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The Penticton Press Mar 7, 1908

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 .
enttcton
VOL. 2.    No. 34.
PENTICTON, B.C., SATURDAY, MARCH 7, 1908
4f
$1.00 Per Year In Advance.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
UTAH  OFFICE, TORONTO
ESTABLISHED  1807
B. E. WALKER, President
ALEX. LAIRD, General Manager
A. H. IRELAND, Superintendent cf
Branches
Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000
Rest, - - - 5,000,000
Total Assets, -  113.000,000
BANK MONEY ORDERS
ISSUED AT THE FOLLOWING RATES I
$5 and under        3 cents
Over  $5 and not exceeding SlO  .....    6 cents
"    $10        " " $30    10 cents 87
"    $30       " " $50    15 cents
These Orders are payable at far at any office ill Ciinauu ol a Chartered Rink
(Yukon excepted), and at the principal banking point', in Oil United Stales.
They are negotiable at $.).<)'> to Ihe �� sterling in Croat Britain and Ireland.
They form an excellent method of remitting small sums of money with  safety
and at '.mall cost, and may be obtained without delay at any office of the Bank
THE LITERARY-
Penticton Branch
��     J. J. HUNTER, Manager.
\ Ar
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Are You Building ?
~1
i
/ S. V. SnutI, Lur
We can supply you with anything you require, J
LUMBER, SHINGLES, SASH, DOORS, and J
BUILDING PAPER.   We also keep on hand j
a large stock cf Fluming Material.    Try some I
of our Vulcanized Rubber Roofing on your *
outbuildings; it is the best.    We keep Corru- 1
gated Carpet Felt to put under carpet.  Try it. f
Lumber Go
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LOOK IN OUR WINDOW
AT THE
Display of Boots and Shoes.
UP-TO-DATE STYLES OF THE VERY BEST
MAKE.
Look In.       = -      Come In.
NORMAN HILL
Manufacturers and Dealers in
Stock Saddles. Bridles.
Schapps, Spurs,
And general riding equipment.
I COMMERCIAL
K Livery, Feed and Sale Stable
g DIGNAN and WEEKS, Proprietors.
fe If you   /ant a Stylish Outfit, this is the place to come.    You can always
�� get teams just when you want them.    We make a specialty  of keeping
tt good horses, safe rigs, carrful drivers and also saddle and pack  horses.
m We are also putting in Hay and Grain for sale, and as we buy  for  cash
i
we get the best rates and our patrons get the benefit.
Special  Attention To The  Wonts Of  Commercial  Men.
I The Penticton Lumber Syndicate %
�� LIMITED if
\ Have on hand a complete stock of \a
$ Seasoned Building Material a
Young Ladies of the Society give
Excellent Entertainment.
Steward's Hall, with its large
additional seating capacity, was
taxed almost to its utmost to accommodate the crowd that turned
out on Thursday evening to enjoy
the entertainment given by the
young ladies of the Literary Society. The young ladies had redeemed the reputation of the fair
sex regarding secrecy, and had
succeeded in keeping every detail
of the performance from leaking
out. Nobody except themselves
had but the faintest idea as to
the character the entertainment
would assume, but all were
aware, that extensive preparations had been in progress for
the past month or more, and
were certain that a first-class entertainment would be given. In
this the highest expectations of
the audience were realized, for,
to be modest in prace, it eclipsed
anything previously presented
by that important town institution, the Penticton Literary Society, and was quite equal, with
the exception of the Dixie Jubilee
Singers, to any entertainment
ever presented in Penticton.
When the curtain rose the first
item, "A Toast to Canada" was
presented, the setting being very
pretty. Miss McCully, in whose
beautiful costume the Canadian
flag was prominent, represented
Canada. Miss Rowe, just behind,
in Neptune attire, splendidly
represented Britannia, the mistress of the seas. The remaining
six or eight members of the
group were attired in white,
Miss Dexter to the left of Canada representing the Canadians
across the international boundary
line. Greetings were exchanged,
and the toast was drunk, after
which the group sang "Rule
Britannia."
The next item was the rendering, in chorus, oi the old, but
ever popular, plantation song,
"Nellie Gray," and this was followed by the most popular part
of the program, a play in one
act, entitled "Mrs. Plodding's
Nieces.'' The play was well put
on, and occasioned much merriment on the part of the audience. The quartette, "Flow
Gently Sweet Afton" by Miss
Rowe, Miss Ede, and the Misses
Florence and Bessie Thompson;
the recitatian, "Freckles" by
Miss V. Sutherland; and the trio
"Ding Dong Bell, by Miss Rowe
and the Misses Thompson, were
all well received.
A piano solo by Miss Lancaster
was followed by "The Peakses,"
j a sort of play representing a
I a family of girls reared upon
i Pike's Peak. They wore tall
I peaked hats, had long pointed
I fingers, and sang with very high-
! ly pitched voices. The whole
I act was wierd and quaint as well
��� as exceedingly humorous.
"God Save the King" brought
; the gathering to a close.
Call and get our prices.
�� Round and Split Fence  Posts. Jjj
O <"VCf:������    ...,A    \!.,..,��,-     AAnSn     Ct.aat 'A
Piano Recital by Miss Rowe and
Ner Pupils.
Office and Yards Main Street. ��j
Penticton Stage and Livery
Stables.
Keremeos, Hedley and Princeton Stap;e Connect with Steamer "Okanagan."
Makes connection with Great Northern R'y at Keremeos.
Pianos and Furniture moved to all points,   and a general Draying
Business transacted.
Saddle and Pack Horses.
Top Buggies, Four-horse Rigs for Commercial Men.
W. E. Welby, Prop.       Penticton.
At the invitation of Miss Mabel
Rowe, the parents and friends of
her music pupils to the number
of fifteen or sixteen gathered at
her home on Winnipeg St. on
Saturday evening to listen to a
musical program which had, for
some time, engaged their earnest attention. This is the first
recital that has been given in
Penticton, and if it is an augury
of future events of a similar nature, the people have some real
musical treats to look forward to.
The pupils, from the youngest to
the oldest, were eager to do their
best; and, while some of them
exhibited more or less nervous
ness, which, however, was quite
excusable at their first appearance before even a small audience, their performance not only
showed careful and thorough
training on the part of their
teacher, but that they themselves were possessed of musical
ability of high order.
The program opened with a
nicely rendered duet, "Bright as
a Button," by Gertie Woodward
and Mabel Rogers which was followed by a piano solo, "Dew
Drops," by little Edith Mitchell.
Both this solo and her duet with
Miss Rowe are worthy of special
mention, as they were exceedingly well rendered for so young
a child. Mr. Miller then sang
"Island of Dreams" in his usual
pleasing style, and was followed
by Gertie Woodward in a pretty
piano solo, "Silver Spring." After a nicely rendered duet by
Miss Rowe and Miss Bessie
Thompson, Mr. Wallace gave
Rubinstein's "Melody in F" on
his violin with excellent effect,
and he was followed by a pretty
duet by Edith Mitchell and Miss
Rowe. "The Forest Brook" by
Mabel Rogers, and a Mazurka by
Bessie Thompson were well performed, and were followed by a
vocal solo, "By the Fountain,"
rendered in good style by Mr.
Arthur Rowe. A duet by Bessie
Thompson and Florence Latimer
followed, then a piano solo,
"Simple Devotion," by Janet
Campbell, which was, perhaps,
the most perfectly rendered item
of the pupils' part of the program, not a mistake of any kind
being noticed, while the interpretation and expression were
excellent. "The Doll's Dream"
was nicely performed by Florence Latimer, and was followed
by Mrs. Mitchell who sang Tom-
erval's "Shepherd's Cradle
Song" in a manner which compelled very hearty applause from
her listeners. The last item wuo
a trio, "Air dc Chasse," very
prettily rendered by Florence
Latimer, Gertie Woodward and
Mabel Rogers.
At the conclusion of the program, Miss Rowe presented a
book of music as a prize to the
pupil who had made the greatest
progress in her studies during
the year. This was awarded to
Florence Latimer.
Light refreshments were then
served, and after a few minutes
passed in congratulating teacher
and pupils, the guests departed,
each one feeling highly pleased
with the evening's entertainment.
Miss Rowe is to be congratulated on the success of her first
recital here; and many will be
pleased to hear that it is her intention to give another about
June which will be held in Steward's Hall in order to permit a
larger number to be present than
was possible on this occasion.
Canning Company Organized.
A representative meeting of
those interested in the establishment of a cannery at Penticton
was held in J. R. Mitchell's office last Saturday afternoon. The
report of the committee appointed at a previous meeting was received and several resolutions
relative to organization were
passed. It was decided to go
ahead with the scheme, and to
place the shares at one hundred
dollars each, the company to be
capitalized at twenty-five thousand dollars. A committee comprising J. R. Mitchell, G. F.
Guernsey, S. W. Hatch, S. J.
Heales, and J. W. Macfie, was
appointed to complete organization, and secure a charter as a
limited company. It is probable
that the company will not erect
a building during the coming
summer, but will rent until such
times as the wharf,  or station
site is finally settled.
Since the question of organizing a canning company was first
mooted a few weeks ago, it has
met with every encouragement.
Although money is rather close
at this season of the year, it has
been surprising the manner in
which people have responded to
the call for funds to carry
through the enterprise. All have
realized what the establishment
of a cannery at Penticton means
for the coming summer the
opening of a market for thousands of dollars' worth of farm
produce���and have taken the
matter up with a will which assures its success in the establishment of a canning plant on the
largest scale of any yet existing
in the Okanagan Valley.
that the effect improved as the
distance increased. It would
probably be at its best about ten
miles away.
Local and Personal
The Ganthony Humbug.
"The distinguished British humorist and entertainer, Robert
Ganthony," purveyor of humor-
istic hash to His Majesty King
Edward VII., accompanied by
his company of "London Artists," gave his "triumphal"
fizzle in Steward's Hall on Monday evening. ' 'The most famous
humorist and entertainer that
has ever visited western Canada," the travelling companion
of the late venerable W. E. Gladstone, the guest of the King and
Queen of Denmark, surely the
good folk of Penticton could not
be blamed for thinking that they
were about to see and hear something out of the ordinary.
Alas! our estimation of royalty
has sunk to dangerously near the
zero mark, while the great Gladstone has dropped from the lofty
pedestal to which popular opinion
had consigned him. To say that
the performance was dull would
not convey the full meaning1. In
many instanooo it, might be
termed vulgar. Some of the
parts taken by Ganthony himself
were fairly good, such as one
would see in a fourth-rate theatre, but in no instance was
talent displayed either on the
part of himself or the other
members of his company. Perhaps Ganthony is one of the "has
beens," and, if so, the sooner he
gives up acting the better it will
be for his reputation. The only
redeeming feature of the show
was in its length, it being very
short. Miss Stanmore, entertainer, of the Court Theatre,
London(?),Miss Fairfax, pianiste
)f the Paris Conservatory of
Music (?), and Miss Manners, one
of London's favorite vocalists(?),
were decidedly inferior to local
Penticton talent. Fred Hewitt,
the famous banjo player(?), for
a cause that might be explained,
did not appear at all.
Wo feel that we owe our readers an apology for publishing
press clippings complimentary to
the Ganthony company, but we
did so in the belief that no self-
respecting journal would compliment a thing that was so totally
devoid of merit.
The people of Penticton have
always patronized entertainments well, and upon this occasion turned out in full force.
They are to be complimented upon the fact that there was very
little applause during the proceedings. If a company of this
description should ever again appear before a Penticton audience,
we suggest that they be promptly hissed from the stage. The
Cosgrove theatrical agents, who
are responsible for the tour of
this company, must be given to
understand that no such shows
will be tolerated in Penticton in
future.
A few persons who occupied
seats in the rear of the, hall expressed the opinion that the entertainment was a good one.
This we take as an  indication,
Dr. R. B. White returned from
Vernon on Wednesday.
J. P. McCuddy, of Fairview.
was in Penticton on Thursday.
C. A. Jackson, dentist, will return from Vancouver in a few
days.
Dr. Robertson, of Peachland,
visited Penticton on Wednesday
evening.
W. D. Lancaster is building an
addition to his house on Fairview
Ave. East.
Constable J. Tooth left on
Tuesday for a couple of weeks'
holidays at the coast cities.
Henry Main and family have
moved from Ellis Street to H.W.
Tapley's house on the meadow.
Over sixty names have already
been obtained as members of the
Penticton Civilian Rifle Association.
Mr. and Mrs. (Rev.) Jas. Hood
spent the past week in Penticton,
guests of Mr. and Mrs. D. A.
Stuart.
Mrs. J. D. McDonald, accompanied by her husband, left on
Thursday for the Vancouver
hospital.
Miss Hancock, guest of Miss
Ley, returned on Wednesday
evening after a short absence at
Kelowna.
Rev. R. J. Mclntyre, of Summerland, will preach in the Methodist Church, Penticton, on Sunday evening.
Denniston Bros, have erected
a hothouse and will grow tomato,
cabbage and other plants to supply the local market.
Const. E. C. Simmons and
family, and Mrs. Baker arrived
on Wednesday evening from
Vernon for a short visit in Penticton.
The Young Peoples' Christian
Union will give an At Home in
the Methodist Church on Tuesday
evening. All, especially the
young people, are invited to
attend.
We understand that the Quadrille Club dance last Friday had
such an attraction for some
people at the Falls, that they put
the hind wheels of their buggy
in front so as to make time getting to it.
F. H. Latimer, C. E., inspected
the work at the Ellis Creek reservoir this week. He reports work
progressing favorably. About
twenty men are engaged, and the
reservoir should be completed in
about a month.
Mrs. Anna L. Gillespie, National Superintendent of Lyceums
for the United States, will deliver her popular lecture, "A
Modern Miracle," in Empire
Hall, Summerland, on Tuesday
evening, March 10. All are cordially invited.    Admission free.
The Amateur Dramatic Club
will give a play in Steward's
Hall on the evening of the 17th
inst., St. Patrick's Day. The
play, entitled "Our Boys," by
H. J. Byron, is in three acts,
and when first put on in London,
Eng., ran for 1,500 consecutive
nights.
The Penticton Quadrille Club
gave another dance on Friday
evening of last week. About
thirty-five couples were present,
a number being from the Falls
and Fairview. Music was furnished by local talent and an enjoyable time was spent. The
committee wish to thank the
ladies who so kindly provided the
refreshments. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. MARCH 7, 1908.
THE PENTICTON PRESS
ISSUED    EVERY    SATURDAY   AT
PENTICTON, B.C. BY
W. J. CLEMENT.
Subscription $1.00 Per Year in
Advance.
ADVERTISING RATES ON
APPLICATION.
The Cost of Living.
A detailed investigation conducted by the Civil Service Association at Ottawa, into the local cost of necessities for the
past ten years showed the cost
of living to have advanced 34 per
cent duri g that period. In Brit-
i ih Columbia prices have steadily increased for a number of
years. Wages have risen, but
the worker has found Limself
little better off. owing to the
simultaneous advance in living
expenses. Development work-
throughout the province has, in
consequence, been seriously retarded.
Some are of opinion that the
introduction of cheap labor is the
solution of the question, but such
a view is purely superficial; for,
while cheap labor would undoubtedly result in the masters of enterprises making more money, it
would not get at the root of the
question. Last year British Columbia imported four million dollars worth of foodstuits, most of
which the province is capable of
producing within its own borders. Not only does the province lose the sum Sv>nt out, but
the distance the goods have to
be hauled and the high freight
rates brings their cost to the
consumer very high. British
Columbia requires more railways
and reduced freight rates, but
most of all more home production
of the necessities of life. Nc jss
attention should be paid to the
production of tl ���'��� forests, mines
and fisheries of the province, but
much more attention should be
paid to the settlement and cultivation of our fertile valleys,
for only by this means can the
cost of living be reduced to anything like a normal condition.
In the year 1906 the imports
of the Dominion exceeded the
ex lorts by nearly thirty - four
million dollars. The imports have
exceeded the exports for the
past forty years, with the exception of the years from 1394 to
1902 inclusive, arid yet we call
Cxnada a produtmg country.
This preponderance of imnorts
over the exports \ij> increased
at an alarming rate since 1992;
.so, as far as trade is concerned,
the country is becoming at least
commercially poorer.
Of course Canada, from its
climatic conditions, must always
continue a large importer of
tropical fruits ai.d other articles
produced only in southern countries, but as to such articles as
butter, cheese, fruits, fresh and
preserved, which can be produced at home, hues, poultry,
ham, bacon, and beef, the case
is very different . A duty should
be levied upon those, and hundreds of similar goods, that
would make their importation
impossible. By th';; means home
industry would i e fostered and
Canada would beeom" an exporting rather than an importing
country. As long as a dollar remains in the country its purchasing power is unlimited. Once
it has gone, and the article it
purchased consumed, it might as
well have passed out of existence
as far as this country is con-
C3rned.
We are convinced, therefore,
that, if more of our necessities
were produced at horns, it would
have a material influence upon
the cost of living. Even if for a
time higher prices were paid for
certain articles, the country
would indirectly benefit by the
money remaining at home.
made a corrupt practice under
the new Election Act which is
now before the Legislature. Several years ago, when an attempt
was made to unseat Dr. Rutledge.
the member-elect for East Middlesex, the Court held that on
account of Dr. Rutledge having
been in the habit of treating, his
continuation of the habit after
he became a candidate did not
1 constitute an offence. Sub-section 3 of section 169 of the new
act is as follows: 'It shall not be
a sufficient answer to a charge
of a corrupt practice under this
section that the person charged
has been in the habit of treating.'"
Treating during election campaigns has, heretofore, rendered
it next to impossible for candidates who did not follow the custom to get elected; and this fact
holds good to probably a greater
extent in British Columbia than
in any of the other provinces of
the Dominion. No doubt many
an M. P. P. or prospective M. P.
P. of Ontario will welcome a law
that makes it a corrupt practice
to treat during campaigns, for
many a man seeking election is
averse to the habit, and only acquiesces in it from force of circumstances. The new law will
be we,3omed by the electorate,
for, hereafter, the merits of the
candidate, or the merits of the
party he .'epresents will alone
determine the election.
A similar law on the British
Columbia statute books would be
a boon to this province for in
past elections the throwing of
money over the bar has cut altogether too large a figure in the
choosing of our law-makers.
WANTED
A White Laundry
���AT���
Penticton.
Additional Locals
Horace Lister, son of Jos. Lister, was taken to Vernon hospital by his father last Saturday.
The boy had fallen on the ice
while skating a couple of weeks
ago and had injured his leg
Blood poison had set in and the
case became very critical. He is,
fortunately, now recovering.
A citizens' ball was held in
! Steward's hall on Wednesday
evening. The attendance was
scarcely as large as at the ball of
two weeks ago, but was quite
equal to it from any other view
point. Messrs. Huycke, Weeks
and Wallace provided the music,
which was even better than that
which they gave at the previous
dance. Another dance will be
held in about two weeks from
Frir't'.y.
Treating and   Elections.
The Toronto Mail  and Em.] ire
says: " 'Treating' of any kind is
Weather Report
Compiled   by   the    Dominion
Government   Meterological   Observer at Penticton for February,
1908 :
Date Max. Temp.       Min. Temp.
-J
6
19J
25
31
18]
22
24}
26
27
26
19}
27
27
2y
30}
20
28
18
18
19
23
28
29}
32
26}
28
32
32
1	
2	
3	
4	
5	
6	
7	
8	
....23 .
....25 .
....26}.
....28}.
....46*.
.39
.... 87 .
38 .
10	
11	
12	
13	
14	
15	
....36 .
45 .
....46 .
41 .
42 .
16	
17	
18	
19	
20	
21	
22	
23	
24	
25	
26	
27	
28	
29	
... 39 .
....46 .
....40 .
....45 ..
....41 .
....43 .
....44 .
....38 .
....43 .
....46 ,.
....44 ..
4) .
February
3 '	
Rain    Sn
10	
18	
25. ...
15
26	
. .07
27	
28	
. .06
FOR SALE
Two heavy double sets of harness and
one single set.
31-4 J. PARTRIDGE.
Subscribe for
The Penticton Press
SAVE
WRITING
LETTERS
To distant friends by sending them
The Penticton Press
A subscription only costs
ONE   DOLLAR   PER   YEAR
And the paper makes a specialty of furnishing information
Of Interest to
Outsiders.
The Press has been largely instrumental
in bringing many settlers to Penticton;  so
If you want your friends to come
here send them the paper.
Now is also a good time for you to subscribe
or to renew your old subscription.
It Pays to Advertise
In a paper that is widely circulated. The
Penticton Press is read by practically everybody in the district;    consequently good
Results are Assured
To advertisers who use its columns. The
merchant who gives most attention to his
advertising is the one who will eventually
do the leading business.
This is the season to lay in a stock  of
JOB   PRINTING
For the coming year.
The Penticton Press
Constantly carries a large stock of Stationery to choose from, and is
Up to-Date En All Its Work.
We guarantee satisfaction
or no pay. Prices moderate.
'enticton Store
Established 40 Years.
Alfred H. Wade, Prop.
Dry Goods, Gent's Furnishings, Boots and Shoes, Groceries
and General Merchandize of all Sorts
Aov>��t fnr      GIANT POWDER CO.
/A��CIll IUI       OKANAGAN FLOUR MILLS CO.
Goods delivered through the town. Prompt attention to orders.
PENTICTON,
B.C.
BEST
$5
WATCH
ON
EARTH
A GUARANTEED WATCH that will go and
keep time.
HARRIS, The Jeweler
PENTICTON FURNITURE lX,
STORE r\
PEOPLE WHO ARE
HARD TO PLEASE
With ordinary stocks of
WALL PAPER find their
vexations vanish in the
presence of our magnificent display.
Newest designs and
colourings here���and you
can' duplicate them elsewhere. Prices the lowest.
^mzvm^c&^s:
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HORTICULTURAL SUPPLIES
E. J. CLAYTON and C. M. JOHNSTON will shortly
open up a store on Main Street as Nurserymen,
Seedsmen and Florists.
SPECIALTIES
Farm and Garden Seeds, Bulbs, Cut Flowers,
and Horticultural Sundries.
Sole Agents in
DANIELS BROS.-Seedsmen to H. M. King  Edward VII.���Norwich, England.
t
I
h B. C. for RICHARD SANKEY & SON,  Royal Potteries,    i
J Nottingham. m
\*f^m*tf*m*.tt ��^�� tt ^m* t*t ��^�� ��^< ��^. tt -^ t*t
Now is the time to place your order with the
OKANAGAN NURSERY COMPANY
For Fruit Trees for Fall Planting.
We guarantee trees to grow if planted in the fall, or will replace any
that miss free of charge.     Come early and avoid the rush.     Send or
call for prices.   Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
OKANAGAN NURSERY CO.
LIMITED.
Capital Stock $50,000
Penticton, British Golumbia.
R. H. ROBERTSON, President
THOS. TODHUNTER, Vice-Pres. E. CURTIS, Manager.
F. E. JONES, Sec-Treas.
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
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*i,J^,^,^,^,^S^'^'^'A^'^'^'^'fi-~'*>'M>'+?.'A?.'*!.'^.'M?.'Jfc'^.r/V.,A!.,��X>
rff mrrxzrzrcr^���������:,-:.
LAYTON'S
THE MAIN STREET GROCERY
SATURDAY SPECIALS :
3 lbs. Best Tea $1-00     3 lbs. Cocoa $1.00
3 lbs. Best Coffee $1.00     1 box No. 1 Apples $2.00
NO OLD STOCK.
OUR WATCHWORD :   " Highest quality at the lowest price possible."
LAYTON'S
WHERE   YOU   CiET THE   ItICi   #��   WORTH.
HOUSES TO LET
Several Acre Lots-planted
MONEY TO LOAN
M. C KENDALL
Real Estate agent, Notary Public and Conveyancer
ATFNT   FAD PHOSNIX of London;  LIVERPOOL & LONDON & GLOBE; and ATLAS
nULIl I    I Ull Fire lnsu,!ini''e Companies. THE PENTICTON PRESS, PENTICTON, B.C. MARCH 7, 1908.
Dr.CA.JACKSON
DENTIST
S. O. Land Company's   Block
PENTICTON, B. C.
CHAS. WERE
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PENTICTON, B. C.
R. B. KERR,
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Notary Public.
KELOWNA, - - B. C.
W. H. T. GAHAN,
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S. 0. Land Co. lilock,
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'Phone 17.
PRUIT,   CONFECTIONERY,
Full Line of
ENGLISH  CIGARETTES  AND  TOBACCOS
C.  E.   POMEROY
Geo. E. Winkler,
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Westbank Town & Fruit Lots
Artistic Hair Gut
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-AT-
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Kierstead & Steele
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ALL KINDS OF JOB WORK
IN OUR LINE.
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NURSERY COT.
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FOR SALE
. , rT>tt,��ttt + tttttt + t(   f"M4+* + 4-f-f-M ������>���-������-���*������ *���
I The Hound of the j
X t
i Baskervilles ���
Another Adventure of Sherlock Holmes
BY A. CONAN DOYLE.
X Author of "The Green Flag" and "The Great Boer War" t
f ���
��� C wrlght (lflfl.) by A. Conan Doyle. 4
"Ha, you Bee it now. My eyes havo
6.000 feet rouph lumber, seasoned.    Apply
T. E. IIALL.
32-4 P.O Box 209, Penticton.
been trained to examine fares and not
their trimmings, it is the first quality
"f a criminal investigator tbat ho
should see through a disguise."
"Tl'it this is marvellous. It might be
his portrait."
"Yes. It is an Interesting Instance of
a throwback, wh'rh appenrs to he both
physical and spiritual. A study of family portraits is mniiRh to convert a
man to the doctrine of reincarnation.
The fellow is a Baskerville���that Is
evident."
"With designs upon the succession."
"Exactly. This chance of Ihe picture
has supplied ns with one of our most
bvious missing 1 Inks.  We have him,
'a boi, we have him, and I dare
iwear that before to-morrow nlgrht he
will be fluttering in our net as helpless
is one of his own butterflies. A pin, a
^ork. and a card, and we add him to
be Biker Street collection!" He burst
lto one of hi- rare fits of laughter as
e  turned   awa>-  from  the  picture.  1
ave not hea-d him laugh often, and It
:as always boded III to somebody.
I was up betimes in the morning, but
loir es  was  afoot,  earlier  still, for  I
aw him as I dressed coming up the
Iriv".
"Yes, we shnnld have a full day to-
lay," be remarked, and he rubbed bis
:'andT  with  the  ;oy  of action.    "The
��ts a*e all in pl"ne, and the drag Is
.'--.) (n 1,,....,   - _^i know before the
day is out whetfie"~e nave caught o\u
big, loan-jawed piite, or whether he has
,'Tot through the meshes."
"Have you been on the moor already?"
"1 have sent a ,eport from Grlmpen
to Piincetown as to the death of Selden. I think I can promise that none
cf you will be troubled In the matter.
And I have also communicated with
my faithful Cartwright, who would
certainly have piaed away at the door
of my but. as a clog does at bis master's grave, if I had not set his mind
at rc.--t about my safety."
"What is the next move?"
"To see Sir Henry. Ah, here he Is!"
"Good morning. ITclmes." said the
baronet. "You loo-; like a general who
i�� planning a battle with his chief of
the =taff."
"That is the exact situation. Watson
was asking for orders."
"And so do I."
"Very good. Yon are engaged, as I
understand, to dine with our friends
the Stapletons to-night "
"I hope that you will come also.
They are very hospitable people, and I
am sure that they would be very glad
to see you."
"I fear that Watson and I must go
to I ondon "
"To London?"
"Yes, I think that we should be
more useful there at the present Juncture."
The baronet's face perceptibly
lengthened.
"1 hoped trat yen were going to see
me through this ��.ir--i-��=s. The Hall
and the moor at' no! very pleasant
place? when one 's alone."
"My dear follow, you must trust me
!mpM"iti'- and 'Jo exacly what I tell
you. You can tell your friend? that we
happy to have come
urgent business re-
town. We bone very
soon to return to Devonshire. Will you
remember to giv: then  that message?"
"If you insist   von it."
"There is no alternative, I assure
you."
I saw by the ba-onet's clouded brow
that he was dee; ly hurt by what he
regarded as our desertion.
"When do you desire to go?" he asked, coldly.
"Immediately after breakfast. We
will drive in tn !oombe Traeey, but
Watson Will len'.-> his things as a
pledge that, he *.v'" 1 cone back to yon.
Watson, you will send a note to
Ftapleton to tell hi-n that you regret
that you cannot rnc."
"I have a seed mind to go to London with yon" s'itl the baronet. "Why
should I slav heie alone?"
"Because it is J iur post of duty. Be
cause you gave me your word that you
would do as you were told, and I tell
you tn slay."
"All right, then. I'll Btay."
"One ii ore dire tion! I wish you to
drive to Merripit House. Rend back
your trap, however, and let them know
thai you Intend to walk home."
"To walk across the moor?"
"Yes."
"Kill thai Is the very thing which
you have so often cautioned me not
to do."
"This time you may do It with safety. It 1 had not every confidence In
your nerve and courage I would not
suggest it. but It is essential that you
should do it."
"Then I will do It."
"And as you value your life do not
go across the moor In any direction
save along Ihe sliaight path which
lends from Merripit House to the
Grlmpen Road, and is your natural
way home."
"I will do Just what you say."
"Very good. I s ould be glad to get
away as soon after breakfast as possible, so rs to reach London in thu
afternoon."
I was much aitounded by this program, though I remembered that
Holmes had said to Stapieton on the
night before that his visit would terminate next day. It. had not crossed
my mind, however, that he would wish
me to go with him, nor could I understand how we cou'd both be absent at
a moment which he himself declared
to be critical. There was nothing for
it, however, but implicit obedience; so
we bade good-bye to our rueful friend,
and a couple of hours afterwards we
were at the station of Coombe Traeey
and had dispatched the trap upon lis
return journey. A small boy was waiting upon the platform.
"Any orders, sir?"
"You will take this train to town,
Cartwright. The moment you arrive
you will send a wire to Sir Henry Bas-
should have hern
with you. but thai
quired us to be I"
Kerviue, in my na ne, to say that II h<
finds  the   pocket-liook   which   I   havr
dropped he Is to send it by registered
pns-  to  Baker  Street."
"Yes, sir."
"And ask at the station office if
there is a message for me."
The boy returned with a telegram.
which Holmes handed to me. It ran:
"Wire received. Coming down with un
signed warrant. Arrive five-forty.���
Lestrade."
"That Is In answer to mine of thlf
morning. He Is the b��st of the pre
fesslnnals, I think, and we may need
his assistance. Now. Watson, I think
that we cannot employ our time bet
ter than by calling upon your acquaintance. Mrs. Laura Lyons."
Hh plan of campaign was begin
ring to be evident. He would use the
baronet In order to convince the Sta
pletnns lhat we WPre really gone
while we should actually return at the
lnrtnnt when we were likely to b<
needed. Tbat telegram from London,
If mentioned by Sir Henry to the Sta
pistons, must remove the last sus
picions from their minds. Already 1
seemed to see our nets drawing close-
round  that  lean-ttwed  pike.
Mrs. I aura Lyons was In her office
and Sherlock Holmes opened his interview with a frankness nnd direct
ness which considerably amazed her.
"I am investigating the circumstances w��<ic'> attended the dmth of the
late Sir Charles Baskerville." said he.
"My friend here. Dr. Watson, has In
frrrned me of what you have communicated, and also of what you have withheld in connection with that matter."
"What have I withheld?" she asked,
defiantly.
"Yen have confessed that you asked
Sir Charles to be at the gate at   ten
e'c!nck.  We  know  that  that  was the
place and hour of his death. You havi
w'thheld   what   the  connection  is  between theip events."
"There Is no connection."
"Tn fhst ease the coincidence must
Indeed be an extraordinary one. But 1
think that we shall succeed in establishing a connection after all. I wish
to  he perfectly  frank with you, Mrs
loons. We regard this case as one of
n urder, and  the evidence may Implicate not only your  friend Mr. Staple-
ton, but bis wife as well."
The lady sprang from her chair.
"His wife!" she cried.
"The fact is no longer a secret. The
person who has passed for his sister
is really his wife."
Mrs. Lyons bad resumed her seat.
Her hands were grasping the arms of
her chair, and I saw that the pink nails
had turned white with the pressure of
her grip.
"His wife!" Bhe said, again. "His
wife! He Is not a married man."
Sherlock Holmes shrugged his shoulders.
"Prove It to  me!   Prove it to me!
And If you can do so !" The fierce
flash of her eyes said more than any
words.
"I have come prepared to do so,"
said Holmes, drawing several papers
from his pocket. "Here is a photograph
of the couple taken in York four years
ago. It Is Indorsed 'Mr. and Mrs. Van-
deleur,' but you will have no difficulty
in recognizing him and her also, if you
know her by sight. Here are three
written descriptions by trustworthy
witnesses of Mr. and Mrs. Vandeleur,
who at that time kept St. Oliver's private school. Read them, and see If you
enn doubt the Identity of these people."
She glanced at them, and then looked up at us with the set, rigid face of
n desperate woman.
"Mr. Holmes," she said, "this man
had offered rre marriage on condition
that I could get a divorce from my
husband. He has lied to me, the villain,
In every conceivable way. Not. one
word of truth has he ever told me. And
why���why? I imagined that all was for
my own sake. But now I see that, I was
never anything but a tool in his hands.
Why should I preserve faith with him
who never kept any with me? Why
should I try to shield him from the
consequences of his own wicked acts?
Ask me what yon like and there ts
rnthlng which I shall hold back. One
thing I swear to you, and that is, that
when I wrote the letter I never dreamed of any harm to the old gentleman,
who had been my kindest friend."
"I entirely believe you, madam."
said Sherlock Holmes. "Tho recital of
these even's it list be very painful tn
you, and perhaps It will make It easier
If I tell you what occurred, and you
can check me If I make any material
mistake. The sending of this letter
was sugre'ed to -ou by Stapieton?"
"He dictated It."
"1 presume that the reason he gave
was that you wou!i receive help rrom
Sir Charles for the leg'l expenses connected with youi divorce?"
"Rxactly."
"And then after you had sent the letter he dissuaded you from keeping the
appoint:) ent?"
"tie told pte that It would hurt his
self-respect that any other man should
find Ibe money for snch an object, and
that though he was a poor man himself he would devote his last penny to'
removing tne obstacles which divided
us "
"He appears to he a very consistent
character. And th' ��� you heard nothing
until you read the reports of the death
In the paper?"
"No."
"And he made you swear to say
nothing about your appointment with
Sir Charles?"
"He did. He said that the death was
a very mysterious one, and that I
should certainly be suspected If the
facts came out. He frightened me Into
remaining silent."
"Quite so.  But you had your    suspicions?"
She hesitated and .looked down.
"I knew him," she said. "But If he
had kept faith with me I should always
have done so with him."
"l tninK tnat on ine wnoie yon nave
had a fortunate escape," said Sherloc':
Holmes. "You hue had him in your
power and he knew it, and yet you are
alive. You have been walking for some
months very near to Lie edge of a
precipice. We must wish you good
morning now', Mrs. Lyons, and it is
probable that you will very shortly
hear from us again."
"Our case becomes rounded off, and
difficulty after difficulty thl"s away in
front of us," said Holmes, as we stood
waiting for the a:ival of the express
"rom town "I shall soon be in the position of being able to put into a single
onnected DPrrpttve o'p of the rrto~'
singular and sensational crimes of mo-
'ern times. Stu-lents of erimiaolog:
vil! remember the analogous incidents
in Godno, in I it tie Russia, In the yea:
'fjfi, and of course 'here are the Antler
son murders In North Carolina, bn
this case pesesses some features
which are entirely Its own. Even now
we have no clear case 'ftgainst this
very wily man. But 1 shall he
much surprised if it is not
enough before we go to bed
night."
The London express ca-"e roaring
Into the station, and a small, wiry hull-
dog of a man had sprung from a first-
class carriage. We all three shook'
hands, and I saw at once from the
reverential way in which l.eslrade
gazed al my companion that he had
learned a good deal since Ihe days
when they had fust worked together. I
could well remember the scorn which
the theories of the reasoner used then
to excite In the practical man.
"Anything good:     he asked.
(To be continued.)
very
clear
this
THE ELLIS ST. STORE.
'PHONE 25.
HAY and FEED
WHEAT (not frozen)    -    2c. per pound, delivered.
BRAN    -       100 lb. sack,  $1.60 per sack       "
SHORTS    -   90 lb. sack,    1.60
B. & O. CHOP, 100 lb. sack, 1.85
BALED HAY (1st class) $24.00 per ton delivered.
W. R. KING & CO.
'PHONE 25.
THE ELLIS ST. STORE.
Canadian   Forestry Association.
The Canadian Forestry Association is a national body having
for its general object the promotion of Forestry in Canada. It
now numbers about 1200 members, all the provinces and districts of the Dominion, as well
as Newfoundland, the United
States, Great Britain and several
European countries being represented.
The association holds meetings
annually in March, when topics
bearing on the application of
forestry under Canadian conditions are discussed. The most
ambitious effort of the association so far has been the holding
in January, 1906, of a large and
representative Forestry Convention at Ottawa.
Annual meetings of the society
have also been held in Toronto
and Quebec, and on the 12th and
13th of next month (March, 1908)
the annual meeting will convene
in Montreal.
Provincial forestry conventions
held within the past couple of
years in Vancouver, B. C, Fred-
ericton, N. B., and Yarmouth,
N. S., have also owed much to
the example and encouragement
of the parent association.
The association is but eight
years old, having been organized
in March, 1900, but has been remarkably successful, especially
in securing the co-operation of
Canadian lumbermen, several of
whom have held the presidency
of the association. Mr. E. Stewart, late Superintendent of Forestry for the Dominion, is the
founder of the association. The
objects of the Association, as set
forth in its constitution, include
the advocating of judicious methods of dealing with Canada's
forests and woodlands, the awakening of public interest in the
consequences of reckless deforestation, the exploration of
the public domain and its division
into agricultural and non-agricultural land with the view of having the latter set aside for permanent forest reserves, the encouragement of tree-planting and
the spread of information on
forests and forestry.
To aid the last-named object,
the association has established
the' 'Canadian Forestry Journal,''
which is issued quarterly and
sent to all members of the association.
The president of the association
for the current year is Mr. H. M. j
Price, Quebec, P. Q. Among j
the ex- presidents are such well-
known public and business men
as Sir Henry Joly de Lotbiniere,
late Lieut.-Governor of British
Columbia; Messrs. Wm, Little,
of Montreal; Hiram Robinson, of
Ottawa; Aubrey White, Deputy-
Minister of Forests, Toronto; E.
G. Joly de Lotbiniere, of Quebec;
and E. Stewart, late Superintendent of Forestry for the Dominion, now of Montreal. The secretary is Mr. R. H. Campbell,
Superintendent of Forestry, Ottawa.
SHM��   HARDWARE
Saws, Axes, Wedges, Striking Hammers, Table and
Pocket Cutlery.
PENTICTON HARDWARE CO.
Buggies
Light Wagons
Extension-Disc &
Spring=Tooth
Harrows
-AT-
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ELLIS STREET.
NORTH VANCOUVER
The Ambitious City,
With 36 miles of Water Frontage
And the best Harbor on the
Pacific Coast. Offers the best
opportunities for
Business or Investment.
A large list of Properties for
sale or exchange.
Call and see us, or write to
MARTINSON & CO.
Lonsdale Avenue,
North Vancouver.
STAGES
Stage leaves for KeremeoB and Hedley at 7 a. m.
on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Returns
on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Stage leaves for Frinceton every Tuesday at
7 a. ni.
Stage leaves for Fairview and Orovill. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a. m. Returns on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at
II l). m.
POST OFFICE.
Hours 9 a. ni. to fi. p, m.
Registered Letter and Money Order wicket
closes 5 p. m.
Wicket opened for half an hour after mail is
distributed.
Arrivals-Per Str. Okanagan: Daily except
Sunday 6 p. m.; Per stage from Hedley, Keremeos. Olalla, Green Mountain, Oroviile, Fairview,
and White Lake: Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 6 p. m,
CInsing-For boat and Btages: 9 p. m. daily except Saturday. Fur Monday's boat and stages:
S.45 p. m. Sundays.
WM.   HAUG,
Wholesale and Retail
MASONS'   SUPPLIES . .
PORTLAND CEMENT, HARD WALL
PLASTER, COAST  LIME
and COAST LATH
Orders by mail promptly attended
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BOX 166   -   KELOWNA, B. C.
Pacific Coast Grown
Seeds, Trees,
For the Farm, Garden, Lawn, or
Conservatory.
Reliable, approved  varieties,   at
reasonable prices.
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Catalogue Free.
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ORBBNHOU5B8-A0I0 Westminster ltd
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C. P. R. TIME TABLE
SHUSWAP & OKANAGAN BRANCH
Daily both ways except Sunday.
SOUTH BOUND   STATION    NORTH BOUND
7.30 a. m Sicamous  6.00 p.m.
6.27   j]     Enderby  4.48   "
S.B2   "    Armstrong  4.08   "
R.30   "   ....ar  Vernon lv.... 3.30   "
9.30    '   ...lv Vernon ar 2.30   "
9.4fi   "   ....ar...Ok. Landing ...Iv 2.15   "
10.00 p. m....lv... Ok. Landing, .ar... ,11.00 a.m.
11.10   "     Kelowna  8.20   "
3.00   "    Peachland  7.26   "
4.45   "    Summerland  6.80   "
6.00   "    Penticton  6.00   "
HOW ABOUT THOSE
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Trees,
Seeds, Bulbs, Roses,
Shrubs, Etc,
You are going to plant this
spring ? The best is what you
want. I have them at right
prices.   Send for catalogue.
DAVID  GELLATLY,
GELLATLY,      -       -      B. C.
q
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Cm
W
WH
*g
%Z
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3
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Lake View Poultry Yards
FRESH EGGS FOR SALE
w
o
ft
03
3
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PURE BRED WHITE ��
LEGHORNS    I
  a-
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$1.00 to $1.50 per setting. |
I. KENT, Propr.     i
THE PENTICTON
DAIRY
Daily delivery of Fresh Milk to
all parte of the Town.
MILK 10c. PER QUART.
H. M. McNeill,     .    Prop.
JUST ARRIVED --
CAR LOAD OF
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The very latest up - to - date
tools for Orchard Cultivation.
Descriptive matter sent on
application to
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KELOWNA       -      -
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NURSERIES
RATHVON & CARLESS
CONTRACTORS
AND
BUILDERS
Plans,  Specifications  and   Estimates
Furnished for all Kinds of Work.
L. A. RATHVON,
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wanted, cooking preferred, camp or elsewhere.
Better than Chinaman. Address No. 11, PRB8S
Oflk'. 33-4
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WANTED
Local agent* for  the Western Canada Fire
Insurance Company, Limited. (Non-Tariff).
Apply to D. H. RICE, General Agent for B. C.
1112 Hastings St.,East,
12-3 Vancouver, B. C.
NOTICE.
Similkameen Land District   District of Osoyoos,
Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that Lydia Droutskoy Fraser.
of Kew Gardens, England, intends to npply for
permission to purchase the following: described
land !���
Commencing at a post planted about 2 miles
in an o&Sterly direction from A. Ford's P. R. No.
3260, thence south 40 chains: thence east 20
chains : thence north 40 chains ; thence weat 20
chains to point, of commencement, and containing
80 acres, more or less.
LYDIA DROUTSKOY FRASER.
Bv ler agent John Robert Fraser, Captain.
Dated March 7th. 1903, 84-8t THE PENTICTON PRESS", PENTICTON, B. C, MARCH 7, 1908.
German Universities.
The whole of North Germany
is full of universities some of
which are among the most
learned in Europe. In no country in Europe, not even in England, are there so many means
of gaining an education and improving one's talents. How is
it then, that the people are wanting in energy, and appear generally heavy and narrow-minded,
though there are among them a
small number of men the most
intellectual in Europe? It is to
the nature of the governments
and not to education that this
strange contrast must be as-
cribed. Iiilellectual education in
Germany is perfect, but everything there is satisfied with theory: practical education is entirely dependent on business; it is
by action alone that the character acquires firmness necessary
to deport itself in the conduct of
life. Governments are the real
instructors of the people, and
public education itself, however
gutid it may be, may form men
of letters, but not citizens, warriors or statesmen.
In Germany, philosophical genius is further advanced than anywhere else; nothing stops its
flight, and the absence of a political career, so fatal to the
masses of the people, gives
greater liberty to thinkers. But
there is an immense distance between minds of the first and
second order, because there is no
self-interest or any object of activity to spur on men not possessed of intelligence of the highest order. lie who in Germany
is not occupied with the universe
has in reality nothing to do.
German universities have an
ancient reputation which date.'
from several centuries before
t!ie Reformation. Since thi;
perio:l the Protestant colleger
have been indisputably superior
to the Catholic ones, and all the
literary glory of Germany belongs to these institutions. The
English Universities have in a
marked degree contributed to
diffuse among the English people that knowledge of languages-
ami ancient literature which
gives to orators and statesmen in
England such a liberal and brilliant education. There it is good
form to know something else besides business, when one knows
it well. The German Universities, though founded on principles-
analagous to those of England,
differ from them in many respects. The host of studehts who
moot at Gcttingen, Halle, Heidle-
berg, etc., form almost a free
body in the state, and rich and
poor are only distinguished by
their personal merit. Foreigners who come from every corner
of the globe readily submit to
that equality which superiority
alone can alter.
There    is   independence    ancj
even a military spirit arr.ong the
i, on leaving the
ity, they were able to devote themselves to public affairs,
their education would be very
favorable to promote an energetic
character; but they again fall
into those monotonous habits
which prevail in Germany and
gradually lose that impetus and
resolution which their life in
the university had inspired in
them, and all they have left is
an extensive knowledge.
In each branch of learning
there is competition even among
the professors themselves, and
each one is constantly doing his
utmost to attract to his lectures
as many students as possible.
Those who are destined for any
particular career, as medicine,
law, etc., are naturally prompted
to become informed on other
subjects; and hence it is that educated men in Germany have a
very extensive knowledge on all
kinds of subjects. The universities have property and a juris-
diction peculiarly their own; and
it is a grand idea to have those
s '.its of learning free. ��� From
the French of Madame de Stael,
A. D. 1812.
The Souther
anapran Land
students; 0.1^ '
univp*
Company, Limited
Still have a few of those Main Street Lots left.
Martin Street and Eckhardt Avenue Lots going fast.
Now is Your Time to Get io on the Ground Floor,
Choice Fruit Lots on the Bench.
A Limited Quantity left.
PRICES RIGHT.
Enquire of She MANAGING DIRECTORS.
PEACHLAND.
Mr. Lapsley drove to Summer
land on business, last Saturday.
Mr. Burgess, who has been
suffering from an attack of
grippe, has about recovered.
A farewell was given in the
hall, Friday evening to Dr. and
Mrs. Lipsett, who are going to
make their home in Naramata.
A social hour was spent before
the formal part of the evening
was reached. The programme
was as follows:
Selection by the Orchestra.
Speech, Rev. Mr. Ritchie.
Solo, Mrs. Pollard.
Speech, Rev. Mr. Whyte.
Instrumental Duet, Miss Keys.
Chas. Robertson.
Speech, Mr. Vickary.
Speech, Mr. Garraway.
Vocal Duet, Mrs. McKechnie
and Miss Candace McDougaL
Speech, W. A. Lang.
An address to Mrs. Lipsett was
read by Mrs. Douglas, and -signed
on behalf of the Baptist Sunday
School, Methodist Sunday School,
W. C. T. U., and the Women's
Weekly Prayer Meeting Union by
Supt. Keyes, Supt. C. G. Elliott,
Mrs. Ritchie, and Mrs. J. L. Elliott, sr., respectively.
Speech of appVeciation by Mrs.
Lipsett.
Recitation, Mrs. Thompson
Elliott.
P'Jlo; Mrs. Jas. Elliott.
C. G. Elliott our ever efficient
chairman then told the Dr. that
it was his turn to speak for himself, which he did. Being one of
Peachland's pioneers, he told of
how there came to be a Peachland, of its early days and so on;
then how much he and Mrs. L.
appreciated the many kindnesses
shown them always, and that at
some future date they might
make their home here again.
After luncheon Mrs. McKechnie sang a solo; then the programme was brought to a close
by Auld Lang Syne, enthusiastically sung.
Peachlanders wish both Dr.
and Mrs. Lipsett every success.
Mrs. (Rev.) Hood and children
of Summerland spent last week
with Mrs. Hood's mother, Mrs.
Urquhart.
Mr. Wilson, of Winnipeg, is
the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
Burgess.
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Robinson
and a jolly group came up in the
launch Maud Moore on Friday,
and were the guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Town for the day.
Mr. Needham sold his splendid
ten acre orchard this week for
the goodly sum of over $8,000 to
Mr. Aitkens, who is at present
in England. Mr. Needham and
family are moving immediately
into the house in town recently
vacated by D. Whit?.
KELOWNA
Geo* Rowcliffe is erecting a
building on his lot on Bernard
Ave. which he recently purchased from A. Eutin.
Mr. Bailey, postmaster, is having an office built on the north
side of Bernard Ave.
D. Lloyd-Jones and Co. are
having a cottage erected on the
property north of the sawmill.
John Dilworth has rented his
ranch and will soon move to Victoria.
After a short illness, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Will
Blackwood died March 1st.
Mr. and Mrs. Cox entertained
the Methodist Church choir at
their residence last Friday evening in honor of Miss Kerkwood
who is returning to her home in
Winnipeg.
Mr. and Mrs. Curts held a
party at their home on Feb. 28,
the event being Mr. Curts' birthday.
A company under Robt. Ganthony gave a concert, which was
very largely attended, in Ray-
mer's Hall on Feb. 29.
Mr. Trench has opened up a
drug and stationery store.
Rev. A. Henderson came down
from Vernon on Monday.
Mr. Erskin returned from Calgary last Friday.
E. Carruthers, manager of the
Kelowna Land and Orchard Co.,
has returned from Scotland,
where he has been for some
months.
What will no doubt be the feature attraction in Vernon this
season will be the appearance
here of the Minstrel Maids, two
nights, commencing Wednesday
March 4. A bevy of pretty girls
under the Juvenile Bostonian
management. This Company has
been playing to packed houses
all over Canada this season and
has had praise from both press
and public. The Minstrel first
part is a feature in the way of
an entertainment where you will
see Miss Jaque Casad, champion
lady baton swinger of the world,
swinging two batons at the same
time. The second part is a musical comedy entitled Harrigan
Holiday where some new songs
and features are introduced that
are new and novel. A half carload of scenery and electrical effects are carried, the company
numbering 22 people. ��� Vernon
News. This Company will appear in Penticton next Monday,
the 9th inst. Tickets for sale at
the Penticton Furniture Store.
PROCLAMATION
tL.s.;
JAMES IIUNSMUIR,
Lieutenant-Governor.
CANADA.
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.
EOWAKI) THE SEVENTH, by the Urace of God,
of the United Kingdom of Great Britain anil
Ireland, and of the ii, iti.,li Dominions beyond
the Seas Kinu, Defender of the Faith, Emperor
of India.
To all to whom tht-Ho presents shall come,���Greet-
INU.
A PROCLAMATION.
W.J. Bowser. I V'v'ilKKEAS by.Section
Attorney-General. I * ii of the "Game
Protection Act. lH9.i." as re-enacted by Section lit
of the "Game Protection Act. Amendment Act,
1906," it is enacted that it shall be lawful for the
Lieutenant-Governor in Council, by Proclamation
lo be published in two successive issues of the
British Columbia Gazette, to declare a close season for tfeese in any part of die Province for any
period of time ;   and
Whereas Our said Lieutenant-Governor, by and
with the advice of his Executive Council, has been
pleased to direct, by an Order in Council in that
behalf, a close -eason for geese within the County
of Kootenay, until and including the 31st day of
AoKost, one thousand nine hundred and eight.
Now Know YE therefore, that in pursuance
thereof, we do hereby proclaim a close season for
Geese within the County of Kootonuy, until,  and
including the 81st duy of August, one thousand
nine hundred and eight.
In Testimony Whereof, We have caused these
Oni i.ett-irs to be made Patent and the Gieat
Seal of the said Province to be hereunto affixed :
Witness. His Honour James Dunsmuir, Lieu-
tet.aiit-G-ver ooi- of  Our   said   Province   of
British Columbia, in Our City of Victoria, in
Our said Province, this loth day of February,
in the year of Our Lord one thousand  nine
hundred and eight, and in the eighth year of
Our Keign.
By Command.
HENRY ESRON YOUNG,
Provincial Secretary.
NOTICE
Similkanipen Land District.   District of Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that Sydney W. Brown of
Oroviile, Was})., U. S. A., railway conductor, intends to apply for permission to purchase the
following described land".: ���
Cunnnoncintf at a post planted at tho north-east
corner of lot 41 Gp 1, thonce north about 40 chains
\c Indian Reserve line; thence west to Osoyoos
Lake; thence, fol!.>wintf the Osoyoos Lake shore,
to the N. W. corner of lot 41; thence :doriK the
north tine of lot 41 to point of commenccement.
SYDNEY W. BIIOWN.
Dated Feb'y.'lrd, 190S.
NOTICE
Similkameen Lund District. District
ol' Yale.
TAKE NOTICE that Mrs. M. E.
Brown, of Fairview, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following
described land :
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of the Indian Reserve
in TP 50, thence north 80 chains; thence
west W) chains; thence south 2(1 chains;
thence east 40 chains; thence south 40
chains; thence west 40 chains; thence
south 20 chains;  thence east   00  chains
to the  point of commencement,   and
containing 820 acres, more or less.
M. E. BROWN
By her agent, C. de II. Green.
Datetl 21st January, 1008.
NOTICE
Leamington Mineral Claim.   Situate in
the Osoyoos Mining Division of  Yale
District.      Where     located ��� Armstrong's, Similkameem.
TAKE NOTICE that 1, R. H. Parkin-
son, agent for C. A. C.  Steward,   Free
Miner's Certificate No. 5,806,  and  W.
E. Welby, Free Miner's Certificate No.
intend,   sixty   days  from  date,
hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder
for a certificate of  Improvements,   for
the  purpose  of    obtaining  a   Crown
Grant of the above claim.
And further take notice that action,
under section 37, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 3rd day of January, A. D.
1908.       RICHARD H. PARKINSON.
NOTICE
FRUIT TREES-Well-grown stcck.
Large quantity of apple trees for sale,
only few choice varieties grown : also
small stock of ornamental trees. Apply
for varieties and price to Manager,
COLDSTREAM ESTATE CO., Ltd.,
15-tf Vernon, B. C.
w. o. w.
Okanagan Camp No. 261.
Meets every Tuesday in the month at
8 p. m. in Woodmen's Hall, Ellis St.
Visiting Sovereigns always welcome.
JOHN POWER, C. C.
R. WILTON, CLERK
HOTEL.   PENTICTON.
First-Class Accommodation For Tourists or Commercial Men.
RATES $2.50 PER DAY
A. Barnes       - -       Prop.
PENTICTON. B.C.
To The Travelling Public.
If you v.-ant a good stable and
prime feed for your horses,  call
on
LIVERY & FEED STABLE.
S. D. HINE,
FAIRVIEW, B.C.
Galarneau &
McKenzie
BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS
When  you   think   of   Building
Look us up.
ADOLPHUS GALARNEAU  W. A. MCKENZIE
Okanagan Grown
Tomato Seed.
Now is the time to send in your
order. I make a specialty of
growing Tomato Seed.    Have
25 Varieties   .    .    .
Best kinds.   Catalogue free.
D. Gellatly, Gellatly P.O.
SEED POTATOES
NOUOTON REAUTY in clnimcd by Herdsmen
to be tho oarllest and most productive potato
grown. I have about half h ton of them for sale
to those who want seal.
E. W. MUTCH.
;,1-�� Storrybank.
FOR SALE.
Red and Black Currant slips, Cuthbert Raspberry canes, and English Green Gooseberry and
"Red Jacket" slips.      Apply to
JOHN N. GUMMOW,
33-2 Peachland, B. C.
A SNAP
For tho person who has faith in the prrowth of
Penticton. Two (rood corner lots, only a block
from Post Ollice and center of town for $375.00.
Lots No. 1 and 30, block 25. old townsite survey.
ARTHUR K. GRANT,
30-4 Maywood P. O.. B. C.
NOTICE.
Osoyoos Land District.       District of Yale, B. C.
TAKE NOTICE that Robert Thomas Hesel-
wood, rancher, of Kelowna, B. C, intends to apply
for permission to lease the following described
land :-
Commencing' nt a post planted at the N. E.
corner of the N. W. !4 section 16, township 23,
thence south 40 chains ; thence west 40 chains ;
thence south 40 chains ; thence west 40 chains ;
thence north 40 chains ; thence west 20 chains ;
thence north 40 chains ; thence east 100 chains,
to the point of commencement, and containing 640
acres more or less.
ROBERT THOMAS HESELWOOD.
21st January, 1908.
E. J. FINGH
Painter, Paperhanger
and Sign Writer
Picture Framing a Specialty.
WALL PAPER Carried in Stock.
Box 196.       Main St.
C. P. R.
LAND FOR
SALE
Choice fruit lots, improved and
unimproved.
FIRE INSURANCE-The Sun of London, Eng., and Queen.   Why not insure
in the best; they cost no more.
Apply to
J. R. MITCHELL.
General
Blacksmith nig
Woodwork and
Carriage Painting . .
Horseshoeing a Specialty
John Partridge.
PENTICTON
& OROVILLE
STAGE
Via Fairview
Leaves Penticton Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 6:30 a.m., arriving at Oroviile the same day at 6 p. m.
Through Fare - $6.00
W. HINE and S. M. SNOW
FAIRVIEW. B. C.
EATON'S PRICES
Plus the Express
-AT-
II.OLIVER'S
SHOE STORE.
AFTER FEB'Y 10, 1908.
Hair Cutting   -    -    35c.
Shaving     - 25c.
BEN BAKER
HENRY MURK
60   YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights Ac.
Anyone lending a sketch and description may
quickly ascertnln our opinion free whether an
Invention is probably patentable. Communication! ntrlctly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents.
Patent* taken through Munn A Co. reoelTC
tpeclul notice, without charge, In the
Scientific American.
A handsomely .llnatrateil weekly. Largest circulation of niiy scientific Journal. TermB, $3 a
year; four months, $1. Sold byall newsdealers.
MUNN &Co.36,Broad^ New York
Branch OlUct,. 626 F St.. Washington, D. C.

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