BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

The Penticton Press Apr 11, 1908

Item Metadata

Download

Media
penpress-1.0211871.pdf
Metadata
JSON: penpress-1.0211871.json
JSON-LD: penpress-1.0211871-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): penpress-1.0211871-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: penpress-1.0211871-rdf.json
Turtle: penpress-1.0211871-turtle.txt
N-Triples: penpress-1.0211871-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: penpress-1.0211871-source.json
Full Text
penpress-1.0211871-fulltext.txt
Citation
penpress-1.0211871.ris

Full Text

Array APR 14 1908
. ^
��
6
VOL. 2.   No. 39.
PENTICTON, B.C., SATURDAY, APRIL 11, 1908.
$1.00 Per Year In Advance.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
IIEAD   OFFICE, TORONTO
ESTABLISHED 1807
B. K. WALKER, President
ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager
A. H. IRELAND, Superintendent of
Branches
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000
Rest, - - - 5.000,000
Total Assets, - 113,000,000
Branches throughout Canada, and in the United States and England
BANKING   BY   MAIL 85
Business may be transacted by mail with any branch
Of the Bank.   Accounts may be opened and deposits
made or withdrawn by mail.   Every attention is paid
to out-of-town accounts.
Penticton Branch     *    -    J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
( ^^mmmmt^^tt*^tt^^t*t~^*.tt*^mtt^m*t\        ^ \
j    Plume Lumber   (
[ Just arrived, a scow load of 1x6 I
1 and 11x6. \
s Get your orders in as it is going :
I fast. /
I S. C. SMITH LUMBER CO., LTD. I
I ^ ��� ���' t ^m�� tt *mm* ����^fc4W^teW '^fc tt ^mm �����^w    )
GENTLEMEN :
What about a Spring Suit that will keep you
cool ? We have them from $4.00 up to $30.
Now is your chance to get a good selection
to choose from.
NORMAN HILL,
The Up-to-Date Ladie' and Gents'  Furnisher.
JUST RECEIVED
A large consignment of
Single and Double
Light and Heavy HARNESS
Express and Driving
KENT & SON
KlKZIMWlXKlKUKZKM&S^&iZZKaiZK
���:
���:
���:
���:
���:
���:
i
���:
���:
V >^r<WdH^0 <i&*<^d> vVa><V5��vV> <V>'
COMMERCIAL
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
DIGNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors.
If you /ant a Stylish Outfit, this is the place to come. You can always
get teams just when you want them. We make a specialty of keeping
good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack horses.
We are also putting in Hay and Grain for sale, and as we buy for cash
��� we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit.
^ Special  Attention To The  Wants Of Commercial  men.
Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
Stage Connects with Steamer "Okanagan" at Penticton, with Great Northern
Railway at Keremeos, and with stage to Hedley and Princeton.
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,  and a general Draying
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.      Penticton.
Penticton Store
Established 40 Years.
Alfred H. Wade, Prop.
mJ*  Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, Groceries
and General Merchandize of all Sorts
k a   - GIANT POWDER CO.
Agent Tor    okanagan flour mills co.
Goods delivered through the town.
PENTICTON,
Prompt attention to orders.
B.C.
Local and Personal
H. C. Huycke returned from
Kelowna on Wednesday.
Dr. R. C. Lipsett, of Peachland, visited Penticton last Saturday.
Tenders are being called for
the putting down of a well on
the school property.
Born���On Sunday, Apr. 5, to
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. C. Ede, of
Penticton, a daughter.
Constable Tooth has had his
two lots on Abbott St. levelled
and fenced with a view to building later.
A. Robertson arrived from
Medicine Hat on Wednesday
with the expectation of settling
in Penticton.
Miss Ellis, of Victoria, is a
guest of Mr. and Mrs. A. H.
Wade, having arrived on Wednesday's boat.
If business men expect the
public to be loyal to the local
stores, they themselves should
be loyal to the local paper.
A party of about thirty-five
young people enjoyed a social
dance at the home of W. A. McKenzie on Thursday night.
Isaac Mawhinney, of Kelowna,
returned to his home on Tues-
dsy after spending a week in
Penticton, guest of A. J. Christie.
Rev. A. T. Robinson, editor of
the Missionary Arena, at Summerland, spent Thursday in Penticton in the interests of his
journal.
E. I. Scott has opened a jew-
elery store in Summerland. We
understand that Mr. Scott is an
experienced optician as well as
expert watchmaker.
J. W. Jackson, wife and three
children arrived last week from
Reston, Manitoba, with a car of
household effects and stock and
have located on lot 10 on the
bench. Mrs. Jackson is a cousin
of A. J. Christie.
A meeting of the Liberal Association will be held in the office of the S. C. Smith Lumber
Co. on Saturday night at 8 p. m.
to elect delegates to the convention to be held in Vernon on the
14th. All Liberals are urgently
requested to be present.
A. E. Bennett has rented his
lot to H. A. Brainard who will
look after the young orchard
that has just been planted out.
Mr. Bennett will visit Peachland
and then Grand Forks, after
which he will go east to spend a
while at his old home in Napanee,
Ontario.
A Ladies' Aid of the Roman
Catholic church was organized
in Penticton on March 29. The
officers elected were: Pres., Mrs.
J. Mahoney; Vice-Pres., Mrs. E.
Curtis; Secretary, Miss Irene
Hunon; Treasurer, Miss Beatrice
Barnes. Meetings will be held
on the first Friday of each month.
Theia will be a football match
at Penticton on Good Friday between the Okanagan Mission
team, of Kelowna, and the Penticton team, and another between
Summerland and Penticton on
Easter Monday. , The games will
start at 2:30 p. m. Everybody
should encourage the boys by
turning out to see the first
matches of the season.
There was a meeting of the
Conservative Association in
Wade's rooms on Thursday evening, the purpose being to elect
delegates to attend the nominating convention at Vernon on the
23rd inst. The delegates selected
for Penticton were Messrs, White
Guernsey, Mitchell, Wade and
Clement; and those from South
Penticton, Messrs. Leir and
Main.
J. Winger, of Peachland, came
to Penticton on Monday.
M. C. Kendall left for the
Kelowna hospital last Saturday.
A. E. Thomas left on Tuesday
morning for Westbank to work
on his coal mine.
Dr. White, Supt. of Methodist
Missions for B. C. passed through
Penticton on Wednesday en route
to the Similkameen.
T. McLean, formerly an express messenger on the Crow's
Nest branch, came in on Monday and expects to remain here
indefinitely.
Mrs. F. H. Latimer and Rev.
R. W. Hibbert attended the Sunday School Convention held in
Kelowna on Thursday and Friday of this week.
Chas. H. Tupper arrived on
Monday's boat with the intention
of settling here. He has purchased
Chas. Greer's lot on the Fair-
view road and will begin planting operations at once.
The structure erected at the
corner of Smith and Main streets
is not a crucifix, but is to support a fire gong. Ladders and
buckets have been ordered, and
when they arrive some kind of a
brigade will doubtless be organized.
The baseball teams of the
Okanagan and Spallumcheen valleys are talking of forming a
league. The Penticton boys are
of opinion that two leagues would
better serve the purpose, as the
number of games to be played
and the distance to be travelled
would necessitate a great amount
jf expense. The winners of each
league could afterwards play off.
Mr. and Mrs. E. Bryce Chalmers left on Tuesday for Winnipeg, where Mr. Chalmers will
again resume his position in the
city clerk's offce. Mr. Chalmers'
two brothers left for Vancouver
about a week previous. The
Chalmers family have rendered
much assistance in getting up entertainments during the past
winter, and we fear that the
Amateur Dramatic Club will suffer severely through their removal.
Miss Ada L. A. Murcutt will
lecture in the Methodist Church
on the evening of Friday, the
17th inst, her subject being
"New Zealand, the Home of
Democracy.'' Miss Murcutt, who
is an Australian by birth, is a
Fellow of the Royal Scottish
Geographical Society, and is
highly spoken of by the press of
all English-speaking countries as
a lecturer. She recently addressed large audiences in all of
the coast cities on various topics
and no doubt she will be greeted
by a full house on the one evening that she will be in Penticton.
There will be no admission fee,
but a silver collection will be
taken.
A movement is on foot to have
the Westbank post-office transferred from its present location
at Mr. Marshall's house to the'
new townsite of Westbank, where
a suitable home can be found
for it in the new store recently
opened there by Mr. Collins. Mr.
Marshall himself is in favor of
the change, and it has the support of the majority of the residents of the Westbank district.
Mr. (J. S. Grant sent a petition
with 100 signatures to the Postmaster General on Saturday.
There is hope of a mail service
at least three times a week, if
not daily, under the new arrangement, while the present service
is carried on only once a week
from Peachland. A number of
families are settling on and adjacent to the new townsite this
spring, and there would seem to
be plenty of valid reasons for
the change.���Kelowna Courier.
Arrangements are being mad<
for a Grand Ball in aid of tht
Penticton Athletic Association to
be held in Steward's Hall or
Easter Monday, April 20th. A
lunch will be provided, and the
music furnished by foreign talent. Tickets on sale first part
of next week.
There is no doubt whatevei
that there will be an unprecedented demand for labor in thi
West this year. At least thirty-
five thousand men will be needed
for railway construction work.
Foley, Welsh & Stewart alone
will absorb 12,000 men west of
Winnipeg on the G. T. P. contracts ; J. D. McArthur & Co.
will employ 5,000 to 7,000 east of
Winnipeg. The building operations in the towns and cities will
also require a considerable number. The new union depot in
Winnipeg will require 1,000 men,
and the massive parliament
buildings to be put up in Edmonton and Regina, a like number.
Thief Gets Six Months.
Wm. Stassell was on Monday
charged before Justices Wade
and Clement with stealing goods
from the cabins of H. Leir and
Mr. O'Connell. From Mr. Leir's
cabin he had taken a revolver, a
hunting knife, two razors, and
other trinkets, while from Mr.
O'Connell's he had appropriated
a coat, a pair of shoes, a hammer
and a clock. The coat, which
Stassell was wearing, had been
identified as the one that had
been stolen, and this led to Constable Tooth making the arrest.
It was decided to make a summary trial of the case, and the
prisoner, pleading guilty, was
given six months' hard labor at
Kamloops for each offence, the
terms to run concurrently.
Canning Company Incorporated.
The certificate of incorporation for the Southern Okanagan
Canning Co., of Penticton, has
been received by the directors,
so everything is ready to go
ahead. The committee appointed
to interview the growers report
that at least seventy - five tons
of tomatoes can be counted on
this year. That will be about all
the factory will be able to handle
this season,
New Stage Arrangements.
According to the latest arrangements W. E. Welby's stage
will in future cover merely the
route between Penticton and
Keremeos. F. Royer runs a stage
between Keremeos and Princeton and D. J. Innis has secured
the contract for the mail stage
between the same points. Welby's stage loaves Penticton at 5
a. m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays
and Saturdays, connecting with
the Great Northern Railway and
Princeton stages at Keremeos,
and arriving in Penticton on the
return trip at 12 noon on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
When the railway is completed
to Princeton the Penticton stage
will connect with train at Keremeos both east and west. When
that time arrives there will undoubtedly be a very large passenger traffic between the two
points.
Call Public Meeting.
The Board of Trade meeting,
it which was to have been dismissed the question of the incorporation of Penticton, was not
veil attended, so that what discussion took place was of an in-
r'ormal character. The opinion
>f those present was unanimous-
y in favor of the project pro-
/ided taxation would not be in-
:reased thereby. It was thought
jest to call a public meeting at
-vhich the pros and cons of the
subject would be fully gone into
md at which the opinion of the
���.vhole community on the subject
night be ascertained. There
��vill be a number of addresses
md every person at all interest-
ad will be given the opportunity
)f expressing his views on the
juestion. It is hoped that there
vvill be a representative gathering, as the feeling of this meeting will doubtless determine
whether or not the project is to
be gone ahead with this year.
Incorporation cannot take effect
before the first day of January
1909, and in order that it might
be brought about at that date it
will be necessary to send to the
Provincial Secretary before the
13th day of June of this year' a
petition signed by a majority of
the property interests of the
place. It will be understood that
the completion of such a petition
will require considerable time,
ind there is, therefore, no time
co lose.
The Fruit Crop.
Some fears were expressed
that the past exceptionally mild
winter would be succeeded by an
early spring which would bring
jut the blossoms of the fruit
trees too early, and thus subject
them to late frosts. Such a circumstance would have resulted
disastrously to the crop of the
coming summer. All fears, however, have been set aside by the
prevailing cool weather. The
frequent light frosts at night are
acting as a deterrent upon the
buds, so that, although they are
ready to burst forth when a few
really warm days come, there
are as yet no trees in blossom.
The prospects of an abundant
fruit crop are, consequently,
very bright, and the Okanagan
Valley may this year be expected
to send out the largest orchard
product in its history. This will
of course apply to the older settled portions of the valley, but a
number of the orchards in the
vicinity of Penticton are now
two years old and will begin
bearing this year, and a number
of the growers are looking for a
considerable crop of peaches.
Weather Report
Compiled by the Dominion
Government Meterological Observer at Penticton, for March,
1908:
Max. Temp.       Min. Temp.
 30
 29
 28
 16
 24
 25
 22
Date
1....
2....
8....
4....
NOTICE.
Osoyoos Land District.     District of Yale, B. C.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Thomas Howl-
wood, rancher, of Kelowna, R C, Intends to apply
for permission to lease tho following described
land :���
Commencing at a post planted at the N, E.
corner of the N. W. Vi Hection 16, township --J.
thence south 40 chains ; thence west 40 chains:
thence south 40 chains ; thence west 40 chains ; \
thence north 40 chains ; thence went 20 chains;
thence north 40 chains | thence east UK) chains, |
to the point of commencement, and containing 640
acres more or lens.
ROBERT THOMAS HESELWOOD.
21st January, 1908.
Subscribe for
The Penticton Press
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
IS.
10.
20.
21.
22.
23.
.40 .
.41 .
.41 .
.37 .
.44 .
.42 .
.44 .
.621.
.50
.62
.50
.61 .
.56 .
.49 .
52*.
.21
.35
.35
.42
.33
.34
.36
50
.48
.50
.50
.58
.55
26	
27	
28	
20	
30	
31	
March
1	
14	
16	
21	
.';�����
.53
.52
.50
.54
.62
.50
.50
Ruin
.26
.03
.08
 26*
 26$
 231
 33
 28
 31
 361
 32
 291
.....26
 241
 21
 29
 27
 32
 19
Snow
    i THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. APRIL 11, 1908.
THE PENTICTON PRESS
ISSUED    EVERY    SATURDAY   AT
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
W. J. CLEMENT.
Subscription $1.00 Per Year in
Advance.
Advertising Rates:
Transient Advertisements���Not exceeding one inch, one insertion, 50c.;
for each additional insertion, 25c.
Lodge Notices, Professional Cards, &c.
$1.00 per inch, per month.
Land and Timber Notices���30 days, $5;
60 days, $7.
Legal Advertising���First insertion, 10
cents per line; each subsequent insertion, 5c. per line.
Reading Notices in Loci News Column
15c. pe- line, first insertion; 10c. per
line, each subsequent insertion.
Contract Advertisements-Rates arranged according to space taken.
All changes in contract advertisements must be in the hands of the
printer by Tuesday evening to ensure
publication in the next issue.
The Missionary Arena.
The first number of the Missionary Arena, an eighteen-page
monthly magazine published at
Summerland by Rev. A. T. Robinson, M. A., has reached the
Press office. From a typogarph-
ical and workmanship standpoint
the Arena leaves nothing to be
desired, while editorially it is
filled with breezy and interesting articles from cover to cover.
The number contains articles on
India, China, one on "The Negro
Problem," and other matter of
interest from a missionary point
of view. We bespeak for the
Arena a warm reception in the
homes of the west as the pioneer
missionary journal of British
Columbia. The Arena is interdenominational and should, in
consequence, appeal to all people
who are desirous of keeping in
touch with the progress of
Christian missionary work all
over the world.
Incorporation and Taxation.
The general impression seems
to have got abroad that under incorporation taxation would be
increased. Even if this were
true it would not be sufficient
grounds for not incorporating,
provided that the money expended in taxation brought good returns. Supposing that for every
dollar the place now pays in
taxes it receives only one half
dollar in the way of improvements in return, it would be bad
business and a poor investment.
On the other hand, if twice the
taxes were paid under incorporation, and for each dollar spent
a dollar's good, or more, were
done the town, so that the payer
reaped a direct benefit, it would
be good business and a good investment.
However, the matter appears
to work out even better than
this in actual practice. In Summerland the taxes have been reduced, on the average, to less
than one half what was paid
direct to the government, and
are about half what is now being
paid at Peachland, where conditions are quite the same. Take
another example, Kelowna,
where a city corporation exists.
The city has not only been compensated for the taxes levied, by
better streets and other local improvements, but it has gone
ahead with leaps and bounds
since it made the venture. Again
the rate of taxation has not
risen but the people are paying
three-fifths of one per cent, on
an assessment much less than
the actual value of the property.
Any cases in which the assessment has been raised, the raise
has been due entirely to the advance in the value of the property. On the other hand, in the
town of Penticton the assessment in many cases runs far
above the actual value of the
property. It is to remedy such
conditions that the incorporation
of Penticton is desired, and not
to heap further burdens upon the
ratepayer.
to thy progress of any community, which is almost totally lacking in Penticton, and that is public spirit. People will turn out
by the dozens and hundreds to a
social, a concert, a dance or a
Ganthony humbug. They will
even dig out their last dollar for
anything in the line of sport; but
when it comes to taking an active, or even an inactive, interest
in questions of vital importance
to the progress, well - being, or
even the very existence of the
place, they too often present the
excuse that they are too busy.
The same fact holds good from a
fruit growers' meeting to a meeting called to discuss an important public work, or one that
might determine the whole future administration of local affairs. We wonder why neighboring towns are making such
rapid strides, and console ourselves with the belief that Providence has been more generous
to them in the bestowal of nature's bounties than to us. The
fact is that Nature has done
more for Penticton than it has
for any other point in the entire
Okanagan; and if our citizens,
instead of grumbling at hard
times and future dull prospects,
would look to themselves as the
real makers or marrers of the
town, conditions would soon become quite different. On the
other hand, so long as we content ourselves with sport, or
neglect the public welfare for
the sake of picking up a few extra dimes, things will remain
about as they are. The Press
is tired extolling the advantages
of Penticton, for natural advantages, alone, never made any
town; what is wanted is united
effort.
There is plenty of business
ability in Penticton to push it to
the front if that ability were
united, but progress cannot be
expected so long as petty rivalries exist. Let us then have one
idea, that of each one of us doing his level best to build up at
the southern end of Okanagan
Lake the finest and most prosperous city in the interior of the
province. Let us think less of
amusement and entertainment
and more of the general welfare,
and let us each be willing to sacrifice a little time to the common
good.
One thing that is very noticeable in our neighboring towns is
that the people are patriotic to
an intense degree. In any of
them if a person wishes to avoid
trouble he had better not say
anything of a depreciatory nature about any of them till he
gets away. This is not always
the case in Penticton, but should
be if we wish the town and community to prosper as it is en
titled by nature to do.
Public Spirit.
There is one thing necessary
<
(A
(/>
LU
a
o
5
o
H
O
H
Z
u
a,
: ��
IIII
-2�� h
:     ��>.
:    �� O en
QJ y O)
fl)P       c
* a> m
B ^ i-
,f\2T3 c
-y =3 w o
.Sn y,.u
��> <u
2t3 c $
*��( +j +-> cS
O """I
u
o
CT3
gj
If
OM
5JI
U �� P.   Urn
'C en Pi
��    <
2,    3
o
H
o
c
a��
ft
LU
a.
a.
i
SAVE
WRITING
LETTERS
To distant friends by sending them
The Penticton Press
A subscription only costs
ONE   DOLLAR   PER   YEAR
And the paper makes a specialty of furnishing information
Of Interest to
Outsiders.
The Press has been largely instrumental
in bringing many settlers to Penticton;  so
If you want your friends to corne
here send them the paper.
Now is also a good time for you to subscribe
or to renew your old subscription.
It Pays to Advertise
In a paper that is widely circulated. The
Penticton Press is read by practically everybody in the district;    consequently good
Results are Assured
To advertisers who use its columns. The
merchant who gives most attention to his
advertising is the one who will eventually
do the leading business.
This is the season to lay in a stock  of
JOB   PRINTING
For the coming year.
The Penticton Press
Constantly carries a large stock of Stationery to choose from, and is
Up-to-Date In All Its Work.
We guarantee satisfaction
or no pay. Prices moderate.
>^>^^^^^^^i<^V^��<^*^*?^*^*^^<^^^^>*^<^*^*^><^><^��<^^>*V>*��>v
60   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights Ac.
Anyone sending a sketch and description may
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an
invention Is prnbiibly patentable. Comniunfca-
thins Hirictly rouflilontlal. HANDBOOK on Patents
sunt free. Oldest fluency for securingjiatents.
Patent* taken through Mimii & Co. reoelrfl
tjttcinl notice, without charge, In the
Scientific American.
A handsomely illustrated weekly. Largest clr-
rijl.it inn of any snlentlDo journal. Terms, $8 a
yenr: f<mr months, f 1. Sold byall newsdealers.
IVIUNN &Co.3eiBroadw-��NewYork
Braucb. Office. 626 F SU Washington, D. C.
Now is the time to place your order with the
OKANAGAN NURSERY COMPANY
For Fruit Trees for'Fall Planting.
We guarantee trees to grow if planted in the fall, or will replace any
that miss free of charge.    Come early and avoid the rush.    Send or
call for prices.   Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
OKANAGAN NURSERY CO.
LIMITED.
Capital Stock $50,000
Penticton, British Golumbia.
R. H. ROBERTSON, President
THOS. TODHUNTER, Vice-Pres. E. CURTIS, Manager.
W. F. H. SWINTON, Sec-Treas.
KS
ft
4
4
4
I
4
KKSfttae^atatatiacaii
i'A*'A*'A*'AW*Z'Hlt��'A)&'AVAte'A*'A*'AA>'A��>'A&'&   I
LARGE STOCK OI
AND
At/ ci-fl Artec ~>>l
JUST ARRIVED.
C. A. C. STEWARD. ��
���SB32aS2SBEB2S?&2��Z3Z2
THIS IS THE LIMIT . .
1
A man in Summerland said last week :���
"My watch is broken. How can I send it to
Harris, the Jeweller, when I live ten miles
away ? " Nothing could be simpler. Drop
me a line, I will send you a mailing box. I
will give you a price on repairing it, and
repair it if you see fit.
REMEMBER : All work guaranteed for
Two Years.
HARRIS, The Jeweler
+r)f^*>tt'm^^tf~l*m tf**^.t*f��^m.tt-***.*t ^fc. tt �����fc t��t
HORTICULTURAL SUPPLIES   (
/
E. J. CLAYTON and C. M. JOHNSTON will shortly
open up a store on Main Street as Nurserymen, 5
Seedsmen and Florists. L
SPECIALTIES \
Farm and Garden Seeds, Bulbs, Cut Flowers, f
and Horticultural Sundries. <
^nlp A<rprrt<! in     DANIELS BROS.-Seedsmen to H. M. King  Ed- f
OOIC Agtmi> III ward VII.-Norwich, England. ��
j        B. C. for
��� ��f^*~tf^*.tt
RICHARD   SANKEY  & SON,  Royal
Nottingham.
Potteries,    k
.tt^mmtU*
T
ARE   THE
LOWEST  IN  TOWN.
HOUSES TO LET
Several Acre Lots���planted
MONEY TO LOAN
Real Estate agent, Notary Public and Conveyancer
A��FNT   FAP.   PHOENIX of London I  LIVERPOOL & LONDON & GLOBE; and ATLAS
/luLll I    I Ull Fire Insurance Companies.
SEED POTATOES
NOTiOTON BEAUTY i* claimed by seedsmen
to be the earliest and most productive potato
grown, I have about half a ton of tbeni for sab'
to those who want seed.
E. W. MUTCH,
31-tf Stonybank,
NOTICE
FRUIT TREES-Well-grown stock.
Large quantity of apple trees tor sule.
only few choice varieties grown : also
small stock of ornamental trees. Apply
for varieties and price to Manager, |
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd.,
15-tf Vernon, ii. 0.
NOTICE
FOR SALE
Ejws for Hatching.    S.  C.   Brown
Leghorns.     First-class   laying  strain.
$1.50 for 15.
87-tf A. J. CHRISTIE.
NOTICE.
Similkameen Land District.   District of OsoyooB,
Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that LydlttDroutakoy Fraser,
of Kew Gardens, England. Intends to apply for
permission Lo purchase the following: described
land :���
Commencing: at a post planted about 2 miles
In an easterly direction from A. Ford's P. R. Nu.
U2G0, thenee south 40 chains J thence east 20
chains; thenconorth 40 chains ; thenee west 20
chains to point of commencement, and containing
80 acres, more or less,
LYD1A DROUTSKOY FRASER,
By her agent John Robert Fraser, Captain.
Dated March 7th, 1908, 84-3t
Similkameen Land District.   District of Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that Sydney VV. Brown of
Orovillo, Wash., U, S. A., railway conductor, intends to apply for permission to' purchase the
following described lands:���
Commoncing at a post planted at the north-east
corner of lot 41 Qp I, thence north about 40 chains
to Indian Reserve line; thence west to Osoyoos
Lake; thence, following the Osoyoos Lake shore,
to the N. W. corner of lot 41; thence along the
north line of lot 41 to point of commencement.
SYDNEY W. BROWN.
Dated Feb'y8rd, 1908.
FOR SALE.
Bronze  Turkey   Eggs,   for   hatching.
$2.50 per setting of 11,    Apply to
 "D'	
88-
C. F. RANDOLPH,
Penticton, B. C.
FOR SALE
Five Horse Power Gasoline   Engine,
Circular Raw & Crosscut  Saw.    All  in
good condition. Cheap for cash. Apply,
J. II. MITCHELL,
Penticton, B. C.
LIQUOR LICENSE
ACT 1909, AND AMENDMENT ACT 1908.
PASTURE
Fenced. With water. On the meadow.
By the week or month.    Apply
J. A. NESBITT,
3G-4 Ellis Street.
Subscription $1.
NOTICE is hereby given that one
month from date I intend to apply to
the Superintendent of Provincial Police,
at Victoria, B. C, for a renewal of my
Liquor License for the premises known
and described as the B. C. Hotel, Penticton, B. G.
88-4 W. H. TAPLEY.
Penticton, B. C., March 24th, 1908.
WANTED.
j Girl to do housework.      Apply
Mrs. W. Ii. King,
35- Penticton, B. C. THE PENTICTON PRE3S, PENTICTON, B.C. APRIL 11, 1908.
$
Miss Mabel Rowe
Teacher of Piano, Organ and
Theory.
���PENTICTON ���      - ��. C.
Robert W. Service Stationed
at Ddwsoii.
Dr.C.A.JACKSON
DENTIST
S. O. Land Company's   Block
PENTICTON, B. C.
'Phone 17.
CHAS. WERE
Accountant & Auditor,
Notary Public
PENTICTON, B. C.
R. B. KERR,
BARRISTER & SOLICITOR
Notary Public.
KELOWNA,        - - B. C.
W. H. T. GAHAN,
Barrister, Solicitor, Notary Public.
MURK  BLOCK,
PENTICTON,      -       -       B.C.
'Phone 11.
FRUIT,   CONFECTIONERY,
Full Line of
ENGLISH  CIGARETTES  AND  TOBACCOS
C.   E.  POMEROY.
Geo. E. Winkler,
Penticton Agent
Westbank Town & Fruit Lots
Kierstead & Steele
Builders and Contractors
ALL KINDS OF JOB WORK
IN OUR LINE.
.   A Card Will Find Us.   .
M. T. Kierstead - R. Steele
PENTICTON, B. C.
Harris
nursery co.,
Penticton.
Beautify your lot with some
of our shade trees.
We have Elm, Ash, Maple,
Catalpa, Mulberry, Black Walnut, and Ash Leaved Maple.
Some perennial shrubs and
apple trees left.
DO YOU KNOW DeLONG
THE PENTICTON
BLACKSMITH ?
This ia his space.
D. VV. Crowley
&Co.
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
Goods Delivered to any part of the
Town.
WE GIVE OUR PROMPT ATTENTION TO
MAIL ORDERS
C. E. HOUSER, Manager.
TELEPHONES.
Dwellings���Individual Lint*. .?2.00 per month.
��� Party  Lino  l.fiO
Business ���Individual Line .. 2.B0
-Party Linn  2,01)
Free Installation within three-')uarterH mile
of office, when one year contract given.
Outside three-quarters mile, add coat of
labour to install.
When no contract, or contract for less than
one year given, cost of labour to install is
charged at time of installation.
C. F. LAYTON,
Local Agent.
Lakeshore Telephone Co.
FOR SALE
Canadian Rred Shire Stallion; 8 years
old; perfectly sound and gentle; weight
1,700 lbs. Will exchange for work
horses or drivers.       Apply
S. T. ELLIOTT,
38���tf. Kelowna, B. C.
Robert W. Service, the poet-
laureate of the Yukon, is to be
stationed at Dawson. This announcement is made in Victoria
papers, and indirect, though non-
official information to that effect
has been received here by Manager D. W. Sanson of the Canadian Bank of Commerce, to
which service Mr. Service is to
be attached.
Little has been known in Dawson of the talented young man,
| and the following from the Vic-
| toria Colonist just received here
j is one of the best  articles  yet
published regarding him :
Robert W. Service, who has
won fame with his first book of
verse, 'Songs of a Sourdough,'
the United States edition of
which is published under the
title, 'The Spell of the Yukon,'
spoke of his work, of himself
and his outlook upon life and
things in general interestingly
to a Colonist reporter yesterday.
He is a young man with promise
of even greater success before
him, and he is modest. "It's all
quite a surprise to me," he said,
"for, you see, I wrote the verses
more to pass the time that hung
heavily while I left the teller's
wicket of the bank at White-
horse. The verses are really the
offspring of makeshift and mischance, and no one was more
surprised than was I when the
public bought the editions so
readily. I was pleased, too, with
che praise given them by Mr.
Kipling, for praise from him is
praise indeed. It's all wrong,
though, to talk of me as a Canadian Kipling; far be it from me
to consider myself in the same
class with him."
The public tl inks differently
to Mr. Service. His book is now
in its seventh Canadian edition,
and the demand grows instead
of lessening. The American publishers report a steady sale, and
Mr. Service is now arranging an
English Edition. Reviewers
from end to end of this continent
and beyond the waters which
divide the continents have praised
the poems; men nearer home
have thanked the writer; in fact
within an hour a Presbyterian
clergyman and another person as
far removed in the social scale
as possible came to congratulate
him; sermons have been preached
with the poems as a text at Vancouver and Toronto, and wherever men read books there has
been praise for the young Canadian poet who has broken the
trail in a new field, the rugged,
striking verse of the great north-
land.
Mr. Service is still a young
man���he says that in the reviews
he has seen of his poems writers
have made him younger and
younger until he has feared that
he will soon be relegated entirely
from the world. He was born
thirty years ago in England, and
was taken to Scotland by his
parents when too young to know
even that Caledonia was "a meet
nurse for a poetic child." After being educated at Glasgow,
sometime at the Glasgow university, he came to Canada ten
years ago, a young man of twenty, fighting against damnation
from city to city until he came
to the Pacific coast, where for
five years he wandered up and
down from Victoria to the City
of Mexico, living for a short time
in every city of consequence on
the Pacific coast, working at all
manner of things. Five years
ago he became a bank clerk in
the local office of the Bank of
Commerce,
Readers of the Colonist will
remember occasionally verses
published over the signature of
Robt. W, Service then. The
poems were striking and it was
generally considered that the
writer would be heard from,
From Victoria Mr, Service went
to the bank's offices at Vancouver then to Kamloops, from
where, three years ago, he was
transferred to White Horse. It
was during the first year of his
service in the bank at White
Horse that most of the poems
which appear in the "Songs of a
Sourdough" were written. All
were written in the open, the
poet finding inspiration as he
walked about near the Yukon's
banks at the little town at the
headquarters of the big river.
For nearly a year they lay on his
desk and then he decided to collect and publish them. The
poems were typed and mailed to
publishers. To five or six houses
they went with the request that
the publishing firms would send
the writer their lowest terms
for printing them. The majority
asked amounts more than Mr.
Service was willing to pay, for
he had no idea of the value of
| h's verses then. When Briggs
& Co. of Toronto offered to print
an edition of a thousand copies
at a price which Mr. Service was
willing to pay, he thought he
might be able to sell probably
half of them and give the others
to friends.
He closed the bargain, and when
later he received a letter from
the publishers with regard to a
second edition, on which they
offered him a royalty, he was
both pleased and surprised. He
soon found that the first edition
had been sold out before it appeared on the galley proofs. The
second edition went like wildfire;
it became necessary to order copies in advance. The next edition
was increased in size, further
poems being added, and at
Christmas a special illustrated
edition was published. Then arrangements were made with Edward Stern & Co. of Philadelphia for the publication of a
United States edition and arrangements will be begun soon
to issue an edition in the United
Kingdom.���Yukon World.
GREEN MOUNTAIN
A meeting of the Conservatives of this district will be held
at W. J. Farleigh's on Saturday
next to choose a delegate to attend the convention at Vernon
on the 23rd inst.
Mrs. L. A. Clark returned
home Sunday after spending a
short time with her daughter,
Mrs. D. J. Innes of Keremeos.
There is very good pasture on
the south slopes now for stock.
Glen Colebank of Penticton
spent a few days last week with
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Farleigh of
Sunnyside Ranch.
Plowing and seeding is the
order of the day with the farmer
now.
An effort is being made to
start a school in Maroon Valley
near the Dolphin Ranch.
The weather has been rather
squally of late, putting one in
mind of March.
New Spring Styles in Boots & Shoes
MEN'S
A good assortment of styles in
all sizes, including Oxfords, in
tan and black. 2d per cent, off
:ili heavy working or plow shoes.
LADIES'
Patent leather, swing last,
Blatcher cut, a new and very
stylish shoe $5.00
Veloiir calf, Blutcher, new and
stylish  $.1.50
Vici kid, patent toe caps at....
$3.50, 3.i5, .5.00.
BOYS'
A 20 per cent, discount on ell
boys' shoes, sizes 8 to 5.
MISSES*
Vici kid, Blutcher cut, patent
tips $2.oo pair
Tan Dongola lace	
$2.25 pair
A good assortment of children's
and infant's shoes.
Purchase now before the sizes
are sold out.
SUMMERLAND.
Mrs. (Dr.) Knox, of Kelowna,
was visiting friends in Summer-
land over Sunday.
Miss M. Smith, principal of
Summerland Public School spent
Sunday visiting friends at Peachland. There was, consequently,
no school here on Monday,
L. A. Fenner left last week
for an extended trip abroad.
The Ladies' Mission Circle will
meet at the home of Mrs. Jas.
Ritchie this week, Saturday.
Miss C. McDougald, of Peachland, spent the week's end visiting friends and relatives here,
returning Tuesday morning.
A team of horses which left
their stable last Friday, in the
hands of David Watson, evidently got out of his hands about five
j'clock that afternoon, and came
tearing along the beach road towards town at a breakneck pace.
They were brought to a sudden
stop, however, by running astride
of the tie-post in front of the
Summerland Supply Co's store.
The breaking of the neckyoke
and singletrees was the only
damage done,
A very interesting game of
baseball was played on the college campus last Saturday afternoon between the students and
the town team. It was the first
good game of the season, and
both nines showed up well. The
play resulted in a victory for the
college lads at the close of a
warm five innings.
I. Robertson has disposed of
his Prairie Valley property and
is building a fine house on his
lots opposite the English church.
Frank Oaks is wearing a bandage just over his left eye. He
says that is where the baseball
struck him last Saturday.
L. B. Hatfield has erected a
substantial residence on his
bench property south of town.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Phinney
were happily surprised on Monday night by the arrival from
Nova Scotia of their eldest son,
Roy, who will make his home
here.
The Williams brothers have
purchased the Adams lot above
Crescent Beach, and are now
waiting for peaches to grow.
w. o. w.
Okanagan Camp No. 261.
Meets  2nd  and 4th  Saturday  in   the
month at 8 p. m. in Woodmen's Hall,
Ellis St.
Visiting Sovereigns always welcome.
JOHN POWER, C. C.
R. WILTON, CLERK
HOTEL  PENTICTON.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.
RATES $2.50 PER DAY
A. Barnes       - -       Prop.
PENTICTON. B.C.
DOMINION ELECTIONS
Vale Cariboo Electoral District
A Convention of the Liberal-Conservatives of Yale-Cariboo will  he
held at
Ellison's Hall, Vernon,
On Thur., April 23,1908
for the purpose of selecting a candidate
to contest the forthcoming Dominion
Elections in the interests of the Liberal-
Conservative Party. Local Associations are requested to meet and appoint
delegates at once. Representation at
the Convention will be by delegations
from the Provincial Electoral Districts
of Grand Forks, Greenwood, Similkameen, Okanagan, Kamloops, Yale, Lil-
Iooet and Cariboo. One delegate will
be appointed for each twenty or fraction of twenty votes cast at each poll.
Accredited delegates may vote either
in person or by proxy, but not more
than five proxies shall be held by any
one delegate.
Chair will be taken at 2 p. m. All
Conservatives are invited to attend
the Convention, but only accredited
delegates will be allowed to vote.
PRICE ELLISON,
Prea. Yale-Cariboo Conservative Assn.
J. A. McKELVIE,
Sec. Yale-Cariboo Conservative Assn.
Galarneau &
McKenzie
BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
When  you   think  of   Building
Look us up.
ADOLr-HUSOAl.AKNEAU     W. A. MCKENZIE
NEW
JEWELRY STORE
-AT-
Summerland.
The patronage of the people of
Summerland and vicinity is respectfully solicited at the Jewelry Store being opened by
E. I. SCOTT,
Expert
Watchmaker and
Optician.
The Optical Department will be
a special feature.
Your eyes carefully examined.
VV. R. KING & CO.
'PHONE 25. THE ELLIS ST. STORE.
SHELF   HARDWARE
Saws, Axes, Wedges, Striking Hammers, Table and
Pocket Cutlery.
PENTICTON HARDWARE CO.
WM.   HAUG,
Wholesale and Retail
MASONS'   SUPPLIES . .
PORTLAND CEMENT, HARD WALL
PLASTER, COAST  LIME
and COAST LATH
Orders by mail promptly attended
to.
BOX 166   -   KELOWNA, B. C.
THE PENTICTON
DAIRY
Daily delivery of Fresh Milk to
all parts of the Town.
MILK 10c. PER QUART.
H. M. McNeill,     .    Prop.
RATHVON & CARLESS
CONTRACTORS
AND
BUILDERS
Plans,  Specifications   and   Estimates
Furnished for all Kinds of Work.
L. A. RATHVON,
'Phone White I
CHAS. L. CARLESS,
���Phone White 2
E. J. FINGH
Painter, Paperhanger
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a Specialty.
WALL PAPER Carried in Stock.
Box 196.        Main St.
C. P. R.
LAND FOR
SALE
Choice fruit lots, improved and
unimproved.
FIRE INSURANCE-The Sun of London, Eng., and Queen.   Why not insure
in the best; they cost no more.
Apply to
J. R. MITCHELL.
PENTICTON
& OROVILLE
STAGE
Via Fairview
Leaves Penticton Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:80 a.m., arriving at Oroviile the name day at (i p. in.
Through Enre - $6.00
W. HINE and S. M. SNOW
FAIRVIEW. B. C.
STAGES
Stapre leaven for Kerempon and Hedley at 7 a. m.
on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Returns
on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
StoRe leaves for Princeton every Tuesday at
7 a. m.
Stage leaves for Fairview and Oroviile on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:31) a. m. Returns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at
6 p. m.
POST OFFICE.
Hours 9 a. m. to 6. p, m.
Registered Letter aud Money Order wicket
closes 5 p. tn.
Wicket opened for half an hour after mail is
distributed.
Arrivals���Per Str, Okanagan: Daily except
Sunday 6 p.m.: Per stage from Hedley, Keremeos, Olalla, Green Mountain, Oroviile, Fairview,
and White Lake: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at G p. m.
Closing���For boat and stages: 9 p. m. daily except Saturday.   For Monday's boat and   staeres:
8.-lb p. m. Sundays.
C. P. R. TIME TABLE
SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH
Daily both ways except Sunday.
SOUTH BOUND    STATION
7.iii) a. m Sieamoua
ii.27
i2
s.uo " .
9..".0 " .
!U5 " .
Ki.oo i>. m.
u.io " .
:s.oo " .
4.V, " .
o.oo " .
NORTH BOUND
  6.00 p.m.
. Enderby  4AB
Armstrong?  4.08   "
. .ar.
..lv.
. .Vernon.
.... Vernon	
.Ok. Landing .
. Ok. Landing.
... Kelowna...
Peachland .
.lv.
.ar.
.lv.
3.3(1
S.30   "
2.15   "
.11.00 a.m.
8.20   "
7.2.1   "
, Summerland  6.30
.. Penticton  0.00
HOW ABOUT THOSE
Fruit and Ornamental
Trees,
Seeds, Bulbs, Roses,
Shrubs, Etc.,
You are going to plant this
spring ? The best is what you
want. I have them at right
prices.   Send for catalogue.
n. VV II)  GELLATLY,
GELLATLY,      -      -      B. C.
s
o
M
W
Ess
Wg
WH
ii
w <
Q
K
O
Lake View Poultry Yards
FRESH EGGS FOR SALE
w
o
o
��
3
w
PURE-BRED WHITE ��
LEGHORNS    ��
  P
EGGS FOR HATCHING * B
$1.00 to $1.50 per setting. |
  S
I. KENT, Propr.     i
EATON'S PRICES
Plus the Express
-AT-
H.OLIVER'S
SHOE  STORE.
JUST ARRIVED-
CAR LOAD OF
Extension and
Reversible Discs
The very latest up - to - date
tools for Orchard Cultivation.
Descriptive matter sent on
application to
S. T. Elliott,
KELOWNA       -      -       B. C.
Now is the Time
-TO-
Get a Motor for
your Boat or Launch
I handle the goods.    Write for Catalogue and prices on the size you require.
B. L. HATFIELD,
Oas Engine Expert,
SUMMERLAND, - B. C.
Pacific Coast Grown
Seeds, Trees,
For the Farm, Garden, Lawn, or
Conservatory.
Reliable, approved varieties,   at
reasonable prices.
No Borers.    No Scale.   No fumigation to damage stock.
No windy agents to annoy you.
Buy  direct   and  get, trees   and
seeds that GROW.
Bee Supplies.  Spray Pumps,
Spraying Material and
Cut Flowers.
Catalogue Free.
M. J. HENRY,
ORRENHOUSES--J0I0 Westminster Rd
ttranch nurseries���S. Vancouver. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B. C, APRIL 11, 1008.
LITERARY COLUMN.
A Beautiful Night in N. America.
(The famous French author,
Chateaubriand, from whose writings this extract is taken, spent
some time in North America.)
An hour after sunset the moon
appeared above the trees on the
opposite horizon. A balmy breeze,
that this queen of nights brought
with her from the east, seemed
to precede her in the forests. A
solitary star gradually arose in
the sky; now it peacefully pursued its course in the blue firmament; now it rested on groups of
clouds which resembled the summit of lofty mountains crowned
with snow. These clouds, folding and unfolding their sails,
displayed themselves in transparent zones of white satin, dispersed themselves in light flakes
of foam or formed in the sky
banks of what seemed like white
cotton wadding, so pleasant to
the eye that one seemed to feel
their softness and elasticity.
The scene on the ground was
not less charming; the velvety
blue light of the moon came
down through the spaces in the
trees and carried sheaves of light
even into the deepest darkness
of the forest. The peaceful river
flowing at my feet was alternately lost in the wood, or reappeared
shining with the constellations
of the night repeated on its
bosom. In a savannah on the
other side of the river the light
of the moon was sleeping motionless on the turf; birch trees scattered here and there were gently
swaying in the breeze and formed
islands of floating shadows on
this quiescent sea of light. Everything quite near me would have
been silence and repose but for
the falling of a few leaves, the
sudden passage of the night
wind or the hooting of an owl.
In the distance, at intervals,
might be heard the hollow roar
of Niagara Falls, which in the
calmness of the night, was reechoed from solitude to solitude
and finally died away through
the lonely forest.
The grandeur, the overwhelming melancholy of this picture,
cannot be expressed in human
language ; the most beautiful
nights in Europe can give one
no idea of it. In vain in our cultivated French fields does the
immagination attempt to explain
itself; on every side it meets the
dwellings of men ; but in these
wild regions the soul takes pleasure in plunging into an ocean of
forests, in hovering over the
abyss of the mighty cataracts, in
meditating on the shores of the
lakes and rivers, and, as it were,
in finding itself alone in the
presence of God. ��� (Translated by
J. Barker.)
KELOWNA
A sacred concert was given by
the Orchestra on the evening of
Mar. 31, in Raymer's Hall. Mrs.
Mitchell, of Penticton, delighted
the audience with her fine voice,
and a number of our local singers, who also appeared on the
program, were much appreciated.
The Conora Debating Club entertained the Kelowna Young
People's Society in the Baptist
church Mar 30. The subject of
debate was, "Resolved that the
Orientals should be excluded
from British Columbia." The
subject was ably dealt with by
the opponents, and the judges
decided in favor of the negative.
The formal opening of the
Kelowna Hospital took place on
the afternoon of April 1. Several speakers were present,
among them Price Ellison, M. P.
P., of Vernon, who came down
for the occasion.
The Kelowna public school
board has appointed Mr. Brown
lately from the east as principal,
Mr. Heslip having resigned.
Mr. and Mrs. W. Mawhinney
and family left on Mar. 31 for
the coast. Mr. Mawhinney is
entering into partnership with a
mmmmWmmmmammaamimigvwmunKWMasBBeat!^^
People are hereby notified not to interfere in any way with the flumes or ditches.
We cannot permit the boring of holes in main flume, or the blocking up of same for the purpose of taking water.
People are warned against the starting of bush fires in the vicinity of the flumes, as this may endanger the whole
system and cause serious damage for which the offenders are liable.
Any pollution of the water in the flumes and ditches, or the infringement of the above regulations will render the
offenders liable to prosecution.
Holders of water agreements are required to have their distribution flumes in order before making application
for water.
All applications and complaints are required to be registered at the Company's office.
The Southern Okanagan Land
Company, Limite
brother in the shingle mill business at Eburne.
Mr. and Mrs. Glass returned
home on Friday last.
Mrs. Ashbridge arrived in
town April 3 to join her husband
who has been here for some
time.
Mr. Knowles is having a house
put up beside his residence.
Considerable property is changing hands in the valley, and
many improvements can be seen
in town and country.
PEACHLAND.
Mrs. J. B. Robinson and son,
George, spent from Friday until
Tuesday in Summerland, the
guests of Mrs. J. R. Brown.
A. Robertson, of Medicine Hat,
who is looking for a home in the
Okanagan, was the guest of Mr.
and Mrs. J. N. Gummmow, over
Sunday.
The people have started their
spring gardening. Potatoes have
been planted over a week and
they expect new ones as usual
by the 10th of June. Gooseberry
bushes are out in leaf.
The up-to-date stable and barn
which Wm. Logan had just completed on his orchard lot was destroyed by fire last Thursday.
It caught fire from sparks which
flew from a stump they were
burning out.
Mr. Conn, "The four-storied
man," recently of Edinburgh,
Scotland, lectured in the Presbyterian Church, Tuesday, and also
rendered a couple of songs which
were much appreciated. The
proceeds, which was an encouraging amount, will go to the
piano fund.
The Women's Weekly Prayer
Meeting held its missionary afternoon at Mrs. (Dr.) Robertson's home Tuesday. There was
a good turn out.
Mrs. Hugh McDaugald enjoyed
a few days' visit from her
brother and his wife, Mr. and
Mrs. Wood ley from Moose Jaw.
They were greatly impressed
with the scenery and climate of
the Okanagan in general.
Mr. Thacker has begun clearing his three acre lot which is
charmingly located overlooking
the lake, one mile south of town.
Mrs. Helmer, of Summerland,
who has been visiting her father,
returned to her home Wednesday.
FOR HIRE.
Good Work  Team,  and  Driver,  for
summer.    Scraping,   plowing,   or  harrowing.    Appl'y
80- W. E WELBY.
18 Acres
ON MAIN STREET.   Two and One=Half Miles from
Town.
usiness
ON MAIN STREET.     Near PRESS office.
Apply - W.J.CLEMENT.
view
IBBagaESCTSaag!3ZSEgC^agEE3gSZ235gSSgL��� ^E��SS3EaSE!EEfflBBai
Situated on Westminster Ave.,
PENTICTON,
Has been sub-divided and is now on the Market at
$250.25 for inside lots
Easy Terms.
$300.22 for corners.
No Interest Charged.
Lots arc 52 feet by 103 feet.
Now is your chance, boys, to secure a beautiful site for a prospective
home.       This is leap year and you  may need  it=--you can't always ���
sometimes tell.
FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS APPLY TO
f\L^l*   ^iVil 1TI9      "���
icton

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.penpress.1-0211871/manifest

Comment

Related Items