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The Paystreak Dec 9, 1899

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Array BOOK IV.
SANDON, DECEMBER, 9 1899.
CHAPTER 10
HAPPENINGS IN BRIEF.
A. W.   Wright went to Rossland
yesterday.
Thomas Brown returned from Nelson Thursday.
(Jeorge Clark spent a few days in
Nelson this week.
I". L. Christie attended court in
Nelson this week.,
('. M. Wilson returned from Spokane on Wednesday. ,
J. D. Giegerieh returned on Thurs
day from the Halcyon springs.
Isaac CcawtVd is tfelievi,ng Thos.
Jalland during liis absence on his
holiday trip.
A. W. Bristol, who recently returned from AMin, went to Lewiston,
Idaho, on Sunday last.,
Mr. and Mrs. George Petty of
Three Forks arc on a tone of Pacific
Coast points. They will return to
the Slocan in April.
There isa delay at the Wakefield
concentrator. Machinery shipped
f'roiu I>enver, Col., several weeks
jiffu has not arrived yet.
Mi>s Nellie Beamis is o Relating
hehind the counter at Atherton's
Christmas Bazaar. The Bazaar is
doing �� land pttice business.
M. K. Hull went to Kaslo vester-
dav on a holiday trip. He will prob��
ahly take hi Spokane and other
prints before returning to Sandon.
Rev. Mr. Roberts of New Denver
will conduct the services In the
Methodist church to morrow. Mr.
Sun ford will preach   in  Slocan City.
Win. II iod and Ilarrv < unpeau
who have been engaged onthe eon-
structloii of the Wakefield e&fieen-
traiQf tor sometime, are back again
in Sandon,
Mayor Pitts, M. L. Grimmett,
'has. I). Hunter, W. MacDonald,
''��� N. Main and John T, Buckley
attended the excursion over the
Columbia i\c Western.
The Chicfi to Resiqn.
Oilier of Police Lawrence  Doolari
announces his intention to hand in
''Is resignation ut the next meeting
"I'the city council. "Larry" lias upheld the majesty <>f the law in Sandon
"IllCe the town was incorporated aud
ll;ls tilled the difficult "lliee ot chief of
Hiee with tact and judgment under
���'" circumstances, His resignation
will be accepted with i4egret by the
c,t.V council and the citizens geiier-
iillv.
, *li*. Doolau's next sphere of use-
���illness will He in the employ of the
'v- h'- A N. (,'o., with whom he is to
,;|k<' a responsible position. The announcement has not yet been official-
V made but it is understood that he
is to be  road  master  for  that com-
1'IIIIV.
�� is nor, probable that a successor
wiil-be appointed this year, as the
present members would prefer to let
lu'"cw council select a chief ot
pqiice according to their own judgment.
THE ALIEN LAB0R_C0MMISSION.
R. C. Clute, Qi (J., the commission
er appointed by the Dominion government in persuance of a request
made by the Slocan miners' unions
that some action be, taken to prevent
the Mine Owners Association importing men trom the United States, arrived on Tuesday evening's train,
accompanied by his secretary, Mr.
Harris.
Without delav Mr. Clute commenced proceedings. On Tuesday
evening at the Union hall he opened
the investigation and after having
his credentials read, proceeded to
make pUin that he was heFe Uo'in-
quire into the labor situation in all.
its phases and to receive testimony j
of any kind whatever that was in
any way bearing on the case.
The first witness t > be put on the
stand was Angus J. MacDonald, a
member of the Miners' Union. In
answer to the Commissioner's questions MacD maid's evidence brought
out the fact that he was a miner fa
Briish subject, had been in the-Slo-
can two years, was employed at the
Payne up to the 1st of June,, had received ��3 50 a day for ten-h.mr shifts.
He believed that men wonld do as
much in eight hours as in ten and
tiaj the Union was ready to stand
th ��� test: that 50J or 600 men were
thrown out of work by the Association and that, the majority were still
in Sandon ami vicinity, most of those
who had left being still in the surround ing camps in B. C. He had
b 'en in Seattle for the purpose of dissuading men from coming into th.'
Slocan to woi'K for the Association,
iiad met. F. A. Wojd theie trviug to
employ men, had seen the advertis-
ineuttt of the employ ment agencies
for miners to work in the Slocan, had
seen c ��pies of the agreements given
by the agencies of which he produced
copies with affidavits from men employed together with their addresses.
He hid s-en five men arrive from
Seattle to work at the Payne. From
their language he judged them to be
Italians, Swedes and a Fin. Did not
known whether they were U, S. citi
/ens or not.
During Mac!) maid's testimony the
Commissioner, explained a point in
the lab >r law that was not generally
unde stood, i. e. that the law was
onlv operative against such countries as had similar laws against.
Canada.
Oil Wednesday morning the witnesses were C, H. Hand, superintendent ot th-' Payne, and Geo.
Alexander of Kaslo. Mr. Hind explained the situation the mine owners took and their reasons for refusing
the ??;S.f>0 asked by the Miners, Union
for oijjht hours. lie stated it as his
belief that the miners would not do
as much in eight hours as in ten. He
also stated that the men employed in
Seattle and brought to Sandon to
work in the Pavne mine were American citizens. He thought that there
was employment for 20,30 men in the
district. He said that the only at-
temp to bring in men to work in the
mines was by advertisment.
Mr. Alexander's evidence was
along the same line as Mr. Hands,
the only radical difference being III
his estimate that there was employ
ment for 3003 miners in this district. | The Association Union Conference.
The investigation did not proceed i 	
oiv Wednesday afternoon on account I    At the meeting of the Silver-Lead
ot the conference to be held between \ y[\tHi Owners'
the Union and Association th.it even-
(Association on Tuesday evening Messrs. Hand, Rammcl-
meyer and Wright were chosen as a
delegation to make overtures to the'
Miners' Union with a view to effecting a settlement of the labor dilii-
mmmmmmmmmMMmmmMm -     "  - icultv.   On Wednesday evening they
htfur day, aud confirmed a statement | met Messrs Smith., Haglerand David-
made by A. J. MacDonald that the |gon 0f the 'Sandon union and J. J.
m��nnr,ir..u nf Mm miiiuw   araila   UmhoI,    ..   ���-
On Thursday morning the witness
were J. J. McDonald of Whitewater
aiid J. A. Ryan.'   McDonald,  who is
secretary of the Whitewater union
merely stated his belief in the eight
majority of the miners  were  British
subject. '' ' < -      ...j ,  ,
Mr. Ryan's evidence was so.newhat
muddled and incoherent     He said
McDonald of the Whitewater branch
and Win. Find ley of the Silverton
organization.
The,conference was brief and re-
��� r- , ���    ,mio wiiiereuoe   was   or!
thatvUe had been employing men tor ( suited merely in an official advance-
many, years, had imported) men from ,m.,,t Dy tire Association of the pro-
Eastjrn Canada to work In the mines position made a few days earlier by
and had found them good men. He Messrs. Hand and Wood when the
had worked in mines himself and delegation from the Kaslo Board of
believed that a conscientious miner | Trade was in Sandon. That is to
would do  as much woi'k   iu   eight |8aV)   t|le   Association   offer
hours as in ten. H^^^^^
On Thursday afternoon Messrs.
Wood, Perry, Wright and Smi.th
were on the stand. F. A. Wood was
the only important witness, as the
evidence of the others brought out
nothing new.    Mr. Wood stated that,  io iiuii       ���,,������, MHM   iUl
the Association had tried to employ   be given before Monday,
men from  wherever they could get
 s  to pay
83.25 per day to miners and the
Union scale to laborers, timbermen
and blacksmiths^'
The proposals of the Association
will conn1 before the' Miners' Union
for consideration this evening, but it
is not probable that  an answer will
them,   Seattle   included.     II<;   had
gone to Seattle himself to get men,
and produced an order for* all the!
miners that could be had at $5 00 a |
day.   H : had met  men there whom
he told to  go to   Sandon   and go to
work   and    guaranteed   that   they
would  not   be   molested.     Ife   had
asked no one as to their nationality. !
Referring to the eight-hour day fie
said that  they   had   men   working
eight-hour shirts in the Last Chance;
but did not consider their work a fair j
test as   it   was   invariably   in  wet
places or bad air
Early Wedding Bells.
The first positive evidence of a
threatened epidemic of matrimony
occurred on Thursday morninjj ait
six o'clock, when George B. McDonald of Cody was united in wedlock to
Miss Lou Hammond of Sandon.
The ceremony took pbice in the
Goodenougii parlor's, only immediate
members of the family being present
Alter breakfast the party repaired
to the C. P. R. "depot, where amidst a
_    heavy shower of rice,  good wishes
r...^~ v..      He would not say j and antiquated footwear, the  happy
that men could not do in eight hours; couple boarded the train en route tor
as much as they could in ten,   but he j Southern California.
did not believe that they would. .Many    handsome    presents    bore
Yesterday morning Geo. Hughes, j ample testimony to the esteem in
superintendent of the Idaho mines, I which both bride and groom arc held
was before the commission. His evi j both at home aud abroad. The Pay-
denee' was reasonable and impartial, i stkkak joins with these In wishing
He did not believe that as much j them a long, happy and prosperous
would be accomplished In eight as in j life.
ten hours, but had no figures to prove, i    Mr. and  Mrs.   MacDonald expect
Win. Davidson followed.    He was i to be at home  at   their residence,
crossquestioned by F. A. Wood, who j Cody, about the loth of January
endeavored to prove that the   "One j ���~    ���    ���
Thousand Miners" mentioned  in the T,,e C,D,C Elections.
. ._.   ...    r  :     n..;.;   I, .... ���~	
first despatch to Laurier as British
subjects was an exaggeration.   Da
vidson maintained   that   in   all   tlu
According to the city charter the
nomination of candidates for civic
honors should take place on the sec-
IB* ��� ��� ... ���--
mines for which the  Association wfis ond Monday in January, which will
were
trying to  import  men   there
many more than 10 XJ citizens.
Yesterday afternoon's session was
uneventful.   The following are the
the official   figures of the   Miners'
Union   of   the   membership   in
different camps: Sandon 520, White
water 110, Silverton  130,
the
be the 8th, and the elections on  the
following Thursday, the  llth prox.
Candidates   for    the    mayoralty
must be owners of real  property to
the value  of  81000, title   to   which
must be registered in the  Victoria
t office not less than six months prior
New Den-l^^e date of election.   Aldermanic
be   the   registered
  ^^^^^^^^^^^^ to  tho value of
100, Greenwood <U, uamp .ncKmney j��5(jq    The municipal  assessment is
Sixtv-tive per cent of the Sandon | taken as t|le basis of valuation. Only
ver 50, Slocan City 48, Nelson 240. candidates must b
Ymir 125, Rossland   L40X PhoeniX owners of property
100, Greenwood 70, Camp Melvmney |5qq.   Tnc muriici,
of the
proportion
.')0. kJIA��,l-��'"   f   ���      -"        ,
members are British subjects and 75
Whitewater members. The
in other camps is not
available. There are 285 members
or the Sandon union employed in this
camp at present.
Mrs   A Henderson  has opened a
millinery store in the Crawford block.
four men are eligible for mayor and
ten for aldermen. No candidateg
have yet declared their intention to.
run for office. The City Clerk is pre"
j paring the voters' list.
Rev. J. A. Cleland left this morning for his new field of labor at
Eugene. Ore.
'I
��� The Paystreak.
The Labor Commission.
i' �����
R. C. Clute, Q. C, of Toronto, wbo
has been sent to British Columbia by
the Dominion government at Ottawa to investigate the labor difficulty and to ascertain whether or
not the enforcement of the Alien
Lobor law is expedient, comes clothed
with ali the powers ot a travelling
court. He ia commissioned wish
authority to take affidavits and receive testimony trom an> source
whatsoever on anv matter reiati/e to
the question in point.
The investigation is being conduct
ed in the fairest manner possible and
both sides are fully represented.
Mr. Clute has been in public life in
Canada for many years and his rec
ord b that of an honest and honorable
man. His conclusions wi!l be fair
and unbiased. If either the Mine
Owners' Association or the Miners'
Union tiind anything objectionable
in the report they will be forced to
reflect that they are injured by the
truth. Nothing more and nothing
leas will be contained in tbe findings
of Commissioner Clute.
STATE OWSED RAILWAYS
The attention of those fearsome
souls who believe government ownership of railways is a foredoomed
failure is invited jo the case of New
South Wales. According to a communication from the secretary of the
New South Wales railway commis-
sion, government ownership has
done ail its advocates elnlm it can be
made to do. The government has
given good service, kept up and improved the equipment, and last year
it made a profit on the investment oi
3 75 per cent.
When the government took over
tbe railways in 18#3 the rolling stock
was delapitated and the roadbeds,
sheds ana machine shops ia bad condition. There were i'2i locomotives,
and some had been on the line over
thirty years. The government bought
l^J new locomotives and had 74 re
built.
The government replaced 1570
wornont coaches with 11H4 new ones
ot greater size. It added 321 coaches
and increased the Beating c*pacit\
f <r passengers from 2&,&zZ to 35,4'JO.
All these coaches are supplied with
air brakes, and the passenger coaches
have gas lights. The government
has erected a new foundry, numerous
engine sheds and great shop! winch
are to be equipped with modern
machinery, electric cranes, and all
needful appliances. The government's management has been economical. It bftf reduced expendi'ure.
j'ist as a private corporation would
nave done. It adopted a standard
axle box which saved oil, tallow and
���waste." It erected a plant for
washing "waste." and saved on its
lubricating bills by substituting mineral oils for vegetable. That is a
pretty conclusive answer to the argument that governments can not, or
will not. exercise such foresight in
conducting business as the individual
or private Corporation would.
Opponents of government ownership always like to believe the service
would be poor. A sample of the service is afforded by the tables of train
ddays. For the year ending June
30th, 189'J, the government operated
270G miles of road, and its total train
runs amounted   to 8,860,648  miles.
Of its through trains. 91 per cent
were on time, and only 7.17 per cent
were more than five mioates late.
Ninety-eight per cent ot its local
trains were oo time, and 100 per
cent of its suburban trains were oo
time.   No poor service about that.
Tbe conclusion one is forced to
draw is that government ownership
in New South Wales looks remarkably like a successful venture after
ten" years of trial. Bat it never
woald have been a success if it had
not been tried, and it never will be
a success in this country until it is
tried.
A LES30S IX ECONOMICS.
Notwithstanding tbe eulogies that
have been lavished on the Canadian
people by the Canadian press for
their enterprising activity in mining,
the tact remains that the citizens of
this country are the last to take advantage of the resources which oar
country contains.   There is no better
evidence of this fact than is furnished
by She comparison of an Ottawa
despatch uf Nov. 1st in the Toronto
Mail and a Vaneoaver despatch of
the same date in the Toronto World.
The Ottawa despatch suites that
ex Senator Warner Miller, of New
York, arte U in Ottawa in company
with Galeae! McNaught of the Irreat
Northern, has taken advantage of
the Slocan miners' strike to purchase
a large number ��� f valuable claims in
the Slocan at what he considers very
reasonable prices.
The Vaneoaver despatch states
that the Sfaeaa strike is nearly over
and that the Provincial government
v\ill be asked to intervene so that
mining operations can   be resumed.
Ex Senator Miller is a wealthy
man. He has made millions in the
pulp industry in the United States.
He is known throughout the American continent asa man whoisalways
ready to take advantage of hisoppor
tunities. The Slocan strike afforded
him opportunities to purchase claims
at prices which he did not consider
exorbitant, It also afforded him the
opportunity tu employ the best miners at a wage which he did not
consider unfair. "Pulp Wood" Miller,
ag he is known throughout the United
States, is a successful man and the
success which has made him president of the great International
Paper Company and the Nicaragua
Canal Company is a guarantee of
future success in his mining operations in the Slocan.
Tin- Vancouver despatch is characteristic of the Canadian people.
The Ontario investors have done
nothing but bemoan the strike���the
cause ef which they evidently do not
understand���and wait for the miners
to give in or the govern men to intervene on their behalf. They
have lost the interest on their capital invested and have watched the
value of their st<<:ks decline while
such men as Warner Miller have
taken advantage of that decline tor
which they were themselves responsible.
The actions of Warner Miller are
as characteristic of the enterprising
American as the actions of the Ontario investors are characteristic of
the less active Canadian.
So it comes that Americans are
found owning many of the best mineral claims while Canadians lock
their money up in farm mortgages
and look to the government to help
them reduce the wages ot a better
class of their fellow citizens.
E. R. Atherton Co., Ltd.
AJUULU 9 9 AAA B fJJiA %x
LADIES
See the New
DOUBLE COTTON
BLANKETS,
Large Size,
Which we are Selling
at $1.50 a pair.
u
GENTLEMEN
We have 50
HEAVY MACKINAW
SUITS
at $0.00 a suit.
E.R. Atherton Co., Ltd.
$ IHi^I^i^ON, B. C, DECEMBER
9,   1899.
It
<On new Denver
Kew Denver Ledge.
The rising of the October full moon
over the twin peaks of Silver mountain
is a memorable scene in New Denver:
at once unique and beautiful to behold.
A short time before it rises the peaks
of the mountain are capped by a halo
of light. To the west, across Slocan
hike, its silvery reflection glistens
among the icefields of the Lowery
glacier, lying on the crest of the Vai-
haila mountains; to the east, away up
Carpenter creek canyon, its light shines
down on the slopes of Payne mountain,
and lights up the great Four Mile basin
and the northern slopes of Red mountain. New Denver is still in the shadow, but while we are admiring the
beauty of the picture, and watching
the white light climbing from eliffto
cliff, and penetrating the dark valleys,
a glimpse of the moon suddenly draws
the eye to the highest pinnacle of the
great twin sentinels Slowly it enlarges
until at last it hangs like a globe of
light directly over the pertks. Us light
���rINti'iis and elides over the rippling
waters of the lak \ steals up the streets
and highways aud byways, and it is
moonlii ht in the Queen City of the lake
The electric street lamps are dimmed
in the brightness of the moonlight It
is everywhere, and even penetrates the
deep-shaded lover's nooks and lights
up the trails through the woods to the
several mines hard by. Out on the
placid waters of the lake moonlight
rowing parties enliven the scene, and
make merry the evening hours with
their hilarity.
Standing upon the lake shore one's
attention is attracted across the water
to Mill creek, where there's n light in
the window shining for all.    It is that
In the home of Big Sandy McKay.    Off
to the north the lights of our neighboring town of Roseberv, shine over the
water, while along the lake shore may
be seen the occasional glow of the headlight of the C. P. R. engine as it rolls
on its way  and climbs the mountain
side to Sandon.     Still   nearer, across
Bigelow bay, the Mollie Hughes group
nnd farther east and higher up on Goat
mountain the Capeila group, show their
lights.   Away to the east, up Denver
canyon, the lights of the famous Payne
mine are in evidence night after night,
augyestingthe permanency of its record.
Back down the canyon again, and near
to town,   "Batt"  keeps  vigil  at the
Mountain Chief  and  keeps  his light
burning.   Up on the broad bosom of
Silver mountain the camp lights of the
California, Marion-Merrimac, and the
Hartney mines are to be seen in their
respective locations;   backed up by the
Home Run, Mowlch, Anglo-Saxon, Lost
T'tfcr, etc ;  thence down through the
foothills to the lake are the Queen City,
the    Frisco,    Ruby,   Fidelity-Bosun,
Neglected, etc.
Away to the south, beyond the cosy
little town of Silverton (whose brilliant
"ghts though not seen are often heard)
tl"; hoisting works of the Galena Farm
loo'n np in the moonlight, and the phenomenal Noonday sends forth its natural stream of wealth,  while farther
south and beyond, the occasional camp for th
fires along the gold belt of Red mountain show up the persevering efforts of
the active and ever hopeful prospector.
All these are rapidly passed in view
and our gaze wanders back to the
placid waters of the Silvery Slocan glittering in the moonlight. We muse on
the days���but "we will touch the harp
gently" and leave each reader to recall
their own happy, loving memories.
Again we must not forget that our
lovely lake in all its beauty, like many
a pretty girl, has its moments of temper, and when she stamps her foot and
the frown gathers, it is time for little
boats to scud for the shore and even the
stately "Slocan" is fain to drop a little
dignity and pass the wharf to sheer
round to the friendly shelter of Union
bay.   While we are gazing and musing
a  fresh  breeze  comes up  the  lake
Glancing to the south, we notice a dark
cloud rising over Six Mile point and
rolling rapidly up toward the glacier.
The breeze grows stronger, the white
caps chase each other up the lake; the
sky is rapidly overcast and the moon is
hid from view.     The  waves  roll up
higher and higher, and dash over the
shore.   It is one of those hurricanes
that sweep down the mountain passes;
fierce while it lasts, but soon over, and
the wind lulls as suddenly as it came
The clouds disappear, and the moonlight  is  brighter  than   before.    The
picture is even more enchanting, and,
tired with watching the ever changing
scenes of grandeur, we seek our humble
ree months. He will sail on the
Oceanic next week, and a host of friends
wish him bon voyage and a safe return
to the Silvery Slocan.
Martin Melde, for years nurse and
steward in the Slocan Hospital, is on his
way to Norway, where he will marry the
girl that he left behind him nine years
ago.	
New Invention!.
KOOTENAY    RAILWAY
& NAVIGATION CO.
Operating Kaslo & Slocan Railway,
International Navigation &
Trading Company,
Below is a list ofi new inventions le-
cently patented by various inventors,
through the agency of Messrs Marion
A Marion, New York Life building,
Montreal:
M. A. Carbonneau, Yamachiche, P.Q.,
fastening device for shoes;  A. Wood,
Folkestone, England, improvements in
harness; Joseph Rey, Joliette, P.Q., ice |
tongs; R. E. Gengo, Kingston, Ont., ash
sifter; James Matthews, Acton  West,
Ont., rein holder; James Mocrody, Temple. England, preservation of eggs;H.
Lemieux,   Montreal,  improvements in
pipes; A. Forland, Ste. Marie Beauce,
P.Q., advertising signs; F. X. Drolet,
Quebec, valve gear for engine; Alfred
Pageau, Montreal, automatic valve teg-
ulator; J. W. Murray. St. George, N.B.,
window sashes; Rev. Arthur Guindon,
Montreal, rotary engine.
KASLO & SLOCAN RAILWAY.
Schedule of Time.    Pacific Standard
��   ���Time-
Passenger train for Sandon   and
way stations leaves Kaslo at 8:00 a
m. daily,  returning, leaves Sandon
at 1:15 p. m., arriving at   aslo at
3:55 p. m.
home for rest.
W.D.
NEW 1IKXVKK ITKMS.
The Marion will make a shipment as
soon as the ore can be sacked.
Constable Forbes has been appointed
license inspector for the Slocan.
F. J. O'Reilly and W. H. Bullock-
Webster leave for England this week.
Richard Lorah and Leta Parker were
married in Greenwood a few days ago.
Iu New Denver, on December 5, the
wile of J. C. Harris, of a son; stillborn.
The Miners' Union will  have an arc
light erected in  front of their hall, the
first one in town.
Deadwood is the latest town in the
Boundary. Wonder if there are no new
names left for new towns.
Miss Oretta Jacobson wiil spend the
winter with her folks in Norway. She
sails from New York this week.
P. Angrignon sold three head of pack
animals last week, for use between Slocan City and the Chapleau mine.
,1. B. McArthur has gone to Toronto
for a short time. He will travel in the
Holy land before returning west
M. R. W. Rathbome left for Kngland
on Monday. He will spend the winter
there after an absence ot fully seventeen
years.
Andv Tunks left Thursday to spend
the winter in Ingersoll, Ont. He will
prospect the Kettle river country before
returning here.
The children of the Sunday school are
busy practising for the Christmas entertainment, to be held in Clever's hall, on
Friday, Dec. 22nd.
Charles 8. Rashdall entertained his
friends with a dinner at the Newmarket
Mondav evening, previous to his depar-
ture to'England, where he will remain
1
It was General Custer who said, some
thirty years ago, that warfare in a mountainous country was almost impossible
without the aid of mules. In view of the
things that resulted from a mule stampede near Ladysmith, the other day, the
British war office will probably rank
Custer as an American humorist of malicious disposition.
Lady���Well, what are you willing to
do for that dinner?
Sandy Pikes���Allow me to make a
propysition, mum. Yeh fill yer husband's meerschaum wid imported fine
cut, an1 den I'll rid yer wardrobes of
moths by blowin'smoke through de keyhole. 	
There was an old Mule from Missouri
Who shot his hind limb out like fury;
A Zulu said "There!"
As he went through the air,
"Dat mule's a lalapaluly."
A gentleman said to a minister, "When
do you expect to see Deacon S. again ?"
"Never!*'said the minister in a solemn manner, "the deacon is in heaven."
Wholesale men predict another rise in
meats.
INTERNATIONAL   NAVIGATION
& TRADING CO., operating on
Kootenay Lake and River.
S. 8. INTERNATIONAL.
Leaves Kaslo for Nelson at 6:00 a.
m., daily except Sunday. Returning
leaves Nelson at 4:30 p. m., calling
at Balfour, Pilot Bay, Ainsworth and
all way points.
Connections with S. F. & N. train
to and from Spokane at Five Mile
Point; also with str. Alberta to and
from Bonner's Ferry, Idaho.
S. 9. ALBERTA.
Leaves Nelson for Bonner's Ferry
Tuesdav and Saturdays at 7 a. m.,
meeting steamer International trom
Kaslo at Pilot Bay. Returning,
leaves Bonner's Ferry at 8 a. m.
Wednesdays and Sundays.
LARDO-DUNCAN DIVISION.
Steamer International leaves Kaslo
for Lardo and Argenta at 8:45 p. m.
Wednesdays and Fridays. Steamer
Alberta leaves Kaslo for Lardo and
Argenta at 8 p.m. Sundays.
Steamers call at principal landings
in both directions, and at other points
when signalled.
Tickets sold to all points i i Ca ada
and the United Statas. To ascertain
rates and fall information, address���
Robert Irving, Manager.
S. Campbell, Kaslo, B. C.
Freight and Ticket Agt., Sandon.
M. W. DAT. Proprietor.
 Manufaturer of all	
Kinds of CARBONATFD DRINKS
Syphons, Gingei Ale,
Sarsaparilla, Etc., Etc.
Sandon, B.O.
Patronize home industry
when you want the best
DEALER IN
MIEIAITIS
E
AT
SANDON, ROSSLAND, NELSON, KASLO, PILOT BAY
THREE FORKS, SLOGAN CITY. The Paystreak.
The Labor Commission.
I
i
if
I ���'
I
i ���
R. C. Clute, Q. C, of Toronto, who
has been sent to British Columbia by
the Dominion government at Ottawa to investigate the labor difficulty and to ascertain whether or
not tbe enforcement of the Alien
Lobor law is expedient, comes clothed
with all the powers of a travelling
court.     He  is  commissioned   with
anthority to take affidavits and receive testimony from any source
whatsoever on anv matter relati/e to
the question in point.
The investigation is being conduct
ed in the fairest manner possible and
both sides are fully represented.
Mr. Clute has been in public life in
Canada for many years and his record is that of an honest and honorable
man. His conclusions will be fair
and unbiased. If either the Mine
Owners' Association or the Miners'
Union fiind anything objectionable
in the report they will be forced to
reflect that they are injured by the
truth. Nothing more and nothing
less will be contained in the findings
of Commissioner Clute.
STATE OWNED RAILWAYS.
The attention of those fearsome
souls who believe government ownership of railways is a foredoomed
failure is invited to the case of New
South Wales. According to a communication from the secretary of the
New South Wales railway commission, government ownership has
done all its advocates clnim it can be
made to do. The government has
given good service, kept up and improved the equipment, and lust year
it made a profit on the investment of
3.75 percent.
When the government took over
the railways in 1888 the rolling stock
was delapitated and the roadbeds,
sheds and machine shops iu bad condition. There were 428 locomotives,
and some had been on the line over
thirty years. The government bought
186 new locomotives and had 74 rebuilt.
The government replaced 1570
Wornout coaches with 1164 new ones
of greater size. It added 324 coaches
and increased the seating capacity
f��r passengers from 28,822 to 35,490.
All these coaches are supplied with
air brakes, and the passenger coaches
have gas lights. The government
has erected a new foundry, numerous
engine sheds and great shops which
are to be equipped with modern
machinery, electric cranes, and all
needful appliances. The government's management has been economical. It has reduced expenditure,
just as a private corporation would
nave done. It adopted a standard
axle box which saved oil, tallow and
������waste." It erected a plant for
washing "waste," and saved on its
lubricating bills by substituting mineral oils for vegetable. That is a
pretty conclusive answer to the argument that governments can not, or
will not, exercise such foresight in
conducting business as the individual
or private corporation would.
Opponents of government ownership always like to believe the service
would be poor. A sample of the service is afforded by the tables of train
delays. For the year ending June
30th, 1899, the government operated
270G miles of road, and its total train
runs amounted  to 8,860,648  miles.
Ofits through trains, 91 per cent
were on time, and only 7.17 per cent
were more than five minutes late.
Ninety-eight per cent of its local
trains" were on time, and 100 per
cent of its suburban trains were on
time.   No poor service about that.
The conclusion one is forced to
draw is that government ownership
in New South Wales looks remarkably like a successful venture after
ten years of trial. But it never
would have been a success if it had
not been tried, and it never will be
a success in this country until it is
tried.
A LESSON IN ECONOMICS.
Notwithstanding the eulogies that
have been lavished on the Canadian
people by the Canadian press for
their enterprising activity in mining,
the fact remains that the citizens of
this country are the last to take advantage of the resources which our
country contains. There is no better
evidence of this fact than is furnished
by the comparison of an Ottawa
despatch of Nov. 1st in the Toronto
Mail and a Vaneoaver despatch of
the same date in the Toronto World.
The Ottawa despatch states that
ex-Senator Warner Miller, of New
York, who is in Ottawa in company
with Colonel McNaught of the Great
Northern, has taken advantage of
the Slocan miners' strike to purchase
a large number of valuable claims in
the Slocan at what"he considers very
reasonable prices.
Tbe Vancouver despatch states
that the Slocan strike is nearly over
and that the Provincial government
will be asked to intervene so that
mining operations can   be resumed.
Ex Senator Miller is. a wealthy
man. He has made millions in the
industry in the United States,
e is known throughout the American continent as a man who is always
ready to take advantage of hisoppor
tunities. The Slocan strike afforded
him opportunities to purchase claims
at prices which he did not consider
exorbitant, It also afforded him the
opportunity to employ the best miners at a wage which he did not
consider unfair. 'Pulp Wood" Miller,
;is he is known throughout the United
States, is a successful man and the
success which has made him president of the great International
Paper Company and the Nicaragua
Canal Company is a guarantee of
future success in his mining operations In the Slocan.
The Vancouver despatch is characteristic of the Canadian people.
The Ontario investors have done
nothing but bemoan the strike���the
cause ef which they evidently do not
understand-and wait for the miners
to give in or the govern men to intervene on their behalf. They
have lost the interest on their capital invested and have watched the
value of their stocks decline while
such men as Warner Miller have
taken advantage of that decline tor
which they were themselves responsible. ^
The actions of Warner Miller are
as characteristic of the enterprising
American as the actions of the Ontario investors are characteristic of
the less active Canadian.
So it comes that Americans are
found owning many of the best mineral claims while Canadians lock
their money up in farm mortgages
and look to the government to help
them reduce the wages of a better
class of their fellow citizens.
E. R. Atherton Co., Ltd.
JUUULJUUULJUULJLJULftJULA
LADIES
See the Hew
DOUBLE COTTON
BLANKETS,
Large Size,
Which we are Selling
at $1.50 a pair.
GENTLEMEN
We have 50
HEAVY MACKINAW
SUITS
at $0.00 a suit.
E. R. Atherton Co., Ltd. ���ir^v
THE 1
;AVSTREAK, SANDON, B. C, DECEMBER a.   1899.
i
J U IL  ^^ta Hew Deiwr
New Denver Ledge.
The rising of the October full moon
over the twin peaks of Silver mountain
is a memorable scene in New Denver:
at once unique and beautiful to behold.
A short time before it rises the peaks
of the mountain are capped by a halo
of light.   To the west, across Slocan
lake,  its silvery   reflection   glistens
among  the  icefields   of  the  Lowery
glacier, lying on the crest of the Valhalla mountains;   to the east, away up
Carpenter creek canyon, its light shines
down on the slopes of Payne mountain,
and lights up the great Four Mile basin
and the northern slopes of Red mountain.   New Denver is still in the shadow, but while we  are  admiring the
beauty of the picture, and  watching
the white light climbing from cliff to
cliff, nnd penetrating the dark valleys,
a glimpse of the moon suddenly draws
the eye to the highest pinnacle of the
great twin sentinels  Slowly it enlarges
until at last it hangs like a globe of
light directly over the peaks.   Its light
"���likens and   irlides over the rippling
water* "f the lak \ steals up the streets
and highways and  byways, and  it is
moonlit ht iu the Queen City of the lake
The electric street lamps are dimmed
in the brightness of the moonlight      It
is everywhere, and even penetrates the
deep-shaded   lover's nooks and lights
up the trails through the woods to the
several mines hard by.    Ont  on the
placid waters  of  the   lake moonlight
rowing parties enliven the scene, nnd
make merry the evening hours with
their hilarity.
Standing upon the lake shore one's
attention is attracted across the water
to Mill creek, where there's a light in
the window shining for all.    It is that
In the home of Big Sandy McKay.    Off
to the north the lights of our neighboring town of Rosebery, shine over the
water, while along the lake shore mav
be seen the occasional glow of the headlight of the C. P. R. engine as it rolls
on its way  and climbs the mountain
side, to Sandon.     Still   nearer, across
Bigelow bay, the Mollie Hughes group
and farther east and higher up on Goat
mountain the Capella group, show their
lights.   Away to the east, up Denver
canyon, the lights of the famous Payne
mint- are in evidence night after night,
RUg^-estingthe permanency of its record.
Back down the canyon again, and near
to town.   "Batt"  keeps  vigil  at the
Mountain Chief  and  keeps  his light
���mining.   Up on the broad bosom of
Silver mountain the camp lights of the
California, Marion-Merrimac. and the
Hartney mines are to be seen in their
respective locations;   backed up by the
Home Run, Mowlch, Anglo-Saxon, Lost
Titfcr. etc ;  thence down through the
foothills to the lake are the Queen City.
th��'    Frisco,    Ruby,    Fidelity-Bosun.
Neglected, etc.
Away to the south, beyond the cosy
little town of Silverton (whose brilliant
Htfl'ts though not seen are often heard)
the hoisting works of the Galena Farm
lof>m up in the moonlight, and the phenomenal Noonday sends forth its natural stream of wealth,  while farther
south and beyond, the occasional camp
fires along the gold belt of Red mountain show up the persevering efforts of
the active and ever hopeful prospector.
All these are rapidly passed in view
and our gaze wanders back to the
placid waters of the Silvery Slocan glittering in the moonlight. We muse on
the days-but ''we will touch the harp
gently" and leave each reader to recall
their own happy, loving memories.
Again we must not forget that our
lovely lake in all its beauty, like many
a pretty girl, has its moments of temper, and when she stamps her foot and
the frown gathers, it is time for little
boats to scud for the shore and even the
for three months. He will sail on the
Oceanic next week, anda host of friends
wish him bon voyage and a safe return
to the Silvery Slocan.
Martin Melde, for years nurse and
steward in the Slocan Hospital, is on hie
way to Norway, where he will marry the
girl that he left behind him nine years
ago. 	
New Invention!.
Below is a list ofi new inventions le-
cently patented by various inventors,
through the agency of Messrs Marion
& Marion, New York Life building,
Montreal:
M. A. Carbonneau, Yamachiche, P.Q.,
KOOTENAY    RAILWAY
& NAVIGATION CO.
Operating Kaslo & Slocan Railway,
International Navigation &
Trading Company,
KASLO & SLOCAN RAILWAY.
Schedule of Time.    Pacific Standard
4  ���Time-
Passenger train for Sandon   and
way stations leaves Kaslo at 8:00 a
m. daily, returning, leaves Sandon
at 1:15 p. m., arriving at   aslo at
3:55 p. in.
stately "Slocan" is fain to drop a little , ?' j^TT . ' "���lcnM'nc<���"*��
dignity and pass the wharf to sheer fa8temng deV,Ce for 8hoe8; A' Wood'
round to the friendly shelter of Union
bay. While we are gazing and musing
a fresh breeze comes up the lake
Glancing to the south, we notice a dark
cloud rising over Six Mile point aud
rolling rapidly up toward the glacier.
The breeze grows stronger, the white
caps chase each other up the lake; the
sky is rapidly overcast and the moon is
hid from view. The waves roll up
higher and higher, and dash over the
shore. It is one of those hurricanes
that sweep down the mountain passes;
fierce while it lasts, but soon over, and I
the wind lulls as suddenly as it came
The clouds disappear, and the moonlight  is  brighter  than  before.    The
Folkestone, England, improvements in
harness; Joseph Rey, Joliette, P.Q., ice I
INTERNATIONAL   NAVIGATION
& TRADING CO., operating on
Kootenay Lake and River.
S. S. INTERNATIONAL.
tongs; R. E. Gengo, Kingston, Ont., ash     Leaves Kaslo for Nelson at 6:00 a.
sifter; James Matthews, Acton West,
Ont., rein holder; James Mocrody, Temple. England, preservation of eggs;H.
Lemieux, Montreal, improvements in
pipesjA. Forland, Ste. Marie Beauce,
P.Q., advertising signs; F. X. Drolet,
m., daily except Sunday. Returning
leaves Nelson at 4:30 p. m., calling
at Balfour, Pilot Bay, Ainsworth and
all way pointa
Connections with S. F. & N. train
picture is even more enchanting, and,
tired with watching the ever changing
scenes of grandeur, we seek our humble
home for rest. W.D.
Pageau, Montreal, automatic valve leg-
ulator; J. W. Murray. St. George, N.B.,
window sashes; Rev. Arthur Guindon,
Montreal, rotary engine.
It was General Custer who said, some
thirty years ago, that warfare in a mountainous country was almost impossible
without the aid of mules. In view of the
things that resulted from a mule stampede near Ladysmith, the other day, the
British war office will probably  rank
to and from Spokane at Five Mile
I Point; also with str. Alberta to and
Quebec, valve gear for engine; Alfred from Bonner's Ferry, Idaho.
S. S. ALBERTA,
Leaves Nelson for Bonner's Ferry
Tuesdav and Saturdays at 7 a. m.,
meeting steamer International trow
Kaslo at Pilot Bay. Returning,
leases Bonner's Ferry at 8 a. m,
Wednesdays and Sundays.
LARDO-DUNCAN DIVI9I0N.
Steamer International leaves Kaslo
for Lardo and Argenta at 8:45 p. m.
Wednesdays and Fridays.    Steamer
I Alberta leaves Kaslo for Lardo and
NEW DENVER ITEMS.
The Marion will make a shipment as
soon as the ore can be sacked.
Constable Forbes has been appointed
license inspector for the Slocan.
F. J. O'Reilly and W. H. Bullock-
Webster leave for England this week.
Richard Lorah and Leta Parker were
married in Greenwood a few days ago.
In New Denver, on December 5, the
wile of J. C. Harris, of a son; stillborn.
The Miners' Union will have an arc
light erected in front of their hall, the
first one in town.
Deadwood is the latest town in the
Boundary. Wonder if there are no new
names left for new towns.
Miss Gretta Jacobson wiil spend the
winter with her folks in Norway. She
sails from New York this week.
P. Angrignon sold three head of pack
animals last week, for use between Slocan City and the Chapleau mine.
J. B. McArthur has gone to Toronto
for a short time. He will travel in the
Holy Land before returning west
M R. W. Rathborne left for England
on' Monday. He will spend the winter
there after an absence ot fully seventeen
years.
Andy Tunks left Thursday to spend
the winter in Ingersoll, Ont. He will
prospect the Kettle rivercountry before
returning here.
The children of the Sunday school are
. busy practising for the Christmas entertainment, to be held in Clever'- hall, on
Friday, Dec 22nd.
Charles 8. Uashdall entertained his
friends with a dinner at the Newmarket
Mondav evening, previous to his depar-
tore to'England, where he wdl remain
\
Custer aB an American humorist of ma-1 Argenta at 8 p.m. Sundays.
licious disposition.  I   Steamers call at principal landings
Lady-Well, what are you willing to  in b��th directions, and at other points
do for that dinner? " \wbeP signalled.
Sandy  Pikes���Allow me  to make a
propysition, mum.   Yeh fill  j'er  hus
band's meerschaum wid imported fine
cut, an' den I'll rid yer wardrobes of
moths by blowin' smoke through de keyhole. 	
There was an old Mule from Missouri
Who shot his hind limb out likt fury;
A Zulu said'"There!"
As he went through the air,
"Dat mule's a lalapaluly."
A gentleman said to a minister, "When
do you expect to see Deacon S. again?"
"Never!" said the minister in a solemn manner, "the deacon is in heaven."
Wholesale men predict another rise in
meats.
' Tickets sold to all points i i Ca ada
and the United Statas. To ascertain
rates and full information, address���
Robert Irving, Manager.
S. Campbell, Kaslo, B. C.
Freight and Ticket Agt., Sandon.
M. W. DAT. Proprietor.
���Manufaturer of all	
Kinds of CARBONATFD DRINKS
Syphons, Gingei Ale,
Sarsaparilla, Etc., Etc.
Sandon, B.O.
Patronize home industry
when you want the best
DEALER IN
MEATS
I
E.
AT
SANDON, ROSSLAND, NELSON, KASLO, PILOT BAY
THREE PORKS, SLOCAN CITY.
M THE PAYSTREAK, SANDON, B. C, DECEMBER 9,   1899.
The   Paystreak.
Is Issued every Saturday in Sandon, in the heart
of the greatest White Metal camp on earth.
SubscriDtiori     i -     ���     ���     W.OOayear
Strictly in advance.
Address: The Paystreak, Sandon, B.C.
Wm. Macadams.
SANDON. B. G., DEC, 9,   1899.
RESOLUTIONS   FOR   1900.
New Denver Ledge. ��� .   ;
At oonsiderable expense* we have
prepared a set of resolutions for the
guidance of Pilgrims and others during the closing year of the 19th ceuf
tury.   Here they are:
1. Never drive stakes on another
man's ground. Look for virgin territory.
2. Look not upon the wine when
it is yellow, except through a telescope, j
3. Do not try to make a million in
a minute. Remember that New
Denver was not built in a day.
4. If you become weary and
heavy laden���with boozerino���do not
fall by the wayside. Keep moving
until the jag assimilates itself with
the atmosphere.
5. Be good to the printer. Always
pay him promptly, and your future
life will bo a continual sip of unalloyed bliss.
6. Do., not get run over by the
street cars of Nelson. You must not
take them for real estate signs. ,    . I
7. FoUdw the trail tblazed by
Jesus in the early days that leads tx>
joy, contentment and prosperity, and
keep off the broad road that will land
you amongst every kind of hell that
Old Nick manufactures.
8. Nev^r throw away your bannocks until you are sure that there is
better grub in sight. I
9. Do not let your spirits fall into
the sump of despair, but let them
roost on the rafters in the shaft-house
of cheerfulness.
10. Never become a mine manager and insomnia will be a stranger
to your couch.
11. Honor the C. P. R. All good
citizens respect the government of
their country.
12. Always speak kindly of the
B. C. Legislature. * You cannot jell
the day when your own upper stope
will become filled with vacuum.
18. Thank the boys who are
pumping lead into the Boers arid
scenery of South Africa. They have
saved you the trouble.
14. Never forget for one moment
tint editors live entirely on air. TJlte
is a delusion that Jshoqld be dispelled'
before the 20th century comes: into
the face of the tunnel of time.
���i *'
TIKI)   TO   MII.VKK.
Talking of the special meeting of
the silver Republican party in Chicago, E. 8. .Corser, of Minneapolis,;
says: "There were 20 states represented,  and the gentlemen' present
included Senator Teller and about 25
other prominent factors in the silver
forces, from Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota and the silver states. The
sentiment of the whole body favored
a platform, when the convention
meets, which shall declare as heretofore and as indicated in the call, for
the cardinal principles of the silver
Republicans, as related to finance,
and especially as to the unrestricted
coinage ot gold and silver and oppo
sition to the surrender of the money
sovereignty of the nation to banking
institutions. In addition to this, silver
Republicans, without exception, will
be found lined up against the retention of sovereignty toy the United
States over the Fillipinos, and. in
general, agaitist the imperialistic
policy of the present administration.
It will also take ground against the
concentration of the wealth and business ot the country by a comparatively few, in the form of trusts and kindred combinations of capital. If the
Democratic and Populist parties shall
declare in their respective national
conventions along lines indicated
above, they will have the cordial
and effective co operation of the silver
Republican forces, but not otherwise."
TRIALS   OF   THE   POET.
A western editor was sitting in his
office one day,, when into the room
came a man whose brow was clothed
with thunder, Fiercely seizing a chair,
he slammed his hat on thetable, hurled
his umbrella on the floor and sat down,
"Are vou the editor," be asked.
"Yes."
���'Can you read writing?"
"Of course."
"Read that, then," he said, thrusting
at the colonel an envoiope, with an inscription upon it.
"&���," said, the colonel, trying to
spell it.
"That's not a B, it's an S," said the
man
"S; oh, yes: I see! Well, it looks
like'Salt for^dLpner,' or 'souls ol sim
ners,'" said the colonel,,   .
"No, sir," replied the man; "nothing
of the kind! That's my name���Samuel
H. Brunner. I knew you couldn't read.
I called to see you_abput that poem of
mine you printed the other day, on the
'Surcease of Sorrow.'"
"1 don't.retnarpbeftf it." said-the colonel., , i.i.','���'.
"Of course you don't, because it went
into the paper under the infamous title
of 'Sinearcase To-morrow."
"A blunder of ���he compositor's I suppose."
"Yea, sir, and that's what I want to
see you about.. The way in which that
poem was mutilated wap sijfnply scan^
dalous �� I haven't slept; a night sincef
Jt exposes me to derision. People
think that I am an ass.,. Let me show
you. .The first li^c. when I wrote it,
read in this way:
"'lam wearv of the tossing of the
ocean a* it heaves!'
"It is a lovely line, too. But imagine
myLhorror,,;anjl the^angujshof my fam-(
ily,- whon'I- opened yout"paper and saw>
the line transformed into:, ( ......
& '4'am wearing out fnf trtfusWs till
they're open at the. knees!'
"That is a little too much. That
seems to me like carrying the thing an
inch or two too far. :���;
^ut look a-heie at the fourth verse;
1 hat's worse yet: i
" 'Cast thy pearls.before the swine, and
lose them in the dirt.'
"He sets it up in this fashion:    ,
" 'Cart thv pills before the sunrise, and
love t'hern if they hurt.'
"Now, isn't that a blood-curdlingbut-
rage oe a man's feelings? I'll leave it
to you if it isn't."
-"It's hard, that's a fact," said the
colonel.
"And then take the fifth verse. In
the original manuscript it said, plain as
daylight:
" 'Take away the jingling money;   it is
only glittering dross!'
"In its printed form you made me
say:
"Take away the tingling hortey; put
some flies in for the boss.'
"By George, I felt like braining you
with a fire-shovel! I was never so cut
up in my life. There, for instance <vas
the sixth verse. I wrote:
" 'Lying by a weeping willow, underneath a gentle slope.'
"That is beauXjfnl, poetic, affecting.
Now, how did your vile sheet present it
to the public?
" 'Lying to a weeping widow, toinduce
her to elope.'.
"Weeping widow, mind you! A
widow! Oh, thunder and .lightning!
This,is too much! ,
"I think I have a constitutional right
lo murder that compositor:  don't you?
"I think you have; but he is out just
now    Come in to-morrow?"    ���'���
"I will." said the poet; ".and I will
come armed."
THSC   OLD,   Otiti   SONGS.
our
Here is a song that no oho sinus;
Here are the words that no one knows.
Out of tbe breath of ji thousand springs,
Out of the chill of a thousand snows,
Cometh the pong that I sintr today,
A song that is new and is old alway;
A little joy, a littlq woe,, ,
An unseen path we blindly go,
A little time for weeping.
A little hour to walk or creep,
A little faith hiU half to keep���
And then there comes the sleeping.
A song that echoes down the years;
A song as old as time is old;
A song we hear with filling tears.
While heads turn gray and hearts grow
cold;
The old, old song, the song of life,
A chant front out a vale of strife!
A little joy, a little woe,
An unseen pith Wfi blindly go,
A little time for weeping;
A little hour to walk or creep.
A little faith but half to keep���
And then the final sleeping.
WISDOM   PERSONIFIED.
This Transvaal White's a duffer; aiuli
Otis is a dub;
I'd whipO.om.paiil..with half the rhein
win Luzon with a cltib.
If Buller had a little sense,if Law ton had
my head,
The wars would both  be ended and rebellion would be dead.
If Bryan   my   advice  had  asked Ohio
would be bia; ,
Nebraska'd be McKinley's if he'd only
known his "biz;'r
The czar might gobble China if he'd stop
to ask me how;
If Wilhelm would but heed my words
he'd rule all Europe now.
Sir Thomas could have won the cup if
he had talked with me;
I could nave kepi the  v>uuop9t0p safely
floating on the sea;
Wisconsin could have won from  Yale if
she'd known what.to do,
And I don't \n\m\ admitting that Jt could
have told her, too.
I am a man you all have met; vou gee
me every day;
No matter what is  to    ��o done, I always
know the' Way;
No matter what another's done, I think
yob will recall
I could have done it better; I'm the man
who knows it all.
���Chicago Tost.
HKDlCIMi   SULPttUK   OKK.
Consul Hungartn��r writes {roar.('alalia that tha method, generally used in
. icily for the .rediic.tion,,9f sulphur .is
..jry . primitive. Tbe kiln ia built into
Jie ground to a depth of from six to nine
feet, the walls being of, masonry ami cv��
lindrical in plytpu, with aalopjtg floor of
stone and gypsum, (W|iim Vhucaleaione,
or kiln, is tilled, tjie wv int lie IkjUo.ji ie ���
in large pieces,.,��o that there may Im no
impediment to the oli I .'(Sicilian term
for molten sulphinj rn:ini/i_r nn|, :l:ud.
the pieces of o.iv become vri'fv!ti;'M.\ -i\:il
ler until the tup of the calcaronn i��
reached. The on- is tlierj luupe i up in
the form of a,large eono, i.nd is covered
with turf, sand, and refuse from fwi'"ier
fusions, in order lo prevent loss a'.'I to
protect it somewhat from, ti.edemerits.
During the filling process, several air
shafts are placed into the ore, \>y mviins
of which the fire is communicated thereto, and through combustion of tin- mineral itself the whole mass melts, this
process lasting from ��� ten to twenty
days. A small hole ia made in the lowest point of the wall, through Which the
liquid sulphur runs, and is taken.off into
square wooden forms, containing from
130 to 170 pounds of sulphur. This is
continued day by day, until all of the
sulphur is extracted.
"Snow," said the Frenchman, "is like
the reserve of a young girl;, it tfecps
warm that which is beneath U "
Hunter Bros.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
Groceries, DryGjods.
MEN'S FURNISHINGS, HARDWARE, CARPETS,
BOOTS & SHOES, TINWARE, LINOLEUMS,
HATS & GAPS, CROCKERY, WTNDOW
SHADES, CLOTHING.
We carry the best lines that money can buy,  and,  buying- in large quanti
ties, save you the extra profit,
Sandon       Rossland        Greenwood       Grand Forks
tig THE PAYSTREAK, SANDON, B. Ci, DBCtMBER V, 1899,
"*fu*.-.':T'''.'."'^'ST IJ.'J'-V.Jv**
MMHHMI
^ACjp^;v:^?^^^^'^'^^T^y^.XuV^^i��'uw'
Tbe. largest Stock .ever shown am
������*     c      :
'.i" I M
Of Christmas Gifts at the Bazaar.    Read the thousand and one
articles, and more to come yet.
B^BBBBL' -    ii   -
iiiiiMiiiifTir��eeg ^^ |i
 Two-wheel Carts
Vu���-Hay Wagons
 Horse and Cart
.���Hocking Horses
������ Nohas Ark
: ���'!-..' Dull Carriages
���     -^ Chime Waulei?
 Swiss Chimes
, i_ioiu a 9tt '"^
5'    -    Viadleft
ii ��� lAL. To\   I'ianos���3 sizes
-r���-Drmns      ���    *
 Carpet S* eepers
|)0H Houses
Toy Stoves
 -Toy Banks   ���
 Pony Carts
Sad "irons
d���Co Carts
��� - Iron Trains
��� --Manic Lanterns
��� Whistles .
' ' iillfiechanicftl Engines-Trains
��� l'itds���Animals -Itoais
. Bellowing Cows
 Crowing Koosters
1 ��� Harking Dogs
���-.lumping Babbitt
 Soldier's Suits
���- Tin Fish Horns
-^-Tov Watches that run
���������  liiiipFIhe Jointed Dolls
 iPollH of all Sifces nnd kinds
-���Fine Dress Dolls
'     ....-A nice lol of Sleeping Dolls
' Assorted Dominoa
-^Picture Blocks-A B C Blocks
���Boys' Racing Sleighs
 Girls' Light Hand Sleighs
^--Ball6on Lanterns
 Tov Picture Books
 Linen Picture Books
Wire Cup and Saucer Holder's Wire Plate Holders
, ; ���"< Waste Paper Baskets
Straw Cuffs   Straw Shopping Baskets   Straw Work Baskets
Straw Mat tat 5 iH $et>. J -Faifyy Japanese Traye
novelties
Pearl Pen Holders , Gathre Pencils     Fountain Gold Pens
A beautiful lot of Ladies' Fancy Cp-to-Date Purses
Fancv Cents' Wailets
Something nice, new and tasty in OPAL WARE.
Some beatitiful painted Flower Pots.
Bohemian Glass Ware of all kinds.
Ivory-handle Dinner Knives Quart Bean Pots���stone
Wedgewood Jugs      : Hot Water Jugs
A select lot of Jardincres
.'���'���'��� I ���
Christ mas Cards
is one of our specialties this year, and are very pretty
and catchy.
MIIIIMHMglHIt  30���CCOOOOOOOOOOOOOOI
flttbe
����Bazaar owtsr,n"-
Beautiful
-We have a select lot   i ,
-Sizes 2x4���3x5���4x6���6x8
���8x10 and 10x12   '���'
-These Rugs .have juitarrived
-and are very heavy   ���
-and will last a life time  .
-The patterns'were all selected
-and are very pretty.
fancy Japanese;
China Ulare^*
���Fancy Tea Sets
 3-piece Sets
 7-pieceSeta
 11 -piece Sets. ..       ..
 42-piece Sets
 Very beautifully decorated
 Odd decorated p ates; cups
 and saucers.        #,.
-Fruit Dishes
-TeaPots
���Vases and Chocolate Jugs
 These goods 'are all imported
 from .Ja,p>a and*re genuine.
-Remember, tbis large
-stock of: Xmas Coodsat
-The Baiaar is the only, stock
-of new goods in the city
-this year (initfttr line.) '
i
���i ������
L
-We have' '   '    '
-a few Toys left
-From last yeat
-that we are,       , .
-selling at prices   ,   ,
-too cheap to mention. THE PAYSTREAK, SAN DON, B. C, P1CIMBER 9, 1899.
DIVISION    BOUNDARIES    DEFINED.
Changes Made by the Minister of Mines
Dating from Jauuary 1st.
In the official Gazette of Nov. 80th
the Minister of Mines makes known the
boundary lines of the several mining
divisions, the changes to take effect on
January 1st. The Slocan Mining Division shall comprise the drainage area of
all streams flowing into Slocan lake
above a point half way between Eight
and Ten Mile creeks on the east shore
of lake and above a point half way
above Indian creek on west shore of
lake, and may be described as follows:
Starting at a point on east shore of
Slocan lake, half way between Eight
and Ten Mile creeks; thence easterly
along height of land between Eight
and Ten Mile creeks to a point where
such height ot land joins the height of
land forming divide between drainage
area of Slocan lake and Kootenay lake;
thence northerly along such divide to a
point where such divide joins the divide
between drainage area of Slocan lake
and Upper Arrow lake; thence southerly along this divide, passing between
Box and Summit lakes to a point where
such divide joins height of land forming
northern boundary of watershed of Indian creeks to a point on shore of Slocan lake half mile above mouth of Indian creek; thence easterly, crossing
Slocan lake to a point halfway between
Eight and Ten Mile creeks to the point
of commencement.
The Slocan City Mining Division
shall comprise that area of country
drained by streams flowing into Slocan
lake above (south) of a point halfway
between Eight and Ten Mile creeks on
the east shore of lake and above* point
halfway north of the month of Indian
creek, on west shore of lake, and also
the drainage area of all streams flowing
into Sioean and Little Sioean rivers
above their junction, ana may be described as follows: Starting at the junction of the Slocan and Little Slocan
rivers; thence easterly and northerly,
following height of land separating
drainage area of Kootenay river and
Kootenay outlet to a point where such
height of land joins the height oi land
forming divide between watershed of
Slocan river and Kootenay lake; thence
northerly along such height of land to
creek on south and Eight ami Four Mile
creeks on north; thence westerly, following height of land between Eight
and Ten Mile creeks to a crossing of
Slocan take to a point half a mile above
Indian creek, on west bank of swch
lake; thence westerly, following northern boundary ol watershed of Indian
creek to a point where it joins the
height of land separating drainage area
of Slocan lake from drainage area of
the Arrow laker thetwe southerly, following such height of taad eomiinwag
easterly to. mouth of Little Slocan
river and point oi eotanwroerfteuS.
TluyAwwwtwthMliningDirvisiowstarts
an the heigh* oi tend founding- flfivide
separating watershed of Kootenay river
en east irom Tv>oten*y kake-on the west
at a point where swch divide is joined
by the height of land betvcttws drainage
area at Wiraiy's amd Crawford creeks;
eh<Hi��enortherPyv following divfde sep-
aracing thedsmmage areaaf Kootenay
and Upper ColuinJWa river on east from
drainage area. of. those rivets emptying
in Kootenay lake on west to a point on
suck divide where it joins the height of
land between drainage areas of Beaver
creek on the north and the Duncan
rivor on the south; thence southerly,
following the divide between the drainage areas of the Duncan river on the
east and Fish river and Trout lake on
the wast; thence westerly along height
ef land forming southern boundary of
Hall or Cameron creek to a point where
it joins the height of land between Duncan and Lardo rivers; thence southerly
along such height of land to a point
where it joins the height of land forming southern boundary of Healy creek;
continuing westerly along divide between Tenderfoot and Poplar creeks to
a height of land forming divide between
drainage area of Kootenay lake on east
and Slocan lake on west; thence southerly along such divide to a point on
such height of land where it joins the
height of land between drainage areas
of Coffee and Kokanee creek; thence
along southern watershed of Coffee
creek to Balfour; thence crossing
Kootenay lake on Crawford bay to a
point on east shore of such latter between Grav's and Crawford creeks;
thence following such eastern boundary
line to point of commencement.
EPIGRAMS   BY   A   NOVELIST.
When glamor goes, nerve comes.
What is youth but happy ignorance.
Your confidential woman is usually a
liar.
The abuse of hospitality is the last
refuge of the needy.
It is a frustrated desire that makes
the majority of vil'ains.
Happy is the man who loves and is
loved of a plain woman.
Many people amuse us who are themselves amused in their sleeves.
The arrogance of those who have
all that they desire is insupportable.
Thoughts are the quickest and the
longest and the saddest things of this
life.
A life that is only a conglomeration
of trifles is a poor thing to look back
upon.
Impertinence and flattery to a woman
are so closely allied that the distinction
is subtle. 	
"This room is very close," remarked
the guest to the head waiter. "Can't I
have a little fresh air ?"
"One air!1' yelled the obliging waiter.
"Fresh."
A Xmas Gift
That would be most acceptable in any
home in the land, must have merit. It is
not so much "what is its cost" as "what is
its worth." It might cost a fortune and
yet have little value.       Not so with the
Bissel Carpet
Sweeper.
It is a luxury that every household should
have; is economical, labor-saving and ever
ready to operate. What would be nicer
lor a Christmas gift? Who would appreciate it more than the queens of Sandon's
homes? You can get them of us now���
speak for one���it will be delivered when
and where you want it. Probably you
would rather have a handsome piece of
furniture���caU and see.
D. J. Robertson & Co.
House Furnishers.       Sandon, B. C.
N��� Br^We hiW& something nice for eVery home in Sandon
SLOCAN CITY NEWS IN BKIKF.
The Miners' Union here now numbers
80 members.
Rev. A. M. Sanford, B, A., oi Sandon,
is announced to preach next Sunday, in
the Music Hall, both morning and even
ing. Mr. Roberts, pastor of the Methodist church here, goes to Sandon for
that day.
Notices are out for a meeting in behalf of the Twentieth Century fund of
the Methodist Church, to be held in the
Music Hall next Tuesday. The meeting
will be addressed by Rev. J. F. Betts, of
New Westminster.
Malcolm Cameron is starting a new
packtrain here, making three outfits in
Slocan City. He should make a success
as there has been too much work for the
other two to handle for some time, all
of which goes to show that business is
improving.
The concert given last Thursday by
the Ladies' Aid of the Presbyterian
church, in honor of St. Andrew's day,
was a genuine success in every particular end reflected the greatest credit upon
all concerned. Quite a tidy sum remained after the payment of the necessary
expenses.
There is a good prospect of the C.P.R.
building a branch line from this point
up the mountains to tap the many rich
properties now being opened up on Ten
Mile, Springer and Lemon creeks. C.E.
Perry, C.E., the chief engineer for this
district, is now looking over the gronnd,
and it is likely a full staff of surveyors
will be put to work within the next few
weeks.          ______
TROUT    LAKE    ITKHS
A ton of ore at one shot wasiin��ijtht
down recently in the workings ul the
Nettie L. This large mass was almost
solid grey copper.
On the Eva group, in the Fiah creek
camp, preparations aie l>eing made to
drive 200 feet each on the vein, crosscuts
to be extended right and left at intervals
of 50 feet in order to thoroughly sample
the ledge.
A large force of men are now working
on the Beatrice. The work on the trail
to the mine is being pushed at ,H)th
ends, but on account of the difficulties
met with it is not expected to be completed for some time yet.
The returns from the shipment of the
120 sacks of ore from the Ethel this fall
netted $370.54. Placing the average
weight of the sacks at 100 pounds, the
shipment would, amount to al>out six
tons, which has therefore returned |*>1-
75 clear profit per ton.���Topic.
A very fine strike was made recently
on the Big Five and Sunset group*-
showing grey copper and galena of M
exceptionally high grade. This proper*;y
is situated at the north fork of Lardeau
creek, and taking into consideration the
size of the showing, it promises lo be a
big thing.	
The little boy sat on the park bench
and swung his feet.
"I'll tell you my name if you'll tell me
yours," he said.
"Well, what is it?" replied the liltle
girl-
"Lerame Kishew.   What's yours?'
"Ollie Wright."
And she dug her fairy little toes in tl
sand and waited. '
The Paystbeak.
Is There  A   Diamond  Field  near
Hudson Ban.
Prof. Hobbs, in Appleton's Popular
Science Monthly for November, alleges   that   some   seven    genuine
diamonds of good size, and a number
y  of smaller ones, have been found in
the clays and   gravels south of the
great bikes, but mostly in Wisconsin.
The drift in which the stones reposed
w;is brought from the north by glac
inl agency during  the   ice  age, or
;l(res of the long past.   By  retracing
the path of the glaciers, as shown hy
the rock  stria dons,    Prof.    Hobo's
reaches the conclusion that the an-
ceatral home of the diamonds was
territory southeastward and eastward
ot James Bay, and hazards  the inference  that   exploration   in    that
neighborhood   may   yet  reveal   "a
region for profitable diamond mining."
The  professor's  argument  for a
Canadian   diamond   Held   is   based
wholly on the belief that the Wisconsin gems had   been   carried   southward by the  glacial drift, and not
at all on the nature ut the rock for-
imitiuns north of the boundary line.
It is worth   mentioning:,   however,
that In his report on the geology of
the Rainy   Lake   region,   made in
1888, that accurate geologist,  Pro!.
Andrew  C.   Lawson,   now   of California, speaks ot the bosses of surpen-
linens suggesting the possibility of
diamonds, particularly if surpentine
locks should bo found near the car*
Imnaceous   schists    that   sometimes
"ceur in   the   Keewatln   formation
N'uthing, as yet. has come  ot Prof.
Lawaon's hint, but as the t'enlogical
wrveys, both in Canada and Wiseon-
rin,  have   taken   the matter up, we
iav expect further light upon it ere
tag.   .Meantime there is little fear of
i rush to the supposed diamond fields,
notwithstanding    their     immunity
Itom the Boer attacks now giving Bo
Bach trouble to Cecil  Rhodes and
liisfellow owners   of SuUtll African
diamond mines.
Shot Bu an "Ad."
At the time of the Maori war I had
a strange experience. The publish
ing office of a local newspaper was
Hose to the scene of some of the hot-
t('st fighting. During the struggle
l��e Maoris ran short of ammunition,
ll|(l. raiding the newspaper office,
fliargwl their guns with type and
stereo-blocks, The novel nminuni-
ll)n proved very effective. One of
"le white invaders was severely
funded with a patent, medicine ad-
^'���'nauient another was crippled for
",e b.V a church bazaar announce-
'"'"i. '<:id the ed|t(tl', who had taken
ll|l-i.'<' with Ihe British troops, had a
"i,ll'u,v escape of being hit with one
^."l* own |KM'ins.
order dated tho 10th day of November. 1899,
authorized the service of the said plaint and
summons on you by insertion of this Notice
three times in a weekly newspaper at Sandon
and by posting a copy of said plaint and summons for 30 days in the office of the Registrar
of the County Count at Rossland, and that
the same shall be good and sufficient service
��f the said plaint and summons.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that you
are required to appear to the said plaint and
summons on the 26th day of January, 1900, at
the sittings of the County Court to be holden
at Rossland.
Dated this Kithjiay of November, A D. lew
Charlks R. Hamilton,
Whose address for service is at the offices of
Daly &  Hamilton,   Bank   of   Montreal
Chambers, Rossland, British Columbia.
1,1 ,"e County Court or Kootenay
Holden nt KoNaliiiid.
IlKTU K.\
Rolt & Grrogan,
Plaintiff*,
and
John  Kidding.
Defendant.
"u  Vil.vk N\mki�� Dkh:niunp
���Iomx KiKl.DiMi :
,1 >JAKK NOTICE that this  action  was on
' ���'"' day of   November,  laoi,   commenced
i,|Tl*ty��ni *riJ that the plaintiff* by their
��0laim the sum of fMUO.OO advanced on a
Ha h R*reem*Blt dated the *7th day of
I, lx i7, which agreement lias not been
w out by you. the mIiI defendant, in any
yw.i.itov��ri   AH  bhttt (In Cart has  by
Certificate of Improvements.
NOTICE.
TIPTOP ANDCODYSTAR MINERAL CLAIMS.
Situate in the Slocan Mining Division of
We^t Kootenav District. Where located :
On the South Fork of Carpenter Creek.
Take Notice that I. A. B. Docksteader,
acting as agent for Biggerstaff Wilson, Free
Miners Certificate No. 88870A, James Albert
Lindsay, Free Miner's Certificate No. tio.'W).
B. C. Riblet, Special Free Miner's Certificate
No. 791, and John Docksteader, Free Miner's
Certificate No. B15085 intend sixty days from
date hereof to apply to the Mining Recorder
for a Certificate of Improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining a Crown grant of the
above claims,
And further take notice that action, under
section 37,   must  be  commenced   before the
issuance of such Certificate of Improvements.
Dated this .loth day of November, 1899.
A. B, D0CK8TEADKK.
SANDON MINERS'   UNION.
[Western Federation of Miners]
Meets every Saturday Evening at  8 o'clock
in Miner.-' Union Hall.
Pres. OBO. Smith.
Vice-i'res, Howakd THOMPSON.
Fin Sec, W. L. H.UU.KH.
SANDON   MINERS'   UNION
Hospital.
OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
Subscribers, #1.00 per month.
Private Patient* #8.00 per day, exclusive of expense of physician or
surgeon and drugs.
J. I). McLaughlin, President.
W. L. Haui.kh,Secretary.
I>K.   W.  K.  GrOMH, Attendant Physician.
MissS, M. CtllBHOLM, Matron.
Grant Cox, WM. DbNAHUK, J. V. Marvin,
Wm (I \khiit and P. H. Mini hy, Management Committee.
A. F. & A. M.
Regulaf Communication of ALTA
LODGE, U. P., held first Thursday
in each Month, in Masonic Hall,
Sandon, at 8 p. m. Sojourning brethern cordially invited.
W. 11. Lilly,
Secretary.
HAMMOND BROS, CO,. Ltd.
SANDON.
PACKERS and FORWARDERS
Sleighs, Cutters, Teams and
Saddle Horses for Hire.
Now is Your Time
To make your selection of Christmas Presents before the
rush begins Now the assortment is most complete.
Our Lines in
Solid Gold Jewellery,
Watches,   Rigns,  Sterling  Silver  Novelties, Cut  Glass   ^
Ware and Electro Plate are very attractive, and we sell
as low as we can guarantee the best quality of goods.
Engraving Free on all Goods Purchased imm
O. W. GRIMMETT,
Jeweller and Optician.
�����
H0NDI
Pure   Ceylon
Is Imported Direct From Ceylon.
NO MIXINGS THIS SIDE,
YOU GET IT STRAIGHT
Supplied by
Stein Bros.,     Sandon.
In One Pound or Half Pound Lead Packets Only.
MINERS'
HOTEL
WATERLAND A WESTERBERG
Proprietors.
SANDON, B. C.
Headquarters for Miners.
Well stoaked liar in connection.
First class accommodations.   fionr<l l>.v the
lay or week.
M. L. GRIMMETT.
L L. B.
Barrister. Solicitor,
Notary nblic, Etc.
SANDON,
B.C.
F. L. CHRISTIE, L. L. B.
Barrister, Solicitor, Etc.
Notan Public.
SANDON, B. C.
Established ]*'���'>���
E. M. SANDILANDS.
Slocan Mines.
SANDON, BRITISH COLUMBIA,
,   ���       atnj.lra  iiiiiiirlit   and   Sold.    General
MiT��enffofSlocanProperties.   Promising
Prospeots For Gale.
CANADIAN  PACIFIC
RAILWAY
AND SCO LINE.
DAILY DAILY
The Direct Route From
KOOTENAY COUNTRY
To  All   Points
EAST WEST
First Clas Sleepers on all Trains from
RKVELSTOKE &   KOOTENAY   LANDING.
Tourist Cars pass Medicine Hat
Daily for St. Paul.   Sundays and
Wednesdays for Toronto,
Fridays for Montreal and Boston.   Same cars pass Revelstoke
one day earlier.
DAILY TRAIN
8:00 Lv. sandon Arr.        16:30
CONNECTIONS.
Daily to Points Reached via.
Nakusp.
Daily except Sunday to Points
reached via Rosebery and Slocan City.
Tickets Issued  Through  and Baggage Cheeked to   Destination,
S. A. COURTNEY,
Agent, Sandon.
E. J. COYLE, W. F ANDERSON,
A. G. P. Agt., Trav. Pass. Agt.
Vancouver, Nelson.
fie sure  that your ticket reads via the
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY The Paystreak.
A Snap Shot
In spite of the quiet times, the
"Old Time Grocery Firm" of
H. GIEGERICH
Is kept bust) in selling and shipping goods.
Fine Groceries by the carload arriving and more on the way. Fine
fresh Vegetables of all kinds. Fresh cooking and eating apples from
Ontario and Washington orchards. Car of Hams and Bacon just in, all
of Swift & Co.'s famed brands. Other toothsome delicacies on the shelves
and arriving.       Step in see for yourself.
STOVES! STOVES!
WE HAVE THE FINEST LINE OF
Coal Heaters
EVER DISPLAYED IN SANDON.
STheAF9amo8u80r Cole's Hot Blast Heater.
Oar claims for this Heater are that it is adapted to anv kind of coal,
CROW'S NEST, LETHBRIDGE. or ANTHRACITE, burning all kinds
equally well.   Kindlv call and inspect our lines.
H. BYERS & Co.
i
��
#
*
Folliotf & iVIcSVIillan.
0000000000000000
Contractors and Builders.
Dealers in Dressed and Rough Lumber.
0000000*000*
Sash, Doors, Blinds, etc., Made to Order at Lowest Possible Prioes.
Mine and Dimension Timber always in Stock. Plans, Estimates and
Speoifioations furnished for all Classes of Building.
SHOPS OPPOSITE C. P. R. FME3GTT SHED.
RAILROAD AVE.   -   -   -   -   SANDON,
mkmmmmmm ** ****** ** "*** *
HOLIDAY GOODS
I haoe added to my regular stock t;he finest
line of FANCY GOODS that has eoer been
exhibited in Sandon. Ladies and Gentlemen's TRAVELLING CASES in Fancy Leather
Cooers. MIRRORS of the Most Stylish and
Latest Designs, The eery Netoest in NOTE
Booh and CALENDER PURSES.
Just received from Toronto a Large assortment
of Beautiful Engagement and Wedding Rings.
WATCHES^^
A full line of Deuber Hampden, Hamilton and Waltham
Watchs always in Stock. Every timepiece Guaranteed
to be Exactly as Represented.
Geo. B. KnotDlesy Watchmaker
.SASLASLSLtULBJULSL SLSULSULSSLSLSLSLSLSLlSLSULSULSii
CITY COUNCIL.
The regular meeting of the city
council was held on Monday evening,
Dec. 4th.     Present:    Mayor Pitts,
Aldermen   Hunter, Crawford,  Mac
Donald and Buckley.
After the minutes had been read
the finance committee recommended
the following accounts for payment;
November salaries  ��32i).9!j
Fire Department maintenance   22.50
November paysheet      95.20
Folliott A McMillan      23.05
Paystreak      22.50
D J Robertson      29.60
GeoLovatt      11����
Harrv Nash        & 00
J M Harris      10.00
Mrs McKinnon      12-75
Team and harness.     202.HO
H Byers      23.85
Miners' Hospital       15.00
Court house rent       15.00
ER Atherton Co        7.10
Miners' Hospital      83.70
Aid. MacDonald moved and Aid.
Buckley seconded a motion that the
interest on "Improvement Loan"
debentures falling due on December
1st be paid, less a reduction of f225,
being the amount of interest for time
elapsing before the city was in receipt of the money from purchasers
of debentures. The interest amount
ed to 1225.    ;     ���
"Health Amendment Bylaw No.
16, 189'J'r was reconsidered and
finally adopted.
Mr. and'Mrs-.^Fred Nivin of White"
water are spending a couple o'
weeks in Coast cities.
Laboring Men Attention.
Beware of all agents and advertisements for the employment of men
in the Slocan country.
The trouble between Miners and
Mine Owners is not yet settled, >��nd
you are requested to stay away. You
will be duly notified when matter
are adjusted.
Executive Committee,
Sandon Miners' Union.
Gales'
Barber Shop
and
Bath House,
The Best
In Slocan.
RECO AVE. SANDON.
Christmas Presents
for
Everybody.
CHINA   SOUVENIERS   OF THE
PAYNE AND SLOCAN STAR.
CELLU LOID COM BIN A HON
DRESSING i\si;s.
COLLAR* CUFF BOXES,
TRIPLE MIRRORS,
WRITING SETS,
MANICURE SETS,
Fine Leather Travelling Casts lor
"    Gentlemen and Ladies,
SCISSORS SETS,
WORK SETS.
SMOKERS SETS
PHOTO' BOXES,
PHOTO ALBUMS.
AUTOGRAPH ALBUMS.
CUT GLASS ATOMIZERS,
COMB AND BISK
MIRROR SETS,
COMB AND SILVER
MIRROR SETS,
STIRLING SILVER
(T RUING TONGS,
NAIL FILES,
PAPER KNIVES.
POCKET COMBS,
CISSONS MATCH BOXER,
TOOTH POWDER BONKS,
(Miltary Brtinh Sets;
PUFF BOXES,
CREAM BONES.
BABY SETS,
CLOTHES BRUSHES,
BUTTON HOOKS,
WHISKS, BROOMS,
STATIONERY SETS,
ODOR CASES,   NECKTIE UOXKS.
Everything New,
No Shoddy,
At the Very lowest Prices, Call
and Examine Thvili. i know 1
Can Please You.
I am giving away three
Beautiful Pr]z3�� s Gentleman's Smoking Set, Lady's
Comb Bisk Mirror and
Brush, GiJ-Is Work Box.
Each Cash Purchase of
One Dollar Entitles the
Purchaser to a Ticket on
These Presents..
DONALDSON
the
DRUGGIST _
The FILBERT CIGAR Store
Cigars,   |      Tobaccos, Pip"'
Smokers' Sundries.
Cards and ���   Ohipa
JAS. WILLIAMSON.
j Reco Laundry
f BEST LAUNDRY WORK IN THE CITY
West End,
Reco Avenue.
���   i>
Down town Office - Mdlartln's Barber Shop
A. D. MACKENZIE,   -   -   -   -   Proprietor.
I tv
_

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