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Omineca Miner Mar 31, 1917

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 (T-'N
THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
mer
VOL. VI, NO. 31
HAZELTON. B. C, SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 1917
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
ARE LOOKING TO OMINECA
Galloway Tells Mining Men of
Importance of Our Ore
Deposits
In his "Notes on the Copper
Deposits of the Northern Interior
of British Columbia," read at the
meeting at Vancouver of the
Western Branch of the Canadian
Mining Institute, John D. Galloway, assistant mineralogist for
the province, made an introductory comment that "Copper mining is now the most important
form of mining in British Columbia, and, although the last two
years have witnessed a steadily
increased production of copper,
there is little doubt but that the
output will be still further augmented in the near future. The
Northern Interior portion of the
province has as yet contributed
only a small proportion of the
yearly copper production of British Columbia, but it must be remembered that it is only within
the last three years that railway transportation, by means of
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway,
has been provided in that region,
and this railway serves only a
limited area of country on either
side of the track."
Prospecting has been in progress along the line of the Grand
Trunk Pacific for some years, but
it is only recently that development may be said to have commenced. At present the only
important copper producing section of the Northern Interior is
Hazel ton-Telkwa district of Omineca mining division.from which
the Rocher de Boule mine contributes the greater part of the
production. Along lower Skeena
river, in the Babine country, and
east of Telkwa, along the G.T.P.
Railway, many copper prospects
are being developed, but production from them so far has been
.small. Between the G. T. P.
Railway and Lillooet district there
is a strip of virtually unprospect-
ed country, in which copper and
other minerals may be found;
this is along the eastern contact
zone of the Pacific Coast range.
This range is 1,000 miles long,
from the International Boundary
line northward through British
Columbia into Alaska. It is
known to contain commercially
valuable ore bodies, in many
places along both its eastern and
western contacts.
j In Hazelton-Telkwa district the
mineralization embraces ores of
gold, silver, lead and zinc,as well
as copper, the last mentioned as
a rule being small to medium-
sized deposits, as distinguished
from large low-grade ore bodies
in other parts of the province.
In the mountains on both sides of
Skeena river, below Pacific station, many showings of copper
ore have been discovered, but as
a rule they are irregular and not
continuous. Further development
may, however.disclose the occurrence of large, low-grade ore
bodies, Small quantities of high
grade copper-silver ore are found
(Continued on 1'bkc Two)
BRITISH THREAMST. QUENTIN
DRIVING WEDGE INTO GERMAN FRONT-
SOCIALISTS SPEAK OUT IN THE REICHSTAG
London :    Haig's   troops  are
still advancing, with cavalry and
armored   motor   cars driving a
steel point at St.   Quentin,  sup-!
posedly one of the main defence!
points of the Hindenburg line.
The British captured four more j
towns within this salient yester-
day   and   the  fighting  became
increasingly bitter. |
The forward movement on the
French front has suddenly slowed
up, artillery being brought into
play, indicating a very close approach to the Germans' main defence line. Meanwhile.the enemy
is seeking relief from the tremendous pressure by making
mass attacks in Champagne.
General Maurice, reviewing the
situation on the western front,
points out the difficulties of further progress for thepresent.and
says the advance has slackened
chiefly owing to the difficulty of
feeding troops in the devastated
country already recovered.
Petrograd: Russians attacked
enemy trenches with asphyxiating gas and chemical shells, in the
region of 'Goldovitchi, on the
northern front. To the rear of
Marmiinovka the enemy attacked
after violentartillery preparation,
and succeeded in forcing an entrance to the Russian trenches,
but was later dislodged by a
counter-attack.
Berlin: A Canadian regiment
attacked a German position east
of Neuville St. Vaast four times
during the night. Each time it
was repulsed with heavy losses,
leaving some prisoners in our
hands.
Amsterdam: Berlin claims to
have sunk 781.000 tons of shipping in February.
I n the reichstag yesterday
Noske, a Socialist member, declared the Prussian system of
government must be abolished.
Various  reports   say   Socialistic
plans are gaining new adherents.
Hollweg says the time is not
ripe for constitutional reforms,
because the greater part of Germany's voting population is in
the trenches.
Washington: President Wilson
has completed the first draft of
his "war message" to congress.
The cabinet view of the situation
is outspoken and frank. Several
members have expressed without
qualification their belief that a
state of war between the U. S.
and Germany has existed for
some time.
Bryan is being unmercifully
castigated for his suggestion that
the whole question of German-
American relations should be referred to an international tribunal
for adjudication.
Rome: Italian papers think
the Teutons may launch their
next offensive against Italy, which
looks to the Entente for aid.
CONTRIBUTIONS
ARE GROWING
The campaign for monthly con- j
tributio,is to the Cananian Pat- j
riotic Fund,  the Red Cross, and
the Soldiers' Aid,   instituted   by
the central patriotic committee, I
opened  yesterday,   when  J.   G.
Powell and Jack Frost,represent-'
ing the three organizations,called
on a majority of the townspeople
and met with a cordial reception
everywhere     Many are already
contributing regularly, and those
who have not so far made regular j
monthly payments are cheerfully!
falling in line  with  the central'
committee's suggestions.   Before
the campaign for funds is ended '
every resident will be given an j
opportunity to make regular con-j
tributions, with the certain result
that Hazelton's patriotic record
for the year  will   even surpass
that of last year.
Red Cross Tea
The ladies are arranging to
hold a Red Cross Tea next Saturday afternoon in St. Andrew's
Hall. In connection with the affair there will be a sale of Easter
eggs, chicks, and bunnies. All
are requested to attend, between
the hours of 3 and 5.
Developing Well
The tunnel on the Hazelton
View has been driven 487 feet,
and has already disclosed several
shoots of nice ore. One of these,
3J feet wide, gave an average
assay of $180. while another.three
feet wide, returned $90. Duke
Harris, who is in charge of the
work, states that some unusually
high molydbenum values have
been found in some places, while
the average of this desirable
mineral is over two per cent.
May Work American Boy
A syndicate of prominent Vancouver men, on whose behalf the
American Boy property was recently examined, is considering
the purchase of the unsold treasury stock, for the purpose of xde-
veloping this well-known group.
Everyone in the district will
wish them success.
"WETS" APPEAR
TO HAVE WON
Victoria,Mar.30:���Up to Thursday night prohibition was in a
minority on the overseas vote of
6163, with 600 votes uncounted.
On the face of the returns the
measure  appears to be defeated.
Buying War Certificates
In addition to sales through
other agencies, the Hazelton post-
office has already sold $1800
worth of war savings certificates,
and it is believed this amount
will be largely increased when it
is generally known that money in
the P. O. savings banks can be
withdrawn for the purchase of
the certificates, which bear higher interest.
Petrograd :     The   dethroned
Czar is a model prisoner.
Stockholm: The entire Swedish
cabinet has resigned.
New York: Hyphenates plan
to block war measures by lobbying.
London: Parliament on Wednesday decided for woman suffrage.
London: Haig says the Canadian divisional train is the finest
he has seen in France.
Washington: All Americans
have been warned to leave Germany before April 2.
Helping Red Cross
Last night's social, under the
auspices of the Red Cross, was
as successful as all such events
prove in Hazelton. There was a
very enjoyable concert program.
The receipts were over $80. The
"White Elephant Sale", which
was a feature of the social, will
be continued this afternoon, for
the benefit of the Indians.
Coming Events
Aprjl 3���Hazelton Board of Trade,
Quarterly Meeting. Progress Club
Rooms, 8 p.m.
April 7-Red Cross Tea and Sale of
Easter Eggs, St. Andrew's Hall, 3 to
5 p. m.
LOCAL NEWS PARAGRAPHS
Items Of General Interest From
Hazelton and Surrounding District
P. Keane arrived from Edmonton on Tuesday.
J. P. Hogan, of Edmonton, was
here on Tuesday.
Chas. V. Smith is paying a
brief visit to Vancouver.
R. S. Sargent is a business visitor in Telkwa this week.
Alex. Zobnic.of Prince Rupert,
was one of Tuesday's visitors.
Mrs. F. M. Dockrill arrived
from Telkwa on Tuesday's train.
T. S. Weatherley, of Montreal,
was among the week's arrivals.
A. McDonald, of South Bulk-
ley was a visitor in Hazelton this
week.
J. C. K. Sealy is spending a
few days at his Bulkley Valley
ranch.
E. G. Ayliffe, of the telegraph
service, was down from North
Bulkley this week.
Sam Lee is rebuilding his laundry, which was destroyed by fire
a couple of weeks ago.
R. G. Cunningham, of R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd.,is spending
a few days in Hazelton.
F. B. Chettleburgh returned on
Thursday from a trip to the Bulk-
ley Valley, on forestry  business.
Mrs. McDougall's many friends
will be pleased to learn that she
is making good progress towards
recovery, and is visiting relatives
in St. Paul.
Rev. T. Ferrier, a prominent
member of the Methodist mission
board, was in Hazelton this
week, and took the service on
Sunday evening.
Harry Hamblin, Dominion constable here, has secured leave of
absence, and will go to the coast
tomorrow to join a forestry draft
for overseas service.
District Forester R. E. Allen
left on Tuesday for Prince Rupert, to take up his new duties as
head of the combined Hazelton
and Prince Rupert districts.
W.Wattie arrived from Alberni
on Wednesday, to take a position
with R. Cunningham & Son,Ltd.
Mr. Wattie expects to bring his
family to Hazelton in the near
future.
Married on Train
Archie McDonald, a South Bulk-
ley farmer,and Mrs. Lucy Tabane,
a widow, were married on Thursday morning, by Rev. M. Pike.
The groom came to Hazelton to
meet the bride,who arrived from
Tacoma on Wednesday's delayed
train. As there is no clergymen
near South Bulkley, Mr. Pike accompanied the couple to Smithers
and performed the ceremony on
the train.
Madrid: Martial law has been
proclaimed in Spain, owing to
labor troubles and high prices of
food. THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 1917
e umnoeca
Published every Saturday at Hazelton. the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
ARE LOOKING TO OMINECA
(Continued from Page One)
on Hudson Bay mountain,  How-
son and Hunter basins,   but ore
production  fmrn them  as yet is
only of slight importance.
The production of copper from
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:   Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING  RATES:     Display,  $2.5(1  per inch per month:   Reading! Hazelton-Telkwa  district in 1915
Notices, 20 cents per line for each insertion
Gazette rates.
Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Vol. VI.
Saturday. March 81, 1917
No. 31
was 2,831,279 lbs.,of which quantity 2,788,000 lbs. was from the
Rocher de Boule mine; in 1916
the same mine contributed nearly
all the district total of 1,648,072
lbs.
In conclusion, there seems to be
sufficient evidence on which to
base a reasonable hope that the
Northern Interior of British Columbia will in future years contribute materially to the copper
production of the province.     In
Legislation of the utmost importance to the mining industry of
British Columbia has been introduced at Victoria, and is now
receiving the attention of the House. The bill introduced by Hon.
Wm. Sloan, minister of mines, is entitled "An Act to Provide for a
Mineral Survey of the Province of British Columbia and for the
Development of the Mineral Resources of the Said Province,
including Provisions in Aid of Prospectors and Miners and for the
Protection of Wage-Earners and Investors."
It provides for the division of the province into six mineral I regard to the Hazelton-Telkwa
survey districts, each to be in charge of a duly qualified mining'district proper, many of the ore
engineer, these districts to be as follows: j bodies here should prove  attrac-
Northwestern, with headquarters at Prince Rupert.and including tive  to  small mining syndicates
the following existing mining divisions: Atlin,Stikine.Liard,Skeena,
Portland Canal, Bella Coola, Queen Charlotte.
Northeastern, with headquarters at Hazelton, and including
Omineca, Peace River, Cariboo, Quesnel.
Central, with headquarters at Kamloops, including Clinton,
Lillooet, Kamloops, Ashcroft, Nicola. Vernon and Yale.
Southern, with headquarters at Grand Forks, and including
Similkameen, Greenwood, Grand Forks and Osoyoos.
Eastern, with headquarters at Revelstoke.and including Golden,
Windermere, Fort Steele, Ainsworth, Slocan, Slocan City, Trout
Lake, Nelson, Arrow Lake, Revelstoke, Lardeau and  Trail  Creek.
Western, with headquarters at Nanaimo,and including Nanaimo,
Alberni, Clayoquot, Quatsino, Victoria, Vancouver and New Westminster,
The engineers are to hold office "at the pleasure of the Crown"
and the following duties will devolve upon them: To carry on
continually a mineral survey of their districts; to keep complete
records and plans of each survey; to keep complete official records
of official business; to make reports to the minister of mines.
In the section of the bill dealing with aid for prospectors and
miners it provides for the resident engineers giving information as
to mineral indications and as to ground open for location as mineral
claims or placer mines as a result of knowledge gained during the
carrying out of the mineral survey of the district; examining
samples and applying such tests as may be possible on the ground
or in his office, and advising as to the nature of any mineral and
as to the best available methods of analysis, sampling, assay and
test; forwarding samples to the minister of mines for further
examination and tests whenever in his opinion such course is
necessary or expedient; reporting to the minister of mines the
location and approximate cost of such roads, trails and bridges as
in his opinion are reasonably necessary in order to render possible
the development of any mineral resources; and generally giving
such advice, information ana directions as may be of assistance to
miners and prospectors within his district.
The proposed mineral survey of the province, if carried out as
planned, will be of inestimable value to the mining industry. It
will be the hope of all who have the interests of legitimate mining]to ask for them for a lonKer per-
at heart that this innovation, at least, will become an accomplished iodand Put tnom on in every
fact. The measure of success to be attained, however, will depend j }lval'able church in this district,
entirely upon the caliber of the engineers chosen to conduct the! A man with a well-prepared lec-
survey operations. Let us hope that no considerations will be ture and a few local slides could
allowed to prevent the appointment of competent and level-headed
officials, since inexperienced, biased, or unduly pessimistic
engineers in such responsible positions could work immense injury.
Another section of the act provides for government-owned
diamond-drilling outfits, for the prospecting of ore deposits.    Such
fm
and individual operators, as large
amounts of capital are not required to develop and equip these
deposits of medium to high-grade
ores. Capital is already coming
in from Edmonton, Alberta, and
Spokane, Washington, and the
district appears to otfer good opportunities for capital from Vancouver and Victoria.
Military  Hospital   Pictures
An Ontario minister the other
day borrowed from the Military
Hospitals Commission a set of
lantern slides. These slides show
what goes on at the hospitals
and sanatoria. That is, they show
something of how our injured
soldiers are being restored to
health and to power for self-
support, however serious their
injuries may be. The minister
exhibited the slides at three
country churches under his
charge. In returning the set he
writes:
"My recording steward, who is
also the postmaster and chairman
of the local recruiting league,
says they should be shown in
every community. They meet
the unrest in many families who
have feared that the maimed who
return will be forced to sell lead
pencils or such like.
"What'I should have done was
render a valuable service to the
country in allaying the unrest
above refen'ed to and in removing the prejudice in some families  from   which  recruits might
aid  to  the  exploration of iron ore, or other large deposits, may be,      secured-
welcomed by some miners, although the proposed charge of double        ajj-     ���     o u-T> ��* ���!
., . * . ,  , . .   ,.,   ,   ,    . .,      ,        Addressing boldiers  Mail
the cost, plus six per cent interest on cost.is likely to be considered      . ���   .,. ,    ,      ,
In order to facilitate the hand-
a rather heavy charge on mining property.
Other provisions of the bill require all free miners giving bonds
or options on their property to insert a clause calling for semimonthly payment of wages, while operating syndicates are required
to give security to the satisfaction of the gold commissioner for the
payment of wages.
The policy of the Bowser administration in the matter of
assisting in the construction of mining roads and trails is to be
continued.
Mining men throughout the province will look with interest for
the completed bill, which is likely to include various new features
before it is given its third reading.
It is claimed that in unscrutin-
eered polls the soldiers' vote
showed four times as many "wet"
ballots in proportion.
Canadian scientists, after long
research, have found a way to
electroplate with  cobalt at from
ten to fifteen times the speed of
commercial nickel and to produce
a whiter and harder surface.
Australian election returnsshow
a majority of twenty for the
national government party over
the independent labor men.
ling of mail at the front and to
ensure prompt delivery, it is requested that all mail be addressed as follows:
(a) Regimental Number.
(b) Rank.
(c) Name.
(d) Squadron, Battery or Company.
(e) Battalion, Regiment (or
other unit), Staff appointment or Department.
(f) Canadian Contingent.
(g) British Expeditionary
Force.
(h) Army Post Office, London
England.
Unnecessary mention of higher
formations, such as brigades,
divisions, is strictly forbidden,
and causes delay.
%
IF YOU CANT FIGHT
YOU CAN AT LEAST
STAND BEHIND THE
MAN WHO FIGHTS
FOR YOU!
THE CANADIAN PATRIOTIC FUND
Which assists the wives and families of Canada's gallant
soldiers, requires millions of dollars to  keep the soldiers'
home fires burning.
District Treasurer: Stephen H. Hoskins, Government Agent
Hazelton Committee:
J.  E.   Kirby,  R.  E.  Allen, J. K. Frost,   J.  R. Barker,
and J. G. Powell.     Monthly Subscriptions are Solicited
THE CANADIAN RED CROSS
The  Hazelton  Branch  requests the support of all in its
efforts to assist in the noble work of this great humanitarian
organization.
Honorary Presidents:  Mrs. (Rev.) John Field; Mrs. (Rev.)
W. Hogan
Chairman:   Dr. H. C. Wrinch
Vice-Presidents: S. H. Hoskins; Mrs. E. R. Cox; W.J. Carr
Honorary Secretary: Miss J. C. Grant
Honorary Treasurer: H. H. Little, Manager Union Bank
Executive Committee:
Mrs. H. C. Wrinch,  Mrs. R. G. Moseley,  Mrs. Chas. Reid,
Miss Hogan, Rev. John Field, Rev. M. Pike, H. H. Phillips
Large or Small Contributions will be Gratefully Received
SOLDIERS' AID & EMPLOYMENT
COMMITTEE
Endeavors to supply soldiers from Hazelton district with
such comforts and necessities as cannot be readily obtained
at the front, and will assist them to re-establish themselves
in civil life when they return. The Committee is acting in
co - operation   with   the   Provincial   Returned   Soldiers'
Commission and the Military Hospitals Commission
Contributions to the Soldiers' Aid Tobacco Fund are Welcome
Chairman: A. R. Macdonald
Honorary Secretary-Treasurer: R.E.Allen, District Forester
H. H. Little. J. K. Frost, F. B. Chettleburgh
H. B. Campbell, H. F. Glassey.
SOME CAN FIGHT, SOME
CAN WORK OR PAY ���
ALL CAN SERVE THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 1917
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
Asquith favors woman suffrage.
The U.S. will build 500 airplanes.
China is sending a special envoy to Japan.
There are 2,500,000 native Germans in the U.S.
The U.S. navy may use Alberta
coal on the Pacific.
Illinois legislature defeated
state-wide prohibition.
German officials returning from
China have been granted safe-
conduct through the U.S.
Bread in England costs a shilling for a four-pound loaf.
British trade unionists now
favor universal free trade.
An industrial survey of Canada
will be undertaken next fall.
Ottawa predicts an influx of
American farmers to Canada.
German influence was behind
the Argentine wheat embargo.
Counting of soldiers' votes on
prohibition was resumed on Monday.
Seventy-five thousand Canadian war certificates have been
sold.
The German food dictator admits the crops have been overestimated.
Greece demands the withdrawal of Italian troops from Epirus
to Avlona.
Coast merchants have petitioned the government to abolish the
weekly half-holiday.
Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Coke
has been appointed to direct Canadian naval services.
Fifty-two thousand bales of
cotton were destroyed by a fire
a .Vladivostok last week.
There is a rumor that Premier
Hearst of Ontario will call a general election at an early date.
The provincial government will
investigate charges in connection
with the Fort George election.
Three thousand women will
assist in gathering the B.C. fruit
crop, to do away with Oriental
labor.
Food exports from the States
in February were reduced about
one-third by the submarine campaign.
A Halifax report says a German submarine was sent to the
bottom by a shot from a tramp
steamer.
Three hundred homes were
destroyed and many lives lost in
a tornado which swept New Albany, Indiana.
Several Bulgarian regiments
are reported to have deserted, as
a result of friction with their
German allies.
Restrictions on the importation
of Canadian fruit and salmon
have been removed by the British government.
Holland has refused Germany's
offer of compensation for the
seven Dutch merchantmen recently torpedoed.
The great success of the British war loan was a matter of
patriotism, not finance, says Bonar Law, who attributes the
over-subscription to the U-boat
campaign.
The steamer Appam and her
cargo have been finally awarded
to the British owners by the U.
S. supreme court.
Hon. P. E. Blondin,postmaster
general hopes to raise a battalion
of French-Canadians for overseas
service in 60 days.
New York financial authorities
say the U.S. is able to loan the
Allies any amount necessary to
conduct the war to a finish.
Vancouver prohibitionists claim
that at Epsom camp, where over
1000 soldiers' votes were polled,
there were only 200 B.C. men.
The Brewster government, it
is reported, will abolish the agricultural credits board, which administers the farmers' loan funds.
Owing to the swarm of German
spies in Petrograd, where enemy
influence is still strong, Moscow
is likely to be made the Russian
capital.
New freight tariffs issued by
Canadian railways provide for a
general increase in class and
commodity freight amounting to
twenty per cent.
Brigadier-General Jack Stewart
is making good with his Canadian
railway brigade in France. One
job, which was wanted in a hurry
and which the engineers estimated would require six weeks, was
completed by the Canucks in four
days.
THE                         '
Up-to-Date Drug Store
for
Kodaks and Photo
Supplies
Toilet Requisites
A  Fine  Line  of Stationery
AGENT FOR THE LEADING MANUFACTURERS OF ALMOST ALL COMMODITIES IN
 GENERAL USE	
J. F. Maguire
Manufacturers' Agent
HAZELTON, B. C.
QUALITY, PRICES AND TERMS ARE RIGHT,
ENQUIRIES INVITED. SAMPLES AND QUO.
TATIONS CAN BE SUBMITTED PROMPTLY
-ALSO INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS.-
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion, British Columbia,
and Alberta Land Surveyors
Offices at Victoria, Nelson, Fort George
and New Hazelton.
F. P. Burden, New Hazelton
1
STUART J. MARTIN
I       Provincial Assayer       f
i i
Hazelton,                    B.C.    j
o -~ ~ 6
HOTEL PRINCE  RUPERT
THE LEADING HOTEL IN NORTHERN B. C.
: : EUROPEAN PLAN ::
One Dollar per day and upwards
25c. auto service to and from all trains and boats
PRINCE RUPERT B. C
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j Hudson's Bay Company
HAZELTON, B. C.
g   Groceries, Drygoods, Boots and Shoes, Hardware, Wholesale Liquors   g
FOR BREAKFAST
Carnation Wheat Flakes, pke, .50 Cream of Wheat, pkj. .25
Quaker Oats, Puffed Rice, Puffed Wheat, .20
Porridge Oats. .20 ' Porridge Wheat, .20 Pancake Flour, .40
BUTTER:   Woodlands, lb., .55;   Meadow Brook, lb., .50
COFFEES:   H.B. Imperial,  Chase & Sanborn's,  Empress,  Jamieson,  lb., .45
EGGS:   Local  New  Laid,  per dozen,  .55;   Fresh, in Cartons, per dozen, .50
MARMALADES:     Crosse   &    Blackwell's,    per   tin,   .90    and    .25;
Grape Fruit, per tin, .50 Green Fig, per tin, .40
APPLES
ORANGES
GRAPEFRUIT
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RAILWAY and STEAMSHIP LINES.
Steamers sailing between Skagway, Juneau,
Wrangell, Ketchikan, Anyox, Prince Rupert,
Ocean Falls, Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle.
Leave Prince Rupert for Ocean Falls, Vancouver Victoria, Seattle,
Friday at 9:00 a.m. For Anyox Wednesday at 12 midnight. For
Ketchikan, WrangelJ, Juneau, Skagway, Wednesday, January 10, 24,
February 7, 21, March 7, 21, at 1 p.m. Fortnightly sailings to Port
Simpson, Stewart, and Queen Charlotte Island points.
Arrive Prince Rupert from the South every Wednesday at 10:30 A. M.
Eastbound trains leave Hazelton: Passenger, Wednesday and Saturday,
7:10 P.M. Mixed 1:56 P.M. Tuesday.     Wayfreight 12:30 p.m. Saturday.
Westbound trains leave Hazelton:  Passenger Tuesday and Thursday,
9:46 a.m.    Mixed 6 A.M. Sunday.    Wayfreight 11:36 a.m. Sunday.
For further information apply to any Grand Trunk Pacific Agent.or to
G. A.  McNiclloll, An.it. Gen. Freight and Passenger Agent.Prince Rupert, B.C.
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
/ 1VFRY nnA *\TA HF^ We are Prepared to supply private
LtifLtiXi UHU OlftULsO anri public conveyances day and
night.     Our stages meet all trainB at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
BEST DRY BIRCH, $6.50 A CORD
I
Consign your shipments in Our
Care for Storage or Delivery.
Address'lilT communications" to Hazelton.
Ruddy & MacKa
HAZELTON >nd NEW HAZELTOI
ml
������Kiiaaaassi
Serve
Save
VERY ONE CAN do
something for his
country
Some can bear arms
Some can produce food
Some can make munitions
Some can give money
It is the privilege of all to help.
Y
OU CAN SERVE by
Fighting���W orking���
Saving���Giving
This is NATIONAL SERVICE
Are YOU doing your part?
ALL EYES turn now to
/\ the Canadian Farmer,
for he can render the
Empire Special SERVICE
in this sternest year of the
war.
But���our farms are badly undermanned���25,000 men are needed on
the land.
With insufficient help, the Man on
the Land fights an uphill fight to
meet the pressing need for Food.
CITY and TOWN
can help.
Municipal Councils, Churches and
Schools, and other organizations,
both of men and women, can render
National Service by directing all
available labour to the Land.
Farmers themselves can exchange
labour.    School boys can assist.
Were you raised on a farm ? Can you
drive a team? Can you handle fork
or hoe? If you can't fight, you can
produce. Spend the Summer working on the Farm.
Let every man, woman and child in
the Dominion who has access to
Land, no matter how small the plot,
make it produce Food in 1917.
For Information on any subject relating to
the Farm and Garden write:���
INFORMATION BUREAU
DEPARTMENT   OF   AGRICULTURE
OTTAWA
DOMINION
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
OTTAWA,   CANADA.
HON. MARTIN   BURRELL, MINISTER
16 THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, MARCH 31, 1917
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
r
^ .extends near Moy and Vendronil,
11 between St. Quentin and La Fere,
J)  with
MONDAY, MARCH 26
a  flood  of  men.     At this
IT ��� ...     ,     ,       i point tho  Allies  have  advanced
Heavy fighting has been ;    , ,     _
iurthest   against   the  Germans.
Paris
in progress in various sectors on
the western front, with large
losses to the enemy. The battle
still rages with utmost fury, and
the Germans are hard pressed.
Another important advance was
made by the French in their
movement against the strongly
fortified town ot St. Quentin.
Positions embracing Castres and
Essigny le Grand,extending over
a front of two and a half miles,
have been taken. ' Our troops
have also made an impression on
the bulge in their line formed by
North of St.Quentin Haig's forces
are forging another wedge, so
that the city is menaced from
three sides. St. Quentin is believed to be one of the strongest
points .on the Hindenburg line.
The British advance is slow, but
methodical, fighting of the most
desperate character marking every inch of progress.
Throughout the Hritish Empire
there is a controlled but deep-
founded feeling of optimism.
Paris: Despite driving rain anil
the lower Coucy forest. A force! every obstacle of broken ground,
crossed the Aillette and attacked [the French forces are advencinj?
the salient at its apex.    We have '��� against the Germans,   and  have
succeeded in establishinga footing
on the Soissons-St. Quentin road.
Berlin admits our gains.
London:    North of Bapaume
reached Folembray, south of the
forest of Coucy. The enemy
unsuccessfully attacked French
positions between theOiseand the
Cambrai road the enemy made a J Somme. Enemy losses were heavy
bombing attack  on  one of our     Shells from  French  Kuns  ex
posts in the neighborhood of
Beaumetz-le-Cambrai, but were
driven off. We improved our
positions westofCroisilles. North
and east of Loos we entered
enemy trenches and captured
prisoners and machine guns.
Two important railway junctions behind the enemy lines
were bombarded by our airplanes.
Eight hostile machines were
driven down out of control.
London: According to a Reu-
ter despatch from Petrograd, the
Russian minister of war has
informed Grand Duke Nicholas
that.owing to his connection with
the dynasty, the government
considers his retention as commander-in-chief of the Russian
armies as undesirable.
Gen. Kroniloff.the new Russian
commander of troops in Petrograd
district, conferred yesterday in
council with workmen's and soldiers' delegates concerning the
German concentration on the
northern front.
A great meeting of soldiers on
the Riga front, which was attended by General Radko, Dimitiieff,
and delegates from the duma, resolved unanimously tostrain every
effort for the defence of Russia.
The new government will pay
all obligations of the late government.
Washington:    The staff of the
ploded   munition  depots   behind
the German lines.
Amsterdam: Hollweg is still
seeking peace. He is expected to
make further overtures to Russia.
Petrograd: Russia is convinced
that Hindenburg's retreat on the
west front is the first move in a
drive on Petrograd. The nation
will prosecute the war vigorously.
Washington: The U.S. has refused to entertain further negotiations respecting the old Prussian
treaty, by reason of the clear violation of its terms by  Germany.
The national guard organization
has been called into the federal
service in 18 states. The maximum paper strength of the navy
hos been increased to 87,000 men.
It is believed congress will
pass a fiat declaration of war
against Germany.
The St. Louis, the first American vessel equipped to fight submarines, has arrived at her destination unmolested.
Philadelphia: The crews of
the interned German warships
were removed and sent under
guard to internment camps in
Georgia.
and the other sank in a collision.
One sailor was drowned.
Mackensen has arrived in Constantinople to reorganize the disrupted Turkish army.
Paris: The hospital ship Astur-
ias was torpedoed by a German
submarine. Thirty-one lives were
lost and twelve are still missing.
French forces have occupied the
village of Coucy and the entire
northern portion of Coucy forest.
The  Hague:     Four   thousand
German  soldiers crossed tlvj line
into Holland,seeking food.   They
i have heen interned at Zwolle.
Petrograd: It has been discovered that Protopopoff had a
secret, wireless station at the
Czar's palace,and had established
communication with Berlin.
A new Russia is budding forth
and there is a marked improve-
| ment in the general situation.
A German gas attack on the
west bank of the Chara river
compelled the Russians to fall
back in an easterly direction.
Washington: Congress may he
asked for a bond issue of a billion
dollars to be used for the purchase
of French bonds, thus aiding the
Allies to prosecute the war.
Many Germans are fleeing to
Mexico. The official belief is
that they leave (o avoid internment, and not to join a German
army.
London: Despatches from Holland report two German moves of
exceeding interest. First, Germany is preparing to shorten her
lines by withdrawals in Alsace,
particularly Mulhausen; second,
Berlin has made tentative offers
for a separate peace with Russia,
with terms including autonomy
for Poland,internationalization of
Constantinople,and Russian domination in Armenia; Russia, in
return to evacuate the Austrian
territory she now holds.
THURSDAY, MARCH 29
J
r
WEDNES., MARCH 28
J
London: The British have
captured Equancourt, ten miles
American commission in Belgium isoutheast of Bapaume.and Long-
will be withdrawnand Holland will javesnes, three miles northwest
undertake the work of adminis- of Roisel.
tering the Allies'relief funds. The Allied  pursuit continued
Rome: Artillery is busy on I hotly yesterday, and was marked
the Trentino front. There is | by violent fighting, both open
enemy activity near Gorizia.        land  of a  massed   character, at
Berlin: Germany is seizin? half-a-dozen points along the flf-
grain and vegetables in the hands fcy-mile front which is now raP>d-
of consumers.     Farms will be >? nearin* the Hindenburg line.
visited and foodstuffs confiscated.:    The French are within UjSS than
��� | a mile of the Hindenburg line and
(f     Trrrrr.ii/ ���,������������,     il iare progressing steadily, despite
^
TUESDAY, MARCH 27
-J
London: Many women, children and old men died of hardship
and starvation resulting from the
brutality of the Germans towards
the French civil population previous to and during the retreat.
inundations and the increasing
resistance offered by the enemy.
The nearest approach of the British to the new line is around Lag-
nicourt,eleven miles westof Cambrai. There was bitter fighting
in this neighborhood yesterday,
German massed forces desperately striving to retake the village,
The ruthless spoliation of orchards
and crops, carried out by order, I which was firmly held  by the
disgusted even  the German sul- j British.
diery.   The sprouting fields were     London: Riots in Berlin are re
harrowed to ruin the crops.
Torch and dynamite were used
to wipe out whole villages. The
French soldiers are furious.
Nivelle is evidently sharpening
the point of his wedge, which
ported and rumors of a revolutionary movement throughout Germany are gaining currency in
Switzerland.
Two  British   destroyers  have
been  sunk.     One struck a mine
London: With sledgehammer
blows Nivelle is driving a wedge
into the German lines north of
La Fere.and at the same time, by
hot pursuit, is forging another
such wedge and thrustingatLaon.
The most bitter fighting of the advance and retreat so far is centered around the point of the second
wedge, near St. Gobain forest.
British military experts express
admiration for the marvelous
speed with which Nivelle moved,
following up every advantage of
the German retreat and forcing
the enemy,in advance of carefully
prepared plans,to give way before
(he tremendous pressure of the
French troops. In the meantime,
lighting on the British front is
still of the open variety, as opposed to the massed conflict in
the French sectors. Weather
conditions continue the main obstacle to swift progress.
British cavalry and armored
cars have taken the town of
Boy el les.
Paris: French forces have
captured important positions in
the region of Leilly and Neuville,and have made further progress north of the Aillette. A
heavy artillery duel is in progress
in the region east of the forest
| of Coney.
Throughout the day and night
heavy guns on both sides raged
in the region of Butte de Mesnil
and Maisons de Champagne. Between the Oise and the Somme
the night was quiet.
German airplanes are dropping
in French territory candy containing germs of fatal epidemic diseases, as well as handbags and
pocketbooks filled with, explosives.
Petrograd: Hindenburg's plan
of attack on Russia was frustrated
by nature at a critical moment,
thaws checking the German drive.
The delay affords the Russians
ample time to prepare defences
which should prove effective in
checking the German advance.
/
FRIDAY, MARCH30
London: The defeat of a Turkish force of 20,000, in a battle
south of Gaza, is officially reported from the headquarters of the
Egyptian expeditionary force.
Heavy casualties were inflicted on
the enemy and 900 prisoners were
taken, including the general and
divisional staff of the 53rd Turkish division. The staff included
four Austrian officers, with thirty-
four other Austrians and Germans. The booty taken included
j two 4-in. howitzers.
Gaza is about 48 miles southwest of Jerusalem.
London: There is no news to-
! day from the British forces on
| the western front.
The weekly official returns of
losses from submarines and mines
continue to indicate that the underwater menace is serious, but
the renewed confidence of neutrals is shown by the larger number of ships using British  ports.
Persistent rumors from Switzerland stale that the Germans
are evacuating Muelhausen and
other places in Alsace.
Amsterdam: Autocracy in Germany now faces a serious crisis.
Sweeping reforms are insisted upon by the growing radical element
which designates Russia as a shining example. Socialistsjdemand
constitutional govern ment and the
elimination of Kaiserism, and it
is believed a revolution is near.
London: The British transport
Tyndareus struck a mine off the
African coast. The crew and a
battalion which was aboard were
saved.
The British bark Neath was
torpedoed, and sank in seven
minutes. The captain was taken
prisoner. It is reported the submarine was later captured and
the'skipper released.
DENTISTRY
DR. BADGERO
Smithers, B.C.
-O
I
I
O
I
I
-o
DALBY B. MORKILL
British Columbia Land Surveyor
:::   MINE SURVEYOR   :::
Hazelton, B. C.
Surveys of Mineral Claims, Townsites,
Timber and Coal Leases, Etc. and General Engineering Surveys.
The obtaining of Crown Grants attended to. tf
B
I   Just Arrived
a 	
I
HOBBERLIN'S
Spring and Summer
SAMPLES
Let" us snow you appropriate styles and WEAVES
NOEL & ROCK .
I Hazelton, B. C. f
s =
nil���.nil���llll���-,iii.���mi���Mil���us:
Assay Office and Mining; Office
Arts and Cr.ifts Building, 578 Seymour Streel
 VANCOUVER, B.C.	
The Estate of J. O'Sullivan
Provincial Assaycrs and Chemists
Established  1897 by the late J. O'Sullivan,   P. C. S., 26 years  with
Vivian & Sons, Swansea.
ISSUES
TICKETS
HAZELTON HOSPITAL
for any period from one month upward at 31 per
m^nth in advance. This rate includes oflice con-
mltationtt and medicines, as well as all costs whilt
in the hospital. Tickets obtainable in Hazelton
nt the Post Oflice or the DruK Store; in Aldermere
from Mr. T.J. Thorp; in Telkwa from Dr. Wallace;
or by mail from the Medical Superintendent at the
Ho��nit��l
IT IS TIME TO THINK ABOUT YOUR
L Vegetable Garden and Flower Beds���
We have just received a
Large Assortment of Fresh
Flower and C171?HP Lawn grass
Vegetable uLiLil/lJ Onion Setts
Begin now to plan for
the Planting Season
R. Cunningham & Son, Limited
i K. to
HAZELTON, B. C.
/f~
CANADIAN PACIFIC  RAILWAY
Lowest rates Prince Rupert to all Eastern Points via steamer
to Vancouver and Canadian Pacific Railway.
Meals and  berth  included on steamer
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
S.S. "PrinceM Maquinna" leave* Prince Rupert every SUNDAY, at 6 p.m.
S.S. "PrinceM Sophia" leavei Prince Rupert Feb. 16th
26th; March 9th, March 19th and March 30th.
J.I.Peters, General AKent, 3rd Ave. & 4th St., Prince Rupert. B.C

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