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Port Essington Loyalist Nov 7, 1908

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PORT ESSINOTON LOYALIST.
ll
Vol. 1.-
-No. 5.
PORT ESSINOTON, B. C, SA.THMAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1008.
SisBscKii-TioN $3 Per Year
Local N^t/s.
The republican party is once
moro in power in the United States,
with Taft as President.
Monday, Nov. 9th, is the King's
birthday, also Dominion Thanksgiving day. A special, patriotic
and Thanksgiving Service will lie
held in St. John's Church Sunday
evening, 8th inst., at 7 p. in. You
are invited.
The North  Coast Trading  Co.
���-,.,...1.   J      .,.��..   -i...   i\..ttKnJi.uj,f;"-
ment of the world-famed "Stanfield
Underwear,"and it would be as well
for all those people who have not
yet purchased their winter underwear to call in and do so while
they have the chance.
The steamer Transit arrived in
port Thursday morning with 160
men for Foley, Welch A Stewart.
They will be distributed among the
different camps along tlie river.
They appeared to be a fine class of
working men; men with muscle,
and the right kind for building up
this new country of ours.
Tlie recent heavy gales have
completed the wreck of the old
H. B. Co.'s steamer Caledonia,
which was bought by Messrs. Foley,
Welch _ Stewart from H. Munro
and others, who purchased her from
the H. B. Co. The boat is now
stripped of all her upper works and
lies on her beam ends on the bar
on whicli she was stranded.
The rarest and most precious
things in the world are the acts of
unselfish men. Doctor Bennett's
plunge into the Skeena on Saturday from the upper deck of the
Distributor to rescue the unfortunate man who slipped overboard
was not only a gTand display of
rare courage and confidence, but
the nobleness of the human heart.
It is such men that help to keep
our faith in humanity on an encouraging level.
The 6teamer Distributor is, we
Understand, making tbe last trip
of the season, all tbe camps being
Well supplied for the winter. Capt.
Johnson will take the boat to Victoria, where she will be laid up for
the winter. We shall be sorry to
miss Capt. Johnson's face from
amongst us, and we wish him not
only a successful trip to Victoria
after his very successful season
here, but a pleasant rest after the
anxieties of the season's work. We
hope to welcome him again at the
opening of navigation on the Skeena
next spring. We see many new
faces, but this only makes the faces
of the old-timers on the river more
welcome.
On Thursday morning a number
of people standing on the Cunningham wharf were anxiously watching a figure kneeling in the bottom
of a small punt on the waters of
the swiftly-flowing Skeena. As the
frail craft drifted nearer the wharf
it was discovered that the angelic
person was no other than Ed. Tait,
Who, upon being questioned what
he was celebrating, said he was
trying to pull alongside of a sloop
Which was half submerged in the
boiling waters. It is rumored that
Ed, who holds the position of clerk
in the Essington Hotel, bought a
Bloop a few days ago with the intention, so it is said, of competing
in the passenger traffic between the
ports of Spokeshoot mid Prince
Rupert. Ed, my boy, we wish you
every success, but allow ub to give
you a little advice: The next time
you buy si bout, buy one that will
iiou.1, uud kuvu sub'marines alone.
A DISTRESSING CASE.
An exceedingly sad occurrence
took place on the Naas river recently. A white man named Haines
who was married to an Indian
woman, died under circumstances
that were most distressing. Haines'
wife went away to visit her friends,
leaving her husband and a little
son in the cabin. During her absence Haines' boat went adrift and
he swam out on the cold waters of
.0*... ���:-.:��� -*...*. \ .*b.-s-,"... **,.ts vT;i*..a
back. He caught cold, and finding
that he was a very sii k man, conked up a quantity of food and told
his little boy, who was only six
year*, old, that he was going tn
sleep for a long time, and that he
must not be frightened. The lad
was to cover his father's face when
he found he wa6 asleep and not to
disturb him, and as there was lot*
of food he was not to bother him
but to eat when he felt hungrv.
Haines died, and the little boy was
alone in the cabin for four day-1
with his dead father before anyone
visited them.
This is one of the sadveases which
make up the tragedies with which
the history of the development of
the west abounds. There are lonely cabins today along the Mackenzie, Liard and Dease rivers which
contain the bodies of men who have
died alone, away from all human
care aud intercourse. We pity
them as we read of these cases, but
it is only when such an instance
happens in our neighborhood that
their intense sadness conies home
to us.
^PORTING NEWS.
On Saturday, Oct. 24, the Canadian Olympic lacrosse team defeated the' English picked team at
the Olympic sports by 14-10. Geo.
Rennie and Alex. Turnbull, ot New
Westminster, were conspicuous
throughout. The best [of feeling
prevailed, and the players exchanged sticks at the finish, to be retained as souvenirs of the meeting.
Tho Tecumsehs of Toronto are
arranging a tour to Australia to
get into shape early for the Minto
Cup matches with the Royal City
early in May.
The peerless Christy Mathev.-
son, pitcher for the New York Ball
Club, announces his intention to
quit ball and go into insurance after
his eight years in the game.
Longboat, the big Indian distance runner captured the Montreal Star road race this year, in
one minute slower time than hi.
record for the distance.
Art Burn, tho well-known distance runner, who competed in the
Olympic Marathon, was bairfy
beaten at Ottawa in an 8 mile exhibition race, by Hubert Thebo, a
youth who started running only
this summer.
S. Humphreys, 1st officer of the
steamer Princess May, reports
rough weather up north. Above
the Wrangel Narrows the steamer
encountered a terrible storm, tlu
worst experienced for n great many
years. The cold was intense, the
forward deck was one mass of ice,
antl dipt. McLeod had to put in
for shelter during a terrific snow
Utorm, which left nix inches of 811 on
on his ship's deck. Port Essington
weather is bud, but, when all's
said, we have a lot, to be thaiikfii]
for.
CONSTRICT:^.  MP 11 EMS.
The work on A'l.gUB Stewart's two
miles shows thut progress made is
good; all the st "fi ma are taken up,
and work is jjoir'-jj (,n briskly.
The samejrepo ' can lie made of
Dan Stewart's tv ������ miles of work;
the station men . ��� all at work, and
a good showing i    uade.
On Smith fr ' contract the
vyork formerly W��jv.> Eric-son is now
taken npby Tie 'sL,.*vhn is doing
good work. .
John AW, rvhiS has the three
miles troxf Aberdeen Af. has jl at
brought/ about 100 j^alinns, and
things :i/e moving n.pidly. " The
big slny recently nrei! was it great
succe.si Though tho rock "broke
hig,"it was not thrown into the
rivtf or wasted, and can all be used
in forming the guide.
Neil Keith's three-mile contract
is well under way, antl a fine showing is made.
Shady's contract of two miles
also shows the amount of work
done. Every station is now taken
up and work is progressing rapidly.
Perhaps as big a showing as any
has l>een made on the contract held
by Mr. McHugh, where the work
has been steadily going on since
its inception, aud where the grade
is beginning to ihow prominently
along the river side.
It is reported that J. Harstone
has sold out his jhare of the contract awarded to Harstone A Stains
at the Little Canyon, to V. Smith,
paymaster of Foley, Welch A Stewart, Prince Rupert,
There are rumor* of complaints
as to the state of t) ���_��� hospitals provided along the construction line.
We hope there is little or no cause
for these rumors. Above all things,
it is needful to have well-equipped
hospitals within easy access along
the line of construction. Railroad
construction is haiardous work at
the licst, and every care should be
taken to ensure the men engaged in
it, of quick treatment for their injuries and comfortable and sanitary
places where they isan be treated
by the niedicul men employed by
the company. We understand that
each man pays his dollar a month
for medical attendance, and each
man has therefore a right to expect
not only skilful medical care���
that, we believe, they do get���but
that that medical treatment be
given them in properly-equipped
hospitals. A workman cannot
work without his tools, be he either
doctor or carpenter, and a patient
stands a poor chance in an ill-
equipped hospital.
A NEW ROADWAY.
Walking along Dufferin street
one cannot help but notiee the
massive and splen.lid structure of
Prizzoll's wharf, with its imposing
���warehouse and abattoir. On sunny
days���so numerous in Essington���
it is quite a pleasure to promenade
along the pier to the head of the
wharf and take iu the beautiful
mountain scenery across the silvery
waters of the Skeena. George is
certainly to ho complimented for
his splendid judgment, both for
building such a fine addition to
the improvement of the town and
also for liis progressive spirit. It
certainly shows that he has the
welfare of the town ut heart by the
many little improvements being
made, such us lighting the wharf
on the arrival of boats, and the
latest move���that of railing off the
pier���now makes this wharf one of
which any town might be proud,
We notice with pleasure that
Mr. Wynn, our chief constable, is
superintending the much-needed
repairs of our plank-walks. The
interests of the town are safe in
his hands, and it has been owing
to the su pi nen ess of the authorities
below that these repairs have not
been done before. We believe that
owing partly to Mr. Wynn's repre*
sei,.,ations tht* provincial Govprn-
nient are a'-out to extend the plank
walk which" runs past the jail to
Mr. Munro's house, and thence
running at a right angle to the
road opposite Mr. Church's resi-
ileine. This is a much-needed
road; it will give a dry, clean walk
to the mill, and also will be a great
boon to the ladies living on the
other side of the Indian reserve, as
they will not have to wade through
the pools of water which ^compose
the greater part of the road through
that reserve, and will also give.
tin-in a road where they will be
safe from the attacks of the dogs
with which the reserve bo plen-
teously abounds.
A SUBSCRIBER'S VIEWS.
EnrroR Loyalist:���I have read
with much pleasure the first issues
of your paper. A more newsy or
cleaner little sheet has never before
heen published on the Skeena.
Why then in your last issue, do
you, instead of keeping up the high
standard attained in your lost three
issues, condescend to what ��*n only
tie called scurrilous abuse of the
opposite party. It may be reprehensible to celebrate the occasion
of our leader's return' to power, but
is it less so to brand those who do,
is Wyoming cowboys, with or without guns? These very men that
you sneer at have been, and are,
supporters of your paper. Ib it
decency to call them "crooks" because they feel justified in accepting a friends invitation to dinner?
Everyone had great hopes of your
paper, sir, but if the last week's
number is a sample of what is to
come in the future, it will not be a
credit to the Skeena river, but the
reverse.
As you published the criticisms
here complained of, I hope you will
publish this letter.
I enclose my card, and am, sir,
A Disappointed Subscriber.
I'.ssington, Nov. 5, 1908.
POLITENESS AND ITS RESULTS.
One of the chief cares of a good
engineer is to soe that all parts of
his engine are well supplied with
oil. Society is a machine similar
in many respects to the working
parts of an engine, and just as> the
bearings of the engine must be kept
well supplied with oil, so must the
machine of society be well oiled to
prevent the heating of the various
parts which make up the whole.
The oil used by the engineer is
cylinder and lubricating oil; the
oil necessary to the welding of society is oil of politeness and kindly fooling. In the work-a-day life
nf our western country we are apt
to think too litth of those common
courtesies uml little nets of polite-
ness which, when all is said and
done, make inl. rconrso between
man and man possiblo and pleasurable?    We  are apt to speak out
what we think, to apportion blame
in unmeasured terms, and, in many
cases, to impute motives to others
which, on mature reflection, we
have no right to do. We pride
ourselves on our plain language,
never stopping to think whether
that language is really justified, or
whether a more temperate expression would not only huvo carried
more weight,*biit would have placated an adversary and put him in
touch with  the way we looked at
'hiniff        l'l"*S"    ������x-lriear lu ffrw-xi in
..L'.^fwi..    '* a., av*\ie*^-STr*i-'^g���*^--
its place, but when it carries with
it an arrogant assumption that we
are right and the others are wrong,
then plain speaking, as we consider
it, is not plain speaking at all, but
a mark of ill-bred self conceit.
Our schools endeavor to teach
the children true politeness, but
how often do the children find it
practised by their elders, and lesB-
ons learned only in schools do not
count for much unless the children
see their elders putting into practice those same lessons which the
teacher endeavors to inculcate in
school. It is the fashion nowadays to sneer at the acts of politeness shown by some of the older
nations of the world. The west is
progressive and go-ahead, but it
will be a bad day for the west if
the day comes when there is na
place in the rapid life lived by its
citizens for those acts of politeness
and courtesy which the experience
of other countries has shown to be
necessary for the well-being of society.
In small towns it is especially
necessary to cultivate kindly feelings between the various part*-,
which make up the whole society.
Where this is not done, cliques
arise, divisions take place, and we
find that pharadaical spirit which
sets up one little set in society la
superior to others. Men are born
equal, and as long as men carry out
the maxims of true politeness and
kindly feeling, they remain equal,
whether they be laborers or mem*
hers of the leisured class. Neither
position nor money make the true
gentleman or gentlewoman, but
the feeling of respect for the feelings and opinions of others, which
ends in true politeness and friendliness, alone stamps the individual
as the true gentleman and the
gentlewoman.
s a s      .i
T.S. Stephens, the genial traveler
for the J. Leckie Co., Ltd. arrived
in town Wednesday, off the Princess May. Judging by the number of trunks he brought with him,
he must have a large and varied
assortment of boots and shoes for
the trades-people to choose from.
The Leckie shoe is gaining favor
with all the contractors and railroad men, as well as with the most
fastidious of tbe fair sex, and no
wonder, as the Leckie people have
proved that their boots are the
best on the market, and what is
more, they arc a home industry,
all their boots being made at their
large brick factory in Vancouver.
We recommend their goods to
everyone, and have no doubt but
what Mr. Stephens will do a big
business here.
The cutting of the great Cullinaii
diamond, the largest in the world,
presented by tin- Transvaal Gov-
eminent to Kin-j Edward VIL, ini
proceeding With unexpected speed
in Anisturdam,and il is hoped that
i ihe two stones from it will be ready
I for tho adornment of the  English
[crown and sceptre before Christ-
��� ������ r>"��i".'."'..>LM| 'j']10 twu stones into which
our minds regardless of the feelings the diamond was first split weighed
of others; we an- too apt to say' 1700 and 1000 carats} respectively,
\
ft
-^1 "       . .iv.	
THE LOYALIST
t
The Loyalist.
ADVERT181NO RATES:
CmI Prospecting and Timber Kolkei, 80
d��Ti, n oo
Land Notices, 00 al.TI A..... 7 00
CertlficaU of Improvement Notices, 00
day.  7 00
All Timber snd Und Notice* must be accompanied by checki otherwise Ihey
will remain unpubllsheal.
Foreign subsrrl|,tl,,ii price per year , 8 00
OHOROK SHADE, Manaom.
ii
ANOTHER FOUR YEARS.
r
For the fourth time Sir Wilfred
Laurier has been returned to power.
That fhe large majority the Liberals had would be decreased considerably was the general idea, and
therefore it was a surprise to both
political parties to find that large
majority hardly impaired at all. It
is very easy to set down the. cause
for the return of the Liberal party
li.ih llinh I lilliffirnfti/ntf^ jtnirjinft
will go up to Ottawa with one aim
clearly before them, and that is,
the best interests of British Columbia. This session B. C. will not be
found dumb in the Dominion
House.
Jumm & FRIZZELL.
Port Essington, B. C.
BUTCHERS!
-ANI
PROVISION OEAIERS.
Vegetables, Green Groceries. Fnrits.
_-L_.   __    U.���
THE WALK-OVER MAN
MADE HI.? BOW TO ESSINGTONIANS
It is easy to say that a gorernment
with all the patronage at its disposal can conceive an almost unlimited fund. No doubt there is a
great deal of truth in both these
statements, but something else is
required before we can find an
adequate reason. For some years
eastern and middle Canada have
had remarkably good times, and
while this fact is always a great
help to the party in power, there-
was also a strong feeling that if tbe
Liberal party were defeated, then
the construction of the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railroad would be
delayed. These two reasons are,
with the Roman Catholic French
vote, to our mind sufficient to ac-
countfor the return of tho Liberal
party to power. We cannot say
We rejoice at it, nor can we with
sincerity congratulate the voters
throughout the Dominion on their
choice. Of late years there1 have
been ugly rumors about men in
high places, accusations of corruption which have been either hushed
up oi smoothed over by partisan
commissioners of investigation. It
-^ttne ihai. mt WiMrtd. Laurier
himself is far above all suspicion
of dishonesty; but that many of
his followers, after twelve years of
power, are steeped in corruption, is
only' too true, and it does not
speak well for a country when a
government, proved to be corrupt,
is returned to power. At present
it seems that we are at the mercy
of the French Roman Catholic vote,
for without it where is the Liberal
majority? Unavoidable as it is, it
is none the less unfortunate tbat
we ih B. G. should practically be
controlled by Quebec. It is still
more unfortunate that the party
kept in power by the French vote,
Bhould be invariably hostile to British Columbia. Whatever the return of the Liberal party to power
may'mean to the rest of the Dominion���good crops in Manitoba
and Saskatchewan, good yields in
orchard and mine in Ontario, favorable weather and good fishing on
the eastern coast (and how many
of the uneducated voters aro there
Who do not credit the party in
power with such a state of things)���7
it only means one thing to British
Columbia: Another four years of
injustice, of taking more from this
province, in proportion, than from
any other province, and of granting
her less; another fotir years of inefficient control of her fisheries; of
hatcheries run b\f men who have
no knowledge of the subject, and
of halibut banks depleted by American poachers. Another four
years of a weak 0 nd inefficient Asiatic policy; another four years of
injustice, hostility and contemptuous disregard for the rights and the
wishes of the people of British Columbia, But fortunately for us
British Columbians wc1 are in a
better position ildW than we were
formerly, We have men representing ufe in the present house whoN
are not the abject slaves of the Quebec tiartv Ifoi'iio-rly we had only
(Huh   i-epri'SeltiiitivesJ ��� men    who
LARGE STOCK OF MEATS
ALWAYS ON HAND.
We also make a specialty of
handling and forwarding freight
from our large new Warehouse to
nil points.
WARNER'S
LUNCH GOUNTERI
Dulferfn St., Port Enlngton.
The Very Best the Market Affords
at the Lowest Prices.
ONLY WHITE COOKS EMPLOYED
Steaks, Chops, Eggs, and Oysters
in any style.
MRS. W.  WARKBR,   PROPRIETRESS.
GEORGE H.  WYATT,
DEALER IN
WALL PAPER!
PAINTS, <k
Dufferin Street, -   Port Essington
E.B. EDWARDS,
Contractor and Builder,
OFFICE AND STORE WORK
A SPECIALTY.
Dufferin Street, opposite Morrow & Frltzell.
Mrs. S. Frizzell,
IMPORTER AND DEALER IN
fUlLLINERY.-DRY dOODS
���AND NOTIONS,
Ladies' & Gentlemen's
Furnishings.
CLOTHING MADE TO ORDER.
Dufferin Bt. Port Essington.
T
WILLIAM C. BURRITT,
Barrister, Solicitor. Notary Public.
PH1NCK RUPERT, B. C.
DR. QUINLAN,
The Pioneer Dentist,
A   AVENUE,
PRINCE RUPERT,  B.  C.
Hicks & Lovic Piano Co.. Ltd.
1204   Douglas   Street,
VICTORIA, B. C,
Victor Talking Machines,
Pianos and Organs.
AND THE BIG RUN WE
HAVE BEEN HAVING ON
THIS FAMOUS SHOE HAS
EXCEEDED OUR MOST SAN
GUINE EXPECTATIONS.
THE WALK-OVER MAN
STANDS FOR SATISFACTION, QUALITY, STYLE
.AiUU3Jl_F.P___T.    THE
Walkover Shoe Is In a class by
Itself; the only SHOE sold In
exclusive stores In the large cities
of the world.
R. Cunningham
& Son, Ltd.,
PORT   ESSINGTON    AND   HAZLETON,   B.C.
McArthur's Emporium
Next door 10 the Ellington Hotel.
GENTS' FURNISHINGS
A SPECIAL.Y.
Penman's Underwear,
Oiled Clothing.
Leckies Boots,
L. J. McARTHUR, Prop.
W. G. CONNON.
DEALER IS
Cigars, Tobacco,
Soft Drinks, tke.
POOL ROOMS ATTACHED.
Graphones and Records
FOR ��ALE.
Cor. Hazleton and   Dufferin   Sts..
Port Essington.
H. KISHIMOTO.
DEALER IN
DRY GOODS.
GROCERIES,
PROVISIONS,,
P. O. Box 31, Port Essington, B.C.
COME TO ESSINGTON!
The Center of Construction.
WE CAN FIND YOU EMPLOYMENT.
Canadian Pacific Employment Agenty.
SHELTON & HICKS.
BAKERY
AND
CONFECTIONERY..
Calumet Restaurant!
Center St.,
PRINCE   RUPERT-
FIRST-CLASS MEALS
AT ALL HOURS.
0
Meals 25 cts.
SHORT ORDERS A SPECIALTY
Italian and French .Management.
DePESSO _ BEINA, Proprietors.
-ValW'**k Plmvlfkt
PORT ESSINGTON.
CONTRACTORS
BUILDERS
AND
GENERAL JOBBERS.
House. Store and Office Work
A Specialty.
Fruit and Vegetables.
A SPECIALTY :
FANCY BUTTER and EGGS
Ocstall River Sawmill.
EVERY DESCRIPTION OF
LUMBER FOR SALE.
JAMES A. BROWN, Proprietor.
DR. A. M. LOWE.
DENTIST.
PaililePB Extwcti'ii.     Crown and
Bridge work a specialty!
PORT ESSINGTON, B, Ul
Launch " STKONGHEART"
Lei.-!*! niinlngham'l Whnri oVcry
day Ior following ISmlroart Cliinp��:
KeithV,   McDonald's,  Alitonelli'si
Shndy's,   Smith Pro..,  Dan
Stewart';*, Ano;. Ste watt's,
and McLeod's.
MiKKNZlE & JACKSON.Agchte,
I'm-1 1" MO .Mi'I''    M U,
ALS QUICK LUNCH I
Port Ellington, B. 0,
Serves Best Meal in Town
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT.
Try Our Coffee and Cakes
Everything NEAT.   Prompt Service.
George Hayes
Importer and Dealer IB Um
finest brands of
Cigars, Cigarettes. Tobacco
COAST   PAPERS
ALWAYS ON HAND.
Pool Rooms & Barbershop
Attached.
S. S. TRANSIT
Leaves Pier 2 every Thursday foi*
VANCOUVER
FIRST-CLASS  $14 00
SECOND-CLASS      8 00
DECK PASSAGE       5 00
Tickets for   sale  at Ragstadt's
Jewlry Store.   Tickets fnust be pur* '
chased, before boarding steamer.
H. J. STAUDTE.
Dufferin Street,
Next Royal Bank of Canada.
BARBER SHOP OF THE FIRST CUSS
THE IVY BARBER SHOP.
Duflci'lii 81 , Purl Essington,
HOT AND COLD WATER
BATHS.
MRS, J. TEAFF, Proprietress
��� -....���.-. ..      ,.|
James Cauthers,
CARPEN1ER and JOINER.
Port Essington Drug Store.
DRUGS,
Patent Medicines*
STATIONERY
AND
PHOTO   SUPPLIES.
HARRISON, CAMPBELL 4 MILLS CO.,
Limited.
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
partnership heretofore existing between Geo, Hayes and C. L. Upton
cor
has   beats*   this day  dissolved b\
" ��ye
in future collect all debts due the
wifi
Proinj.it   attention  given   to  all
pi'iVi'c left nt the  Caledonia Hot**!,
mutual consent.    Geo. Hayes will
in future
late Arm.
GEO. HAYES.
C. L. UPTON.
Port KtrVMii|4t.m. B. C, Oct. 4, 100*1. II
THE     LOYALIST
OUR FISHERIES.
The following statement of facts
respecting tlie invasion of the waters
of British Columbia by foreign vessels and the consequent loss to oui
ports, is contributed by a correspondent who is familiar with the
facts, says the Vancouver World.
By the Treaty of Washington, 1846,
it was stipulated that the boundary
between Canada and the United
States should follow the 49th parallel of latitude to the middle of
the straits, separating Vancouver
island from tho mainland, and from
there should run down the Straits
of Fuca to the Pacific Ocean.
This treaty clearly defines the
southern boundary. Under the
Treaty of Washington the German
Emperor, as arbitrator, on Oct. 21,
1872, declared the Gulf of Georgia.
JoniiBt-one Straits, Queen Charlotte
Bound,, or Hecate Straits, to be
Canadian waters. This treaty was
signed at Washington, D. C,  in
1873, carrying out the arbitrator's
award.
Hecate Straits ends in the waters
of Dixon Entrance, which were declared to be Canadian waters by
the Alaskan Boundary Award of
October Mth, 1903. This treaty
declared the line should run from
Cape Muson, via Cape Chacon, to
the Portland canal, and not as American fishermen very often claim,
three miles off the South Alaskan
coast line. We therefore find that
all waters extending from the Alaska boundary line in (he north to
the 49th parallel, and its southerly
and westerly continuations in the
south, are territorial waters, under
the treaties and decisions named.
On April 18th, 1896, a telegram
was sent to the minister of marine
and fisheries at Ottawa, to the officer in command of the government
cruiser Quadra to warn all fishing
vessels not flying the British fleg
out of the waters of Hecate Straits
and Dixon Entrance, so tbat it is
fully recognized at Ottawa that
those waters are under Canadian
jurisdiction. American fishermen
have no right inside of a line taken
from the middle of the Straits of
Fuca, where they enter the ocean
to Cape Muzon, in Alaska, the line
keeping three mile's off the shore of
the outermost Canadian islands,
and extending from north to south
about six hundred miles.
The fishing grounds on this
coast from Qstpe Flattery to the
Arctic Circle have been well prospected, and it is well known to all
fishermen thatthete are no halibut
fishing banks of any extent outside
of those contained in Canadian
Waters. Many attempts have been
made by American companies to
locate halibut banks on the Alaska
coast, but without success, and all
the great catches landed this season
at Puget Sound and Alaska ports
came cut of Canadian waters.
Captain Newcomb of the cruiser
Kestrel has stated in several of his
reports that if the Canadian harbors in the vicinity of the fishing
grounds were to be well guarded, it
would be impossible for the American fishermen to follow the halibut
fishing, as the dory system of fishing, followed on this coast, can only
be carried on during fine Weather
and in the vicinity of good harbors,
as the schooners and steam fishing
vessels operating the dories require
the use of the harbors for sheltering
in stormy weather and also for
cleaning their fish. To anyone,
therefore, who is conversant with
the method of halibut fishing on
this coa-st, it is quite obvious that
no fast or expensive cruisers are
required to guard our fisheries, but
what is required is a nuinher of
gasoline boats Stationed at the different harbors, Which are used by
the American poachers, with the
Kestrel for outside work. There
are ft _jiuml*ejf of gasoline boats
owned by  the  Dominion Govern*
ment antl used during the summer
months for patroling the salmon
fishing grounds, which are at present lying idle, and would be very
suitable ior the purpose of guarding
our harbors, so that a very small
additional expense would be entailed by immediately putting those
boats into commission for the protection of our fisheries. From 1898'
to 1903 the total catch of halibut
on the Pacific coast increased fivefold, and was eight times more than
the total catch of halibut on the
Atlantic coast.
In 1906 Capt. Newcomb, of the
cruiser Kestrel, stated that, the
total catch of halibut on the Pacific
coast was 39,334,329 pounds, and of
this total only 9,414,330 pounds
passed througii the port of Vancouver. The catch of halibut this
season has far surpassed any previous year, and 1 am quite safe in
saying that not one-fifth will pass
through Vancouver.
Were the laws bearing on the
protection of our deep sea fisheries
to lie immediately enforced we
would have not five steam fishing
vessels, with their headquarters at
the port of Vancouver, but many
times that numbr, as all Americans who wish to remain in the
business would be forced to put
their boats under the Canadian
flag and fish out of that port or
from some port on the coast of
British Columbia. It is often remarked by people not conversant
with the fish trade antl the fishing
industry that Canadians aro lacking in enterprise by not participating to a much larger extent in
the deep sea fishing industry, but
under present conditions it is impossible for a Canadian firm to
successfully compete against the
Americans who have free access to
our fishing grounds and free entry
to their own unlimited markets.
The American company operating
out of Vancouver which has enjoyed such great concessions during
the past nnmber of years, is at present erecting at Ketchikan the largest fish freezer in the world. If the
laws bearing on the protection of
our deep sea fisheries were to be immediately enforced, this fish freezer
at Ketchikan, or any other fish
freezer, built either in the cities of
Puget Sound or Alaska, for the
purpose of freezing and storing
halibut, would not be worth the
ground they are built on, and instead of Canadian fisheries going to
enrich and build up the cities of
Puget Sound and Alaska they would
largely contribute to the upbuilding
of'the cities of British Columbia.
There are no fishing grounds in
the world more prolific than these
contained in the waters of Hecate
Straits, Dixon Entrance and the
other waters adjacent to the coast
of British Columbia, and there is
no reason why we should not have
an enormous fish trade in this pro
vince were the fisheries to  receive
adequate protection.
Let us take, for instance, two
fishing towns on the British coast,
Grimsby and Hull, fishing principally to supply Uie British market.
Those towns have a combined fishing fleet of over a thousand steam
fishing vessels, besides numerous
other craft. Great Britain has a
population of about 40,000,000. To
the south of us wc have the United
States alone with a, population of
80,000,000. Wo have also the fast
increasing population of Canada,
and cheap water transportation to
the teeming population of the
Orient. Why, then, should we not
have a fishing injustry in this province as great as lie combined ports
of Grimsby and lull?
Think what attjndustry such as
this would iiicii/j i*, the province
and the gmt increase of trade in
all lines, vhich must surely follow
such an industry, th*Mtish curing
and proierving work^the ice factories and cold stores, the box factories, the engineering and repair
shops, the coal, fishing gear and
supplies, necessary to outfit such a
fleet.
AN APPROPRIATE NAME.
Bishop Hartsell, while on a tour
in the southern States, met a negro
who was the father of sixteen children, the youngest of whom was
scarcely out of arms, and on asking
him what the youngster's name
was, received this reply, "Judas
'Scariot, sah."
"You don't mean to tell me that
is his baptismal name, do you?"
"Indeed, I do sah; ain't that a
Scrip'ral name?"
"Yes; but do you know who
Judas Iscariot was?"
"Course I does, sah; but doan de
Scripture say it would have been
better for Judas 'Scariot if he had
never been boinefrf"'
"Yes; but what has that to do
with this little chap?"
"Dat's just it, sah. It would
have been better for this poor little
chap if he had never been horned,
and dat's why we rails him Judas
'Scariot."
CHURCH SERVICES.
Methodist Church.���Rev. B. C
Freeman, pastor. Morning service
11a. in. Sunday school 2 p. m.
Evening sermon, 7:30.
St. John's Church���Rev. W. F.
Rushbrook, rec.or. Morning ser-
vice.ll a. m. Sunday school 2 p.
m,    Evening service 7 p. m.
The regular Salvation Army services are held by Adj. Blackburn.
Good duck shooting on theOcstall
river.
E. EBY & COMPANY,
KITSUMKALUM, B. C.
General Dealers
A First-Class  HOTEL also
adjoins the premises.
A Good Point at which to Outfit for the Interior.
In traveling up the Skerna make this your
HEADQUARTERS.
Essinsgton
Hotel
R. J- McDonell
Proprietor
The leading hotel in northern British Columbia, elegantly equipped to meet the requirements of a fastidious public, and.commanding a superb view of the approaching
steamers.
Hot and cold baths at all hours. Baggage
transferred from all incoming and to all
outgoing boats.
Hotel Caledonia
Pert Essington, B. C.
MRS. S. KJR6Y
Proprietress
The only First-Class Hotel north of Vancouver.
Cuisine can not be surpassed
anywhere in the norih, .   .   .
Baggage transferred to and from hotel.
Sample rooms ���[���        Hot and cold baths
Capital (paid up) $3,900,000.      Reserve fund, $4,390,000.
Total assets $46,000,000.
The Royal Bank of Canada
Head office: Montreal, Que.
pays particular attention to the accounts of out-of-town
customers.
The Savings Bank department offers great advantages to
everyone.
Why run the risk of losing your money by fire or otherwise when you can leave it in the bank and have it safe.
One dollar opens an account.
We issue drafts and money orders payable in all parts of
the world.
Port Essington Branch, S. A. .Morley, Manager
R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd.
General Merchants
Port Essington and azelton, B.C.
ESSINGTON SAWMILL
LUMBER,
SALMON   CASES.
SHINGIES.
Hotel  Northern
Simpson, B. C.
Under new management. Thoroughly renovated.
E. W. RICHARDS
I.ateSS. (Rinosnil.
Subscribe for The Loyalist 1
A purely local paper published   in   th" interests
of  the  Skeena   District and   its various  resources,
A PAPER for the MINER and FISHERMAN
OF INTEREST TO ALL. THE     LOYALIST
Local News.
If you want to see something
good, take a look at the shoe display in McArthur's Emporium.
Everything from a dancing pump
to a chrome-tanned Klondiker.
For a small stock it is the best to
be seen in this part of the country.
James E. Kirby, who has been
acting as Deputy Mining Recorder
at Hazleton, has been appointed
Registrar of the Hazleton Registry
of the County Court of Atlin, from
the 20th day of October, 1908, in
the place of F. W. Vallcau. Mr.
Kirby is a nephew of H. E. Kirby
of this town.
McKenzie & Jackson have a fine
display of picture post-cards showing views of Essington. These
-sards are just the thing to send to
your friends to show them that wc
are not living among the wild Indians, as some people think, but in
one of the best-kept villages in the
province.
' Canada has at last got over its
election troubles, and once more all
hands will get down to work and
help build up the coming nation of
the west. The great republic to
the south of us has had its say. It
matters not what happens we arc
all striving for the same end to
praise the bridge that carries us
over.
Why is it that p-ospectors arc
unable to record their mineral
claims in Port Essington? Several
complaints have been made by
mining men that they have had to
go to Prince Rupert to record their
locations. It is time that the proper
authorities thought something
about the business interests of the
people of this village and a little
less about the hot air o! a rival
burg.
MiBs Simpson arrived from Victoria on Saturday, by the steamer
Camoeun, having been engaged by
Mrs. Kirby to take charge of the
Caledonia dining room. We understand that Miss Simpson is a vocalist of no mean order, and will no
doubt be prevailed upon to take
part in the social gatherings to be
given this winter. If so we will be
pleased, as talent is a little short at
the present time.
There have been rumors of complaints about young lads carrying
22 calibre rifles. In the old country
and in pa- ts of Canada boys' rifle
clubs have been formed. Why
should not Port Essington bave its
rifle club? The ammunition is
cheap, and we believe that almost
every Port Essington boy has a
rifle. Targets can easily be made
and without great expense. Teach
thejboys how to handle their guns
and you eliminate the danger; but
let them have their weekly club
practice, and small as the beginning
may be we do not know how useful
it may prove in the end. Is there
no one public-spirited enough to
lead such a movement? The boys
will follow.
When Daniel DeFoe wrote Robinson Crusoe he endeavored to picture a case of isolation, and did
very well. There is a saying that
"truth is stranger than fiction,"
and there is something in it. Robinson was landed upon an island,
found a few goats, a man Friday,
and a parrot. Everyone who has
read the'story has shed a few tears
at the awful isolation. This is but
natural, but while we'are weeping
and wailing over the imaginary
solitude of one who never lived, let
us get close to our own and think
of the solitude of one who is known
to us, one with whom we have
broken bread and chewed dried
salmon. Think, oh think of that
poor, lonely human creature left at
the Balmoraljcannery, alone.frienrl-
less, cold, and maybe dry���even in
this very Wet season. Al, we pity
you. Rousseau, Holland, Hanson,
aud ull the rest were traitors,
WHAT THE WEST WILL BE.
In an article on  the Canadian
Northwest   the    London    Times'
special correspondent says that, as
one  notes the settling up of the
vast middle-west of Canada, and
the   steady   construction   of   new
railroads, as well us  the continued
branching out of the Canadian Pacific railroad, the conviction grows
upon the mind that here the  balance of Empire will  have to lie
shifted   more   rapidly  than   elsewhere.    This is no doubt perfectly
true, and as this  great Canada of
ours settles up  and as one by one
her vast natural resources are utilised  ami turned   into wealth, the
weight that Canada now carries in
the counsels of the  Empire will be
intensified a   hundredfold.      But
there Is another of a narrower nod
perhaps an almost parochial view,
and one that is   perhaps  of  even
more interest to us now, and that
is,   that   as   settlement   advances
westwards so will  political   power.
When the G. T. P. is completed we
shall find here, in  the  far  west, a
reproduction of the  History of the
Middle-west.     Wherever it is possible  there    will    be   farms   and
ranches along tiie line of the railroad and along every   b.anch  and
spur.    Tbe valleys  leading  down
to the main line will be filled with
settlers,   und   industries    will   be
started and mines developed.    The
history  of Manitoba and  tbe old
Northwest   territories will lie repeated, but with   this  exception:
i here will not be the weary wait of
ten years which there was then, before men realized  the possibilities
of the new country.   That is all
past, for the experience of the past
has proved   the certainty of the
success of these new settlements in
the   future.     As   th9 population
grows so will its political influence
grow, and in place of the west only
having members in the  House so
few in number that they are not
able to    bring   western   interests
forcibly before the real power holders of the east,   the west will have
the balance of power, and will have
tbat "say:: in Dominion  affairs to
which its rich resources have so
long e i) tit led it.
It is less than 25 years since the
C. P. R. was completed to the Pacific, and this year, in spile of the
lack of rain in August, the wheat
crop is estimated at about 110,000,
000 bushels, while the production
of other cereals, almost equally important for the prosperity of the
country, reaches to an even higher
figure. If this be a history of the
past, what a wonderful p ospect is
before us in the future, when there
are still vast tract* of land yet unsettled and yet unpioductive, but
of the greatest possibilities. Of
those yet unsettled lands British
Columbia has a large share. This
is tho inheritance which is ours and
our children's, and one which we
nust not throw away or carelessly
ity than anything that has yet
been done. Wc do not want large
tracts of land to lie idle until some
rich speculator or unscrupulous
corporation can hold up intending
settlers and make them pay an exorbitant price, but we do want to
see every valley and every prairie
filled with settlers industrious and
contented, and doing their share
for tho prosperity of our province.
OUR TELEGRAPH UNE.
The employees of the government
telegraph  line  have their   hands
full. Heavy winds ami the natural
causes give them  etiiugh to do to
keep tho line up in the ordinary
course  of  things,      iow, to those
natural enemies of lie line which
are always in evidence, is added a
human   one in   the pt-cson   of the
man  who  is  clearirg the lasiroad
right-of-way, o* blasting  through
the  rocky  bluW> along wliei*, the
line runs. Jn some cases, no doubt,
thes'o is carelessness, but not in *,he
majority,   A man takes a contract
to clear a certain distance of right.
of-way; the wire runs right along
where he is working.     Now, he is
paid so much for the job, and if he
pulls the wire down and stretches
it again outside his sphere of work,
he is delayed for several days. The
line is rendered useless during the
time of moving it, and he has also
iso replace it back after his work is
done: some more extra days' work
for which he receives no allowance
whatever.    The small   contractor'
cannot afford to put in several days'
work for nothing; he has enough
troubles of his own, what with bad
weather and unforseen delays.     It
is no doubt very hard lines on the
superintendent   of  the   telegraph
line, who   thus  has   much   exiia
wo.'k thrown on his men.   We can
not in  reason blame hjm for the
delays, nor can we blame the con-
��� ractor or man who clears the right-
of-way, so  long  as they exercise
all possible cave, which we understand is done in the majority of
cases.     The delays in telega ams is
unfortunate, but at present they
appear to be unavoidable, and it is
not fair to blame  where  blame is
not desevvod.
THE B. C. LIQUOR ACT.
destroy.     This is  the inheritance
which as yet belongs to the public;
let us see that those responsible for
its administration keep it as public
land and held at a distance from
the land speculator and the timber
grabber, who, to suit their own selfish ends, would tie up for years
large tracts of land which would
otherwise be supporting an industrious population and yielding up
this quota to the wealth of the
nation.
It is fortunate for British Columbia that she lias a Government who
have declared themselves in favor
of the bona fide settler, end who
have, to some extent at least, discouraged the sspeculator. There is
room for farther improvement and
for more stringent regulations. A
heavy tax on all lands held and
not improved by those that hold
them would perhaps do more for
British Columbia's future prosper-
We have heard some very resectable and supposedly intelligent peoplo expressing tbeir views
on the Liquor Act in force in the
Province of B-itish Columbia.
Some of these mistaken villagers
have used the hammer to such nn
extent that the impression has
gone abroad that Essington is simply the habitation of a lot of drunks
and gamblers. As such is not the
case, the sooner this is distinctly
understood the better it will be for
all concerned. A perusal of the
I/quor Act now in forco in British
Columbia will show that it allows
certain pivileges to bona fide travelers, and it is an outrage that
those who a;o courageous enough
to venture out in this northern
country and risk their lives, suffer
the many hardships that full to
the lot of all men who are the forerunners and builder of the happy
homes of us who are-lucky enough
to follow them, thnt when they
come into to\vn,wet nnd ice-covered,
that they cannot even enter a
saloon to get warm much less to
seer re such stimulant as is absolutely necessary, If those of the
monumental mind will only tnke a
look at the Act. pas-ed by the late
and naich-to-bt'-lnmeiited Theodore
Davie thev will discover that there
are a lot of things that they are at
tho present time overlooking. We
tlo not wish to go on record as upholding the liquor traffic���far from
it���but we do wish to express ourselves very plainly on this subject,
McKENZIE & JACKSON,
General
Merchants
New Stock of Fall and WinterSuits
(V-Bopp. Royal Bank of Canada.
LATEST STYLE AND BEST OF
WORSTED CLOTH.
Boys' and Girls'
Reefer Jdtktitd
For the Winter
New Stock of the
Celebrated
McPHERSON SHOES
At Popular Prices.
MOTOR BOAT SUPPLIES
Columbia Dry Cells,
$3.00 per Set of 6
Agents for the House of Hobberlin
Made - to - Measure Clothes. Call
and have a look at the SAMPLES.
Robertson J R
DUNDEE D
Scotch Whisky
DIRECT FROM THE
Distiller to the Consumer
The Oldest. Purest and Best,
and cannot see why anyone, no
matter who he is, has not the same
privileges in this village as he has
in the Capital of the Province,
where it is possible at any time to
walk into a road-side house on
Sunday and procure all the refreshments you may require. Answer
wanted.
Of Interest to Women.
Cnalfrllmtloni to this colninn should be nd*
dressed to "Clio," In care of the Loyalist offlce.
Pospovers.���2 eggs, 1 cup flour.
1 cup milk, *J teaspoonful salt; beat
eggs well, stir in a little milk then
a little flour alternately until all is
used; add salt. The secret of good
popovereis vigorous beating. Place
in jem pans, filling them not more
than half full. Bake in quick oven
15 to 20 minutes. Beat thoroughly
just before baking.
Question.���Is the blowing of
soap bubbles healthy for children?
���"Bubble."
There is no Unuisotiient enjoyed
by children which is more healthful than the blowing of soap bub��
bles, and it is equally so for grownups. It not only cultivates the
habit of deep  breathing,  but  also
the proper carriage of the shoulders
and poise of the head, if done properly. It should always be done
out-doors or in a room with a free
circulation of pure air. For winter
eveningB there is no more beautiful,
amusing and healthful entertain*
ment for girls and boys than a soap
bubble party. All that is needed is
some bowls half full of soapy water
[preferably castile soap] and a
dozen or two of new clay pipes.
OCSTALL RIVER PROPERTIES.
R. H. Swinerton, of the firm of
Swine rton A Oddy, real estate, life
and fire insuranco agents, came up
on the Camosun from Victoria last
Saturday and made a trip up the
Ocstall to see some properties in
which he is interested. This is not
Mr. Swineiton's first trip, as we
wore looking over the register of
one of our hotels a few days ago,
and saw that he had visited Essing*
ton April 80th. 1901, at which time
he was looking into things. Can
it be possible that those things are
now looking so good as to induce
him at this time of tho year to
make a trip up the Ocstall river?
We hope so, ahd wish every success to him, for he is one of tho
few you meet and can   remember*,'
*

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