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The Paystreak Sep 2, 1899

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Array I
THE  PAYSTREAK
BOOK III.
HAPPENINGS IN BRIEF.
SANDON, SEPTEMBER 2 t899.
CHAPTER 47
Blake Wilson of Nelson is in town
today. '
Mrs. Wm. Lawson and family returned from the Coast Thursday.
Jack Lowes spent a few days in
town trom Duncan City this week.
J. G. Main and family are expected to return from the Co��st to-day.
Mrs. W. E. Hodder of Kaslo was
visiting with Mrs, Vallance this
week.
Tommy Milne is papering and
decorating the interior of the Payne
residence.
George Creech, who recently returned from tbe Yukon, is visiting
his brother, Bert.
Abe Legget, the only one of his
kind, has gone to Windermere in
search of pastures new.        W
John Wickles paid |5 into the
city police court lor being drunk
and disorderly on Thursday.
Miss Dovall, who has been visiting
with Mrs. Dwyer, left on Thursday
tor her home in Walla Walla.
C. W. Main, who has been with
the Ruth company for some time,
left tor Montreal un Wednesday.
The meeting of the Mine Owners'
Association, which was to have" been
held yesterday, will take* place on
the 5th.
M. W. Day has completed the improvements to his soda WHter factory
and now has an institution complete
in every detail.
Rowland will celebrate Labor Day
in grand style on Tuesday. An excursion rate trom Sandon is given
over the C. P. R.
Ernie King of Kaslo. who is suffer-
ing with inflammatory rheumatism,
went through to Banff on Monday,
accompanied by Pat Walsh.
There will be an election of officers
by the Sandon Miners' Union today,
(���eo. Smith and R.J. McLean are
the presidential candidates.
Main Bros, will build a warehouse
on Cody Avenue, opposite the Pay
streak office.   A lot has been secured and building will be commenced
in a few days.
Henry Nightengale, of Kaslo, who
tiies the iron horse on the K. A S.
express, became a benedict on Wednesday evening, joining hands with
Miss Jessie Price of that city.
The collector's tax notice is out
��nd property holders are asked to
pay up before the end of this month
to get the benefit of the one sixth re-
hate un the city revenue tax.
J. V, Martin, while working in
McLaughlin's carpenter shop yesterday, got his hand into tne machinery
and had three lingers crushed. The
injured members had to be amputated.
The Sandon Miners' Union will
H'ive a bajl iu Virginia Hall on Tuesday evening next, Labor Day. The
invitation is extended to all who
want to enjoy themselves and know
how to have a good time.
The N. & S. train was two hour
late yesterday, owing to a delay with
the 'Imperial." Since the inauguration of the new service the express
has been so regularly on time that a
delay is noticable enough to cause
comment.
D. H. Price, editor of the Aylmer
Express, left the Eastern Press Association at Nelson long enough to
visit Sandon. He spent a couple of
days in the hills, getting an idea of
what mining is like when seen at
close range.
The new addition to the school
house is progressing rapidly, .and
will be ready for occupancy;in a few
days. At present the industry of
"teaching the young.7liiind how to
shoot" is somewhat Interfered with
by the building operations.
Jake Hoover, the man who was
arrested two weeks ago for flourish'
ing a gun at a dance in McGuigan,
was fined $50 and costs in the District court last Wednesday. Six-
shooters are not considered good
form in the best social circles of the
camp now-a-days.
Dan Godfrey's famous military
band will be in Nelson next Saturday. The C. P. R. is giving a single fare for the round trip, going
Saturday and returning Monday.
Excursions will also t*i run from
Kaslo and oTSer points,        r
The K. A "fir, will give a single
fare for the round crip to Nelson on
Friday aud Saturday to hear God
frey's band. A steamer will connect
with the train at Kaslo on Saturday
aiternoon, and returning will leave
Nelson alter the concert, enabling
passengers to return to Sandon on
Sunday.
A, C. McArthur has received word
that he will probably be called on to
take charge of the.C. P. R. stuion at
Rossland. If "Mac," in the performance of his duties as,agent satisfies
the company as well as lie has done
the .people of Sandon, they should
put him in charge of the Windsor
station in Montreal.
The continued chilly weather and
the frequent fal s of snow on the
higher levels should do much to advertise this region as a summer resort. To those in a tropical climate
who are suffering from excessive
heat we can cheerfully recommend a
visit to the Last Chance hill or the
Jackson Basin. No artificial coolers
are necessary in those parts.
A concert under the auspices of the
Ladies aid Society of the Presbyterian church will be given in Virginia hall on Friday evening next,
8th inst. There will be a collection
in lieu of admission, the proceeds of
which will be devoted to interior
furnishing of the new church. Mrs.
F. A. Wood will sing and many
Items of new and special interest
are promised.
The reprehensible practise of stealing wood is again in vogue in Sandon and is being carried on with
crafty vigor by midnight marauders.
Next to the man who does not pay
his subscription, the wood thief is the
most desdicable character that our
present dav  civilization allows  to
exist. We m_ke this statement in
the hope that pur neighbors may be
put on their guard sufficiently to
place their wood under cover. We
don't care to use woodthat is allowed
to remain out in the rain.
The up-town citizens of Sandon
are manifesting considerable impatience with regard to the street light
service. During the dark nignts attendant on the present cloudy
weather travelling is dangerous in
the upoer part of the town and the
city council will be asked to take
some action to have the service restored. An economy which jepord-
izes the Safety of citizens is not appreciated in this end of the town.
-   ��� ��� ���
SLOGAN MINES.
The Rambler-Cariboo.
M few men are employed on out-
sWte-work at the Ruth this week.
A couple of men were put on at the
R. E. tee this week to do outside
work.
Wm. Thomlinson and Harry
Sheran are taking out some ore on
their claim adjoining the Stranger in
Jackson Basin.
The ore shipments from White*
water this week were Whitewater
44, Jackson 31. From Sandon for
the week. Coin 3, Payne 5| tons.
The right of way for the Ruth
flume has been completed and construction was started at Cody on
Tuesday. John Magner is ineliarge
of the work,
The ore shipments over the K. A S.
have increased considerably during
August. All tbe ore is going into
the Kootenay Ore Company's sampling works at Kaslo.
The Queen Bess is making extensive improvements about their bunk
houses and out buildings. When the
present alterations are completed
there will be accomodation at the
mine for 100 men.
A 100 foot tunnel contract has been
let on the Miller Creek. The work
will be done in the lower tunnel and
it is expected will tap the ledge.
There is good ore showing in the
upper tunnel, but the main body is
below those workings and the ground
is too wet to permit sinking a winze.
CITY COUNCIL.
A special meeting of the city council was held on Monday evening for
the purpose of considering accounts
and other matters in connection with
Creek Improvements.
On motion of Aid. Buckley, sec
onded by Aid. Crawford, Mr. J. E.
wood was appointed assistant auditor
for the purpose of auditing the accounts in connection with the Creek
Improvements, 1898.
On motion of Aid. Hunter, second-
ed*by Aid. Crawford, it was decided
that a special meeting of the city
council should be held on Friday
evening, 1st inst., for the purpose of
hearing any charges made by any
rate payer in connection with the
Creek Improvements accounts, and
that Geo Lovatt be notified personally to attend the said meeting.
The strike made in the Rambler-
Cariboo last week  now shows thre;
feet of solid ore.   The drift will have
to be continued for 75 feet along the
ledge and an  upraise qiade for 110
feet to connect with the shft, whicli
has been sunk  190 feet  from the
upper tunnel,   This shaft shows continuous ore all the way down, with
two feet of high grade ore in th;
bottom.   This leaves 300 feet of stop-
ing ground  between  the upper and
lower tunnel, from which no ore has
yet been taken.   A few more men
were put on this week and shipments
from the property will be increased.
J, B. McArthur, president of the
company,  J.  J.   Humphrey, vice-
president, and A. F. McClaine, secretary, paid a visit to the mine on
Wednesday and inspected the new
strike.
Get a Vote, You Maq Need It.
Don C. Kurtz of the Kaslo Recording office, has  been appointed collector of votes tor this district.   As
there will be a federal election within a few munths and a provincial
election may occur at almost any
time, it is important that those entitled to the franchise who are not
already on the list should get their
names en at once.    No expense is
involved and no other proceeding is
necessary than to fill out an application form and send it to the collector.
The same roll is used for  both provincial and dominion lists and one
registration  entitles the citizen to
vote at both elections.   If you are
not already on the list drop into the
Paxstreak offce or send us your
name, occupation and address and
we will attend to the matter for you
tree of charge.   If you are a liberal
yorir vote is necessary to maintain a
stable  government,   to boost along
the "growing time,1' and to keep the
tory conspiritors out of office.   If you
are a conservative your party needs
your vote to turn the rascals out, to
get into office themselves, and to
show the grits that they have sacrificed the confidence of the people of
Canada,   If you are an independent
in politics you should get on the, list
in order to help in the overt||row of
machine govornment and to oust tbe
subsidy hunters and charter sharks
who are throttling Canadian manhood and sapping the vitals of this
fair dominion through tbe subserviency of a blind partyism.    Judging
from the prices paid in  West Elgin
recently, votes should fetch good figures this fall.
The owner of a mineral claim
near Slocan lake a few weeks ago
obtained a eertiflet of improvement,
but failed to file the same with the
Minister of Mines within thirty days.
According to one of this year's am-
endmends this delay worked an invalidation of the certificate and tbe
owner wrote to the Minister of Mines
asking what he should, do. The
minister replied advising him to relocate the ground!
Work on the Wakefield tramway
will probably be commenced next
week. The Paystreak.
I
A NEW TALE OF THE EDMONTON
ROUTE.
As Black as it is Painted, but as
Rich as the Land of Ophir.
When the Klondike boom started
two years ago there were many
routes offered the credulous gold
seekers who joined "the mad race
for wealth." Each was heralded as
the only practicable route to the
treasure vault of the Arctic, and
maps and distances were distorted so
that each was made to appear the
shortest, safest and quickest way to
the land of gold and snow. There
was the St. Michael's river route,
the Cbilkoot pass, the Skagway
trail, the Dalton trail, Stickine-Teslin
route, Ashcroft trail, Peace River
route, Spok��ne route, and some even
facetiously suggested the New Orleans overland route. All had their
quota of unfortunate wayfarers, and
each was the scene of terrible tragedies. All were bad, but none were
worse than the Edmonton route.
Fifteen hundred miles of unexplored prairie and forest, swamp and arid
plain, impassable rapids and impenetrable mountain ranges, inland seas
and awful expanses of snow and ice.
The world has heard how over a
thousand eager argonauts dared the
dangers of that awful trail; of how a
meagre 50 reached, the metropolis of
the Yukon; of how another 150 struggled back to civilization, and of how
many hundred are still wandering
in the wilderness or have passed over
the great divide. It was a terrible
tale, and no words have been too
black to picture the horrors of the
overland route to the goldfields. But
there is more to tell; not of the horrors of that great lone land, but a
tale of hope and a presage of empire.
Early in that memorable spring,
when the world stood aghast at the
blind, mad rush for gold, a little,
party of five from Sandon joined the
long trek to the land of promise.
They were J. A. Hotfmeyer, Joe
Snyder, Louis Pecati, Frank Huffman and Mrs. Huffman. All were
used to the ways of frontier life and
each was an adept in the art of
pioneering. Should anyone get
through they would not be left behind. They chose the Edmonton
route. J, A, Hoffmeyer is back in
Sandon now, and the* tale he tells is
both interesting and terrible.
Starting from Edmonton, their
route lay to Athabasca Landing,
��� where they took the Hndsons' Bay
steamer down the majestic waters of
the Athabasca to Fort Chippewayan.
Gliding smoothly down the noble
river the voyager passes through a
beautiful land ot undulating, parklike prairie, watered by crystal
streams and timbered with verdant
copses of fir and aspen ; a land whose
possibilities for the future are as
great as its dangers and lonliness
for the present are all-prevading.
Here in this far away corner of this
great dominion are pastoral lands
sufficient to maintain the teeming
populations of Europe, but uninhabited save by the nomad aborigines
and the lonely factors of the Hudsons'
Bay. At Pelican rapids, 80 miles
below Athabasca Landing, the Dominion government is sinking a test
well In search of oil. Through the
six-inch pipe that pierces the earth's
crust for a thousand feet there is
escaping every day enouge natural
gas to supply the city of Toronto; its
never-ceasing roar can be heard
many miles away and the aroma of
petroleum permeates the atmosphere
for leagues around. Down along
the Athabasca river are many of the
greatest wonders of nature : pools of
asphalt that bubble and simmer from
springs below, natural gas erosions
that once lit will burn forever, petroleum swamps which a .carelessly
dropped match would turn to a flrey
living hell, rivers whose waters are
salt and from whose banks the Indians cut the crystal where it is laid
up by a bounteous nature.
Through all this wilderness of undeveloped wealth* they passed to the
Great Slave River and the Great
Slave Lake. Here they found a body
of water as large as Lake Huron,
whose shores have never been explored. At Fort Resolution they met a
priest of the Catholic faith who told
them of mineral wealth within a
day's march of the inland sea. With
the aid of an indian guide they were
taken to a range of hills within 40
miles of the lake where within the
compass of a few miles were found
many enormous ledges of galena,
veins of gold bearing rock and leads
whose surface croppings showed
native copper. The party spent
many days prospecting in this dis
trictj finding mineral deposits of untold value and seeing surface showings the magnitude of which would
make a mining man dumb with
amazement.
After this disaster befell the party.
Hurricanes blew on the Great Slave
Lake, now this way, now that, but
always vielent and unceasing. One
day in July, while tossing about in a
terrible gale, Frank Huffman was
washed out of the boat into the raging sea and in a twinkling was beyond his comrades aid. Supplies
were lost in the storm and the party
discomfited. From Fort Smith Mr.
Hoffmeyer turned back, but the
others went on, determined to make
their destination. From then until
no word has come of their success or
failure.
Making his way back by easy
stages, Mr, Huffman at last made
Edmonton, bringing with him samp
les of the mineral they had found
about Great Slave Lake. Assays
from the galena samples gave 100
ounces silver and 70 per cent. lead.
Gold and copper assays of fabulous
richness were obtained, some specimens running $1,0C0 to the ton.
Mr. Hoffmeyer leaves next week
for Wilksbarre, Pa., to spend the
winter. The wealth he discovered
in the north has not turned his head,
but, lie says, when the resources of
this great region become known and
means of communication are afforded
he will return to what he considers
the greatest undeveloped mineral
country in the Dominion of Canada.
Hot. John D. is Fixed.
The wealth of John D. "Rockefeller
has now reached the sum of $244,-
000,000, and furthermore is increasing at the rate of $1,500,000 a month,
or $50,000 a day, or $2,083 an hour,
or $34.50 a minute, or 57 cents every
second of time, day and night, Sundays and holidays,
Nelson Miner���Mr. H. W. Hawley
arrived in town from the Mollie Gibson mine yesterday. Mr. Hawley,
who has the contract for the new
wagon road, states that the first
three miles from the lake have been
completed. He sub-let contracts for
construction ot the first five miles
from the mine toward the lake. The
road will be about 12 miles long
when completed.
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E. R. ATHERTON CO. Limited,
Business Is quiet, So They Say
But we can say that we are
selling more sho^s today than
ever before. Why! Because we
have the largest stock, the best
quality and the best Prices o
any House in the Country.
Do not send out of town for your
shoes when yoiL can buy them
cheaper right at home, and always be assured of a perfect fit.
Spend your money at home
and you will no doubt get part
of it back again. So says a good
citizen.
We have in stiock ,51500 worth
of Blankets. We have 4 point,
3 1-2 point and 3 point Mackinaw Blankets, the best that are
manufactured; they are thick as
a board, "warm things."
we also have a fine line of white
and colored wool blankets, horse
blankets, and a large stock of
cotton blankets. Also a fine line
of pure white cotton filled satin
cover quilts, wool filled quilts and
baby quilts; these goods just arrived.
We do not expect to hold up
every person who comes in our
store. But we do take great
pleasure in showing you the
finest and largest stock of bedding in this country.
E. R. ATHERTON, Co., Limited. THE PAYSTREAK, SANDON, B. C, SEPTEMBER 2,   1899.
MININ��   RB&OR'DS
The following is a complete list of the
mining transactions recorded during the
week in the several mining divisions of
the Slocan. Those of New Denve- were
as follows :���
LOCATIONS.
August 22���Lake, Granite cr, A Mc-
Whirter.
23���Brase, near Rosebery, J Clark.
24���Orrorrora, n fork Carpenter, C
Haller.
26���Kitchener, near Cody, E M Quirk.
26���Moon Fraction, Twin lake basin,
A J Becker. Tonka Fraction, near
Alamo, H T Twigg.
ASSESSMENTS.
August 22���Red Fox, Red Fox Fraction, Old Newry, Pram. 23���Olencpe,
Hub. 24���Fitz, Chitopa, Opatunka,
Broken Hill, Edinburgh for 8 vears. 25
���Pay Day. 26���Okanagan Chief, Imperial.   28���Lee Fraction, Golden.
TRANSFKBS.
August 22���Alert %, J A McDonald
vto Dan McLeod, Aug 22.   Bird Fraction
5-12, S T Walker to Alex Smith, Aug
22.   Summit Fraction 1, H M Walker to
same.
23���Adirondack 2-9, Wm "Niven to H
Lowe, W Murray and R Sloan, on Aug
19.
24���Forest King J, J Fraser to E L
White, Aug 21. Gipsy Queen i, A Wild
to E L White, Aug 21. Le Roi J, Lee
Coombs to G H Dawson, June 15.
28���Galena Mines, Limited, notice of
liquidation in London Gazette, Jan 10.
Kelvin, J Campbell to E Shannon, Aug
26. Snowdon %, L Doolan to J Carolan
on Aug 28.
OPTIONS.
August 26��� P Burns and D D Mann to
Lorenzo Alexander, option to purchase
for $40,000, Minnehaha, Jennie, Evening, Violet, Carnation and Violet Fraction, Aug 18.
SLOCAN   CITY   DIVISION.
LOCATIONS.
August 21���Victor, reloc Whatcom,
H Reichart.
22���Addie. 1st n fork Lemon, D T
Davie and Annie Horton. Venus, 4th
s fork Lemon, J Anderson.
23���Legal, reloc Whippooiwill, Ben
Robertson and A R Balderson.
24���Lexington Fraction, reloc Polly,
I Beaupre.
25���Homestake, reloc of Detective, J
Dovion.
26���Eden, Slocan lake, C E Smither-
ingale. Golden Hill, Skinner creek, T
DTobin.
ASSESSMENTS.
August 21���Queen, Cheboygan Fraction, Ponce. 22���Silver Mast. 25���Delphian, Chilkat, Rocky Fraction. 26���
Truro, Tamarac No 2 Fraction, Lucifer,
Flora, Gold Bank, Gold Rock.
TRANSFERS.
August1 22���Exchange, Sir Charles
Tupper to New Gold Fields of British
Columbia, Limited. Ida i, J B Thompson and E B Dunlop to I Robinson.
AINSWORTH   DIVISION.
LOCATIONS.
August 16.���Georgette,Duncan river,
A Goudroux, M Fortien, W A Abbott.
Mountain Chief, Meadow cr, J Brighton
and J McVeigh. Hard Fraction, same,
John Kelly J McKenna and J Campbell. Starlight, same, J Kelly and J
Billings. Summit,01ympia,Homestake,
and Great Northern, Houser cr, F H
Harper. C P R, same, J P Mahoney,
K & S, same, RN Barnard. Leila,same.
J B Anderson. Ongiana, Little Glacier
creek, J Anderson. Foy. same, H R
Stovel. Early Bird, Woodbury cr, C H
Green. Gallia, Copper cr, C Leblanc.
Hutetia, Copper cr, A Hallet.
cr, C F Caldwell. No 2 and No 5, same,
C C Poyntz. No�� 3, same, F D Crome.
No 4, same, A Johnson. Elgin Chief
No 2, Glacier cr, S Swanson and J
Sherwood. Elgin Chief No 1, same,
same.
18���Hilda, Beartrap cr, T Duffy.
19���Atlantic, Sawyer cr. J P Sawyer.
Alki Fraction, Kootenav lake, A O Egbert. Jack, Woodbury cr, M E Young.
Sanford, Kaslo cr, same. Bob, Woodburv creek, M Murcheson. Teutonic,
Davis cr, A McKenzie and T Brown.
ASSESSMENTS.
August 16���Sil ver Queen .Silver Queen
Fraction, Maggie, Elsie, Monitor, Main
lander, Chicora, Chippawa, Niagara,
Cornwall, Bump and Fraser. 17���Rebel,
Alberta No 2, David, Herbert, Elia and
Chief. 18���Lucky Boy, Paystreak and
Extension of Any*. 19���Congress, Joker
and Derby. 21���Comber. Great Western, Silver King, Silver Queen, Yukon,
26 to 1, Southern Cross and Park Region. 22���Sideline bv Sunderhill, Rus-
ler, Victor, Horsefly .Waverley.Vernon,
New Chummy, Hill Top, Noble Friend,
16 to 1 for four years and Lakeview.
23���Lakeside, Silver Leaf.Knobhill and
Kootenay Star.
TRANSFERS.
August 21���Protest against any sale
or deal on the Butte Fraction. Florence
L, J, Angus Mclnnes to Florence Mclnnes.
22���Colonial J, J G Ross to J J Red.
A REVOLUTION IS PENDING,
In the New York Engineering & Mining Journal the assertion is made that it
takes three years' time and $750,000 expenditure to put a copper mine on a
dividend-paying basis. Thia may be
true of all the Michigan, Lake Superior
mines, but copper mining, like all other
industries, is undergoing a process of
evolution,and certain properties recently
opened in Ontario will be worked according to the most modern methods
and with the latest invented and perfected machinery.
The mines alluded to in the E. & M.
Journal require to have shafts sunk to
the depth of many hundreds, perhaps
thousands, of feet into the earth before
they strike "pay dirt," and very costly
and cumbersome machinery must be
purchased and installed for hoisting
purposes. On the contrary, mining
properties in Ontario, now in process of
development, show hundreds of thousands of tons of rich ore now in sight
which needs only to be quarried out.
Add to this advantage the fact that a
process for extracting oxidized nickel
direct from the ore has been invented
and patented by Prof. Antoine Graf,who
ia now engaged in building a battery of
hie electro-chemical furnaces at the Mt.
Nickel mine, about four miles from Sudbury, Ont., (which is one of the Great
Lakes Copper Company's properties) and
it is self-evident that a revolution in the
copper mining industry is really impending.
The Great Lakes Copper Co., organized
a short time ago will, without a doubt,
ship metal to market within ninety days
of the date of organization and be a dividend payer within a year. Under the
old process of developing a mine and reducing the ore this would be an impossibility, but the electric process which
extracts the metal in the first run
through the furnace will render it an
easy matter to accomplish thia feat���
Sault Star.
Angus Mclnnes has been appointed
collector under the revenue act.   He is
17���Cloudburst and Dixie, Woodbury I also registrar of the county court.
UNCLE SAM IS BOTTEN.
In defence of Mr. Astor's change of
residence and allegiance it might be
urged (if one had the hardihood) that in
his native country there is no adequate
protection of human life���the primary
purpose of government. More human
beings are criminally killed in every
year in the United States than have died
in any modern battle. In England murder is punished, and is therefore seldom
committed. In the United States, suspected persons, frequently innocent, are
put to death by their neighbors with impunity, and in one large section of the
country it is customary to mutilate the
victim before killing him, to burn him
with red hot irons, to tear his flesh from
him in strips and afterwards to curry
away portions of the body as souvenirs.
In England lynching is unknown.
In the United States, mobs of laborers
on strike are permitted to murder other
laborers in the streets and in their homes,
to destroy their employers' property and
that of others without effective opposition. In England nothing of this kind
is allowed. In the United States no
person's good name is secure from the
oral or printed lie. In England the
slanderer and libeller are silent under
the menace of the law. In the United
States the courts and legislative bodies
are, as a rule, corrupt. In England the
judges are just and the legislators honest. Iu the United States ignorant vulgarians and howling demagogues are
found everywhere enjoying the distinction of high political preferment. In
England the holding of an important of
flee is presumptive evidence of education
and good breeding. In an American
city the public service is controlled and
the public revenues looted by coarse, unlettered thieves known as "bosses." In
English cities the "boss" is known.
When charging so confidently and
with such precision the motives impelling Mr. Astor in a change of allegiance,
nis star-spangled critics might profitably
consider whether some of these facts
may not consciously have affected his
decision. Not theirs, of course,nor mine,
would be affected by considerations so
trivial, but to an understanding enfeebled by possession of the "Astjr millions"
they might seem relevant and important.
The United States were good enough, as
doubtless Hades is good enough, for the
old original John Jacob, but the degenerate William Waldorf may have an unmanly weakness for security, peace, and
self-respect.
In draughting the Scheme of Things
the Creator made no provision for good
government. It is a hope, a dream, "a
radiant and adored deceit," a "light that
never was on sea nor land." They have
it in Heaven, doubtless, and by the way
Heaven is a pure autocracy, neither
saints nor angels sharing in the cares of
state; but here on earth we shall have it
only when bo good and wise as to require
no government at all. Good government
is too precious to be bestowed upon a
people so unworthy as to need it. But
there are degrees of bad government.and
as an American, who has lived and observed in both countries, I am of the solemn conviction that of all the governments of great nations that of the United
States is the most senseless, corrupt and
inefficient, and that of England the
least. That there is anything discreditable in a change of allegiance from the
one country to the other, according to
interest or taste���or for that matter from
any country to any other���is a proposition of such monstrous unreason that it
could win assent from nobody but a malicious idiot or a patriot.���'Frisco Examiner.	
MYSTERIOUS MINE.
Bertram Tennyson, of London, Eng.,
a nephew of the late poet laureate, and
a mining ex pert,has been investigating
various properties in Cassiar, in the
vicinity of Dease lake, in the interests
of a British syndicate. While having
no glowing accounts of rich quartz or
gravel to relate, he is by no means dissatisfied with the district from a mining
standpoint.
"The gold is there," says Mr. Tennyson, "but capital must be spent in order
to secure it. It is emphatically not a
poor man's country. What is needed is
a hydraulicking plant; with that and the
liberal expenditure of money many of
these properties can be made to pay
dividends."
Mr. Teqnyson says that while there
has undoubtedly been a great deal of
sickness and suffering in that country,
more especially on the Edmonton trail,
he is satisfied that a good deal of it was
due to the ignorance of conditions, unfitness for the life and neglect of proper
care of themselves on the part of many.
He returns to civilization In perfect
health himself, stronger and better in
every way for his trip, and having lost
only what he could afford to lose���lo
pounds of superfluous avoirdupoi i
He met some strange characters iu
the north, some of them being men of
whom probably no one in the outer
world has any knowledge of their existence. One such man is a mulatto.named C B Smith, who has been camped <m
a river bar back of Dease lake for the
past 42 years. No man knows just how
much this man Smith is taking out, but
the diggings evidently pay, as he has
always enough dust to obtain all the
comforts of life to be had in that conn-
try. Mr. Tennyson spent a night in
Smith's cabin, and found him a most
unique and interesting individual. In
speaking of his brother, whom he has
not seen for forty years, but of whom
he is very proud, because "he is nearly
white," Smith offered to Tennyson a
lutter of introduction, whom he described as "a perfect gentleman of pleasing
personality and irridescent idiocyncra-
cies". As Smith could only give his
address as "North America, near Man-
treal," it is probable that Mr. Tennyson
will never have the felicity of meeting
the distinguished individual.
Mr. Tennyson states that there is a
man at a point about 70 miles from
Dease Post, who for many years lias
been working a hill claim all alone. H��'
lives like a hermit and will converse
with no one. He has tunneled into the
hill the astounding distance of 2,500
feet and has apparently got some very
rich dirt. Some three years ago this
man was in Victoria, where be spent
money like Mater for a few months, living on the best in tho land. No one
ever found out who he was or where he
came from, and one day he silently disappeared and loft no trace behind. As
soon as he has got another well nllea
sack he will probablv pay Victoria another visit, but whether his identity
will ever become known seems doubtful .���Victoria Globe. THE PAYSTREAK, SANDON, B.C., SEPTEMBER 2, 1899.
THB WOB-��'S SILVKR PRODUCTION.
The predictions so freely made a few
ears ago by those not familiar with the
conditions controlling production, that
the silver production of the world would
rapidly decrease, and might be expected
J?all"to a point of comparative insigni-
i >nce, have not by any means been
realized. Notwithstanding its lower
price, the output of the white metal has
oeen'maintained at a high level and in
1898 showed the very respectable increase
ag'compared with 1897 of 266,314 kilograms, or 4.7 per cent. Taking the production for eight years past, we find that
it has been as follows:
Kilograms.
1891    4,479,649
,cq9     5,935,315
Sw          5,339,746
{894"';'.'.'.'    5,554,144
iQQR    5,667,691
896*'      5,496,178
rot     5,668,305
[gjjs;;;;;;;  5,929,619
1 kilogram���32.21 trov ounces.
It will be seen that the production of
1898 was larger than that of any previous
vear since 1892, and approached what
was then considered the extraordinary
production of that year- This great output was obsorbed by the world's markets
without difficulty, and at average prices
not greatly below thoseof previous years.
In fact, the price of metal rose toward
the end of the year, and has been well
maintained since its close.
At the time the predictions above re-
Peru  1,107,188
Europe:
Austria  750,233
Hungary  508,166
France  1,524,138
Germany  9,115,744
Greece 	
Italy	
Norway	
Russia	
Spain	
Sweden	
Turkey	
United Kingdom
Asia:
Japan
799,850
859,520
89,531
164,324
4,343,786
42,176
,     28,927
147,002
______________________      1,479,759
Australasia      10,136,013
HUMOROUS   LITTLE   THINGS.
���'Getting home trom the seaside?"
"Yes."
���'Any curiosities?"
"One.   My board bill is coming by
freight."
��
A little Jtutland, Pa., girl is very
much up to the times. At her prayers
the other night, after the usual appeal for her loved ones, she added:
donald. The premier, talking once
with a friend on the peculiar customs
of different people, stated that on a
visit to the west a reception was
given him, at which a bishop from
Belgium was present. As the party
were being escorted by a body of
men in Highland costume, the foreign
bishop, seeing the bare legs and kilts,
asked why the men wore no trousers.
"It's just a custom," gravely replied
Total  $112,478,287
The United States in 1898 was the
largest producer, with a total of 58,763,-
127 ounces, or 1.827,723kilograms; Mexico following closely with 1,768,501 kilograms.   No other country  approached
either of these two, Australasia, which
was the third producer in rank reporting
a total of only 534,360 kilegrams.   It is
probable that Bolivia was the fourth actual producer, though Germany gives a
quantity greater by 138,440 kilograms.
The German official statements,however,
give the fine silver output of the refineries, and a considerable portion of that
was obtained from  imported  ore  and
base bullion.    Our own production, as
given in the table, includes only that
from ores mined in the United States.
In addition to that quantity our smelters
and refineries turned out in 1898 a total
of  39,784,000 ounces, or 1,237.560 kilograms, obtained from foreign ores and
bullion.
SLOGAN   ORE   SHIPMENTS.
Total shipped July 1 to Dec. 81,1898,
17,994 tons. January 1st, 1899, to
August 26:
Week.
Payne	
Last Chance..
Slocan Star...
- .   ,   .        T    ,     . , Sir John.     "In some places people
"And please Ix>M take care of your- tftke off thel_ hatg && ft mftrk o{ honor
self, too, for it anything should hap-       distinguished gue8te.  here they
pen to youwe> couldn't have anyone t_ke off their troU8er8;.
but Mr. McKmley to depend upon,
and he isn't doing as well as papa
expected."
��
He was a newspaper man,      fjL
And she a maiden fair;
Together thev sat upon the beach
Enjoying the fresh sea air.
Placing an arm about her waist,
He whispered, "Now confess
That you have no objections to
The 'liberty of the press.'"
"According to my belief," said she,
"It cannot be so bad;
For I know the good book tells us,
To 'make waist places glad.'"
���-Chicago News.
��
The late Colonel   Ingersoll  was
riding in a street car one day, when
the Rev. DeWitt Tal mage got in, and
I
fer red to were made, we stated our rea
doubting their force, and ex- -It is to be noted that by far the greater
that the production part of the world's supply of silver now
The reasons  for comes from the North American contin-
sona tor
pressed tlu
belief
would continue large^^^^^^^ _
to belief���the correctness of which time
has proved-may be very briefly stated.
A large quantity of silver is and will be
always saved as a by-product in connection with other metals, as gold, copper,
an I lead; silver will continue to be largely used for ornamental and household
purposes and in the arts, its position  as
a valuable and decorative metal being
too firmly established by custom to permit a change; and finally, a very large
part of the world's population still uses
silver as its chief monetary metal���to
say nothing of the quantities used for
subsidiary coinage in even those countries which adhere most, closely to the
gold standard.
In the accompanying table we give in
detail the silver production of the world
in 1898, as collected foi and presented in
"The Mineral Industry,"  Volume VII.
The figures are chiefly obtained directly
from the producers, or from official records ; careful estimates being made in a
tew eases, where there is no official information to be obtained.   The figures are
given in Troy ounces as a matter of con.
venience.   In many countries the reports
are made in kilograms originally, and in
a few years, we trust, all will be returned
by that standard.   The values givei are
the commercial values, as established by
the current prices in the New York and
London markets :���
Countries. Value.
North America:
United States    $34,670,245
Canada       2,616,110
Mexico      33,546,855
Central American States. 957,909
/ >;outh Ameiica: 1M.71.
Argentina  lW<b
Bolivia.                       6,490,000
Chile..  .            2,722,245
Colombia.:.::  971,187
Ecuador  4��BW
thev presently fell into an argument. IDardanelles".'
Finally Ingersoll said: "Then ytttttjES^S?.
would like to live in a place, Brother Igj��� ���;;���;;���
|Talmage, where everyone had to be yf^fcy,;
law?"     "Certainly," said I Wakefield
Coin.
Ajax 	
Sovereign	
Reco	
Ivanhoe 	
Treasure Vault	
Trade Dollar	
Liberty Hill	
Madison	
(Wonderful 
American Boy     20
Idaho Mines 
Queen Bess	
Wild Goose	
Monitor	
Whitewater	
Jackson	
Bell	
Wellington	
Antoine.
ent; which in 1898 furnished 3,784,637
kilograms, or 63.5 per cent, of the total.
The South American countries, which in
the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries sent to Europe quantities
of silver previously unprecedented, now
hold a very subordinate place, their aggregate output last year being 605.671
kilograms, or 10.2 percent.of the world's
total. Bolivia, Peru, Chile, and probably Western Argentina have great reserves of silver ores, and may increase
their production largely in the future.
The European production calls for
little remark. Outside of Germany,which
is referred to above, the only important
producer is Spain,where nearly all of the
metal is obtained from the silver-lead
ores.
The only reporting producer in Asia is
Japan. There is reason to believe that
some silver is obtained in China, but it
is impossible to determine the quantity.
No silver is reported from Africa. The
Australasian output was chiefly from the
Broken Hill and neighboring mines of
the Barrier Range in New Sonth Wales;
though some comes also from New Zealand.
We have had from time to time a renewal of the useless discussion over the
cost of producing silver. It is entirely
impossible to determine any fair average,
as the costs of production will vary so
widely, even in mines in the same district. It is sufficient to say that if an increased production is drawn out on an
average price of 58# cents, it is highly
probable that, in the great majority of
cases, silver can be put upon the market
for a little less than that sum.
The present indications are that production is still increasing, and that the
output for 1899 will be still greater than
that of 1898.���E. & M. Journal.
good  by 	
Talmage. "You would like to live
where everyone had to go to church
regularly eyery Sunday?" "Yes,
that would suit me." "Where no
man could get a drink and swearing
was not permitted?" "Yes, that's the
place for me." "And where every
man would have to keep regular
hours?" "That would be heaven on
earth," said Talmage, smiling and
striking his knee with his open palm.
"Well," said Bob, looking over his
glasses, "you'd better go up to Sing
Sing. That's tne way they do there."
��
The following humorous incident is
related of the late Sir John A. Mac*
Emily Edith	
C< mistook	
Noonday���.     40
Enterprise	
Tamarac	
Black Prince	
Total
5,271
2,245
548
S3
15
40
20
180
119
113
50
S
15
28
20
660
1,441
15
260
2,012
580
80
11
65
401
100
48
540
20
S
a
820
580
60
120
400
710
20
20
Total tons.
60       17,118
Follow the Ore Body.
More mining failures have resulted
from crosscut tunnels intended to tap
the vein than by all other plans combined. Until a mine's development is
sufficient to show to a certainty that a
substantial ore body is in sight to justify the cost of driving a tunnel, it is a
most unsafe proposition. The best rule
for beginners is 'the oft-repeated one,
"Follow the Ore." A prospecting tunnel is a delusion and a snare.
DEALER IN
Cr
MEATS
w
AT
SANDON, ROSSLAND, NELSON, KASLO, PILOT BAY
THEEE PORKS, SLOCAN CITY.
11
4 I
I I'
9) THE PAYSTREAK, SANDON, B. C, SEPTEMBER 2, _!��*__
]\
MINING   RBCSORDS
The following is a complete list of the
mining transactions recorded during the
week in the several mining divisions of
the Slocan. Those of New Denve- were
as follows :������
LOCATION8.
August 22���Lake, Granite cr, A Mc-
Whirter.
23���Brase, near Rosebery, J Clark.
24���Orrorrora, n fork Carpenter, C
Haller.
26���Kitchener, near Cody, E M Quirk.
26���Moon Fraction, Twin lake basin,
A J Becker. Tonka Fraction, near
Alamo, H T Twigg.
ASSESSMENTS.
August 22���Red Fox, Red Fox Fraction, Old Newry, Pram. 23���Glencpe,
Hub. 24���Fitz, Cbitopa, Opatunka,
Broken Hill, Edinburgh for 3 years. 25
���Pay Day. 26���Okanagan Chief, Imperial.   2ft���Lee Fraction, Golden.
TRANSFEBS.
August 22���Alert %, J A McDonald
vto Dan McLeod, Aug 22.   Bird Fraction
5-12, S T Walker to Alex Smith, Aug
22.   Summit Fraction 1, H M Walker to
same.
23���Adirondack 2-9. Wm Niven to H
Lowe, W Murray and R Sloan, on Aug
19.
24���Forest King J, J Fraser to E L
White, Aug 21. Gipsy QueenJ, A Wild
to E L White, Aug 21. Le Roi J, Lee
Coombs to G H Dawson, June 15.
28���Galena Mines, Limited, notice of
liquidation in London Gazette, Jan 10.
Kelvin, J Campbell to E Shannon, Aug
26. Snowdon % L Doolan to J Carolan
on Aug 28.
OPTIONS.
August 26���P Burns and D D Mann to
Lorenzo Alexander, option to purchase
for $40,000, Minnehaha, Jennie, Evening, Violet, Carnation and Violet Fraction, Aug 18.
SLOGAN   CITY   DIVISION.
LOCATIONS.
August 21���Victor, reloc Whatcom,
H Reichart.
22���Addie. 1st n fork Lemon, D T
Davie and Annie Horton. Venus, 4th
s fork Lemon, J Anderson.
23���Legal, reloc Whippooiwill, Ben
Robertson and A R Balderson.
24���Lexington Fraction, reloc Polly,
I Beaupre.
25���Homestake, reloc of Detective, J
Dovion.
26���Eden, Slocan lake, C E Sraither-
ingale. Golden Hill, Skinner creek, T
DTobin.
ASSESSMENTS.
August 21���Queen, Cheboygan Fraction, Ponce. 22���Silver Mast. 25���Delphian, Chilkat, Rocky Fraction. 26���
Truro, Tamarac No 2 Fraction, Lucifer,
Flora, Gold Bank, Gold Rock.
TRANSFERS.
August' 22���Exchange, Sir Charles
Tupper to New Gold Fields of British
Columbia, Limited. Ida J, J B Thompson and E B Dunlop to I Robinson.
AINSWORTH   DIVISION.
LOCATIONS.
August 16.���Georgette,Duncan river,
A Goudroux, M Fortien, W A Abbott.
Mountain Chief, Meadow cr, J Brighton
and J McVeigh. Hard Fraction, same,
John Kelly J McKenna and J Campbell. Starlight, same, J Kelly and J
Billings. Summit,01ympia,Homestake,
and Great Northern, Houser cr, F H
Harper. C P R, same, J P Mahoney,
K A S, same, RN Barnard. Leila,same.
J B Anderson. Ongiana, Little Glacier
creek, J Anderson. Foy. same, H R
Stovel. Early Bird, Woodbury cr, C H
Green. Gallia, Copper cr, C Leblanc.
Hutetia, Copper cr, A Hallet.
17-���Cloudburst and Dixie, Woodbury
cr, C F Caldwell. No 2 and No 5, same,
C C Poyntz. No* 3, same, F D Crome.
No 4, same, A Johnson. Elgin Chief
No 2, Glacier cr, S Swanson and J
Sherwood. Elgin Chief No 1, same,
same.
18���Hilda, Beartrap cr, T Duffy.
19���Atlantic, Sawyer cr. J P Sawyer.
Alki Fraction, Kootenay lake, A O Egbert. Jack, Woodbury cr, M E Young.
Sanford, Kaslo cr, same. Bob, Woodburv creek, M Murcheson. Teutonic,
Davis cr, A McKenzie and T Brown.
ASSESSMENTS.
August 16���Sil ver Queen .Silver Queen
Fraction, Maggie, Elsie, Monitor, Main
lander, Chicora, Chippawa, Niagara,
Cornwall, Bump and Fraser. 17���Rebel,
Alberta No 2, David, Herbert, Elia and
Chief. 18���Luckv Boy, Paystreak and
Extension of Any. 19���Congress,Joker
and Derby. 21���Comber, Great Western, Silver King, Silver Queen, Yukon,
26 to 1, Southern Cross and Park Region. 22���Sideline bv Sunderhill, Rus-
ler, Victor, Horsefly .Waverley .Vernon,
New Chummy, Hill Top, Noble Friend,
16 to 1 for four years and Lakeview.
23���Lakeside, Silver Leaf.Knobhill and
Kootenay Star.
TRANSFERS.
August 21���Protest against any sale
or deal on the Butte Fraction. Florence
L, J, Angus Mclnnes to Florence Mclnnes.
22���Colonial i, J G Ross to J J Red.
A REVOLUTION IS PENDING,
In the New York Engineering & Mining Journal the assertion is made that it
takes three years' time and $750,000 expenditure to put a copper mine on a
dividend-paying basis. This may be
true of all the Michigan, Lake Superior
mines, but copper mining, like all other
industries, is undergoing a process of
evolution,and certain properties recently
opened in Ontario will be worked according to the most modern methods
and with the latest invented and perfected machinery.
The mines alluded to in the E. A M.
Journal require to have shafts sunk to
the depth of many hundreds, perhaps
thousands, of feet into the earth before
thev strike "pay dirt," and very costly
snd cumbersome machinery must be
purchased and installed for hoisting
purposes. On the contrary, mining
properties in Ontario, now in process of
development, show hundreds of thousands of tons of rich ore now in sight
which needs only to be quarried out.
Add to this advantage tbe fact that a
process for extracting oxidized nickel
direct from the ore has bean invented
and patented by Prof. Antoine Graf.who
is now engaged in building a battery of
his electro-chemical furnaces at the Mt.
Nickel mine, about four miles from Sudbury, Ont., (which is one of the Great
Lakes Copper Company's properties) and
it is self-evident that a revolution in the
copper mining industry is really impending.
The Great Lakes Copper Co., organized
a short time ago will, without a doubt,
ship metal to market within ninety days
of the date of organization and be a dividend payer within a year. Under the
old process of developing a mine and reducing the ore this would be an impossibility, but the electric process which
extracts the metal in the first run
through the furnace will render it an
easy matter to accomplish thia feat���
Sault Star.
Angus Mclnnes has been appointed
collector under the revenue act. He is
also registrar of the county court.
UNCLE SAM IS KOTTEN.
In defence of Mr. Astor's change of
residence and allegiance it might be
urged (if one had the hardihood) that in
his native country there is no adequate
protection of human life���the primary
purpose of government. More human
beings are criminally killed in every
year in the United States than have died
in any modern battle. In England murder is punished, and is therefore seldom
committed. In the United States, suspected persons, frequently innocent, are
put to death by their neighbors with impunity, and in one large section of the
country it is customary to mutilate the
victim before killing him, to burn him
with red hot irons, to tear his flesh from
him in strips and afterwards to curry
away portions of the body as souvenirs.
In England lynching is unknown.
In the United States, mobs of laborers
on strike are permitted to murder other
laborers in the streets and in their homes,
to destroy their employers' property and
that of others without effective opposition. In England nothing of this kind
is allowed. In the United States no
person's good name is secure from the
oral or printed lie. In England the
slanderer and libeller are silent under
the menace of the law. In the United
States the courts and legislative bodies
are, as a rule, corrupt. In England the
judges are just and the legislators honest. In the United States ignorant vulgarians and howling demagogues are
found everywhere enjoying the distinction of high political preferment. In
England the holding of an important of
flee is presumptive evidence of education
and good breeding. In an American
city the public service is controlled and
the public revenues looted by coarse, unlettered thieves known as "bosses." In
English cities the "boss" is known.
When charging so confidently and
with such precision the motives impelling Mr. Astor in a change of allegiance,
ids star-spangled critics might profitably
consider whether some of these facts
may not consciously have affected his
decision. Not theirs, of course,nor mine,
would be affected by considerations so
trivial, but to an understanding enfeebled by possession of the "AsUr millions"
they might seem relevant and important.
The United States were good enough, as
doubtless Hades is good enough, for the
old original John Jacob, but the degenerate William Waldorf may have an unmanly weakness for security, peace, and
self-respect.
In draughting the Scheme of Things
the Creator made no provision for good
government. It is a hope, a dream, "a
radiant and adored deceit," a"light that
never was on sea nor land." They have
it in Heaven, doubtless, and by the way
Heaven is a pure autocracy, neither
saints nor angels sharing in the cares of
state; but here on earth we shall have it
only when so good and wise as to require
no government at all. Good government
is too precious to be bestowed upon a
people so unworthy as to need it. But
there are degrees of bad government.and
aa an American, who has lived and observed in both countries, I am of the solemn conviction that of all the govern-1
ments of great nations that of the United!
States is the moat senseless, corrupt and
inefficient, and that of England the
least. That there is anything discredit-'
able in a change of allegiance from the
one country to the other, according to
interest or taste���or for that matter from
any country to any other���is a proposition of such monstrous unreason that it
could win assent from nobody but a malicious idiot or a patriot.���'Frisco Examiner.	
MYSTERIOUS MINE.
Bertram Tennyson, of London, Eng.,
a nephew of the late poet laureate, and
a mining expert,has been investigating
various properties in Cassiar, in the
vicinity of Dease lake, in the interests
of a British syndicate. While having
no glowing accounts of rich quartz or
gravel to relate, he is by no means dissatisfied with the district from a mining
standpoint.
"The gold is there," says Mr. Tennyson, "but capital must be spent in order
to secure it. It is emphatically not a
poor man's country. What is needed is
a hydraulicking plant; with that and the
liberal expenditure of money manv of
these properties can be made to pay
dividends."
Mr. Tennyson says that while there
lias undoubtedly been a great deal of
sickness and suffering in that country,
more especially on the Edmonton trail,
he is satisfied that a good deal of it was
due to the ignorance of conditions, unfitness for the life and neglect of proper
care of themselves on the part of many.
He returns to civilization in perfect
health himself, stronger and better in
every way for his trip, and having lost
only what he could afford to lose���10
pounds of superfluous avoirdupoi >>
He met some strange characters in
the north, some of them being men of
whom probably no one in the outer
world has anv knowledge of their exis-
tence. One such man is a mulatto.named C. B Smith, who lias been camped on
H river bar back of Dease lake for the
past 12 years. No man knows just how
much this man Smith is taking out, hut
the diggings evidently pay, as he has
always enough dust to obtain all the.
comforts of life to be had in that country. Mr. Tennyson spent a night in
Smith's cabin, and found him a most
unique and interesting individual. In
speaking of his brother, whom he hns
not seen for forty years, but of whom
he is very proud, because "he is nearly
whte," Smith offered to Tennyson a
letter of introduction, whom he described as "a perfect gentleman of pleasing
personality and irridescent idiocyncra-
cies". As Smith could only give his
address as "North America, near Man*
treal," it is probable that Mr. Tennyson
will never have the felicity of meeting
the distinguished individual.
Mr. Tennyson states that there is a
man at a point about 70 miles from
Deaso Post, who for many years has
been working a hill claim all alone. He
lives like a hermit and will converse
with no one. He has tunneled into the
hill the astounding distance of 2,800
feet and has apparently got some very
rich dirt. Some three years ago this
man was in Victoria, where he spent
money like water for a few months, living on the best in tho land. No one
ever found out who he was or where he
came from, and one day he silently disappeared and left no trace behind. As
soon as ho has got another well nlieo
sack he will probablv pay Victoria another visit, but whether his identity
will ever become known seems doubtful.���Victoria Globe.
{ THE PAYSTBEAK, SANDON, B. C, SEPTEMBER 2, 1899.
THE WORLD'S SILVER PRODUCTION.
The predictions so freely made a few
ears ago by those not familiar with the
conditions controlling production, that
the silver production of the world would
rapidly decrease, and might be expected
Jvfcll to a point of comparative insigni-
J ����� have not by any means been
Notwithstanding  its   lower
h^nce,
realized. ^^^^^^^^^^^
price the output of the white metal has
Jeen maintained at a high level and in
1898 showed the very respectable increase
as compared with 1897 of 266,314 kilo-
grams, or 4.7 per cent. Taking the production for eight years past, we find that
it has been as follows:
Kilograms.
1891     4,479,649
,gj)2         5,935,315
1OQ0      5,oo9,74o
J2 I...    5,554,144
\%i             5,667,691
896 '.I    5,496,178
52?      5,668,305
[ggg;;;;;;;;;  5,929,619
1 kilogram���82.21 trov ounces.
It will be seen that the production of
1898 was larger than that of any previous
yeareince 1892, and approached what
was then considered the extraordinary
production of that year- This great output was obsorbed by the world's markets
without difficulty, and at average prices
not greatly below thoseof previous years.
In fact, the price of metal rose toward
the end of the year, and has been well
maintained since its close.
At the time the predictions above referred to wt>re made, we stated our reasons for doubting their force, and ex-
Peru  1,107,188
Europe:
Austria  750,233
Hungary  508,166
France  1,524,138
Germany  9,115,744
Greece  799,850
Italv  859,520
Norway  89,531
Russia  164,324
Spain  4,343,786
Sweden  42,176
Turkey  ,     28,927
United Kingdom  147,002
Aria a
Japan  1,479,759
Australasia  10,136,013
HUMOROUS   LITTLE   THINGS.
Total  $112,478,287
The United States in 1898 was the
largest producer, with a total of 58,763,-
127 ounces, or 1,827,723 kilograms; Mexico following closely with 1,768,501 kilograms.   No other country  approached
either of these two, Australasia, which
was the third producer in rank reporting
a total of only 534,360 kilegrams.   It is
probable that Bolivia was the fourth actual producer, though Germany gives a
quantity greater by 138,440 kilograms.
The German official statements,however,
give the fine silver output of the refineries, and a considerable portion of that
was obtained from  imported  ore  and
base bullion.    Our own production, as
given in the table, includes only that
from ores mined in the United States.
In addition to that quantity our smelters
and refineries turned out in 1898 a total
of  39,784,000 ounces, or 1,237.560 kilograms, obtained from foreign ores and
bullion.
It is to be noted that by far the greater
, n     i -it-f that the production   part of the world's supply of silver now
pruned the belief that the production j v ^ f ^ ^^ American contin.
would continue large.   The reasons  for
this belief���the correctness of which time
lias proved-may be very briefly stated.
A large quantity of silver is and will be
always saved as a by-product in connection with other metals, as gold, copper,
un I lead; silver will continue- to be largely used for ornamental and household
purposes and in the arts, its position as
a valuable and decorative metal being
too firmly established by custom to permit a change; and finally, a very large
part of the world's population still uses
silver as its chief monetary metal���to
say nothing of the quantities used for
subsidiary coinage in even those countries which adhere most closely to the
gold standard.
In the accompanying table we give in
detail the silver production of the world
in 1898, as collected foi and presented in
"The Mineral Industry,"  Volume VII.
The figures are chiefly obtained directly
from the producers, or from official records; careful estimates being made in a
tew cases, where there is no official information to be obtained.   The figures are
given in Troy ounces as a matter of con
venience.   In many countries the reports
are made in kilograms originally, and in
a few years, we trust, all will be returned
by that standard.   The values give, are
the commercial values, as established by
the current prices in the New York and
London markets :���
Countries. Value.
North America:
United States    $34,670,245
Canada       2,61b,H0
Mexico      33,546,855
Central American States. 957,909
'-;outh America: ,�����_-��
Argentina                 188,070
Bolivia              ... 6,490,000
Chile..    ... 2,722,245
Colombia:;.;;;'.".'.*.     wmi
Ecuador  4>55!*
comes from the North American contin
ent; which in 1898 furnished 3,784,637
kilograms, or 63.5 per cent, of the total.
The South American conn tries, which in
the sixteenth, seventeenth and eighteenth centuries sent to Europe quantities
of silver previously unprecedented, now
hold a very subordinate place, their aggregate output last year being 605.671
kilograms, or 10.2 per cent.of the world's
total. Bolivia, Peru, Chile, and probably Western Argentina have great reserves of silver ores, and may increase
their production largely in the future.
The European production calls for
little remark. Outside of Germany,which
is referred to above, the only important
producer is Spain,where nearly all of the
metal is obtained from the silver-lead
ores.
The only reporting producer in Asia is
Japan. There is reason to believe that
some silver is obtained in China, but it
is impossible to determine the quantity.
No silver is reported from Africa. The
Australasian output was chiefly from the
Broken Hill and neighboring mines of
the Barrier Range in New Sonth Wales;
though some comes also from New Zealand.
We have had from time to time a renewal of the useless discussion over the
cost of producing silver.   It is entirely
impossible to determine any fair average,
the costs of production will vary so
even in mines in the same dis-
It is sufficient to say that if an indrawn out on an
"Getting home trom the seaside?"
"Yes."
"Any curiosities?"
' "One.   My board bill is coming by
freight."
��
A little Jutland, Pa., girl is very
much up to the times. At her prayers
the other night, after the usual appeal for her loved ones, she added:
"And please, Lord, take care of yourself, too, for it anything should happen to you we couldn't have any one
but Mr. McKinley to depend upon,
| and he isn't doing as well as papa
expected."
��
He was a newspaper man,
And she a maiden fair;
Together thev sat upon the beach
Enjoying the fresh sea air.
Placing an arm about her waist,
He whispered, "Now confess
That you have no objections to
The 'liberty of the press.'"
"According to my belief," said she,
"It cannot be so bad;
For I know the good book tells us,
To 'make waist places glad.'"
������Chicago News.
��
The late Colonel Ingersoll was
riding in a street car one day, when
the Rev. DeWitt Talmage got in, and
they presently fell into an argument.
Finally Ingersoll said: "Then you
would like to live in a place, Brother
1 Talmage, where everyone had to be
I j    v.,   i���.���0��       <<P_~i-ai-ltt "   anirl
donald.   The premier, talking once
with a friend on the peculiar customs
of different people, stated that on a
visit to the west a reception was
given him, at which a bishop from
Belgium was present    As the party
were being escorted by a body of
men in Highland costume, the foreign
bishop, seeing the bare legs and kilts,
asked why the men wore no trousers.
"It's lust a custom," gravely replied
Sir John.    "In some places people
take off their hats as a mark of honor
to distinguished guests;  here they
take off their trousers."
SLOCAN   ORE   SHIPMENTS.
Total shipped July 1 to Dec. 81,1898,
17,994 tons. January 1st, 1899, to
August 26:
Week.
Payne	
Last Chance	
Slocan Star	
Sapphire	
Ajax 	
Sovereign	
Reco	
Ivanhoe	
Treasure Vault	
Trade Dollar	
Liberty H1U	
Madison	
Wonderful	
American Boy     20
Idaho Mines	
Queen Bess.
good by law?" "Certainly," said
Talmage. "You would like to live
where everyone had to go to church
regularly eyery Sunday?" "Yes,
that would suit me." "Where no
man could get a drink and swearing
was not permitted?" "Yes, that's the
place for me." "And where every
man would have to keep regular
hours?" "That would be heaven on
earth," said Talmage, smiling and
striking his knee with his open palm.
"Well," said Bob, looking over his
glasses, "you'd better go up to Sing
Sing. That's tne way they do there."
��
The following humorous incident is
related of the late Sir John A. Mac-
lid Goose	
Monitor	
Whitewater	
Jackson	
Bell	
Wellington	
Antoine	
Rambler	
Dardanelles	
Great Western	
Bosun	
Marion	
Capella	
Fidelity.-.	
Vancouver	
Wakefield	
Emily Edith	
Comstock	
Noonday      40
Enterprise	
Tamarac	
Black Prince	
Total
6,271
2,245
54S
S3
15
40
20
180
119
112
50
S
15
28
20
660
1,441
15
260
2,012
680
80
11
65
401
100
48
640
20
>
8
820
580
60
120
400
710
20
20
Total tons.
60       17,118
Follow the Ore Body.
More mining failures have resulted
from crosscut tunnels intended to tap
the vein than by all other plans combined. Until a mine's development is
sufficient to show to a certainty that a
substantial ore body is in sight to justify the cost of driving a tunnel, it is a
most unsafe proposition. The best rule
for beginners is 'the oft-repeated one,
"Follow the Ore." A prospecting tunnel is a delusion and a snare.
DEALER IN
as
widely, even in
trict	
creased production is   ^	
average price of 58# cents, it is highly
probable that, in the great majority of
cases, silver can be put upon the market
for a little leas than that sum.
The present indications are that production is still increasing, and that the
output for 1899 will be still greater than
that of 1898.���E. & M. Journal.
*<S1
M|E1A|T|S|
AT
SANDON, ROSSLAND, NELSON, KASLO, PILOT BAY
THREE FORKS, SLOCAN CITY.
��t
i The Pay streak.
A Rich Lardeau Claim.
A few days ago the Revelstoke
Herald announced a new and important strike of over three feet of
clean ore in the Nettie L., near Ferguson. The importance and richness
of the ore in this body was demonstrated by Assayer Holdich, when
he made an assay from samples
brought to town by the manager,
W. B. Pool. The assays gave the
astonishing results as follows: 717
ounces silver, 919 in gold 70 per cent
lead and 10 per cent copper. Mr.
Pool was as much surprised as anyone when the result of the assay was
made known to him, although he
was satisfied that the strike was a
rich one, yet he did not suppose that
it would reach the figures that it did.
Taking the figures of the assay and
putting it in at dollars and cents,
with giver say at 60 cents, the present market price, copper at 18 cents
per pound and lead at 84.45 per cwt,
would bring the price of the Nettie
L. ore up to $540 per ton, which is
an astonishing evidence of the richness of the Lardeau. It is the intention of the manager to start stoping
ore for shipment immediately, and
already ore sheds are being erected
on the ground. By December 1st Mr.
Pool expects to have 200 tons ready
for shipment to the smelter at Trail.
By that date the Nettie L. will be
within four miles of steamboat and
railway transportation, as it is expected that two railways will be built
and in running operation to the south
end of Trout Dake, with steamer connection between the south end of the
lake and Trout Lake City.
Marcus Daly in the Ohanagan.
A Vancouver despatch says: J, F-
Bledsoe, superintendent of the Fair-
view Corporation's mine properties,
Okanagan, says: 'Two mining engineers urged me recently to keep a
secret in connection with their identity until they consummated certain
deals. Their business has been done
and their mission is a secret no longer, The mining engineers were
agents of Marcus Daly, who sold the
Anaconda mines recently for 919,
000,000, and who has been looking
out for another Anaconda mine.
These men represented themselves as
miners looking about for cheap gold-
copper claims. They took different
routes, and in two weeks had bought
up nearly every copper claim in the
Okanagan country comparatively
for a song. Among the purchases
was Copper Mountain, in Similka-
meen, a vast quarry ot copper gold
ore, and it is the intention of Mr.
Daly to carry on operations there on
his usual gigantic scale. Since the
news leaked out an army of prospectors have spread over the district and the recorder finds great
difficulty in accomodating prospectors registering new finds.
The Gentleman's Game.
the other day from doing work oh
the Climax claim, located at the
head of Haskins creek. They sunk
on the vein several feet and when
they left the property on Tuesday
last 2J feet of almost solid galena ore
was exposed.
Kelly A Blooraineaur, who are
working the Jeanette and other
claims on Wilson Creek, sent down
a large consignment of supplies this
week. They are cutting trails and
making preparations for a heavy
season s development.
He had been calling with great
regularity for some time, but that
was all.
"What do you think of this movement to let women propose?" he
asked. '
"If some such plan isn't adopted,'
she adventured, "there seems to be
little liklihood that you will ever be
married."
After be bad caught bis breath he
made the customary avowal and the
engagement was announced next
day.
Hamilton  Watches
Are the best for Hard Service, being
the favorite Railroad Watch of North
America, largely taking the place of
other watches where accurate time is
required. The Jewels in these Watches
are Jewels, not imitation, and set in
Gold. The Higher Grades have Sapphire Pallets.   Everything that goes to
make the finest Timekeeper is to be
found in these Watches.
Seventeen Jewel Grades from *W) to
155.  Twenty-one Jewels from >40 to >f50.
Call and see them. ���
I also handle the famous Hampden
Watch.  I state only facts and can
back up every assertion made.
Q. W. GRIMMETT.
Jeweller and Optician.
The FILBERT CIGAR Store
Cigars,        * Tobaccos, Pipes,
Smokers' Sundries.
Cards and Chips.
JAS. WILLIAMSON.
"Here is a terrible thing," com
raented the young thing,.looking up
from, the paper. "A young man
attacked his wife with a poker and
waa only stopped by the screams ot
the woman attracting a passerby,
who summoned the police."
"Ah, a poker game," replied the
major. "The gentleman 'passed,'
the lady 'saw him' and 'called.'
The Trout Lake Topic says: Mes-
Smith and Bailey came down
rf*=_m
CHARLES GALES
|]| TON80RIAL ARTIST.
Has the Pincst
BARBER SHOP
and
BATH ROOMS
In tne Slocan.
Everything New, Complete and
Up<tO'date. The Comfort and
Convenience of Patrons will receive
the most Careful attention. Call
and see us at the New Stand.
Two Doors Above the Post Office.
RECO AVE. SANDON.
*_I*__?__^-^
Fine Seasonable Groceries
and
Table Novelties.
Unequalled for Variety and Purity.
Hotels, Mines and Families will find it to their ad
vantage to see these new goods In all lines before
purchasing elsewhere.   Mail Orders will receive as
usual our prompt attention and forwarded as desired
Sandon, B.C.
AINSWORTH.
H. GIEGERICH,
KASLO,
H. BYERS & Co.
Builders and Heavy Hardware.
���S-C^gj^gji
Prospectors Outfits. Picks, Shovels and
Steel, Camp Stoves, Camp Cooking
Utensils.     Powder, Caps and  Fuse.
RECO AVE. SANDON.
r a vyvrrm a 5 a"a-a tn'isrs nrmnnr vwmm a a a a a rnvwrvvvvTs
J. R. & D. Cameron,
RECO AVENUE,
i
o
KOOTENAY TAILORS. ?
JLtJUULSULgJULla.
o
See our New Goods. The ��
Latest in Fall Suitings. We
Carry the Finest Lines in the ��
Slocan. Fit, Material and
Workmanship Guaranteed.
SANDON.
JUUUUU o o gJLftJULgAgJLgJLgJUUUU AJUULgAM.ff.gBJULaJJL9.ftga 9JSJLSJ
Donaldson's  Rheumatic  Cure.
It has Cured Others,
It Will Cure You.
F. J. DONALDSON,     DRUGGIST.
RECO AVENUE,
SANDON, B. C.
Folliott&McMillan.
Contractors and Builders.
Dealers In Dressed and Rough Lumber.
000000000000
Sash, Dmi% Blinds, tto., Mad* taOrdor at Lowest Possible Prloss.
���Ins and Ohnaaslsn Tliabar always laStsok. Plans, Estlmatas and
SaooHlaatlons furnished for all Olassss sf Balldtnf.
SHOPS OPPOSITE O. P. R. FREIGHT SHED.
RAILROAD AVE.  -   -  -  -  SANDON.

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