BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Penticton Press Nov 23, 1907

Item Metadata

Download

Media
penpress-1.0211872.pdf
Metadata
JSON: penpress-1.0211872.json
JSON-LD: penpress-1.0211872-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): penpress-1.0211872-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: penpress-1.0211872-rdf.json
Turtle: penpress-1.0211872-turtle.txt
N-Triples: penpress-1.0211872-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: penpress-1.0211872-source.json
Full Text
penpress-1.0211872-fulltext.txt
Citation
penpress-1.0211872.ris

Full Text

Array ftbe   penticton
VOL. 2.   No. 19.
PENTICTON, B.C., SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1907.
0s
&AR Jjj Apvanc^7
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO
ESTABLISHED  1807
B. I. WALKER, President
���LEX. LAIRD, General Manager
A. H. IRELAND, Superintendent of
Branches
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000
Rest, - - - 5,000,000
Total Assets, -  113,000,00(7
Branches throughout Canadr, and in the United States and England
86
A GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS TRANSACTED
FARMERS'   BANKING ^^
Every facility afforded Farmers for their banking
business.    Sales Notes cashed or taken
for collection
BANKING  BY  MAIL.���Deposits may be made or withdrawn by
mail.    Out-of-town accounts receive every attention
Penticton Branch    -    ��    J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
\ 7Kr
��������-
���*��-
-<*��-
�������-
-��-
Are You Building ?
���~S\
We can supply you with anything you require,
LUMBER, SHINGLES, SASH, DOORS, and
BUILDING PAPER. We also keep on hand
a large stock of Fluming Material. Try some
of our Vulcanized Rubber Roofing on your
outbuildings; it is the best. We keep Corrugated Carpet Felt to put under carpet.  Try it.
S. G. Smith
t
 i     �� J. ^        i
Imith Lumber Go. V
UNDERWEAR
Of all Kinds
and sizes
At prices
  away down
Give us a call and see our stock before purchasing elsewhere
NORMAN HILL
The Up-To-Date Ladies and Gents Furnisher
SADDLES!   SADDLES!
Just arrived, a choice assortment of
Stock Saddles, Bridles, Schapps, Spurs, and general
Riding Equipment at close prices.
KENT & SON.
Smith Street
Penticton, B. C.
I COMMERCIAL
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
DIGNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors.
k If you vant a Stylish Outfit, this is .he place to come.   You can always
�� get teams just when you want them.   We make a specialty of keeping
k good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack horses.
S We are also putting in Hay and Grain for sale, and as we buy for cash
5 we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit.
5 Special Attention To The Wants Of Commercial Men.
1
��
fe THE PENTICTON LUMBER 8
K        SYNDICATE Ltd.
8 DEALERS IN
B ALL KINDS OF DRY
$ OFFICE and YARDS on MAIN STREET
!
FIR POSTS AND CORDWOOD.
BUILDING MATERIAL �����
I
STRAWBERRY    PLANTS
For.Fall Planting.   I have them in the following varieties:
Glenmary, New York, Magoon.
First-Class Plants.   Write for Prices.
D. Gellatly, Geiiatiy, s.e.
FRUIT GROWERS UNITE
Leading Growers Discuss Feasible Plan to Form Provincial
Exchange
A very interesting and profitable meeting of fruit growers
was held in the sample room of
the Hotel Penticton on Monday
evening, at which Jas. Johnstone, the president, and W. J.
Brandrith, the secretary of the
B.C. Fruit Growers'Association,
and P. H. Wilson, the president
of the local exchange at Chilli-
wack delivered addresses. The
attendance was fair, but not so
large as it would have been had
longer notice been given. However, as meetings should be
judged by results rather than by
the numbers that attend, this
one must be regarded as very
successful.
W. J. C. Ede, the president of
the Penticton Exchange, occupied the chair.
MR. JOHNSTONE,
who is a very successful g jwer
at Nelson, and is also the president of the lately formed Fruit
and Produce Exchange of B. C,
was the first speaker. In his
address, Mr. Johnstone clearly
pointed out the advantages to be
derived from co-operation in
marketing. He had been instrumental in the organization
of the Fruit and Produce Exchange of B. C. with headquarters at Revelstoke. The
object of this organization was
to market all the fruit grown in
the province. The disadvantage
of the past system, by which
each exchange has sought its
own market, has been, as is well
known, that proper distribution
of prodnce has been impossible,
often a glut being formed in
places, while in others fruit
could not be had.
The new union had been begun
last spring and had met with
good results. It was now desired to bring in all the local exchanges in the province so that
more effective work might be
done next year. In order for an
exchange to become a member
of the Fruit and Produce Exchange, it was necessary to deposit* $100.00. This would be
paid back from the profits of the
sales. Some exchanges charged
ten per cent., others five, but in
the State of Washington, where
the fruit was all handled by a
central union, only one per cent,
was charged. Each local would
be responsible to the central
body for the class of fruit sent
out, and the central would bear
the responsibility of finding a
market. By the central organization having full charge of marketing, it would be possible to
properly distribute the fruit, as
all wholesale films in the North
West would deal directly with it.
Incidentally the speaker touched upon the packing of apples,
and expressed himself of opinion
that the most satisfactory way
in which to have it done was to
have a central packing house to
which the growers brought the
apples in their orchard boxes.
Under the system of handling
fruit hitherto in vogue, the
grower received no redress if the
receiver claimed that the fruit
arrived in bad condition. Under
the systematic method which he
wished to ettablish, the difficulty
would be overcome. It would
be necessary to keep one first-
class man at a good salary to
have charge of the marketing
and the local exchanges would
constantly keep him informed as
to the shipments they had ready.
At his direction the fruit would
be shipped direct from the producers to the wholesale firms in
the Northwest. Each grower
would have his own mark upon
each box, and thus his individuality would be preserved.
MR. BRANDRITH
was next called upon and, in beginning, gave a very pointed illustration of the effects of the
lack of co-operation. He had
been attending exhibitions in
Manitoba and the Northwest,
and at many of the towns there
were no plums to be had at any
price. When he reached Calgary he had noticed an immense
stack of plums, and, upon enquiring as to their value, was
told that he could have any quantity at sixty cents per crate.
There were plums from almost
every section of the province in
the pile.
The central organization would
have canvassers in the Northwest, a larger territory would be
covered, and the work would be
more cheaply carried on, as only
one president and one secretary
would be necessary. He approved of the plan whereby the
grower's name would be put on
every box, as in that way he
would benefit from sending out
a good article, and could be located if he sent out inferior
fruit.
MR. WILSON
followed in an address in which
he outlined the work that had
been accomplished by the local
exchange at Chilliwack, and
heartily endorsed the plan of
union. Until the exchange had
been started at Chilliwack, everybody had packed their own fruit,
and had shipped to Vancouver.
Owing to the competition of the
growers in the market, a low
price had to be accepted and they
got no redress if the purchaser
proved dishonest. The exchange
had been organized last year
with a result that better prices
Were being obtained. Some of
the dealers had reiused to pay
the prices asked by the exchange
and had gone to the farmers,
but by the time they had paid
the cost of picking, packing and
shipping, the fruit had cost more
than if they had dealt with the
exchange. Formerly apples had
brought about 80 cents per box,
f. o. b. Chilliwack, but they were
now bringing $1.25 f. o. b. Mr.
Wilson said he realized that
better apples could be grown in
the Okanagan than at Chilliwack, and, consequently, better
prices could be obtained at this
point.
At the conclusion of Mr. Wilson's address, a number of
IMPORTANT POINTS
were brought out through questions asked by the hearers. The
capital stock of the Fruit and
Produce Exchange of B. C. was
ten thousand dollars, but it comprised the local exchanges of the
Kootenay, Revelstoke, Salmon
Arm, and Chilliwack and was,
consequently, very strong. The
freight on the produce would be
paid by the purchaser, hence a
larger capital stock was unnecessary. The Exchange dealt with
the wholesale merchants, not
with the consumers, and there
had never been any lack of orders. The entire output of Chilliwack had passed through the
Exchange this year. There were
three men at present in the
Northwest taking orders.
As the central exchange received its orders, it would forward them to the local exchanges,
stating the prices that would be
paid. Produce would be sold, as
is usual in commercial transactions, on thirty days credit.
The central organization would
collect payment and make returns to the local exchanges
every thirty days.
Regarding market. Mr. Johnstone stated that the demand
could not be supplied in twenty
years. The fault in the past had
been that all had shipped to one
place.  Nevertheless, British Col
umbia will have to work to keep
the market in the future as the
Ontario growers are s> aring no
efforts to get control. Being
questioned regarding tomatoes
the answer was that there had
never been a surplus of tomatoes:
reported, but lack of proper distribution was responsible for
failure to find a market.
The much mooted question of
freight rates over the C. P. R.
was brought up, whereupon the
three speakers assured their
hearers that the C. P. R. gave
much better rates than the Am-
merican lines, so that there was
no danger of the California
growers securing an advantage
in that respect. Figures were
quoted to substantiate their
statements. Mr. Brandrith stated
that the only reason that California fruit brought a higher
price than that from this province was in the name. British
Columbia fruit could be picked
when ripe and was, in consequence, much superior in flavor
to that from California, which
had to be picked green, and
merely softened in transit. When
people came to really know British Columbia fruit, they would
be willing to pay a much higher
figure for it.
Mr. Johnson said that this year
he had soid his cherries for twenty cents per pound, and had actually, on one occasion, received two
dollars for eight pounds. This
was the result of getting a name,
and nobody would find any difficulty in securing high prices if
they took good care to get a little
name. The object of the central
exchange was to foster this individual spirit, and to assist and
encourage the individual grower.
In conclusion Mr. Brandrith
had a
WORD OF WARNING
to fruit growers. Salmon Arm
had for years been famous for
its highly colored apples. Three
years ago there was not a sign
of disease of any kind in the orchards. A few days ago he and
Mr. Wilson had gone through the
packing house at that place and
failed to find an apple that would
grade No. 1 on account of scab.
Mr. Brandith said he would give
his remedy by a quotation from
St. Paul, with the addition of one
letter; "Spray without ceasing."
It was suggested that a show
of hands be taken in order to
test the feeling of the meeting in
regard to uniting with the Fruit
and Produce Exchange in order
to strengthen the hands of the
speakers at future meetings. The
feeling of the meeting proved unanimous in favor of the union.
A vote of thanks was then passed
to the speakers for the addresses
they had given.
This was the first of a series
of meetings that will embrace
Summerland, Peachland, Kelowna, Vernon and other points
farther north.
Local and Personal
D. C. McLaren, of Vancouver,
Grand Master of the Orange
Lodge for British Columbia,
spent Monday in Penticton. Mr.
McLaren is on a trip through the
province visiting various lodges,
and assisting in the organization
of new ones. He left on Tuesday
morning for Keremeos.
The strawberry is always considered an early summer fruit,
yet E. Curtis, Mgr. of the Okanagan Nursery Co., was last week
showing a bunch of mature berries gathered on the 15th. of
November from the lot of W. II.
Scott on the bench. The berries
were grown on a plant from a
runner, and Mr. Curtis says that
the parent plant has produced
over fifty plants this season. He
believes that if the parent plant
were not allowed to produce more
than two plants, strawberries
c^uld be grown at a profit in the
late fall.
J. W. Milligan of Kelowna
spent Tuesday in Penticton.
L. P. Evarts has the framework up of a good sized house
near his present residence.
Don't forget to buy a ticket to
the Grand Ball in Steward's Hall
on the 29th. inst. Apply to Chas.
Were or Henry Main.
Robt. Parmley is receiving the
congratulations of his many
friends on the arrival of another
boy to help look after the horses.
Frank Bawtinheimer of Kelowna, and Chas. Burtch of Summerland, have been spending the
past week shooting in this vicinity.
C. V. Cros3; V. S., spent a
week in Hedley, returning on
Wednesday evening. He is now
at Fairview, but will be back on
Tuesday.
The ladies of the Presbyterian
church will hold a sale of work
in Steward's hall Wednesday,
Nov. 27, from 2 p. m. to 8 p. m.
There will also be a supply of
homemade cooking for sale, especially for bachelors.
R. J. Armstrong of Keremeos
was in town a couple of days this
week. He stated that he would
return at the end of next week
with a load of mutton, comprising stall fed Shropshire lambs
from his ranch, and would dispose of them about town.
A telegram conveying the sad
news of the death of Mrs. ThoSi
Welford, mother of Mrs. Tho?.
Roadhouse and Mrs. R. H. Weeks
of Penticton, was received from
North Dakota on Monday evening. It had been expected that
Mrs. Welford would spend the
winter here.
Dugald Burpee and wife arrived from Fredericton, N. B.
last week bringing a team and a
carload of effects with them. Mr.
Burpee is now having a house
built on his land on the bench
this side of Dog Lake. Mr. and
Mrs. Burpee were accompanied
by Geo. W. Foster who will also
settle here.
An event of considerable local
interest was the marriage on
Wednesday morning of *Mr. Dan
McKay, of Penticton, and Mrs.
Palmer, who has had charge of
the boarding house at Naramata
for some time. The ceremony
was performed at Summerland
by the Rev. Jas. Hood. The
Press extends its congratulations
and good wishes for a happy and
prosperous wedded life.
J. Gibbins, Provincial Inspector of Dairies and Milk, paid a
visit to Penticton on Saturday
last. He spent some time in inspecting the dairy owned by H.
M. McNeil. He expressed himself as perfectly satisfied with
the airy and commodious stables,
the sanitary arrangements, dairy
utensils, etc. After a thorough
examination he pronounced the
cows perfectly healthy and in
first-rate condition.
Wm. H. Harris this week exhibited some fine looking samples
of ore from the claim lately opened up by himself and his brother
Henry near Green Lake, southwest of Okanagan Falls. The
sample, which was taken fourteen feet below the surface, probably carries gold, silver, and
copper, but in what proportions
is not yet known as returns have
not yet been received from an
assay being made at the coast.
At the depth of fourteen feet the
ledge is seven feet in width. It
has also been traced for about
two miles on the surface. Harris Bros, intend beginning development work as soon as sufficient
capital has been raised. Should
the claim turn out as well as it
promises, it will mean a great
deal to the vicinity of Okanagan
Falls and Penticton. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. NOVEMBER 23, 1907.
THE PENTICTON PRESS
ISSUED    EVERY    SATURDAY  AT
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
W. J. CLEMENT.
not  very   distant    future.     It
seems that   people   cannot   be
brought to realize the  damage
they are doing, r.ot only  to the
town, but,   indirectly,   to themselves by sending their cash a-
way.   Instances have been cited
where people sent their cash out
______���_��� :of town and then asked the local
merchant   for  credit.     This  is
ADVERTISING RATES ON anything bu1 a fair deal.   There
Subscription $1.00 Per Year
Advance.
in
*
-*i��<*��36E��.e*v
\   Come and See   j Pent
^7 V-    <n|
��^H   MH rer^as2^ra?^jr^:��g^:-^
My new line of pretty
Glassware
England.
imported   direct  from
FANCY FLOWER VASES,
APPLICATION.
It
Oriental Restriction
is   beginning   to   look
as
though the mission of Hon, Ro-
dolph Lemieux, Canadian Postmaster-General and Minister of 10f the g00C}S| there is very little
are ca i, ���:��� ;!>���>e certain mttiv-K-:
are not carried by the local merchants, iii v. hich havers are justified in sending away, but when
it comes to the most commonplace forms of merchandise it is
a different ;���. itter. Usually, if
the express be added to the cost
to be gained by dealing with the
departmental stores. However,
the local merchants should also
raaliz? their responsibility to the
community as well as the buyers,
tii- n- iirr .-it present at anj se!j their g00(js at as small a
margin as possible.   A cash dis-
so
count that would so reduce  the
cash price of goods as to  render
it  unprofitable   to  send   away
might be offered.   If the town'
is to build up as it is hoped that'
it will,   both   buyer  and   seller
must co-operate in keeping all:
the money possible from leaving
the place.
The provincial government
taxes commercial travellers from j
other provinces. Why not tax
Eaton and Simpson catalogues at
the same rate? It is hardly within the power of the province to
levy taxes upon goods imported j
from the east, but some scheme
should be devised whereby the
mail order houses would be made
to bear a portion of the burden ! |
of taxation for the privilege of
doing business within its borders.
Wanton Destruction.
There  is  one feature
of the
Labor, to Japan would bear fruit
in the restricton of Japanese immigration.
This is apparently coming none
too soon as, if we are rightly informed
least fifteen hundred idle men
walking the streets of Vancouver.
At any rate, if the present stringency in the money market continues much longer, the country
is certain to have, in the place of
a scarcity of labor, a scarcity of
work. When that time comes,
what is the country going to do
with its fifty thousand Orientals?
The life of an Asiatic will not be
worth as much as the life of a
coyote, and all the powers of the
state will not be able to afford
him protection.
Side by side with these facts
we see instances of men like
Rudyard Kipling or the Rev. Dr.
Robert Johnson of Montreal
spending a few days in this province and then going east and
addressing public gatherings as
though they knew all about the
question. One can hardly conceive the audacity of such persons, who have never had the
opportunity of seeing below the
surface, setting themselves up
as teachers, but the spectacle of
large gatherings listening with
mouths open to their utterances
is still more surprising.
Doubtless white laborers are
often unreasonable in their demands, and arc unwilling to do
a fair day's work for a fair day's
pay, but it is noticeable that such
conditions are invariably found
where white labor is brought into competition with that of the
lower races. A depraved appetite, which must be fed upon the
thing that caused it is formed ;
hence the deman 1 for yellow
laborers to 'cvelope our resources. There is no example in
history where a country long endured having as its inhabitants
two races, the one subservient
to the other. The case of the
Southern States, with its Negro J
population, should prove sufficient example for Canadians to
avoid.
To what purpose is all   this
feverish haste to develope the
resources of the country.     Canadians have a great heritage with
great resources, but that is no
reason why they  should call in
the whole barbaric world to assist them in wasting it.     Our
country   has   great   resources;!
then let us see that those re-j
sources are   kept  for  a  great!
people and their  posterity  for'
generations   to    come.      More!
patriotism and less greed for im- j
mediate personal gain is what is j
needed in Canada,  and  we are '���
glad that the Dominion government has grasped the  situation,
even though it may be   late in
the  day,   and   hope   that   Mr.
T       ���       ,      .    . Small Debts Court
Lemieux   mission may accomplish all that is expected of it by'    One thing very much  needed
this province. ii Penticton is   a  Small   Debts
Court.   The complaint is contin
k
VINEGAR AND TOMATO CATSUP BOTTLES,
MARMALADES AND PRESERVES,
SUGARS AND CREAMS
General Merchandise
C. BARNES'
i
*
'^ntfeton Store
Established 40 Years.
Alfred H. Wade, Prop.
Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, Groceries
and General Merchandize of all Sorts
Agent for
GIANT POWDER CO.
OKANAGAN FLOUR MILLS CO.
Goods delivered through the town.
TERMS GASH.
.*��-
/    PENTICTON,
Prompt attention to order*.
B.C.
if
\
DO YOU WANT TO TAKE THE ONLY PAPER published in the
Southern Okana&an ?
Then subscribe for
������ THE PENTICTON PRESS ����
DO YOU OWN PROPERTY IN PENTICTON or at
any of the other towns in the district, or are you contemplating purchasing any ?   Subscribe for
as THE PENTICTON PRESS S��
It makes a point of publishing information of special
value to people living at a distance. The Press prints
the facts, and the facts only.    .
British Columbia   Game   Laws ���
that should be amended.    Ample J ��
care is being taken for the pres
ervation of game animals  and
birds, but others that cannot be
so classed, and yet are  perfectly
harmless, are allowed to bo destroyed.   Tak<��, for instance, theII
divers, mud-hens, loons and os-
! preys,   which   frequent   watery
districts,   These birds can be of
no po sible use to those who take
a delight   in   destroying   them.
Th ��� bi ute instinct  seeme to be
10  Blrong  in    some    would-be
sportsmen that they wish to kill
every live thing that comes within  their   range.     I here   are  a
number of \ arieties of birds and
animals to be found in British
Columbia that are not frequently met with elsewhere and  they
form no inconsiderable source of
attraction to the lover of nature.
The divers, which swim around
our wharves and are naturally so
tame,   are   very   beautiful   and
graceful birds,   and so  are the
shy loons, winch break the monotony  with   their  weird  cries.
The ospreys, or fish-hawks,  are
not often seen, and the fact that
they subsist on fish should not be
sufficient cause to warrant their
destruction.
Many people come to British II
Columbia to  make  their homes1
here not merely on account of j
the climate and scenery, but also
because in a new country it is
possible   to   get  nearer   nature j
than   in   older   settled    places.
Laws should, therefore, be passed
to   protect   those   animals   and
birds that by their presence make ]
life more pleasant.
DO YOU WANT TO ADVERTISE in a paper that is
read in every home in the vicinity of Penticton and is
then sent away for friends to read? Do you want <"o
advertise in a paper that has subscribers in all parts of
Canada, and in many other countries where the English
language is spoken ? Have you anything to sell ? Is
there anything you want to buy ? Have you any announcements to make ? Are you buying government
land or recording a timber or mineratclaim?. Advertise in
���S THE PENTICTON PRESS'S
IF YOU ARE A MERCHANT,' carry a good bright
advertisement in a good bright paper. If you are a
professional man, your professional card should appear
in your loctd paper. If you are engaged in any kind of
mercantile, professional or mechanical pursuit, your
local paper should contain a standing announcement of
your presence.
DO YOU WANT ANY PRINTING DONE ? We can
print you anything you like at the office of the Press,
Letter iads, Note Heads, envelopes, Bill Heads, Statements, Business, Professional and Visiting
Cards, Posters, Dodgers, Programs, Booklets,
or anything else where paper, type and ink are used.
All our type is up to date, and we are continually adding
new lines. We keep on hand a large stock of almost
every conceivable class of stationery in order that we
may be able to turn out exactly the kind of work required and at the shortest possible notice.
Are you going to
��S GET MARRIED 2��
We can print your invitations or announcements at the
office of
THE PENTICTON PRESS
fr
Red Star Grocery
Has opened with a clean, fresh stock of staple and fancy
Groceries.
Well Tickle Your Palate
and your economical bump at the same time.     .     .
Goods delivered promptly to al! parts of the town and
bench.
(^
G. CLAARSON & SON,
Corner Main Street and  Fairview Avenue.
\
8
>
i
zzm&$%
L. A. RATHVON
'Phone Whit
CHAS. L. CARLESS
'f'liong VMfcltc 2
CONTI
1
I
ACTORS
UILDERS
\ Good Workmanship and
,. .JSESsESSSiKEKS
3jgBE3gaeBES^^EBBgHflBmBMBBBBtt
i
I
i
Satisfaction Guaranteed
PLANS and SPECIFICATIONS FURNISHED
RATHVON & CARLESS
A card will bring us to you.
Vv*>iV>vV>V��iv"*>��^>v'W><'
�� Now is the time to place vour order with the
t OKANAGAN NURSERY  COMPANY
For Fruit Trees for Fall Planting.
The Mall Order Business.
It is reported that in the space
of twenty minutes over three
hundred dollars worth of money
orders payable to eastern mail
order houses were purchased a
few days ago at the local post
ually expressed that it is next to
impossible to collect a debt if the
debtor does not wish to pay. Unless the sum to be collected is
large, the time, trouble, and expense necessary to collection are
so great that it pays better to
lose the amount altogether.    If
office.    It is estimated that  a I the government were approached
larger cash business is done with | in the right  way  at  the   next
those eastern  firms than   with
any store in town.   Unless something is done to check  this outflow of cash, Penticton is doomed
meeting of the Legislature there
can be no doubt that the need of
the community in lh'" respect
'" "��e met.    This is a  question
to exceedingly hard limes in the] to deal with.
for the Conservative Association
EATON'S PRICES
Plus the Express
-AT--
H.OLIVER'S
SHOE STORE.
THE PENTICTON
DAIRY
Daily delivery of Fresh Milk to
all parts of the Town.
MILK 10c. PER QUART.
H. M. McNeill,     .    Prop.
DAIRYMEN
HAVE SEEN THE
Sharpies Tubular Cream
Separator
Has no dripping oil.
No holes to dig out with hair pins.
Oil once a week.
No hot bearings.
Has an invention by which the handle'
is thrown out of gear when you stop
turning, thereby not endangering one's
life or clothes.
To realize the superiority ot this
Separator
You Should See It.
C. W. CROSS,
REPRESENTATIVE.
I
���
I
���
i
���:
We guarantee trees to grow if planted in the fall, or will replace any
that miss free of charge.     Come early and avoid the rush.     Send or.
call for prices.    Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
OKANAGAN NURSERY CO. 3
LIMITED. ���     ���
Capital Stock $50,000 .     '
Penticton, British (Bolumbia..
R. II. ROBERTSON;'President
THOS. TODHUNTER, Vice-Pres. E. CU1U1S, Manager.
F. E. JONES, Sec-Treas.
\
&2��^2tt2tt2&
'J&'^lt
ML C KENDALL
Notary Public and Conveyancer
A first-class Ten Acre Lot for $1,450.00.    Easy terms.
A 5-roomed House and Lot (right in town) $425.00 Cash.
1 Acre near town, planted, two year old trees, $700.00 Cash.
HOUSES TO LET THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. NOVEMBER 23, 1907.
\V
CHAS. WERE
Accountant & Auditor,
PENTICTON, B. C.
F. E. JONES
Book Keeping & Accountant Work
Office Hours - 9 to 6
Care of Okanagan Nursery Co.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
Notary Public.
KELOWNA,        - B. C.
;*������>��������������������������������������� + ������ ���.>M + 4++f + <fM4.fM4^M.
| The Hound of the |
t Baskervilles I
i
I     Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes.
| BY A. CONAN DOYLE.
t Author of "The Green Flag" ani "The Great Boer War"
C ipyrlght (I'M:) by A. Connn Doyle.
+ + * + 4 ++++4-++++>+++44++-+4-*+++M + + MO* + -f+****
ALL KINDS OF
Needlework  Desired
Children's Bonnets & Clothing
a Specialty.
C. MOULD, Winnipeg Street
J. R. CAMPBELL
ELECTRICIAN.
Dealer in all kinds of
Electrical Supplies, Batteries
and
Gasoline Engine Parts
Terms  and   specifications  for    all
kinds of Electric Wiring and Bell
Work.
Agent for famous Brantford bicycles
Box 160 KELOWNA
'Thank you; I am afraid 1 cannot
claim her acquaintance. We have established a most important fact by
these questions, Watson," he continued, in a low voice, as we went up
3tairs together. "We know now that
the people who are so Interested n.
our friend have not settled down in hi
own hotel. That means that while
they are, as we have seen, very
anxious to watch him they are equally
anxious that be should not see them.
Now, this Is a most suggestive fact."
"What does it suggest?"
"It suggests���Ualloa, my dear fellow, what on eaith is the matter?"
As we came icund the top of the
stairs we had run up against Si.
:Ienry BaskervIUe himself. His face
was flushed with anger, and he neld
an old and dus:y boot in one of hi:>
hands. So furious wts he that he was
hardly articulate, and when he did
speak it was in a much broader and
more Western dialect than any which
we had lieaid from him in the morning.
"Seems to me   'ley are playing me
for a sucker In   '.is hotel," he cried.-
"They'll   lind   thr 've  started    In    to
monkey  with  the  wrong  man  unless
they are careful   By  thunder, if that
v mi-sing boot there
1 "in take a joke with
-     es, but they've got
������   k thi" time."
r your boot?"
���?an to Pnd it."
you said that it was a
chap can't find
will be tro'ible.
the best, ?-'r. 1
a bit over the
"Still Irr- r'.ns
"Vab    -'���     n  ��� ���
"But, surely.
new brown boo
Mac!; one.
"What!
And now It's an old
you  don't  mean    to    say
Penticton Feed
Store
Dealers In
flour, Hay,  Grain,  Chicken-
Wheat, Etc.
Wholesale and Retail.
All   orders   delivered  Free  to any i
part of Penticton,  Bench or Flat. I
".That's just vi
! only bad tire
the new brown,
latent lesthe' s,
a3t night the;-
Dues, and to-da
one of the bla.
HARRIS
NURSERY CO'Y.
Home Grown Fruit
Trees
| Ornamental Trees, Small Fruits &c.
Ipecially   large   stock  of
uade Trees and Budded
Apples.
Penticton, B. C.
.t? Spes
itarln?!'
out.
el. 1
you th
tience I
"J.Tin ���
thle
excuse
trine	
: t I do me-in to say.
���airs in the world���
'"e old black, and Hie
hich I am wearing
ok one of my brown
they  have  sneaked
Well, Y.a\e you got
an, and  don't stand
���ian waiter had ap-
��� ne.
���   made  inquiry all
1 can hear no word
it boot comes back
i'll S3e the mana-
&o    right
ad, si:'���I promise
������111 have a little pa-
'ound."
!";- the last thing of
'���'    den   of
es, you'll
g yea aiiout such a
1  worth     troubling
.'hv.   vnn
It."
sc:1ol;s over
"How dr
'.:> it?'
Fruit and
Confectionery
CE. POMEROY.
OKANAGAN
COLLEGE
SUMMERLAND, B. C.
A CHRISTIAN SCHOOL for
young men and young women, situated amid surroundings beautiful and
inspiring and in a community of exceptional moral strength.
Regular course for University
Entrance.
Thorough Commercial course.
Special advantages for music.
Competent Instructors.
Well appointed building, tastefully furnished, heated with hot
water, provided with bath rooms and
improved sanitary arrangements.
Terms moderate.
COMMERCIAL DEPARTMENT
This department, it is expected, will provide
facilities for work second to none in the
province. Prof. Aaron Perry, M. A., tho organizer and late conductor of the Commercial
Department of Victoria High School, will
have charge of this Department in the College. The success that has attended Prof.
Perry's efforts elsewhere guarantees the quality of the work to be done in this Department.
PIANOFORTE DEPARTMENT
Miss Eunice Winnifred Haines will conduct
the work in pianoforte instruction. Miss
Haines is a pupil of Prof. George Pratt Maxim, of Boston, a graduate with honors from
the Pianoforte Department of the School of
Music of Acadia Seminary, and winner in the
competition for musical composition adjudged
by Dr. Percy Goetachins of Boston, the specialist on Tone Relations. Mias Haines hns
had successful experience in teaching and
comes highly recommendad by Principal De-
Wolfe, of Acadia Seminary.
VOCAL DEPARTMENT
The work in Voice Culture will be under
charge of Miss Kathrine Cleveland Davison of
Boston, an experienced "Teacher, Choir and
(Choral Class Director and pupil of Prof. Frank
E. Morse of Boston and Madame Gertrude
Franklin Salisbury, of the International
School of Music of Boston, Florence and Paris.
For further information apply to
E. SAWYER, M. A., Principal.
"I Just don't attempt to explain it.
It scem3 the very maddest, queerest
thing that ever happened to me."
"The    queerest    perhaps "    said
Holmes, thoughtfully.
"What do you make of It yourself?"
"Well, I don't profess to understand
it yet. This case of yours is very complex, Sir Henry. When taken in conjunction with your uncle's death I am
not sure that of all tho Ave hundred
cases of capital importance which I
hare handled there is one which cuts
so deep. But we hold several threads
in our hands, and the odds are tnat
one or other of thorn guides us to the
truth. We may waste time in following the wrong one, but sooner or later we must come upon the right."
We had a pleasant luncheon In
which little was said of the business
which had brought us together. If
was in the private sitting-room to
which we afterwards repaired that
Holmes asked BaskervIUe what were
his intentions.
ro  go  -o  Ba<::ervllle Hall."
"And when?"
"At the end of. the week."
"On the whole," said Holmes, "I
think that your decision is a wise one.
1 have ample evidence that you are
being dodged in ' ondon, and amid the
millions of this g-r-at city it Is difficult
to discover who these people are or
what their object can be. If their lu-
' His name," said the cabman, "was Mr
Sherlork Holm's,"
tentions are evil they might do you a
mischief, and we should be powerless
to prevent it. You did not know, Dr.
Mortimer, that you were followed this,
morning from my house?"
Dr. Mortimer s:arted violently.
"i'ollowed!  Bj   whom?"
"That, unfortunately. Js what I can
not tell you. Have you among your
neighbors or acquaintances on Dartmoor any man with a black, full
beard?"
"No���or,  let    me    see���why,    yes.
Barrymore, Sir Charles's  butler, is a
man with a full, black beard."
"Ha!  Where is Barry more?"
"He is in charge of the Hall."
"We  had  best  ascertain  If he    is
really there, or If by any possibility
he might be in London."
"How can you do that?"
"Cive  me a telegraph  form. 'Is all
ready   for  Sir  Henry?'  That  will  do.
Address  to  Mr.  Barrymore,    BaskervIUe Hall.  What  is  the  nearest telegraph-office? Grlmpen. Very good, we
will send a second  wire to the postmaster,  Grlmpen:   'Telegram  to    Mr.
Barrymore,  to  be  delivered   into  his
own hand.    If absent,  please    return
wire to Sir Henry Baskerville, Northumberland Hotel.' That should let us
know  before evening  whether Barrymore is at his post in Devonshire or
not."
"That's so," sa'.d BaskervIUe. "By
the way, Dr. Mortimer, who is thi;��
Barrymore, anyhow?"
"He Is the son of the old caretaker,
who is dead. They have looked after
the Hall for four generations now. ho
far as I know, he and his wife are as
respectable a couple as any in the
country."
"At the same time," said Baskerville, "it's clear enough that so long
as there are none of the family at the
Hall these people have a mighty fine
home and nothing to do."
"That is true."
"Did Barrymore profit at all by Sir
Charles's will?" asked Holmes.
"He and his wife had five hundred
pounds each."
"Ha! Did they know that they
would   receive  this?"
"Yes;  Sir Charles was very fond of
talking  about  the   provisions  of his
will."
"That is very interesting."
"I  hope," said Dr.  Mortimer, "that
you do not look with suspicious eyes
upon everyone who received a legacy
from Sir Charles, for I also    had   a
thousand pounds left to me."
"Indeed!   And  anyone  else?"
"There    were    many    insignificant
sums to individuals, and a large number of  public charities.    The residue
all went to Sir Henry."
"And how much was the residue?"
"Seven hundred and forty thousand
pounds."
Holmes raised his eyebrows in surprise. "I had no idea that so gigantic
a sum was involved," said he.
"SU Charles nad the reputation of
being rich, but we did not know how
very rich he was until we came to ex
amine his securities. The total value
of the estate was close on to a mil
lion."
"Dear me! It. Is a stake for which ��
rna.n might well play a desperate
game. And one more question, Dr
Mortimer. Supposing that anythin?.
happened to our young friend here���
you will forgive the unpleasant hypothesis!���who would Inherit the es
rate?"
"Since Rodger Baskerville, 'Sit
Charles's younger brother, died un
married, the estate would descend to
the Desmonds, who are distant cousins. James Desmond is an elderly
clergyman  In  Westmorland."
"Thank you. These details are a'l
of great interest. Have you met Mr.
James Desmond?"
"Yes; he once come down to vis:;
Sir Charles. He Is a man or venerable appearance and of saintly life. I
remember that he retusad to accept
any settlement from Sir Charles
though be pressed it upon  him."
"And this man of simple tastes
would be the heir to Sir Charles's
thousands."
"He would be the heir to the estate, because that is entailed. He
would also be the heir to the money
unless It were willed otherwlss by
the present owner, who can, of
course, do what he likes with It."
"And have you made your will. Sir
Henry?"
"No, Mr. Holmes, I have not, I've
hud no time, for It wt'i only yesterday that I learned how matters stood.
But In any case 1 feel that the money
should go with the title and eqUte-
That was my poor unclu'�� idea. How
U the owner going to restore the
glories of the Baskervilles if he has
not money enough to keep up thq
property? House, land, and, dallan
must go together."
"Quite so. Well, Sir Henry, I am ol
one mind with you as to the advisability of your going down to Devonshire without delay. There is only
one provision which I must make.
You certainly must not go alone."
"Dr. Mortimer returns with me."
"But Dr. Mortimer has his practice
to attend to, and his house is miles
away from yours. With all the good
will In the world, he may be unaible
to help you. No, Sir Henry, you must
take with you someone, a trusty man,
who will be always by your side."
"la it possible that you could come
yourself,  Mr.  Holmes?"
"If matters came to a CI'IbIs I
should endeavour to be present in
person; but you can understand that,
with my extensive consulting practice and with the constant appeals
which reach me from many quarters,
it Is impossible for me to be absent
from London for an Indefinite time.
At the present instant one of the
most reyerod names In England is being besmirched by a blackmailer, and
only I can stop a disastrous scandal.
You will see how impossible It is for
me to go to Dartmoor."
"Whom would you recommend,
then?"
Holmes laid his hand upon my
arm.
"If my friend would undertake it
there Is no man who is better worth
having at your side when you are in
a tight place. No one can say so
more confidently thap I."
jne proposition toon me completely by surprise, but before I had time
to answer, Baskerville seized me by
the hand and wrung it heartily.
"Well, now, that is real kind of you,
Dr. Watson," said he. "You see how
It is with me, and you know just as
much about the matter as I do. If you
will come down to Baskerville Hall
and see me through I'll never forget
It."
The promise of adventure had always a fascination for me, and I was
complimented by the words of Holmes
and by the eagerness with which the
baronet hailed me as a companion.
"I will come, with pleasure," said I.
"I do not know how I could employ my
time better.''
"And you will report very carefully
to me," said Holmes. "When a crisis
comes, as it will do, I will direct how
you shall act. I suppose that by Saturday all might be ready?"
"Would that suit Dr. Watson?"
"Perfectly."
"Then on Saturday, unless you hear
to the contrary, we shall meet at t'-_-
10.30 train from  Paddington."
We had risen to depart when Baskerville gave a cry of triumph and
diving into one of the corners of the
room he drew a brown boot from under a cabinet.
"My missing boot!" he cried.
"May all our difficulties vanish as
easily!" said Sherlock Holmes.
"But it Is a very singular thing,"
Dr. Mortimer remarked. "I searched
this room carefully before lunch."
"And so did I," said Baskerville.
"Every Inch of it."
"There was certainly no boot In It
then."
"In that case the waiter must have
pla-ced it there while we were lunching,"
The German wis sent for. hut professed to know nothing of the matter,
nor could any Inquiry clear it up
Another item had hern added to that
constant and apparently purposeless
series of small mysteries which had
suoceeded each other so rapidly. Setting aside the whole grim story of Sir
Charles's death, we had a line of inexplicable incidents all within thp
limits of two days, which Included the
receipts of the printed letter, the
black-bearded spy in the hansom, the
loss of the new brown boot, the loss
of the old black boot, and now the return of the new brown boot. Holmes
sat in silence In the cab as we drove
back to Baker Street, and I knew from
his drawn brows and keen face that
his mind, like my own, was busy in
endeavoring to frame some scheme
Into which all these strange and apparently 'disconnected episodes could
be fitted. All afternoon and late into
the evening he sat lost in tobacco and
thought.
Just before dinner two telegrams
were handed in. The first ran: ���
"Have just heard that Barrymore is
at the Hall.���Baskerville." The second:���
"Visited twenty-three hotels as
directed, but sorry to report unable
to trace cut sheet of Times.���Cart-
wright."
"There go two of my threads, Watson. There is nothing more stimulating than a case where everything
goes against you. We must cast round
for another scent."
'.'We have still the cabman who
drove the spy."
"Exactly. I have wired to get his
name and address from the Official
Registry. I should not he surprised if
this were an answer to my question."
ine ring at the bell proved to be
something even more t! fisfactory than
an answer, however, for the door opened and a rough-looking fellow entered
who was evidently the man himself.
"I got a message from the head
office that a gent at this address had
been inquiring for 2,704," ssid he. "I've
driven my cab this seven years and
never a word of complaint. I came
here straight from the Yard to ask
you to your face what you had against
me."
"I have nothing in the world against
you, my good man," said Holmes. "On
'.ho contrary, I have half a sovereign
for you If you will give me a clear answer to my questions,"
"Well, I've had a good day and no
mistake," said the cabman, with a grin.
What was it you wanted to ask, sir?"
"First of all  your name    and    address, in case 1 want you again,"
"John Clayton, 3, Turptsv Street, the
Borough, My cab is out of Shipley's
Yard, near Waterloo Station,"
Sherlock Holmes mad�� a note of it.
"Now, Olaytpn, tell me all aiout
the fare who eame and watched this
house at ten o'clock this morning and
afterwards followed the two gentlemen down Regent Street."
The man looked surprised and a little embftriasstjd. "Why, there's no
good niy telling you things, for you
seem to know as much as I do already," said he. "The truth Is that the
gentleman told me that he was a de-
toettVa and that I was to say nothing
at>out him to anyone."
"My good fellow,    this    Is    a very
serious   business,   and   you  may   find
V0U.r8O.lt  in  a  pretty   bad   position  if
you try to hide anything from me. You
say  that your fare  told  you  that he
was a detective?"
"Yes, he did,"
"When did he say this?"
"When he left me."
"Did he say anything more?"
"He mentioned his name."
Holmes cast a swift glance of tri
umph  at me. "Oh,  he mentioned his
name, did he? That was    Imprudent.
What was the name that he mentioned?"
"His name," said the cabman, "was
Mr. Sherlock Holmes."
Never have I seen my friend more
completely taken aback than by the
Cabman's reply. For an instant he sat
In silent amazement. Then he burst
into a hearty laugh.
"A touch, Watson���an undeniable
touch!" said he. "I feel a foil as quick
and supple as my own. He got home
upon me very prettily that time. So
his name was Sherlock Holmes, was
It?"
"Yes, sir, that was the gentleman's
name."
"Excellent! Tell me where you plck-
���zi iia> un and all that occurred."
(To be continued.)
NORTH VAWER
The Ambitious City,
With 36 miles of Water Trontage
And the best Harbor on the
Pacific Coast. Oners the best
opportunities for
Business or Investment.
| A large  list of   Properties   for
' sale or exchange.
Call antl see us, or write to
MARTINSON & CO.
Lonsdale Avenue,
North Vancouver
STAGES
E. J. FINGH
Painter, Papsrhanget
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a  Specialty.
WALL PAPER Carried in Stock.
Bo .        Main St.
y f ���!>'��:* leaves for Keremeos and Hedley at 7 a. m.
on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Returns
on Monday.s, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Stage leaves for Princeton every Tuesday at
7 a. m.
Stage leaves for Fairview and OroviUa on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at C:30 a. m. Returns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at
6 p. na.
POST OFFICE.
Hours 9 a. m. to C. p. m.
Registered Letter and Money Order wicket
closes 5 p. m.
Wicket opened for half an hour after mail is
distributed.
Arrivals���Per Str, Okanagan: Daily except
Sunday 6 p. m.; Per stage from Hedley, Keremeos, Olalla, Green Mountain, Oroviile, Fairview,
and White Lake: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 6 p. m.
Closing���For boat and Btages: 9 p. m. daily except Saturday. For Monday's boat and stages:
8.45 p. m. Sundays.
South Okanagan Valley
Bureau of information of tho Sout)
Okanagan Valley and for a list of pro
perty for sale, improved farms, Penticton T. S. Coy's lots, etc. Apply to
Wm. Smyth Parker
General Real Estate Agent, who will
always cheerfully give prompt and besl
attention to all iiiquiries from intending
investors.
PENTICTON, B. C.
C. P. R. TIME TABLE
SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH
Daily both ways except Sunday.
SOUTH BOUND    STATION    NORTH BOUND
7.H0 a. m Sicamoua  6.00 p.m.
6.27   "     Enderby  4.48   "
8.52  "    Armstrong  4.08  "
8.30   "   ....ar Vernon lv 3.30   "
9.80   "   ....lv Vernon ar.... 2.30   "
9.45   "   ....ar. ..Ok. Landing ...lv.... 2.15   "
lu.OO p. m lv... Ok. Landing .. .ur 11.00 a.m.
11.10   "    Kelowna  8.20
8.00   "    Peachland  7.26   "
4.45   "    Summerland  6.30   "
COO   "    Penticton  6.00   "
FOR SALE
Peach Orchard for sale ��� cleaned,
fenced, and planted with 1,200 trees.
This will double itself in the spring;.
Price $1,850 on easy terms.
40 acres Fruit Land and house, on the
lake front near Kelowna, partly cleared
fenced and ready for planting. Price
51,200 on terms.   A sure moneymaker.
Write JAMES BROOKS,
18-2 Peachland.
Artistic Hair Gut 35c
Easy Shave     -    15
and Hot Baths
-AT-
H. MURK'S
FOR SALE
SAY, BOYS   !
Did you ever have to let a good bargain slip by because you had no money
saved up? If so, dun'I be caught agair
but begin now to save $0 or $10 a
month in the B. C. Permanent Lo:n
and Savings Co., of Vancouver.
Jas. F. Tupper,   Local Representative.
Three Angora Cats.   For particulars
address   MRS. L. B. FARLEIGH,
18-4 Green Mountain.
FOR SALE.
A good, young, new milch cow in fine
condition.   Apply at Press Office. 18tf
TENDERS WANTED
For Fifteen cords of four foot Wood
for Penticton Public School. Apply to
J. R. Mitchell.
WANTED
COLUMBIAN   COLLEGE.
NEW  WESTMINSTER, d. C.
Founded ISO-'. Incorporated 1S93.
Provide? a Christian homo for students of both
sexes at moderate rates, Has a preparatory class
for junior students taking Public School work.
Does High School work, and prepares for Provincial teachers' examination:!. TeacheB ali branches
of a Practical Business course, and confers Diplomas. Imparts a liberal education in its Collegiate
Course, and in the 1 lilies' Course for M.E. L., and
M. L. A. In Theology confers the degree of B. D.
:n University work can take students through th<
complete Arts Course fer the B. A. degree of Toronto Univt rsity, with which the College is in full
affiliation. In Science teaches the tirst year of
Toronto School of Science, and has a t-pectal Engineering work in this Province. In Music, a
omplete course in Theory. Voice Culture, and
Piano and Organ, in conjunction with the Toronto
College of Music, Special instruction in Art anc
Elocution, while all students are repuired to tak<
Physical Training with all the privileges of a we!'
quipped Gymnasium, For Calendar, address
Columbian College. 17
A situation on a farm.    Experience
in dairy work: can also handle team.
Apply ROBERT McKEE,
Penticton, B. C.
or Preeb Office. 18-4
NOTICE TO HORSE OWNERS.
Veterinary Dentistry is practi
eally new. Some of the mam
symptoms of bad teeth are
slovering, loss of flesh, weal
ayes, rough coats and manj
jther symptoms. If your horsei
are troubled with any of these
symptoms, be sure to have him
examined. I use only improved,
.nodern up-to-date instruments,
including a mouth speculum thai
is unexcelled. Call and see me
xbout your horses at the Commercial Stables.
Dr. C. W. Cress,
VETERINARY DENTIST.
C. P. R.
LAND FOR SALE
Agricultural and timber   land   for  nale
for $1.00 per acre with $2.00 per' thousand feet of lumber.
Houses to let.
J. R. MITCHELL,
District AK'ent.
PENTICTON
& OROVILLE
STAGE
Via Fairview
Leaves Penticton Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., arriv-
,ng at Oroviile the same day at 6 p. m.
Through Fare - $6.00
W. HINE and S. M. SNOW
FAIRVIEW. B. C.
D. W. Crowley
&Co.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Goods Delncrcd to any psrt of the
Town.
WE GIVE OUR PI OMPT ATTENTION TO
MAIL ORDERS
C. E. HOUSER, Manager. j
Subscribe for
The Penticton Press
Subscription $1.00 Year.
WANTED HDIAIEiY
100 BUYERS
FOR
GASOLINE ENGINES
APFLY TO
S. T. Elliott
THE IMPLEMENT MAN
KELOWNA      -      -       B. C.
G. It KIEEFER
GENERAL BLACKSMITH.
Horse Shoeing and Repair Work.
Give Me a Trial.
Very Best of Workmanship.
Fruit Trees
smmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Home Grown Nursery Trees
Apples, Plums and Prunes
for sale for spring planting
For varieties and prices apply to
Manager,
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd J
Vernon, B. C.
BEN BAKER
BARBER    -     MAIN STREET
PRICES
Shave 15 ets
Face Massage 35 "
Hair Cut 35 "
"    Tonic, extra 10 "
"    Singe, extra 25 "
Shampoo 25 "
Beard Trim and Hair Cut.. 50 "
Bath  50^ THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B. C, NOVEMBER 23, 1907.
MM������WW
OKANAGAN FALLS
D. M. Cox, the would-be "Humourist" and school teacher of
Ok. Falls, has now retired from
the city and is keeping batch at
the old "Stage Ranch" of the
above mentioned place.
Mr. J. Arnott has made a flying trip to Oroviile and we hope
to hear a good report on   return.
WESTBANK
On Friday last there was a
very enjoyable entertainment
held in the schoolhouse here. The
earlier part of the evening was
given over to a concert programme. Help was given by
both Kelowna and Peachland.
Miss Steel's singing "Tatters"
brought much applause, likewise
the audience enjoyed a" solo by
Mrs. 0. Pollard together with a
duet by Mrs. Pollard and W.
Coldham. Among the load talent Mrs. Campbell, Messrs, J. S.
Marshall, J. and J. Campbell, together with Dr. Nash were
heartily applauded, not forgetting Mr. Hayman's folk lore
song. About 10:30 the seats were
moved out and about 20 couples
took possession of the floor and
enjoyed a good time until the
wee sma' hours. Mr. D'Aeth
very kindly threw his residence
near the school open for the ladies to have room to serve the
refreshments. The net proceeds
were $23.00, some of which will
go to the Peachland circulating
library, the balance used for
school fittings such as lamps, etc.
Dr. Thacker, lately of England
and Australia, has purchased 15
acres from R. C. Bennett near
Shannon Lake.
Fall planting of fruit trees has
been in vogue here this last
week, Mr. Bennett planting on
his Goldie Field property, and
Mr. Faulkner on his ranch.
ey will Double in Value Within a Year,
$250.00   EACH    FOR
Lots 15=16-17=18-19=20 Block 18-
6=7=8-9-10 "       19
5^6-7 "      33-
15-16-17 "      34
40 feet front.
<t
i<
(<
u
���46 feet front.
���f
em Okanagan
LIMITED.
Go.
International Convention of Fruit
Growers.
As announced in the press of
Oct. 26, the fifteenth annual convention of the North-West Fruit
Growers' Association will be held
at Vancouver on Dec. 4, 5, and 6.
Fruit will be on exhibition, not
only from all parts of British
Columbia, but from the Western
States as well, and substantial
prizes are being offered. Special
rates have been arranged for
over the various railways, whereby delegates will purchase first
class tickets to Vancouver and secure from the agents at the starting points receipts. On the presentation of these certificates, properly filled out and signed by
the Secretary, return tickets will
be issued free.
An excellent programme has
been prepared whereby the convention will be addressed on subjects appertaining to fruit culture by leading growers of British Columbia, Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah and California.
Johnson-McRaye Recital.
The entertainment by Pauline
Johnson and Walter McRaye on
Friday evening was quite well
patronized by the people of Penticton. Most of the numbers
were well received by the audience, particularly Miss Johnson's
recital of her poem, "The Englishman"; while Mr. McRaye's
interpretation of Druminond's
"Little Bateese" and "When
Albani sang" received merited
applause. The entertainment
closed with a laughable farce in
which both acted their parts to
perfection.
The Kamloops district fruit
zone is an extensive one. How
far north it reaches has not yet
been demonstrated but at Frank
Allingham's place, about 120
miles up the North Thompson
valley, apples and other hardy
fruits flourish. A sample of apples brought down this fall and
left with Government Agent G.
C. Tunitdl affords ample evidence that fruit-growing can be
successfully conducted there. ���
Exchange.
Successful Opening Concert.
The concert last evening to
open the winter's series of the
Literary Society's meetings was
largely attended by the friends
of the Society in spite of the disagreeable weather.
The entertainment opened by
all singing a couple of verses of
The Maple Leaf Forever; after
which the President of the Society, J. F. Tupper, in a few words,
outlined the aim and objects of
the Society. The regular programme was opened by an instrumental duet by the Misses Ede
and Lancaster, followed by a solo
by Mrs. Mitchell to which she
was obliged to respond with an
encore. A comic recitation by
Miss Sutherland was followed by
a solo by Mr. Miller who was
brought back for a second. Selections on the violin by Win. Den-
niston, a Plantation Medley by
Messrs. G. Harris, Hibbert, Wood
and Tupper, and a piano solo by
Mrs. Mahoney were also encored.
A well rendered song by Charlie
Thompson concluded the first half
of the programme, after which a
collection was taken and a few
minutes' intermission enjoyed.
The second part of the programme opened with a violin solo
by Mr. Wallace which received a
hearty encore. Mr. Clement followed with a recitation, and was
in turn followed by Mr. Hales
whose solo was heartily encored.
One of the best: numbers on the
programme was the presentation
of the 1st. act in the 3rd scene
of "As You Like It" by Miss
Dexter, Miss Lancaster, and Mr.
Miller. The parts were exceedingly well carried out and received the hearty appreciation of
the audience. A duet, "Excelsior", by Mrs. Mitchell and A.
Rowe brought the programme to
a close and the concert broke up
by the singing of the National
Anthem.
NOTICE
Similkameen Land District. District
of Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that Messrs. Arnott
and Hine, of Okanagan Falls, hotel-
keepers, intend to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
land:���Commencing at a post planted at
the north-west corner of and including
a small island at the south-east end of
Dog Lake ; containing one acre, more
or less.
WARWICK ARNOTT,
WILLIAM BAKER HINE.
Dated 24th September, 1907. 15-
NOTICE.
Similkameen Land  District.     District
of Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that W. H. Legge,
of Victoria, R. C, for himself and as
agent for C. H. Wilson, of Nahum, B.
C, occupation rancher, intends to apply
for permission to pnrchaco tho follow
mg described land :���
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of lot 3098, thence
north 20 chains; thence east 40 chains;
thence south 20 chains; thence west 40
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 80 acres, more or less.
WALTER H. LEGGE.
Oct. 17, 1907. 15-
Card of Thanks.
Having disposed of my business to W. R. K[ng& Co., I take
this opportunity of thanking all
my customers for their past patronage and would solicit a continuance of the same for my
successors.        L. C. Barnes.
NOTICE.
After 60 days I intend to apply to the
Honorable the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Beginning at a post marked lot N.E.
41, thence north 40 chains, more or less,
to Indian reserve lands ; thence 80
chains, more or less, west to Osoyoos
Lake; thence southerly along shore to
west post of lot 41; thence east to
point of commencement.
S. W. RROWN.
Osoyoos, B. C. Nov. 18th, 1907,
NOTICE
Sixty days after date we intend
applying to the Chief Commissioner of
Lands and Works for permission to purchase 10 acres of land in Similkameen
Division of Yale, described as follows :-
Commencing at the north-west corner
of lot 190, group 1, Osoyoos; thence
southerly along the west boundary of
said lot 190 nine hunflred feet; thence
northerly following present shore line
of Dog Lake six hundred feet more or
less to the south boundary of lot 189,
group 1, Osoyoos; thence northerly,
easterly, and southerly along south
boundaries of lots 181) and 197, group 1,
Osoyoos, to point of commencement.
Purposes for which required���agricultural purposes.
W. T. SHATFORD.
Penticton, B. C, Oct. 24th, 1907.      16-
NOTICE
Similkameen Land   District.     District
of Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that John J. Cochrane, of Moose Jav;, Sask., occupation
Real Estate Agent, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described land: -
Commencing al F. E. Jones' northwest corner post, thence south 40
chains.; thence east 20 chains; thence
north 40 chains; thence west 20 chains
to point of commencement and containing 80 acres, more or less.
JOHN J. COCHRANE.
Agent, H. L. Jones.
Dated Oct. 26. 1807. 16-
NOTICE
FRUIT TREES-Well-grown stock.
Large quantity of apple trees for sale,
only few choice varieties grown : also
small stock of ornamental trees. Apply
for varieties and price to Manager,
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd.,
15-tf Vernon, B. C.
At J. A. NESBITT'S
Smith Street.
The  celebrated  Acme   orchard
extension Cultivator, one and
two-horse.
De Laval Cream Separator.
One gentle high-grade Milk Cow.
One first-class Sail Boat, with
sail and oars.
Second-hand Furniture   bought
and sold.
Agent for Oregon Nursery Co'y.
w. o. w.
Okanagan Camp No. 261.
Meets every Tuesday in the month at
8 p. m. in Woodmen's Hall, Ellis St.
Visiting Sovereigns always welcome.
J. W. EDMONDS, C. C.
R. WILTON, CLERK
RICHARD II.
PARKINSON
British Columbia Lund Surveyor
Hydralic Engineer Architect
Office at Fairview. B. C.
HOTEL.  PENTICTON.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.
RATES $2.50 PER DAY
A. Barnes       - -       Prop.
PENTICTON, B.C.
To The Travelling Public.
If you want a good stable and
prime feed for your horses,  call
on
LIVERY & FEED STABLE.
S. D. HINE,
FAIRVIEW, B.C.
Galarneau &
McKenzie
BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
When  you   think   of   Building
Look us up.
ADOLPHUS GALARNEAU  W. A. MCKENZIE
BUL
From France, Holland and
Japan.
Seeds   Trees
Plants
For Fall Planting.
Reliable Varieties at reasonable prices.
Please note that my fruit trees are
not grown from imported piece root
grafts, but are budded on own growth
of seedling, from bearing trees.
Fertilizers, Bee Supplies, Spray
Pumps, Spraying Material, Cut Flowers, etc. Oldest established nursery on
the mainland of B. C.    Catalogue free.
M. J.  Henry's  Nurseries,
Greenhouses and Seedhouses
VANCOUVER
B.C.
H. HARLOW
Dealer in
BUILDING MATERIAL: LIME,
LATH, CEMENT, HARD
WALL PLASTER.
Manufacturer of Miracle
Cement Blocks
Which make a true hollow wall,
the strongest cement block wall
built.
The Miracle Block took the
Grand Gold Medal at the Lewis
and Clarke Centennial Exposition
at Portland, Ore. 12-tf
l OKANAGAN f
| FRUIT LANDS
j ���...���s���L-f
I And Residential Lots p
1 Fire and^J-.ife insurance        1
j A. E. BENNETT, MfSSS.. j
( PENTICTON. (
Next Door to Post Office. f
-��*-*^.**-^&*.*��-*8&��.��*3-',a^tt.*��-
WmmtSMmWmmmmmmWmmmmmWm
DO YOUR     '
EYES
FEEL TIRED ?
Do you suffer from headaches ? These are two
of the results of eye-strain. Those spectacles may
not suit you the way they did once. Come in and
have your eyes tested free of charge; it may be of
great benefit to you.
The Jeweler
Shovels, Rakes, Floes,
Barbed Wire, Poultry Netting,
.lujiuii.-.cwjp^jtH'gigjtT^jiHJW.gBWj.i ammmmm^mmma^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
SHELF HARDWARE, Etc.
PENTICTON HARDWARE CO.
Why  Not Secure One  Of Those  Acre
Lots In Lot 2y.
This is in the Finest Residential District with a
beautiful view and the best of water. Nice large
trees; peaches, plums, apples and cherries���some
bearing this year, Just a few choice lots left, easy
terms���One quarter cash, balance six, twelve and
eighteen months.   Interest at six per cent.
J. R. MITCHELL
Real Estate & Insurance Agent.
Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
Keremeos, Hedley and Princeton Stage Connect with Steamer "Okanagan."  ���
Makes connection with Great Northern R'y at Keremeos.
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,  and a general Draying
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.      Penticton.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.penpress.1-0211872/manifest

Comment

Related Items