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The Paystreak Oct 5, 1901

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BOOK VI.
SANDON, OCTOBER 5 1901.
CHAPTER 2
HAPPENINGS IN BRIEF.
Tin- Rambler stock is climbing.
Geo. B. McDonald paid Kaslo a visit
0n Monday.
��
Harry Howsen paid Sandon a brief
visit this week.
Oscar V. White took a flying trip to
Kaslo Thursday.
Capt Seaman, of the steamer Slocan,
was in town Thursday.
Miss S. M. Chisholm returned Wednesday from her eastern trip.
Mrs. McKinnon and Miss McKinnon
left for the Boundary on Thursday.
L. C. Henderson was in town Sunday delivering his 1901 edition ofthe
B. C Directory.
A. H. Buchanan, manager of the
Hank kA' Montreal, Nelson, paid Sandon
a visit Thursday.
The Dawson Sun is to hand on our
exchange list. The subscription price
is $25 per annum.
K. Hamilton of the J. Cholditch &
Co., was in town Thursday, interviewing our merchants.
The Church Exemption By-law was
lost at Kaslo. Dey won't do a ting to
dat returning officer.
The Trail smelter seems to have corralled all the available ore in sight in
this part of the Slocan.
R. U. Dunsmuir and B. J. Perry,
who were inspecting the Noble Five
left Sunday for Victoria.
Work is to be resumed on the Albion
property in the Ainsworth camp alter
an idleness of two years
The London Hill Development Co.
will commence work on their dry ore
properties near Bear Lake.
The Court of Revision for the Slocan
Riding of West Kootenay Electoral
District, will be held in Kaslo Monday,
November 4th.
The Greeno Bros, have thrown up
their contract at the Payne. Thev were
sinking a winze from No. 5 to No. 8
tunnel, 300 feet.
The conservatives of Nova Scotia
were given the glssy eye in the election
held there on Oct. ist. They only
secured two seats.
The Star will put on another team
next week hauling ore. The daily
amount loaded will then be 35 tons.
The "West Fork News" is the name
of a new paper published at Beaverdell,
B. C, by Jim Greer, formerly publisher
ofthe Greenwood Miner.
The bee ofthe shareholders of the
Rink company brot out quite a number
of people.    Some of them,  not being
used to this kind of labor, are nursing
blistered hands.
The Washington has 60 tons of ore
sacked ready for shipment, which will
be sent out in a few days. A very important strike was made on this old
property last week.
The new Brewing firm of Twogood
&. Bruder, have opened up for business.
They recently took over the Tattrie &
Band interest in the New York Brewing Co. They are experienced heads
at the business.
Supplies have been sent up to the
Fourth of July group, sufficient for four
men until! next spring, and it is the
intention to push work all winter. Ten
tons of ore will be shipped before the
snow comes, after which no further
shipments will be made until March.
Wr. F. DuBoise left Slocan on Monday for Seattle. It is rumored that he
will return shortly with his bride, now
Misss Laura Hammond, of the Sound
city. Mr. DuBoise is manager at the
Arlington mine, and has a host of
friends who will be happy to congratulate him on his return.
A Crosseyed Switchman.
We met Buck Kiser the other day.
Buck is a old time switchman whose
bibulous habits precludes the possibility
of his laboring at his calling in these
anti-intoxicating railroad days. We
remember a yarn connected with him
when he was switching at Pocatella.
Buck has the misfortune of being badly
crosseyed, or swivel-eyed as the boys
term it, in fact he takes in everything
at a glance, owing to the fact that you
can't tell which particular point catches
his glance.
He had just worked long enuf to get
a pie card, and coming in one evening
to get his supper he passed the
"mourner's bench," on which sat about
ten dead broke railroad men waiting to
be invited. It was considered good
form in those days never to eat without
a partner, and Buck followed the custom by winking at the head man. Immediately the whole gang walked in
with him. Buck said nothing but did
some deep thinking, especially when
his pie card was knocked full of holes.
He got to the bottom of it when each
man swore he looked and winked at
him personally. After this Buck made
his dates outside and up town. Buck
is now a mucker.
Bq-Lato Lost.
The Kaslo City Church Exemption
By-law was lost at Monday's poll.
The vote stood 44 for, and 44 against.
The point was raised by Rev. J. H.
Thompson that the returning officer
had the right to cast the deciding vote,
and upon 4'ie request of Messrs Thompson and McAnn the declaring of the
vote was adjourned until 10 a. m. on
Tuesdciy when A. W. Allen, returning
officer, announced that the by-law was
lost.���Kootenaian.
Some slight domestic grievances required the attention of Judge Lilly's
court Wednesday. The chief actors
came from McGuigan.
The City of Sandon Court of Revision
will be held in the City Hall Saturday,
October 19, for the purpose of considering assessments. All parties who wish
their assessments changed are required
to give ten days notice.
Paragraphs.
A man would doubtless be just as
irritable as a sitting hen were he placed
in a similar position.
The prodigal son gets the fatted veal,
but the prodigal daughter is given the
icy mitt.
Here is*an advertisement that deserves response. It reads: "If John
Smith, who thirty years ago deserted
his poor wife and babe, will return,
said babe will knock the stuffing out of
him."
Fatality at the Rambler.
A sad and fatal accident occured at
the Rambler-Carriboo mine on Tuesday
morning at 2:30 o'clock which resulted
in the death of Joseph Tresh and injuring Fred. MacDonnell.
Tresh and his partner had fired their
round of holes at the bottom of the
shaft, and had ascended to one of the
stations .above where there was more
shots to be fired. Here they found the
boys not thru lighting their fuse and
started to help them when some of the
first charges exploded and Tresh and
MacDonnell were caught by the flying
debris.
A party of miners at once went to
their rescue, and bore Tresh to the
boarding house and cared for him as
well as possible until Dr. Gomm
arrived. The unfortuaate man breathed his last at six o'clock.
On examination it was seen that he
had received a fracture of the skull and
also a large dent in his left side, and
the left leg was also broken.
MacDonnell escaped with nothing
more serious than a few bruises and
a shaking up and he will be all right
in a few days. Tresh was buried in
the Sandon cemetery, Wednesday.
The Smelting Situation.
The activity of the Canadian| Smelting Works in securing the bulk of the
output of the Slocan  mines is causing
comment in mining circles.    They have
now  secured the  output of most of the
mines   around    Sandon,    particularly
along the K. & S.    The title deed of
the new iron deposits around  Kitchner
is said to have been made out to T. G.
Shaughnessy, president of the Canadian
Pacific railway, and associates.    These
deposits have   been   proved with  the
diamond drill,  and  found to be practically inexhaustible.    This  gives the
Trail smelter all the flux of that nature
required,    .-\dded   to   this   they   have
gone  into the dry ore belt around Slocan City, Silverton and Enterprise and
made contracts at low  figures for the
output   of the best   mines.    All  this,
coupled with  their   evident  desire  10 ���
secure the   silver-lead   output,   points
very   conclusively   to the   supposition
that a  refinery  will be  built by  this
company.     They    have   not   hitherto
made much of an effort  for this class
of ore.    As  the  situation now stands
their competitor, the Kaslo and Slocan
railway, is practically a feeder to  the
Canadian Pacific, and whether this turn
of affairs will be allowed  to continue
only the future will  tell.    The importance ofthe K. & S. as a feeder to the
Great  Northern laid in their drawing
their ore to the American smelters over
the Great Northern railway.    As the
question now stands they will get none
of this haul, and to protect  their interests will they be compelled to erect a
smelter of their own?
Taking these facts into consideration
this should revive the question of the
erection of a smelter at Kaslo, which
would be the nearest and most conven-
point for the Great Northern interests.
The mines in this vicinity will be benefitted by the campetition thus resulting
and the outcome is awaited with interest.
The woman who has a pair of low
shoes and pretty silk stockings never
gets the bottom of her skirt soiled.
A girl that can't sing and will sing,
should be muzzled.
ORE SHIPMENTS.
FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER.
From Sandon Over the K. & S.
v      Slocan Star 196 tons
American Boy 167 tons
Last Chance  60 tons
Payne   42 tons
Ruth  15 tons
Sunset  40 tons
From Sandon Over the C. P. R.
Minnesota Silver Co... 105 tons
Goodenough...  30 tons
Star 220 tons
From Whitewater.
Whitewater    -394 tons
 mm.	
The actress who has eyes like diamonds is never anxious to lose them for
advertising purposes.
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-WrKMMMM THE PaWSTREAK, SANDON, B. C, SEPTEMBER 28,
Certiflcate of Improvements.
MINER BOY MINERAL CLAIM.
Situate in the Sioean Mining Division of West
Kootenay District Where located:���North
of Bear Lake, about two miles from the
K. & S. railway and about 1 mile West of
the London Mineral Claim.
TAKE NOTICE that I, W. J. H. Holmes, acting aa agent for Charles Schoeuberger, Free
Miners Certificote, No B37769. August Frieder-
ioh Adams, Free Miner's Certificate No. BS7781
and Theodore Prederioh Adams, Free Miner's
Certificate No. B37780, intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certiflcate of Improvements, for
the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the
above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this 15th day of Sept.. A. D. 1901.
W.J.H. HOLMES, P. i_.S.
Agent.
FOR SALE.
A limited number of shares in
the Similkameen Valley Coal
Co,, Limited. For further particulars apply to
W. W. FALLOWS.
Snndon, B. C.
NOTICE.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works. Victoria,
B. C, for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described
lands.
Commencing at a post marked Willard V
Hill's South West Corner, about one and one
half miles South West from the head of Slocan Lake, thence South eighty chains, thence
East eighty chains, thence North eighty
chains, thence West eighty chains to starting
point containing 640 acres.
WILLARD V. HILL.
Dated September 9th, 1901.
flkilinerp
We have received . our fall
milinery and as we are taking
most of our stock to Phoenix
and Cascade City on Oct. ist
we wish our patrons to come
and take their choice before
that date.
m. & B. mclkinnon
palace Tbotcl
KNOWLES & FINLAY,
The dining room of the
Palace Hotel has just been
opened under competent management. Run on the American plan.
Meals 50c    Tickets $7
o-aTormr
main St.   *    Sandon
M. L. Grimmett,
L. L. B.,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR,
NOTARY PUBLIC, ETC.
SANDON, B. C.
W. W. WARNER,
MINING ENGINEER.
*^-^a * y^i
MINING PROPERTIES HANDLED
ON COMMISSION.
Mining Properties  Examined   and   Reports
Made.   Will Open up Mining Properties by
Contract or Salary.   Twenty Years-
Experience.
Sandon   Bottling
Co.
C. A. BIGNEY.
Manufacturers or
Carbonated Drinks
of all kinds.
CODY AVENUE
SANDON,
| Mverpthing
Wou Wear
%
��900000000000000000000000*
ft *fc
2
i
!
s
1
!
*
s
i
*
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!
!
i
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1
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ft
8
ft
-ft
-ft
-ft
���ft
I
ft
I
l
���ft
-ft
ft
ft
!
!
5
I
Should be purchased
on a common sense
basis. You cannot
get something for
nothing. The man
who buys cheap
shoddy is not only
the poorest but the
most expensively
dressed. He does
not get the worth of
his money. The man
who buys good
clothes dresses for
less money. The
best is the cheapest
every time. There
is a large difference
between purchasing
cheap goods and
purchasing goods
cheap.     o��    J    ^
See ��uv Stock.
VftOBo SBvown.
��Xk000000000000000000000tttfc
Ibap, Oats, 3Bran,
and WU)eat at
6iegericf)fs
THE BIG STORE.
Having made special  arrangements to receive IDailV
Shipments of Oreen Groceries, fresh Mutter
and XSggS we are in a position to fill your orders promptly
with good selected stock.
IN DRY GOODS.
Special bargains in Ladies Shirt Waists consisting of
Silks, Organdies, Muslins and All Over Laces. Ready-
made Skirts in Tweeds, Serges, Crash and Ducks.
B few Sailor Ibats to Close ��ut at Cost
Mens' Furnishings.
The most complete line of shirts ever shown in the
west. Neglige, Cambric, Silk and Flannell Outing. A
large shipment of ties in latest styles to arrive this week.
ithe 1bunter*1kendrick Co., Zimiteo
p. SBuvns & Co
*
Ibead ��ffice,
THelson, 3B. C.
TAeco Bvenue,
Sandon, 38. C.
m
mm
Zlmmili.
Bealers 3n
fresh
and
Cured
Meats
of all
Muds.
MARKETS IN ALL THE PRINCIPAL TOWNS OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA. 7/Vru^^^ /^Cn.a^
BOOK VI.
SANDON, OCTOBER 5 t90J.
CHAPTER 2
HAPPENINGS IN BRIEF.
The Rambler stock is climbing.
Geo. B. McDonald paid Kaslo a visit
oll Monday.
Harry Howsen paid Sandon a brief
visit tliis week.
Oscar V. White took a flying trip to
Kaslo Thursday.
Capt Seaman, ofthe steamer Slocan,
was in town Thursday.
Miss S. M. Chisholm returned Wednesday from her eastern trip.
Mrs. McKinnon and Miss McKinnon
left for the Boundary on Thursday.
L C. Henderson was in town Sunday delivering his 1901 edition ofthe
B. C. Directory.
A. H. Buchanan, manager of the
Bank o( Montreal, Nelson, paid Sandon
a visit Thursday.
The Dawson Sun is to hand on our
exchange list. The subscription price
is S__5 per annum.
R. Hamilton of the J. Cholditch &
Co., was in town Thursday, interview-
injLi* our merchants.
The Church Exemption By-law* was
lost at Kaslo. Dey won't do a ting to
dat returning oflker.
The Trail smelter seems to have corralled all the available ore in sight in
this part of the Slocan.
R. U. Dunsmuir and B. J. Perry,
who were inspecting the Noble Five
left Sunday for Victoria.
Work is to be resumed on the Albion
property in the Ainsworth camp alter
an idleness of two years
The London Hill Development Co.
will commence work on their dry ore
properties near Bear Lake.
The Court of Revision for the Slocan
Riding of West Kootenay Electoral
District, will be held in Kaslo Monday,
November 4th.
The Greeno Bros, have thrown op
their contract at the Payne. They were
sinking a winze from No. 5 to No. 8
tunnel, 300 feet.
The conservatives of Nova Scotia
were given the glssy eye in the election
held there on Oct. ist. They only
secured two seats.
The Star will put on another team
next week hauling ore. The daily
amount loaded will then be 35 tons.
The "West Fork News" is the name
of a new paper published at Beaverdell,
B. C, by Jim Greer, formerly publisher
ofthe Greenwood Miner.
The bee ofthe shareholders of the
Rink company brot out quite a number
of people.    Some of them,  not being
used to this kind of labor, are nursing
blistered hands.
The Washington has 60 tons of ore
sacked ready for shipment, which will
be sent out in a few days. A very important strike was made on this old
property last week.
The new Brewing firm of Twogood
&. Bruder, have opened up for business.
They recently took over the Tattrie &.
Band interest in the New York Brewing Co. They are experienced heads
at the business.
Supplies have been sent up to the
Fourth of July group, sufficient for four
men unlill next spring, and it is the
intention to push work all winter. Ten
tons of ore will be shipped before the
snow comes, after which no further
shipments will be made until March.
W. F. DuBoise left Slocan on Monday for Seattle. It is rumored that he
will return shortly with his bride, now
Misss Laura Hammond, of the Sound
city. Mr. DuBoise is manager at the
Arlington mine, and has a host of
friends who will be happy to congratulate him on his return.
A Cro88et}ed Switchman.
I
Bq-Lau** Lost.
Some slight domestic grievances required the attention of Judge Lilly's
court Wednesday. The chief actors
came from McGuigan.
The City of Sandon Court of Revision
will be held in the City Hall Saturday,
October 19, for the purpose of considering assessments. All parties who wish
their assessments changed are required
to give ten days notice.
The Kaslo City Church Exemption
By-law was lost at Monday's poll.
The vote stood 44 for, and 44 against.
The point was raised by Rev. J. H.
Thompson that the returning officer
had the right to cast the deciding vote,
and upon the request of Messrs Thompson and McAnn the declaring of the
vote was adjourned until 10 a. m. on
Tuesday when A. W. Allen, returning
officer, announced that the by-law was
lost.���Kootenaian.
We met Buck Kiser the other day.
Buck is a old time switchman whose
bibulous habits precludes the possibility
of his laboring at his calling in these
anti-intoxicating railroad days. We
remember a yarn connected with him
when he was switching at Pocalella.
Buck has the misfortune of being badly
crosseyed, or swivel-eyed as the boys
term it, in fact he takes in everything
at a glance, owing to the fact that you
can't tell which particular point catches
his glance.
He had just worked long enuf to get
a pie card, and coming in one evening
to get his supper he passed the
"mourner's bench," on which sat about
ten dead broke railroad men wailing to
be invited. It was considered good
form in those days never to eat without
a partner, and Buck followed the custom by winking at the head man. Immediately the whole gang walked in
with him. Buck said nothing but did
some deep thinking, especially when
his pie card was knocked full of holes.
He got to the bottom of it when each
man swore he looked and winked at
him personally. After this Buck made
his dates outside and up town. Buck
is now a mucker.
Paragraphs.
A man would doubtless be just as
irritable as a sitting hen were he placed
in a similar position.
The prodigal son gets the fatted veal,
but the prodigal daughter is given the
icy mitt.
Here is��an advertisement that deserves response. It reads: "If John
Smith, who thirty years ago deserted
his poor wife and babe, will return,
said babe will knock the stuffing out of
him."
Fatality at the Rambler.
A sad and fatal accident occured at
the Rambler-Carriboo mine on Tuesday
morning at 2:30 o'clock which resulted
in the death of Joseph Tresh and injuring Fred. MacDonnell.
Tresh and his partner had fired their
round of holes at the bottom of the
shaft, and had ascended to one of the
stations above where there was more
shots to be fired. Here they found the
boys not thru lighting their fuse and
starred to help them when some of the
first charges exploded and Tresh and
MacDonnell were caught by the flying
debris.
A party of miners at once went to
their rescue, and bore Tresh to the
boarding house and cared for him as
well as possible until Dr. Gomm
arrived. The unfortuaate man breathed his last at six o'clock.
On examination it was seen that he
had received a fracture of the skull and
also a large dent in his left side, and
the left leg was also broken.
MacDonnell escaped with nothing
more serious than a few bruises and
a shaking up and he will be all right
in a few days. Tresh was buried in
the Sandon cemetery, Wednesday.
The woman who has a pair of low-
shoes and pretty silk stockings never
gets the bottom of her skirt soiled.
A girl that can't sing and will sing,
should be muzzled.
The Smelting Situation.
The activity of the Canadian| Smelting Works in securing the bulk of the
output of the Slocan mines is causing
comment in mining circles. They have
now secured the output of most of the
mines around Sandon, particularly
along the K. & S. The title deed of
the new iron deposits around Kitchner
is said to have been made out to T. G.
Shaughnessy, president of the Canadian
Pacific railway, and associates. These
deposits have been proved with the
diamond drill, and found to be practically inexhaustible. This gives the
Trail smelter .nil the flux of that nature
required. Added to this they have
gone into the dry ore belt around Slocan City, Silverton and Enterprise and
made contracts at low figures for the
output of the best mines. .Ml' this,
coupled with their evident desire 10 j
secure the silver-lead output, points
very conclusively to the supposition
lhat a refinery will be built by this
company. They have not hitherto
made much of an effort for this class
of ore. As the situation now stands
their competitor, the Kaslo and Slocan
railway, is practically a feeder to the
Canadian Pacific, and whether this turn
of affairs will be allowed to continue
only the future will tell. The importance of the K. & S. as a feeder to the
Great Northern laid in their drawing
their ore to the American smelters over
the Great Northern railway. As the
question now stands they will get none
of this haul, and to protect their interests will they be compelled to erect a
smelter of their own?
Taking these facts into consideration
this  should revive the question of the
erection of a smelter at Kaslo, which
would be the nearest and most conven-
point for the Great Northern interests.
The mines in this vicinity will be benefitted by the campetition thus resulting
and the outcome is awaited with interest.
ORE SHIPMENTS.
FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER.
From Sandon Over the K. & S.
v      Slocan Star 19610ns
American Boy 167 tons
Last Chance  60 tons
Payne  4210ns
Ruth  15 tons
Sunset  40 tons
From Sandon Over the C. P. R.
Minnesota Silver Co... 105 tons
Goodenough...  30 tons
Star 220 tons
From Whitewater.
Whitewater 394 tons
 m.	
The actress who has eyes like diamonds is never anxious to lose them for
advertising purposes.
if
V
.1
inaMt_.a__ws.wla. HUNTING BIG GAME.
Up nnder the rim of the Mogol-
lon Mountains, which fonri the
northern end of the Tonto Basin,
Arizona, and which are covered by
a part of the largest pine forest in
the. world, the cattlemen are making preparations for a great war of
extermination against bears, mountain lions and wolves, because of
the damage these beasts have done
to stock in the last two years.
The Mogollon range is a great
wall of rock stretching half way
across Arizona from east to west,
and from 1000 to 2000 feet in
height. There are only two or
three places where a wagon can
make the ascent and as many more
where the tough and wiry broncos
of the cattlemen can cross from tbe
gradually rising plain on the north
to the many valleys lying under
the rim on the south.
From the Colorado River, more
than 100 miles to the northward,
the desert gradually rises in an
almost unbroken plain, until the
rim of the mountains is about 7000
feet above sea level. Here it suddenly drops away, leaving innumerable deep rocky canyons, which
are the homes of countless bears,
wolves and lions in the fall and
winter months. In summer these
beasts nearly all go up on top of
the mountains to escape the heat
and to be near herds of deer and
turkeys that make their homes in
the broad, unbroken pine forests
which stretch for miles along the
almost flat top of the mountain
range.
The country to the south of the
rim forms the range for thousands
of cattle, the owners making their
homes among the canyons and foothills, wherever a sufficient water
supply can be had. Being in many
places more than 100 miles from
the nearest peace officers, might is
right among these people, and there
is probably not a region within the
confines of the United States where
men are more skillful in the use of
the six-shooter and the lariat than
here. From the age of ten they
are as much at home in the saddle
as an Easterner in a rocking chair,
and boys, and girls, too, perform
astonishing feats of horsemanship
and roping.
Hook Ludson's two boys, Hugh,
aged 18, and Pierce, who is 14,had
an experience lately which illustrates well their bandiness with the
rope and ability to take care of
themselves. The two boys were
working with the round-up in the
Naeglin Canyon country, and started one morning to join another
round-up outfit that was working
about eight miles away. Their
course took them down a steep
canyon for several miles and then
over a steep ridge into another
narrow valley.
About three miles down the canyon made an abrupt bend, the walls
being several hundred feet high.
As the boys came around this bend
they ran almost into a large she-
bear, who was feasting on a freshly-
killed calf. Both had left camp
without buckling on their six-
shooters and belts of cartridges, but
angered at the sight of the dead
calf both charged at the bear, ropes
swinging in readiness for a throw.
The bear fled down tbe canyon.
The speed of an old, lean she-bear
is remarkable, and for a quarter of
a mile neither boy was able to get
close enough to land his rope.
Brush, trees and boulders made it
a difficult task to cast a 50-foot
rope with certainty, but Hugh at
last managed to drop a loop over
the bear's head and left fore leg,
and swerving his horse to the right,
the bear went on one side of a scrub
oak and the horse on the other.
When the rope tightened, the horse
was nearly thrown from his feet,
and the bear turned a somersault.
The younger boy was going at
such speed that he nearly ran over
the bear as she rose to her feet, but
this did not prevent him from dropping a loop over her head as he
went by. By this time Hugh's
rope had slipped down around the
bear's body, and as Pierce tightened his rope, Hugh's caught around
both hind feet. The bear was
again thrown to the ground by a
jerk from Pierce's rope, and Hugh
hastily throwing several turns of
his rope around the horn of the
saddle jumped to the ground and
started toward the bear,pulling out
his knife and opening it as he weut.
Watching his chance, he stabl>ed
the bear several times in the region
of the heart, and then slashed her
throat. In a few moments the hear
Geared struggling. After scalping
the boar for the bounty, the boys
cut off a few pounds of the best
meat and went on their way as if
nothing unusual had happened.
It is not unusual for cow-punchers to rope a bear and even a
mountain lion in this country,
where the heavy underbrush and
the manzanita scrub, together with
the rough and broken nature ofthe
ground, make a close approach
possible without detection. During
the fall round-up,  the foot-hills,
which are heavily timbered in
many places, become tha resort of
hundreds of bears and turkeys
which congregate here to feed on
the acorn mast and the juniper
berries with which the ground is
covered. The deer also love the
acorn mast, and the wildcats and
mountain lions follow up to feed
on venison and turkeys. The cow-
punchers, in working among the
canyons,often have exciting experiences with both bears and lions.
Jake Hendershott, a German
rancher, nearly 60 years old, was
going up a canyon close to the rim
one day last fall looking for outlaw
steers, when his dog started a female mountain lion aud two half-
grown kittens from among the large
boulders. The lioness faced the
dog, in her endeavor to cover the
retreat of her young. The dog, a
cross between a bull and a mongrel
hound, closed in on the mother before she could escape. Both kittens
took to a small pine tree. Luckily
the dog got a throat hold, and, encouraged by the shouting of Jake,
held on, even though his sides and
belly were torn by the sharp claws
of the lioness.
Hendershott had no weapon of
any kind, but slipping from the
saddle,seized the first thing at hand,
which was a chunk of granite, and
ran to the assistance of the dog.
He grabbed the lioness by the ear
with his left hand, and with his
right, using the granite chunk, he
pounded her skull into such a mass
that he was not able to save the
scalp for the bounty. Then he
turned his attention to the two1
kittens in the pine. Mounting his
horse and riding up underneath the
tree, he was able, after several attempts, to drop a noose around one,
and it was but the work of a second
to spur the horse into a run and
jerk the kitten from the tree. The
dog immediately rushed in, and
with Jake's assistance soon despatched the kitten. The other cub
was treated the same way, and the
scalps of hot-h being cut off, Jake
returned to doctor his dog.
The wild tieasts annually destroy
hundreds of cattle and colts. Horse
raising in that region has been almost entirely given up on account
of the number of colts killed by
lions. In the last five years the
Ellison family have killed more
than 200 bears and one-third as
many lions. Four were killed in
one morning last fall out of ten
started during the day.
This spring Dena, the youngest
girl, roped and dragged to death a
black bear,weighing more than 200
pounds, and captured a cub alive
bringing it to the ranch tied behind
her saddle.
It is such people as this who
undertake what is designed to be
the greatest round-up of wild beasts
ever known in this country. The
Ellison boys have the matter fa
hand. It is their intention to get
together aa many cowboys as poegj.
ble, and with a party of 200 or 300
to surround a district 15 or 20 miles
square. With trained horses and
dogs they will drive their quarry
into a deep canyon, where they can
kill their game at will. They n-
pent to round up several hundred)
of the beasts, and as the bounty on
lion and bear scalps is $20 each,
and on wolf scalps $10, the result
should be profitable.���New York
Sun.       	
ir   TOU   WOULD   LIVE   LONG-
Sleep eight hours, but never with
another person in the same room.
Sleep on your right side.
Keep the room windows open all
night, summer and winter.
Place several rugs on the floor
about the bed.
Place the bedstead at least three
feet from every wall. All walls
are cold and cause a cold draft
downwards. The center of a room
is safe.
Before yon sleep, lie on your
back without a pillow and breathe
deep fifteen or more times.
Through the day repeat deep
breathing five minutes, Ave times
or more,
Deep breathing saves doctor's
bills.
Avoid all intoxicants, and drink
no tea or coffee, and little or no
fluids when eating.
Drink an abundance of water
two hours after eating and a glass
of water one hour before.
Never use tobacco in any form
whatever.
Pet animals carry disease germs.
Live in the. country if possible,
make it possible.
Take frequent short holidays.
Limit your ambition a little.
Keep your temper. Never worry
or borrow trouble.
Eat the flesh of no animal, such
food is full of uric acid, the cause
of rheumatism. Uric acid is also
iu coffee.
Live only on cereals, fruits and
nuts, and a small share of vegetables.
Always wear linen mesh goods
as linen absorbs and carries away
moisture four times as fast as wool.
N THE PAYSTREAK, SANDON, B. C, OCTOBER 5,
E. A. BROWN, M. E.
Underground Surveys
and Examinations. Dc
velopment and Assess"
ment Work. * Surveys
and Estimates made for
Tramways.
Virginia Block, Sandon, B. C.
A. F. & A. Mi
ALTA LODGE NO. 29.
Regular Communication held first Thnrs
diiv in each month in Masonic. Hall at 8 r. M
Sojourning brethern are cordially invited to
attend,
A. B. DOCKSTEADER, Secretary.
F. L. Christie,
L. L. B.,
NOTARY PUBLIC, BARRISTER,
SOLICITOR, ETC.
ATHERTON BLOCK
SANDON
Sandon Cartage Co.
WALMSLEY & McPHERSON
Express, Baggage,
and Cartage.
Delivery to all   Parts of the City.
Established 1805.
E. M. SANDILANDS.
Sandon, B. C.
Notary Public.
Insurance and Mining
Broker.
Mining Stocks bought and sold. Gen-
��� riil agent for Slocan Properties
Promising  Prospects  for  Sale.
Sandon Miners'
Hospital
Subscribers, $i per month ; Private
patients, $2 per day, exclusive of
Expense of Physician or Surgeon
and Drugs.
Open To The Public.
DR. W. E. GOMM,   Attendant Physictan.
MISS S. L. CHISHOLM, Matron.
J. H. McNEILL, Pres. Hospital Board.
ANTHONY SHILLAND, Secretary.
Ship Your Trophies of the Chase to
Harry W. Edwards,
TAXIDERMIST
Revelstoke,    B. C.
He will stuff and mount in good
style any Bird, Beast, Reptile or Fish
that you can present. You do the killing.    We do the rest.
SILVER CITY LODGE NO. 39.
I. O. O. F.
Meetings in the Union Hail every Friday
Evening at 7:80. Visiting Brethern coidially
nvited to attend.
R. CUNNING, N. G.
GEO. WATTE,       JAS. H. THOMPSON |
feeeretary. Vice Grand.
Notice to Creditors.
In the matter of the estate of James Williamson, late of the City of Sandon, B. O, Merchant, deceased.   ���
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN PURSUANT
to the "Trustees and Executors Act," that
all creditors und others having claims against
the Estate of the said James Williamson,
who died on the-..ind day of July, A. D..1.X.1.
are required, on or before the 1st day of Oc-
.toWr l"*ol, to send by post prepaid, or deliver
to F. L, Christie, of the Atherton Block, Sandon, B. C, Solicitor for Mary Elizabeth Williamson tie administratrix ofthe estate of
James Will, mson, their christian and sur
names, addresses and descriptions and full
particulars of their claims, the statement of
their accounts and the nature of the securities, if any, held by them.
And Notice is hereby further given that immediately after such last mentioned date the
said administratrix will proceed to distribute
tlie assets of the deceased among the parties
entitled thereto, having regard only to the
claims of which she shall then have notice;
and that the said administratrix will not be
liable for the said assets or any part thereof
to any person or persons of whose claims notice
shall not have been received by her at the
time of such distribution
F. L. CHRISTIE,
Solicitor for the Admistratrix.
Dated the 27th day of August. A. D., 1901.     ���
Certifloate of Improvements,    j
CONDORE AND CORLISS FRACTION MTN-
ERAL CLAIMS.
Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of West
Kootenay District    Where located:   One
quarter of one mile South West of Cody
Townsite.
TAKE NOTICE that I, A. B. Docksteader,
as agent for Frederick A. Henneberg, Free
Miner's Certificate No. B.VJ224, and John Docksteader, Free Miners' Certiflcate No. B5_!221,
intend, sixty days from date hereof, to apply
to the   Mining Recorder for Certificates of
Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining
Crown grants of the above claims.
And further take notice that action under
section 37 must be oommenced before the
issuance of such Certificates of Improvements
A. B. DOCKSTEADER.
Agent.
Dated this 27th day of August, A. D. 1001.
NOTICE
TO
DELINQUENT    CO-OWNERS  OF   THE
SILVER CHORD MINERAL CLAIM.
Application for Transfer of Liquor License.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty days
from date hereof we, the undersigned, intend
to apply to the License Commissioners of the
city of Sandon for a transfer to us of the
liquor license formerly hold by Mrs. Annie
Egan of the Palace Hotel.
KNOWLES & FINLAY.
Dated at Sandon this 24th day of Aug., 1001.
ANADIAN
���"PACIFIC
PAN-AflERICAN
EXCURSION to BUFFALO
SIXTY DAY LIMIT.
Sept. 3, 17.     Oct. 1, 15.
it.:,
CHOICE OF ROUTES.
ALL RAIL -:- LAKES -:- SOO LINE
VIA ST. PAUL OR CHICAGO.
Through Sleeping Car
Kootenay Landing to
Toronto. One Change
to Buffalo.
The Art Piano of Canada.
To J. R. Cameron and A. R. Porter or any
person or persons to whom they may have
assigned their interests in the Silver Chord
Mineral Claim, situated near Sandon and
registered in the Recorder's office for the
Slocan Mining Division.
You are hereby notified that I, Philip J.
Hickey, acting as agent for J. D. Farrell and
Volney D. Williamson, have caused to he expended one hundred dollars in labor and improvements upon the above-mentioned mineral claim under the provisions of the Mineral
Act, aud if within ninety days from the date
of this notice you fail or refuse to contribute
your proportion of such expenditure, together
with all costs of advertising, your interest in
said claim will become the property of the
subscriber under Section I of an Act entitled
"An Act to Amend the Mineral Act, 1000."
VOLNEY I). WDLLIAMSON,
J.D. FARRELL,
[PHILIP J. HICKEY, Agent.|
Dated this 5th Day of August, 1901.
City of Sandon Court of Revision
NOTICE is hereby given that the annual
sitting of the Court of Revision for the pur-
of hearing all complaints against the assessment for th�� year 1001 as made by tbe assessor
of the City of Sandon, B. C. will be held in the
Council Chamber, City Hall, Sandon, B. O, on
Saturday Oct. 10th 1001 at 10 o'clock a. m.
C. E. LYONS,
City Clerk.
Heintzman Co.
MAKERS,
Toronto,  Ont.
0*
Thomas. Duffy,
AGENT,
Sandon -- B. C.
For time tables, rates and full inform
ation call on or address nearest local
agent.
H. W. Harbour.
Agent. Sandon
J. S. Carter^ E. J. Coyle,
D. P. A. A. G. P. A.,
Nelson, B. C. Vancouver, B. C.
*
1
1
I
#
fresh Vegetables
Carrots SBeets 1
Cabbage
Zettuce
Onions
TRabishes
Cucumbers
& Zarge Consignment
ffust Mrriveo.
__k
m��lt��li��lm��limmZ^^^
���falland SBros.
Sandon   *   *   British Columbia
-C
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4-1
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a
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Cm
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75
O
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a*
Satisfaction
M_____H__r_r__________H__a__-i^_M__M__M^__i___-M
That is what everyone wants who orders
a suit of clothes or pair of trousers. We
guaaantee SATISFACTION to all our customers.    Leave your order with us far a
FALL SUIT.
FASHIONABLE
| J. R. CAflERON. F^S
1
���I
I
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"��� __H
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iMW'>iflfp'iiyM|WWMI����lfUM<l^ THE PAYSTREAK, SANDON, B. C, OCTOBER S,
i
f
.
The Paystreak.
Published Every Saturday in the heart of the Richest White
Metal Camp on Earth.
Operated in the interests of the Editor,
Subscription   -   -   -   -   $2.00 a year.
Strictly in advance.
Specimens Shipped on Suspicion,
William MacAdams,    -   Publisher and Proprietor.
SANDON, OCTOBER 5, 1901.
Sarnia, Sept. 25th, 1901
Dear Billy.
I hear it rumored around here
that Yorkey's train cost Canada 75c
an ounce and that Yorkey's visit will
average $5 a minute from the time he
hits Canadian soil until he pulls his
freight for the old sod again. I would
not like to knock Yorkey's game because I don't know how soon we may
be thrown together, but this looks a
little steep.
I found a man in Petrolea the
other day who never invested a cent in
wild cat stock. He is the only one in
Western Ontario who did not go after
the gilded bait so skillfully prepared
for the credulous. The gentleman I
refer to is a brother of R. T. Lowery's.
Possibly R. T. put him on.
Speaking about Petrolea, there is
a town that swooned under the blighting breath of the Standard The Pe-
trolia I knew a few years ago was a
busy, bustling, enteprising town where
the game ran high and social sociability ran roit. In fact it was a hot number. But oh ,what a difference. The
smoky refineries no longer permeate
the atmosphere with the aromo of
crude petroleum. The oil well wildcatters have all gone to Beaumont,
Texas, or Bakersfield, California The
erstwhile enterprising tankers and
drillers who would take a sucker in in
the morning and turn him out before
night, skinned to the hoof, are no
longer'in evidence. They are all gone.
I saw Petrolea yesterday at its present
best. It was fair time. But it held
only a shadow of its past glory. The
races were but the ghostof what had been
and the horses were backed by farmers.
As I rode silently home thru the starlight night the phantom-like pumps
rocking to and fro in the distant fields
seemed to squeak and moan * 'Standard," "Standard."
But that is what happens to those
who try to stand outside of the monopoly. They go down the line. It
could not be otherwise. The indepen-
kent refinery has no license to live.
Its time has passed. ,The process
which has led from individuals to
partnerships, from partnerships to
campanies, from companies to corpor
ations, from corporations to combines,
from combines to trusts, and from trusts
to monopolies is working yet. The independent industry is a quarter of a
century behind the times. Petrolea
has found this out.
As a business concern the Standard is positively all right. It may
wreck a few individuals who foolishly
refuse to submit to the inevitable and
sell out. But when the Standard gets
the business in their own hands it
knows how to handle it. A walk thru
the Standard works is an educator.
John D. is certainly onto his job.
There is not a misfit in the whole institution. Every man is earning his
pay. Every wheel works as smooth
as oil. Every one is busy and everyone
takes an interest in his work. Ask
the men and 90 per cent of them will
tell you that they are getting better
wages today than they ever earned in
their lives before. Every man jack of
them takes a parental and proprietory
interest in the machine he handles and
when he explains it he assumes an air
of proud consciousness of the dignity
of his situation which always accompanies responsibility. John D. employs the best men he can find. He
pays them the best wages. He promotes by merit. He gives every man
a show to prove his ability. He carefully looks after those injured in his
employ. He inculcates in all the idea
that a job in the Standard is good for
life. He encourages labor unions and
meets his men in the same spirit that
he would meet a millionaire operator���
on a business basis. He never refuses
to recognize the rights of his employes
John D. Rockefeller understands the
labor question. The Standard has
never had a strike.
There is only one thing I really
see wrong about John D. He is working for the wrong party. If he was
running the Sarnia refinery, for instance, for the Dominion of Canada
instead of for the Standard he would
be just about right. John D. has
eleven hundred million���more money
than he could pur down a crack in
twenty years���yet the system by which
he has made it keeps him a slave to
his wealth. The money is no good to
John D. yet the public does not profit
by the economies of production his
genius effects. This is manifestly
wrong and must soon be righted.
Private monopoly must pass. Public
monopoly must come. A finely balanced socialism is the logical outcome.
When that day comes people will build
monuments to John D. as the man
who demonstrated that monopoly was
possible.
Yours while not otherwise engaged.
Everything looks favorable for a
good bussiness outlook during the
winter season in this section of the
Slocan, all knockers to the contrary
While the Sandon camp may not be
able to rustle employment for 3,000
men, she will make a big stride toward
advancement over previous seasons.
It would pay some of our townsmen to
look into conditions and facts before
"knocking" any further.
The fight between the teamsters
and draymen at San Francisco is now
off. It appeajs to be easier to make
comments on what might have been
done, now that the trouble is over, but
one lesson has been learned which the
people of Rossland could well take to
heart; that arrogance on the one side
was primarily the cause of any unreasoning obstinacy on the other. That
arrogance and bluffing tactics never
will pave the way to any favorable
settlement. Laboring men generally,
in the United States and Canada, are
blessed with intelligence enuf to see
the unreasonableness of any proposition if it is shown to them in a courteous manner, but the last century
methods of whipping a man thoroly,
then dictating terms, in this age only
opens the way for future complications.
No lasting or beneficial peace was ever
secured by such methods.
The government refinery has got
to come and government smelters will
follow. Half the papers in the silver-
lead district of British Columbia are in
line and the other half are either spieling or somnambulistic. The New
Denver Ledge is on the right side,
the Revelstoke Herald knows what is
wanted and is not afraid to say so, the
Lardeau Eagle is in on the ground
floor and the Moyie Leader will come
to the centre as soon as Smythe wakes
up. These papers are in touch with
the people. They represent the independent sentiment of the people in the
districts in which they are published.
They recognize that the mining industry will never attain its full measure of
prosperity until it gets a fair return for
what is produced. A referendum on
the subject would be almost unanimous
in favor of the government building
smelters and a refinery.
The man who, having the highest
authority in his country, violates a
sacred law and causes the losst 0
thousands of men and millions of dollars thru war, is so great an anachis
that it would be impossible to find n��
equal. ____^-
Dooley says:    "The only spoor*
me wife ain't good at is washin
Wm. MacAdams.    cookin'.". THE PAYSTREAK, SANDON, B. C, OCTOBER S-
five
Bollar
Suits
\VT***AVm ______________mSr. UM ******B**********.*mmm***mmmm*-  ___���1^^���,^^��
'-VMjKSSHfiXatJwM��������������* ^^���^���-^-------------^-���^^^ ^^������������������������������������������������^��������',-,-,-,-,-,-,-,i,-,-,-,-,-,���,���^
Stealers tn
mine and mill
hardware
��ve Cavs,
Steel nails,
Canton Steel,
HURRY UP
$fpou want
one of our 5
dollar suits .
ONLY 50 LEFT.
& ��. Btberton, Co,
(Ztmited.)
ti
^:
: ��� ���; I
-V
m
��*!
.$
Zeave
Wour
Order
for a
fall
Suit with
U. 2)avid,
Zhe minevs XXailov.
powder, Caps and fuse. %overtige til
tthe papstreak
Stoves at
Ssmton   *   ��*'*-*������   *   *"*>
jwmii���m i nriiTirr '���������
41
THE PAYSTREAK, SANDON, B. C, OCTOBER 5,
I
IVANHOE HOTEL
Just received a brand
new stock of Whiskies, Brandies, Wines
etc. Will be pleased
to have old customers
call and give them a
trial. Certain to
please and always
welcome.
���w
Richard   Orando.
Stranger
Should y.Air meanderings about
this mundane sphere take you to
Neto Dencer
Remember that there is a hotel
in the Lucerne of America at
which pilgrims max enjoy all the
comforts of a home, at prices on
a par with the damage levied by
other houses thruout the district.
The Idealistic Scenery of this
Beauty Spot in Nature's Wonderland can be best enjoyed from
the balcony of the
Newmarket Hotel.
The cuisine supplied assays high.
The bedrooms are large, airland luxuriously furnished. The
other accomodations are unexcelled in the Slocan, and the
brands of bottled comforters kept
in stock are health-giving and
soul-inspiring when taken in
prope/ quantities. The proprietor's name is
Henry Stege.
The Most Complete  Health  Resort on
the Continent of North America.
Situated    'midst    Scenery   Unrivalled   for
Grandeur.
Halcyon Hot Springs
fe Sanitarium, ate
Excursion ana Nurse
Halcyon Springs, Arrow Lake B. G.
Terms, $15 to ��18 per week, according
to residence in Hotel or Villas.
Its Baths cure all Nervous and Muscular Diseases.    Its waters heal all
Liver, Kidney and Stomach
Ailments and Metallic  Poisoning.
Telegraphic   Communication  with  al
parts of the World.
Two Mails arrive and depart Every Day
Sunday excursion rate good leaving Satur-
ay, returning Monday, $2.75.
The Denver.
Union Block Script.
AU persons are hereby warned against the
purchase of the following certificates of San-
Miners' Union Block Script as the same has
been satisfied.
No. 1, Aug. Slst, lltOO in favor of W L. Hagler
$100
No. 33, Sept. 82nd,1900,|n favor of Wm. Walmsley $50.
No. 44, Oct. 15th, 1900 in favor of John T.Campbell, $100
No. 51, Oct. 24th 1900, in favor of John T, Campbell, $22
No. 65, Nov. 17th 1900, in favor of John T. Campbell, $38
No, 80, Dec. 28th, 1900, in favor of John T. Campbell $45.
ANTHONY SHILLAND, Sec.
Sandon, September 20th, 1901.
Gale
>o Barber
Shop
Cody Ave.
Sandon
Comfortable Rooms
Reasonable Rates
A Quiet, Orderly, Homelike Hotel
AND BATH ROOriS
innnnnr
Is the best Tonsorial   Establishment in the Slocan.
Balmoral Building Main St.
*
Zhe
filbert  Cafe.
Open Day and Night.
Best Meals in Town.
Everything Necessary to
Satisfy the Internal
Anatomy,
Bmerican and
European plan.
0%
LLOYD & BENNETT,
PROPRIETORS.'
*
The Auditorium
OFTHE
THE MINERS' UNION BLOCK
Is the only hall in the city
suited for Theatrical Performances, Concerts, Dances and
other public entertainments.
For   bookings write or wire
Anthony Shilland,
Secretary,  Sandon  Miners'   Union
Sandon, B. C.
PIONEER HOTEL
OF THE SLOGAN.
^
HOTEL SANDON.
ROBERT CUNNING, Prop.
Tpr^ir^TroTnnnriririririnrs
A Table that is Replete with the
Choicest Seasonable Viands.
Rooms: Large, Airy and
Comfortable.
���*���>*
Special Attention to
the   Mining   Trade.
v
folliott & McMillan
Contractors and Builders.
DEALERS IN,
Rough and Dressed Lumber, Coast
Flooring and Joint Finishing Lumber
Moulding, Etc.
Sash and Door on  Hand to Order.
-.���-JOBBING PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO-I-
Factory on Main Street
fresb fruit
Keceived
teverp
Bap at
**Milliamson's>
Consignments
THE PROSPECTORS' EXCHANGE.
No. 4 K. W. C. BLOCK, NELSON. B. C.
Gold, Silver-Lead and Copper mines wanted at the EXCFIANGE.
FREE HILLING GOLD properties wanted for Eastern investors.
Parties having mining property for sale are requested to send samples of their ore to the
EXCHANGE for exhibition.
All samples should be sent by express PREPAID.
Correspondence solicited.   Address all communications to
Telephone No. 5*4.   P. O. Box, 700 ANDREW P. ROSENBERaER. Nelson. B. C.
SBargains in
footwear
In order to close out a few lines of GFNTLE-
MEN'S FINE SHOES we are offering
some great bargains.     Look in the Window.
Zouts Ibupperten /
UTTLB  JOHNNIE ��   QUESTIONS.
)h, tell me, papa, tell roe why
J many start are in Um sky 7
?hvd(��s the moon come out at night?
Vhat makes the snow ho very white?
Oh tell me, papa, tell m|aulck.
BILQI
All
h, tell me, papa, thte onMlng:
fhv ��re the leaves all green in spring?
why does the bark grow on the tree?
3oW did the wit get in the sea?
Oh, tell me, papa, tell me quick.
}h, tell me, papa, if you know,
if hat makes the grass and flowers grow?
Mv do we wslk upon our feet?
ij what has made the sugar sweet?
Oh, toll me, papa, teli me quick.
-.nd tell me, papa, tell me how
rhe milk and cream get in the cow?
[ow many scales a fish has got?
Vhat makes the heat so awful hot/
Oh, tell me, papa, tell me quick.
Ind tell me, papa, don't forget.
That is it makes tne water wet?
Yt.it holds the sun up tn the sky?
Vhen vou were born, bow old was I?
[uh.tell me, papa, tell me quick.
[)D OUTLOOK FOK THK WINTER.
[The Lardeau Eagle is greatly encour
-fed by the good showing that is being
fade by properties thereabouts. It
ys derelopment is forging ahead and
oud reports continue to come in from
(ery direction. Preparations for the
���������hiding season are now being made,
ud Lardeauites have a good winter to
ok forward to. The ore production
i winter will do much to attract outliers fur next year.
IAnother big strike of ore has been
wavered on the Ajax, one of ��he
litni nn the Nettie L group, some 800
et above tha (ind made some weeks
^o while the claim was being surveyed
he possibilities of the Nettie L. group
|em to enlarge each week. The wagon
����l to tliis mine in now nearing com-
Wiiii, and the force will be gradually
I-Teased from now on.
Tlie contractor, Sig Davis, and his
en are down from th*** Mountain I .ion
oup. having lompleted  the 50-foot
Innel. They have not struck the ore
<iv, hut thing* are looking all right,
d instructions may be received this
ek to continue * work until the ore
iy is tapped. A cabin has heen built
d well provisioned, and Mr. Davis
inks there would be no difficulty in
��rking there for two months yet. The
me owners, the Mountain Lion Go ,
[ve made the first monthly payment
.11000 on the American, which is
|der a working bond, and the pay roll
]*��ey is expected dally.
W. Livingston,   of  the Ruffled
fouse.was in town on Sunday securing
s.   He and his co-owners have
Iaacks of 1300 ore ready for the packers
1 this amount will be more than
ubled before shipping.
Onager Chas W. McCrossan is exited to arrive here from Colorado
frweek, and the Metropolitan may
P" cease operations for the winter on
fount of its location; but work on the
��<"k Warrior will be pushed incess-
fly. The Warrior cabins are now
post completed and a force of twelve
ln will be at work by Monday next,
P��r the old owner of the property, T.
Horne. Over 100 sacks of the pro-
fed 20 ton ship aent are now ready
I shipment.
fd. Hillman is building a cabin on
1 Horseshoe mineral claim, arid the
force of two men will be increased upon
Its completion. Tbe property has been
surveyed and is being crown granted
Andrew Ferguson left on Monday for
the Trail smelter with a second shipment of 40 tons of Triune ore. With
the 20 tons belonging to the lessees of
last year this makes an output of 80
tons so far this season. The owners
hope to make another 40-ton shipment
this season, aad more if possible to
work at the mine.
SC1BNOK   AND   MINING.
lhe percentage of gold in bard amalgam is usually in direct proportion to
the temperature of the pulp, a little
more mercury being required in winter
There is no trne anthracite coal on
the Pacific coast as far as known. There
is a limited anthracite coal area in Colorado, and a still more limited one in
New Mexico.
A 160 foot mast has been set up at
chunks of mineral exhibited on the
streets daily by his various friends
prove. The ore still holds up with the
first run, which gave results of 21,000
ounces silver and five ounces gold per
ton, or a total of a little over; $18,000
per ton.    	
MUST   BK   OPKNKD   DP.
The Lardeau Eagle is a wide-awake
miniug paper, and a credit to the division in which it Is published. In a recent
number it concludes an article on the
possibilities and immensity of British
Columbia mineral resources thus:
"There are only two ways by which
a mining country can be opened up.
hither capital must be attracted to do
the mining or the government must do
the mining themselves. Any government not sufficiently radical to adopt
the latter policy, should carefully refrain
fi om dabbling tn legislation, of which
that policy la the only logical conclusion.
* "The foundation of the whole business is the prospector.   He should be
Siasconset, Mass , for the wireless tele-	
graph station which will receive met-| |eft severely'alone by the legislator and
$12,000, and about 400,000 feet of lum
berwillbe used.   When the new ore
bins are completed, there will be, it to
said, a storage capacity of 11,000 tons.
PROMISING GREENWOOD PROPERTY
Howard C. Walters has leased to
Wm Fowler, well known in the Boundary and American Okanogan districts,
the Providence mineral claim, situated
near Greenwood, for twelve months
from September 1st, the leasee to bear
all costs of working same and to pay
lessor 10 per eent of net returns of all
ore sold, says the Greenwood Times.
Conditionally that claim shall not meanwhile have been sold to someone else.
Mr. Fowler has the right to purchase it
for the sum of $10,000 cash. The Providence was one of Ihe first claims in the
Boundary district to ship ore. One
shaft is down 70 feet and a second shaft
15 feet, from which 600 sacks of ore, together weighing 82,500 pounds, have
been sent to the Tacoma smelter .giving
an average return of 400 ounces in
silver and one ounce in gold per ton.
sages from tbe Nantucket lightship. \
Ground connections were made by
placing eight heavy metallic plates,
2|x8 feet, in the ground.
In Russia oil holds absolute sway.
And from Baku to Nishni Novgorod
petroleum finds favor on railways and
steamships alike For 20(0 miles along
the Volga boats ply from north to south
propellefl by means of oil, of which 8,-
000,000 tons Is used in Russia alone.
regulation framer. His customs vary-
according to conditions Leave him to
hammer them out for himself and make
no law touching prospecting not based
on them. Next to tne prospector comes
the local mining svndicate, which has a
good property, which it wants to make
into a mine It has a tough job in front
of it. Any legislation based on the
assumption that it is picking up large
chunks of gold and silver every shift is
An Austrian electrician has devised a bound to be away off.   Then comes the
L_ _______^   _������___.�����_������;*��,,   willa   >li_>__AtA.i    in
telephone which takes care of itself It
has a phonograph attachment.nnd when
the owner is away from home,he simply
sets the machine to say to those who
call him up: "I am away from home.
The phonograph will take the message."
Tellurium waa first obtained in 1782
from telluride of gold in the mines of
Transylvania. It has not been used in
any form and is only interesting to
scientific chemists and metallurgists.
It is very light and brittle, easily fused,
and so volatile that it burns if heated in
the air.
As an instance of the difficulty attending tho making of sur.eys in Alaska,
Mr. FrancisTagliahue, of East Oakland,
has just made a survey of a strip only
200 feet long at Karluk, on Kadiak
island, which required a trip of 46 days
and an outlay of over |500.
Theoretically, there Is no obstacle to
working mines 12,000 feet deep. Mines
5,000 feet deep are now ueing worked,
and the other 7,000 feet coula,probably,
admit of a vertical shaft with intermediate landings and separate hoisting engines���a winze on a large scale, with,
of course, proper ventilation.
Comparison of the economy of the
compound and triple stage expansion
types of engines in similar work and in
vessels substantially the aame.extending
over one year in both cases, shows that
the triple-stage engine cost less for coal
by 18 per cent, the cost of up-keep being
nn greater with one type than with the
other.
There is excitement in Colorado over
a great strike made by an old darky at
Georgetown. The entire country adjacent has heen staked. He has named
the claim The Harris, after himself
is very liberal with Ins ore, as
big mining companies with directors in
London or Chicago and other embellishments. This is a very timid bird.easily
scared. Dividends is what it is after.
Any legislation that touches its dividends is liable to hurt its feelings. Insecurity of conditions will keep it away
altogether. But no mining country can
get along without it. And the biggest
problem, which today stares in the face
of the government of a country containing unexploited mineral resources, is
how to steer a course amid the rising
waves of modern radical opinions as
held by the average elector and at the
same time keep legislation in such shape
as to make capital willing to invest in
mining operations in the country "
CHEAP   TREATMENT.
LARGEST   IN   THK   WORLD.
A despatch from Grand Forks says
theGranby smelter is now being enlarged to double Its present capacity,
and will within six weeks be treating
1800 tons of ore daily. Since the arrival
of H. C. S. Miner from the east, il has
been decided to make a still further
enlargement, bringing the capacity up
to 2000 tons a day. Besides the new
plant now being installed, two additional furnaces will be ordered immediately. As it takes four or five months
to build a furnance, the plant will not
be bronght up to its maximum capacity
before next spring. When these furnaces are installed the Granby smelter
will be the largest gold-copper smelting
plant in the world
BIG PROFITS POR THK MONTH.
The secretary of the Ymir mines has
issued a circular to the share-holders in
the company giving the result of the
Ymir's operations for the month of
August. During the month the company's mill ran for 29 days and 10 hours,
dropping 80 stamps, and while the
tonnage put through the mill Is not
given, the estimated profit on the
month's operation is given at $26,600.
He
solid
In conversation with a representative
of the Phoenix Pioneer, Mr.Miner, president of the Granby Co., expressed him
self as greatly pleased with the work
that has been done at both the mines
and the company's smelter at Phoenix
in the last twelve months. He stated
that while they had alreadv gotten the
cost of treating ore down to what was
believed to be a low figure���generally
believed on the outside to be $1 90 per
ton���within six months they would still
further reduce the cost at least 25 per
aiMit. It was the aim to treat Phoenix
ores as cheap if not cheaper than similar
work could be done at any existing
smelter.
On the completion of the Republic
and Grand Forks railway it is understood that the freight and treatment
rate for Republic ores will not exceed
$6.50 per ton. These ores will be
treated ai Grand Forks.
The improvements now going on at
the Mother Lode smelter, to double Its
capacity, necessitate the expenditure of
"NUMEROUS   AND   COSTLY."
The "farmers-1 at the Le Roi are
having a perfect picnic. The daily
accidents are like wedding presents
"numerous and costly" and the casualty
list is assuming alarming propositions.
���Rossland World.
MKAHURK   POR   MEASURE.
Do not look for wrong and evil-
Yon will find them if you do;
As vou measure for your neighbor,
He will measure back to you.
Look for goodness; look for gladness >,
You will meet them all the while,
If you bring a smiling visage
To the glass you meet a smile.
JARRING.
Millionaire���My son, I started at ten
years of age a clerk in a country store.
Today I'm worth ten millions.
His Son���Well, pop, you couldn't do
it these days, you know. Dey all ha*
cash registers.
N THE PAYSTREAK, SANDON, B. C, OCTOBER 5,
I'
The Eoolutionanj Process.
Messrs. Morgan, Rockefeller, Harri-
man and others are doing the people of
the earth a service they little dream of.
They are concentrating the industries
and producing harmony where all is
war and strife. They are convincing
millions that competition is a failure
and are putting the millions in such
relation to them that they will become
natural antagonists, Then the majority will only have to assume the control and direction of the industries,
turning the stream of wealth produced
into the public treasury instead of into
the pockets of the millionaires. The
millionaires will not be able to hire men
to support ownership by the few of all
the nation's wealth. It will be very
easy to make the transformation. The
sooner the wealth is in the. hands of the
very few the sooner will the transfer1
come. The industries will be organized
so completely that there will be no friction in their operation when that day of
deliverence comes. It is part of the
evolutionary process.
Certiflcate of Improvements.
MINER BOY MINERAL CLAIM.
Situate in the Slocan Mining Dirision of West
Kootenay District Where located:���North
of Bear Lake, about two miles from the
K. & S. railway and aboat \ mile West of
the London Mineral Claim. .
TAKE NOTICE that I, W. J. H. Holmes, acting as agent for Charles Schoenberger, Free
Miners Certiiicote, No B3776.1, August Frieder-
ich Adams, Free Miner's Certificate No. B37781
and Theodore Prederich Adams, Free Miner's
Certificate No. B37780, intend, sixty days from
the date hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for
the purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant of the
above claim.
And further take notice that action, under
section 37, must be commenced before the issuance of such Certiflcate of Improvements.
Dated this 15th day of Sept.. A. D. I'M.
W. J. H. HOLMES, P xj. S.
Agent.
NOTICE.
FOR SALE.
A limited number of shares in
the Similkameen Valley Coal
Oo��� Limited. For further particulars apply to
W. W. FALLOWS.
Sandon, B. C.
M. L. Grimmett,
L. L. H.,
BARRISTER, SOLICITOR,
NOTARY PUBLIC, ETC.
SANDON, B. C.
NOTICE is hereby given that thirty days
after date I intend to apply to the Chief
Commissioner of Lands and Works. Victoria,
B. C, for a special license to cut and carry
away timber from the following described
lands.
Commencing at a post marked Willard V
Hill's South West Corner, about one and one
half miles South West from the head of Slocan Lake, thence South eighty chains, thence
East eighty chains, thence North eighty
chains, thence West eighty chains to starting
point containing 640 acres.
WILLARD V. HILL.
Dated September 9th, 1901.
palace footel
KNOWLES & FINLAY,
0\
The dining room of the
Palace Hotel has just been
opened under competent management. Run on the American plan.
Meals 50c    Tickets $7
inrinnfo-
main St   *   Sandon
W. W. WARNER,
MINING ENGINEER.
******
MINING PROPERTIES HANDLED
ON COMMISSION.
Mining Properties Examined   and    Reports
Made.   Will Open up Mining Properties by
Contract or Salary.   Twenty Years'
Experience.
Sandon   Bottling
Co.
C. A. BIGNEY.
-*-ft*ft-*-*fta-
Manufacturers oi
Carbonated Drinks
of all kinds.
CODY AVENUE       -       SANDON.
\k000000000000000000000000W
| Mverpthing    |
Wou Wear \
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5
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Should be purchased
on a common sense
basis. You cannot
get something for
nothing. The man
who buys cheap
shoddy is not only
the poorest but the
most expensively
dressed. He does
not get the worth of
his money. The man
who buys good
clothes dresses for
less money. The
best is the cheapest
every time. There
is a large difference
between purchasing
cheap goods and
purchasing goods
cheap.     p��    <fi    ojjl
w
���ft
8
ft
ft
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Tbap> 0ats, 3t\ran,
and Wlf)eat at
(Biegertclfs
THE BIG STORE.
��� Having made special  arrangements to receive Bailp
Shipments of Oreen Groceries, fresh Mutter
and ZLzggS we are in a position to fill your orders promptly
with good selected stock.
IN DRY GOODS.
Special bargains in Ladies Shirt Waists consisting of
Silks, Organdies, Muslins and All Over Laces. Ready-
made Skirts in Tweeds, Serges, Crash and Ducks.
B few Sailor fbats to Close ��ut at Cost
Mens' Furnishings.
The most complete line of shirts ever shown in the
west. Neglige, Cambric, Silk and Flannell Outing. A
large shipment of ties in latest styles to arrive this nock.
IXhe 1bunter*%\enbrick Co., Zimiteb
p. 3Burn$ & Co.
��$i��
**
%
Tbead ��ffice,
nelson, X. C.
g     See ��ur Stock.    $
\VI)0So 3Bvowtto\
\\\0000000000000000000000^
IReco Bvenue,
Sandon, 3B. C.
Bealers 3n
fresh
and
Cured
Meats
of all
Tkinds.
MARKETS IN ALL THE PRINCIPAL TOWNS OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA.

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