proprietors. He will refuse
to look upon his employer as an
enemy or try to rob that employer at the mandate of any little
tyrant speaking in the name of
organized labor." |
GREEN MOUNTAIN
We had some zero weather
last week, and there is good
sleighing at present.
John McLennan and wife of
Okanagan Falls spent Sunday
with their daughter, Mrs. G. A.
Clark.
R. L. Allen spent Sunday with
Alex. Ford of Springbrook Farm.
Anti-Tuberculosis   Contribution.
The following letter was received by Mrs. C. A. C. Steward,
President of the local branch of
the Anti-Tuberculosis Association.   It requires no comment: .
Dear Mrs. Steward,���I have
the honor to acknowledge yours
of the 16th ultimo,  containing
] cheque for $166.50.
On behalf of our Society I beg
to thank the residents of Penticton for their generous contribution.
This is the second contribution
coming from Penticton, and I
have no hesiiation in saying, that
if the people of British Columbia
acted as energetically and generously as the people of Penticton, we would have no trouble in
having Institutions enough to
handle all our consumptives in
this country.
I have the honor to be,
Dear Mrs. Steward,
Your obedient servant,
C. J. Fagan, M. D.,
Secretary.
Okanagan Grown
Tomato Seed.
Now is the time to send in your
order. I make a specialty of
growing Tomato Seed.    Have
25 Varieties   .   .    .
Best kinds.   Catalogue free.
D. Gellatly, Gciiatiy p.o.
w. o. w.
Okanagan Camp No. 261.
Meets every Tuesday in the month at
8 p. m. in Woodmen's Hall, Ellis St.
Visiting Sovereigns always welcome.
JOHN POWERS, C. C.
R. WILTON, CLERK
HOTEL,   PENTICTON.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.
RATES $2.50 PER DAY
A. Barnes       - -       Prop.
PENTICTON. B.C.
To The Travelling Public.
If you want a good stable and
prime feed for your horses, call
on
LIVERY & FEED STABLE.
S. D. HINE,
FAIRVIEW, B.C.
Galarneau &
McKenzie
BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
When  you   think  of   Building
Look us up.
ADOLPHUS GALARNEAU     W. A. MCKENZIE
KfnLE RIVER ASSESSMENT DISTRia.
NOTICE ib hereby given, in accordance with
the Statutes, that Provincial Revenue Tax and all
assessed taxes assessed and levied under the "Aa-
���lensment Act" and 'Public Schools Act" and
amendments, are now due aad payable for the
year 1908. All taxes collectible for the Kettle
Kiver_Assessment District an due and payable at
my office, at the Government Building, Fairview,
This notice in terms of law ia equivalent to a
personal demand by me upon all persons liable for
taxes.
. ?aiS��8t Fairview- B- C, tJili 30th day of Janu-
H. A. TURMER,
Deputy Assessor and Collector,
Kettle River Assessment District.
NOTICE.
Osoyoos Land District.      Diat rJet of Yale, B. C.
TAKE NOTICE that Robeit. Thomas Has*.-
wood, rancher, of Kelowna, B. C. , intend* to apply
for permission to lease the following described
land :���
Commencing at a post planted ist the N. E.
corner of the N. W. V*. section 16, township 23,
thence south 40 chains ; thenee we tt 40 chains ;
thence south 40 chains ; thence west 40 chains ;
thence north 40 chains ; thence west fO chains ;
thence north 40 chains ; thence east lOtf chains,
to the point of commencement, and containing; 640
acres more or less.
ROBBKT THOMAS HASKtWOOP-
21st January. 1908.
NOTICE
Similkameen Land District.     District
of Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that Mrs. M. E.
Brown, of Fairview, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following
described land :
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the Indian Reserve
in TP 50, thence north 80 chains; thence
west 60 chains; thence south 20 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 40 chains; thence
south 20 chains; thence east 60 chains
to the point of commencement, and
containing 320 acres, more or less.
M. E. BROWN
By her agent, C. de B. Green.
Dated 21st January, 1908.
E. J. F1NGH
Painter, Paperhanger
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a Specialty.
WALL PAPER Carried in Stock.
Box 196.       Main St.
C. P.
LAND FOR SALE
Agricultural and timber land for sale
for $1.00 per acre with $2.00 per thousand feet of lumber.
Houses to let.
J. R. MITCHELL,
District Agent.
H. HARLOW
Dealer in
BUILDING MATERIAL: LIME,
LATH, CEMENT, HARD
WALL PLASTER.
Manufacturer of  Miracle
Cement BSocks
Which make a true hollow wall,
the strongest cement block wall
built.
The Miracle Block took the
Grand Gold Medal at the Lewis
and Clarke Centennial Exposition
at Portland, Ore. 12-tf
NOTICE
Leamington Mineral Claim.   Situate in
the Osoyoos Mining Division of Yale
District.      Where    located ��� Armstrong's, Similkameem.
TAKE NOTICE that I, R. H. Parkinson, agent for C. A. C.  Steward,   Free
Minerrs Certificate No. 5,806,  and W.
E. Welby, Free Miner's Certificate No.
intend,  sixty days from date,
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for a certificate of Improvements,   for
the  purpose  of    obtaining  a  Crown
Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action.
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 3rd day of January, A. D.
1908.       RICHARD H. PARKINSON.
EATON'S PRICES
Plus the Express
-AT-
H.OLIVER'S
SHOE STORE.
D. W. Crowley
&Co.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Goods Delivered to any part of  the
Town.
WE GIVE OUR PROMPT ATTENTION TO
MAIL ORDERS
C. E. HOUSER, Manager.
PENTICTON
& OROVILLE
STAGE
Via Fairview
Leaves Penticton Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., arriving at Oroviile t he same day at 6 p. m.
Through Fare - $6.00
W. HINE and S. M. SNOW
FAIRVIEW. B. C.
JUST RECEIVED AT
J. A. NESBITT'S,
ELLIS STREET
Full line of Samples for Spring
and Summer Suitings.
Crown Tailoring Company
Call in and see these fine goods.
JUST ARRIVED ==
CAR LOAD OF
Extension and
Reversible Discs
The very latest up - to - date
tools for Orchard Cultivation.
Descriptive matter sent on
application to
S. T. Elliott,
KELOWNA       -      -       B. C.
NURSERIES
|&MWLtrf      60   YEARS'
^EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
- w w * -        Copyrights &.c.
Anyone Bending a sketch and (Inscription may
illicitly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention Is probably patentable. Comraunlca-
tlom strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on I'ateuts
sent free. Oldest aaenoy for securing: patents*
Patents taken through Munn & Co. racolve
$prclal notice, without charge, In the
Scientific Americast
A handsomely Illustrated weekly.   lowest clr-
������ulitiWm of any scientific journal.    Terms. $3 a
your; four months, 91* Sold by all newsdealers,
MUNN &Co.36,Broate��' New York
Branch Offlco. 626 F St., Wellington, II. C.
Send for our descriptive  catalogue of
Nursery Stoclt.    Address
The   Riverside   Nurseries
25-tf GRAND FORKS, B. C.
THE PENTICTON
DAIRY
Daily delivery of Fresh Milk to
all parts of the Town.
MILK 10c. PER QUART.
H. M. McNeill,     .    Prop.
Pacific Coast Grown
Seeds, Trees,
For the Farm, Garden, Lawn, or
Conservatory.
Reliable, approved  varieties,   at
reasonable prices.
No Borers.   No Scale.    No fumigation to damage stock.
No windy agents to annoy you.
Buy  direct  and  get   trees   and
seeds that GROW.
Bee Supplies, Spray Pumps,
Spraying Material and
Cut Flowers.
Catalogue Free.
ML J. HENRY,
CR!3ENHOi;SES"30U> Westminster Rd
Brunch nurseries.-S. Vancouver.
NOTICE
FRUIT TREES-Well-grown stock.
Large quantity of apple trees for sale,
only few choice varieties grown : alsr>^
small stock of ornamental trees. Apply
for varieties and price to Manager,
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd.,
16-tf Vernon, B. 0.
A Bargain
Three lots on Main St. for $1,000.
One block from Bank. Half interest in
same for $500. Positively the best
value in town.   Ai.ply
M. C. KENDALL.

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