BC Historical Newspapers

BC Historical Newspapers Logo

BC Historical Newspapers

Omineca Miner Sep 23, 1911

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ominecaminer-1.0211839.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ominecaminer-1.0211839.json
JSON-LD: ominecaminer-1.0211839-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ominecaminer-1.0211839-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ominecaminer-1.0211839-rdf.json
Turtle: ominecaminer-1.0211839-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ominecaminer-1.0211839-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ominecaminer-1.0211839-source.json
Full Text
ominecaminer-1.0211839-fulltext.txt
Citation
ominecaminer-1.0211839.ris

Full Text

 ��� V L -
VOL. I, NO. 4.
HAZELTON, B. C. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1911.
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR.
<
I
N DECLARE
NST RECIPROCITY
Laurier Policy Rejected By Enormous Majority���Climax of a Stirring
and Historic Campaign���Hon. R. L. Borden Goes Into Power
with Record Majority���Promises British Columbia Better Terms
I
Six Cabinet Ministers Defeated���British Columbia Returns Solid Conservative Representation���Hon. Richard McBride or Attorney-General Bowser May Become Members
of New Cabinet���Vancouver Gives Largest Conservative Majority In Dominion���
Clements Probably Elected   over   Ross   in the  Comox-Atlin Electoral   District
Overwhelming defeat is the
portion of the Laurier administration. The people of Canada,
with no uncertain voice, have declared that reciprocity is a dead
issue. The result of the election
has been greeted with enthusiasm throughout the Dominion,
and Canada has placed herself on
record for all time, as a strong
and self-reliant nation.
The telegraph line connecting
Hazelton with the south was
down until late yesterday morning, and press of business has
prevented the receipt of complete
returns, but enough news of the
election has been received to remove any doubt of the completeness of the victory.
Complete returns from Comox-
Atlin will not be available for
several days, but Conservatives
confidently claim the seat for H.
S. Clements.
The campaign in Hazelton was
closely fought, but the town remains Conservative, giving a
majority of 17 for Clements,
with the possible addition of
three votes. Ross's committee
put up a strenuous fight, but the
sentiment of the people was a-
gainst their man, notwithstanding
his ill-founded claim to be a "Man
from the North." It is safe to
say a majority of the 81 voters
who voted for Ross here were
more or less influenced by their
railway affiliations. So far as
the returns have come in, Ross
obtained majorities only where
the railway influence is strong.
Cabinet Plant Not Ready
Halifax, Sept. 22:-Hon. R. L.
Borden said today: "The thanks
of the country are due to those
strong Liberals who placed a
great national issue above all
considerations of party allegiance
and whose untiring efforts contributed in a marked degree to
the splendid result achieved."
Mr. Borden would not discuss the
probable personnel of the cabinet.
He will go to Ottawa tomorrow.
The leader's majority in Halifax
is over 700.
Election Incidents
Vancouver, Sept. 22.���(Special
to the Miner). Election day in
the lower mainland cities passed
without accident, sensation or
spectacular scenes. McBride and
Bowser concluded their provincial tour with a great meeting
here on Tuesday night. Joe Martin had a meeting of his own the
the same night, and had a narrow escape from being the target for stale eggs, which were
concealed in the hall but not
used, because Joe failed to show
his old ginger and did not make
the expected attacks. He gave
a rambling address. Sir Wilfrid
Laurier was rapped hard at Montreal on Thursday.   Stale eggs
were thrown at Bourassa at St.
Hyacinthe last night in retaliation for the hooting of Laurier at
Montreal the previous evening by
Bourassa sympathizers.
Laurier Gladly Retires
Quebec, Sept. 22���"I gladly
lay down the premiership. We
believed reciprocity would benefit the people of Canada. The
electors declared otherwise. I
bow to their decision," said Sir
Wilfrid Laurier today. He announced that he would not sit in
opposition.
CLEMENTS IN THE LEAD
Conservative Candidate in this Constituency Leads, with a Number of
Polling Places to Hear From���Mr.
Clements   Expected  to Win the Seat
As we go to press a Vancouver
despatch states that reports received from Comox-Atlin up to
noon give Clements a majority
of 42, the figures being: Clements, 1448; Ross, 1406.
It will be several days before the
complete returns from this big
constituency will be available.
Following are the detailed reports
so far received:
Ross   Clements
Prince Rupert
397
225
Hazelton
81
98
Sealey
19
3
Aldermere
17
15
Kitselas
17
19
Kitsumkalum
9
17
Goose Bay
13
20
Atlin
22
21
Telegraph Creek
16
3
Kispiox
7
0
Cedarvale
5
7
Breckenridge's Ldg
2
4
Copper City
11
9
Red Cliff
9
7
Bennett
1
2
Boulder Creek
3
2
Skeena Crossing
7
4
Port Simpson
10
6
Hardscrabble
5
3
Inverness
1
7
Jedway
6
4
Skidegate
5
7
Queen Charlotte City 14
7
Stewart
44
63
Estevan
2
1
Telkwa
11
12
Discovery
17
16
Twenty Mile
8
10
Chicken Lake
4
4
Bitter Creek
3
12
McDougall's Camp
28
10
Port Essington
36
28
Glentanna
9
4
Spruce Creek
13
5
Digby Island
11
1
Andimaul
8
7
The latest bulletin received
states that seventeen polling
places in the south gives Clements 269 majority.
Earl Grey Will Stay Over
Montreal, Sept. 22���It is announced here that Earl Grey will
postpone the date of his departure, now fixed for October 8, in
order to install the new government.   The Duke of Connaught,
Canada's new Governor-general,
will postpone his day of sailing
from England. Opinion here is
agreed that Hon. George Foster,
Premier Hazen, of New Brunswick and Hon. Robert Rogers,
minister of works for Manitoba,
will be offered portfolios.
Returns from Provinces
Unconfirmed returns from the
various provinces are as follows:
Liberal Conservative
Ontario 14 69
Quebec 37 21
Nova Scotia       9 8
New Bruns.        4 5
P. E. Island       2 2
Manitoba 1 9
Sask. 7 3
Alberta 4 1
Brit. Columbia   0 7
Majority for Conservatives 47.
Conservatives Sweep Ontario
Toronto, Sept. 22:���The defeat
of the Liberal party in Ontario
is decisive. The returns indicate
that out of 85 seats contested the
Conservatives have carried 65.
The defeat of so many ministers
is regarded as most significant of
the uncompromising attitude of
the people. Ontario has registered a most emphatic protest
against reciprocity. Hon. Clifford Sifton appears to have been
most correct in his prediction of
the result. Every place in which
he spoke during the campaign
has been won by the Conservatives. The presence of American citizens on the platform with
Sir Wilfrid Laurier during his
meetings was emphatically resented.
Taft Much Disappointed
Washington, Sep. 22 ��� Great
disappointment is felt here at the
result of the Canadian elections.
The annexation speeches of
Champ Clark and others are held
to have had much to do with the
result. President Taft, upon
hearing the returns, at Kalamazoo, Michigan, expressed disappointment, but said "We will
still do business at the old stand.''
Victory for Common Sense
Ottawa, Sept. 22:���Hon. Clifford Sifton, speaking here today,
declared the victory is a supreme
tribute to the common sense and
loyalty of the Canadian people.
The Great Silent Vote
Defeated Reciprocity
Victoria, Sept. 22:���(Special to
the Miner) Premier McBride
said the result of the election is
just what many independent
critics have expected���that the
great silent vote of the country
would be against reciprocity.
The defeat of the Laurier government means that Canada is
forever done with reciprocity
and is prepared to continue to
cultivate the home and imperial
markets first, last and always.
The decision of the Canadian
people will make our American
cousins have a deeper regard for
all loyal Canadians. The provincial leader paid tribute to R. L,
Borden, the coming prime minister.
Insurrection in Spain
Madrid, Sept. 22:���The great
strike in Spain has developed into a revolt and what in its origin
was a purely labor movement is
now a revolutionary conflict.
The power of the agitators among
the masses has increased in proportion to the repressive measures of the government. Communes have been established in
two cities, where the authorities
were driven out. It is the old
story of the conflict between
church and state. Anxiety is
felt in London, owing to Queen
Victoria's close connection with
royal family,
A PORTFOLIO FOR 0, C.
n>l>:>Yed the New Prime Minister will
Offer Cabinet Position to Provincial
Premier or Attorney-General Bowser
��� Better    Terms   for   the    Province
Vancouver, Sept. 22.���(Special
to the Miner) It is believed here
that either Premier McBride or
Attorney-General Bowser will be
called to Borden's cabinet. Stevens' majority in Vancouver was
2990, the largest in Canada.
British Columbia returns the
solid seven Conservative members predicted by Mr. McBride.
The Conservative majority in the
House, on latest returns, is placed
at 47. Hon. W. J. Bowser said
today Mr. Borden had pledged
his word to British Columbia that
he will appoint a royal commission to inquire into the financial
relationship between the Dominion and this province, with a view
to granting better terms to British Columbia. In the matter of
public works and other relations
with the federal government, this
province is now assured of a
square deal.
Peace May Prevail
Paris, Sept. 21:���The Moroccan
war cloud is drifting away. The
authorities are hopeful of an amicable settlement of the dispute
with Germany in a few days.
Russia's Premier Assassinated
St. Petersburg, Sept. 21:���The
police are unable to learn who
instigated the lawyer Bogrof,'the
assassin of Premier Stolypin, who
died on Monday. Every known
relative of the prisoner is being
arrested and all are subjected to
the third degree in order to extract confessions. Kokovsoff is
likely to become premier.
Tecumsehs After Trophy
Vancouver, Sept. 22���(Special
to the Miner). The Toronto Tecumsehs will arrive tomorrow.
They will play two games with
Vancouver, on October 4th and
7th, for the Minto Cup, won by
the local lacrosse team from the
New Westminsters in a two-game
series by 10 goals to 5.
Ten Million Dollar Company
. Vancouver, Sept. 22���(Special
to the Miner). Announcement is
made of the incorporation of the
| Vancouver Harbor Dock Exten-
j tion company, with a capital of
ten million dollars. C. F. Petty,
of the Vancouver Timber Exchange, who recently returned
from London, is the promoter.
Crosscut Tunnel On Rocher
de Boule Group Breaks Into Body of High Grade Ore
MUCH NATIVE COPPER
Big Upper Vein Straightening Up and
Carrying Splendid Ore���Hanging Wall
Not Yet Reached���Cowan Bond Will
Be  Taken  Up ��� Development   Plans
The feature of the week in local
mining was a remarkable strike
on the Rocher de Boule group,
where a body of high grade copper ore was encountered in the
upper vein. A crosscut tunnel,
run to tap the vein, reached the
footwall on Monday, breaking
into ore showing a good deal of
native copper as well as copper
glance and copper pyrites. The
vein was reached in 60 feet,
about 11 feet less than the owners expected to drive, the gain
being accounted for by the
straightening up of the vein,
which shows in the tunnel a dip
of 75 degrees. R. P. Trimble,
one of the owners, came in yesterday with samples from the
vein, which are attracting much
attention. He reports the tunnel
has cut through 4 feet of the ore,
and the hsng.ng wall has not yet
been reached. The showing is
declared to be very fine and
strengthens the general opinion
that this group is bound to play
an important part as a producer.
On the lower vein, which is also
remarkable for its unusual showing of ore, an assay of 313 ounces
of silver has been obtained from
the lead ore.
When the tunnel on the upper
vein has been driven far enough
to define the width of the lead,
the work of prospecting the veins
will be practically finished and
the way will be open for a comprehensive plan of development
by means of tunnels which will
tap the veins at considerable
depth.
It is understood that the bond
given to W. . J. Cowan will
be taken up within a few dr.ys,
when Trimble & Pemberton, the
present owners, will turn the
Rocher de Boule group over to
the American capitalists who are
associated with Mr. Cowan.
A telegram received yesterday
by P. J. Jennings from Mr. Cowan at Salt Lake City announced
that the first payment will be
made within a few days, when
instructions for the beginning of
development work will be telegraphed to the superintendent.
It is intended to build a boarding
house and power house at once
and to install an air compressor
and machine drills as soon as
they can be delivered on the
ground. A favorable answer is
expected to the petition asking
for the immediate construction of
a wagon road to Juniper basin,
where the Rocher de Boule group
is located.
Developing Placers
On Omineca River
The placers of the Omineca
river, which in past years produced millions in gold, are expected to yield large returns in the
yellow metal in the near future,
as the result of the operations of
a number of mining men who
have acquired ground for dredging purposes. Probably the most
important work is that inaugurated by G. H. Knowlton, the
Vancouver operator who has a
number of men employed prospecting his leases by means of
rotary drills, Mr. Knowlton,
who returned from the Omineca
on Monday, states that five miles
of ground are already prospected,
bed-rock proving to be from
twelve to thirty-four feet deep.
The result of the work is most
encouraging and only better
transportation facilities are required to make dredging highly
profitable.
Mr. Knowlton, who was accompanied by M. E. Latferty,
a dredging expert from Leadville,
left for the coast on Tuesday.
He will return in the spring, and
hopes to have extensive operations under way next season.
Efforts are being made to secure
the construction of a wagon road
from Tatla lake to the mines, allowing the transportation of a
plant, which it is now impossible
to take in.
LATEST FROM GROUNDHOG
Manager McEvoy Returns from Big Coal
Field���Wonderful Showing of Excellent Coal on Claims of Toronto Company���Equal to Best in   Pennsylvania
Bank  Robbers   Uncaught
Vancouver, Sept. 22:���(Special
to the Miner) Two hundred and
seventy-two 'thousand dollars
was the actual amount stolen
from the Bank of Montreal at
New Westminster. A dozen of
the ablest detectives in America
are working on the case, but
there is still no definite clue.
The banks offer a reward of $32,-
500 for the capture of the criminals, and ten per cent of the
amount recovered.
Of greatest importance to the
province in general and this district in particular are the recent
developments in the Groundhog
coal fields. With a width of at
least 20 miles, and extending
north from the Skeena for possibly 40 miles, the field shows
possibilities of immense production of coal, which is equal to the
best in the  Pennsylvania fields.
James McEvoy, practically the
discoverer of the field, located
sixteen square miles eight years
ago. The property was acquired
by the Western Development Co.,
a close corporation formed in Toronto. The claims, which are
situated in the center of the
southern part of the field, have
been closely prospected, with the
result that when Mr. McEvoy
left the field a few days ago, it
had been demonstrated that at
least four of the eleven seams on
the property are of a quality and
extent to be profitably worked.
In general the veins dip less
than ten degrees from the horizontal. The main upper seam,
six feet in thickness, which has
been proved over the greater
part of the property, carries coal
which on the surface assays 4.12
per cent moisture, 7.43 per cent
volatile combustible matter, 82.6
per cent fixed carbon and 5.85 per
cent ash. Though classed as semi-
anthracite, this coal, in physical
characteristics and for all practical purposes, is anthracite, comparing favorably with the best of
Pennsylvania anthracite, and is
the only coal of its class in western America.
The party of twelve which
went to Groundhog in June to
continue work on the property,
has returned to Hazelton. Mr.
McEvoy, who came out with
them, will spend a few days in
the Telkwa and Copper river coai
fields before returning to the east
to prepare plans for next season's
work.
\ 'I
THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1911
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
Macdonald & Rauk, Publishers and Proprietors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATIOS: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year,
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $1.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 15 cents per line for first insertion, 10 cents per line for each subsequent
insertion.        Legal notices inserted at B. C. Gazette rates.
Vol. I.
Saturday, September 23, 1911.
No. 4.
Canada Is for Canadians
Put to the (est, the people of the Dominion have justified
themselves. In unmistakable terms they have rejected the
reciprocity pact, declaring their belief in a higher destiny for
Canada than that of an appanage to the great republic to the south.
The veteran Sir Wilfrid Laurier, who for so many years has directed the policies of the nation, has made the great mistake of his
career in endeavoring to resurrect an obsolete policy, repugnat to
the spirit of the people, and has seen his party disintegrate and his
power vanish.
The Conservatives come into power under most favorable
auspices. The country is prosperous and can be made more so.
The abuses which have obtained may be remedied, and with a
strong majority the new premier may be expected to inaugurate
a policy which will expedite the growth of the Dominion along safe
ancl conservative lines.
The problems to be solved are many; but the people have expressed their confidence in the ability of the Conservative leader
and his associates, and may look with confidence to the future.
We believe Canadians and we include those of other nationalities who have cast their lot with us���will henceforth stand
shoulder to shoulder in the endeavor to make Canada what she
should be   the greatest nation in the great British confederacy.
Would Help Mining Industry
A good purpose will be served by the discussion of the faulty
arrangements for the mining exhibit at Vancouver fair if those interested are able to induce the exposition authorities to give adequate prominence to next year's exhibit of ores. That an industry which has contributed hundreds of millions to the wealth of the
province should be kept in the background at British Columbia's
greatest fair, is a condition not to be tolerated; but it is probable
that mining men themselves are partially to blame.
Newton W. Emmens, a well-known mining engineer, who was
one of the judges for this year's exhibit, has written an article in
which he makes a number of pertinent suggestions to which the
mining men of the province might well give attention. Mr.
Emmens was evidently attracted by the Hazelton exhibit, of which
he says:
The comparatively new district of Hazelton, which is situated
alone: the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad some two hundred miles east of Prince Rupert, had a good and well arranged display of copper, gold and silver-lead ores, which give great promise
for the future success of mining in that section, and indicate that
with the completion of the railroad now building, a new and important source of mineral wealth will be made available, especially in
silver-lead ores, which are so much in demand by the smelters.
After expressing regret that many of the mineral resources of
the province were not represented in the exhibits, Mr. Emmens
suggests that the mining interests might effectively cooperate with
the exhibition authorities in the future, with a view to securing a
better and more representative display of British Columbia's ores
and minerals at future fairs. Among his suggestions are the
following:
In order to make the exhibits of more general interest and
practical utility it would be well if they were accompanied by assay
certificates showing the several metallic contents of the samples
shown, and if proper maps were displayed of the districts represented so that a stranger might be able to form an adequate idea as to
their location with respect to known routes of transportation. It
would also be of great benefit to the mining industry of the province
if the several districts represented were to issue little pampelets,
illustrated with photographs, setting forth the salient features of the
ore deposits and the natural facilities which exist for economic mining.
What is needed at the present time is capital for the development of
the known ore bodies, and one of the objects of these exhibitions is
to show ore samples so as to attract capital; this being the ease
every effort should be made by the owners of prospective mines to
make their display as complete as possible and to give all information possible covering all points bearing on the economic mining of
the ores, their nearness to transportation, smelters, etc., which can
be best accomplished by the cooperation of the mine owners with
the exhibition authorities, who will render every facility for the
proper display of the sample.! sent in. It is therefore up to the
miners themselves to put their shoulder to the wheel and send in
good and complete exhibits which should be accompanied by a representative from each district who is familiar with the ores and
can answer questions regarding the same.
So much for the part the mining men should play. The exhibition directors must also do something if the industry is to be
properly represented in the future. The first requisite is a separate building for the display of ores and mining machinery. The
miners of the province will not take the pains to prepare exhibits
unless they are assured of adequate accommodation and fair
treatment. It will be necessary for the management to make such
regulations as may be required to prevent the mining exhibit being
used to further the "boosting" of stock, whether legitimate or otherwise. If stockjobbers are allowed to make use of the mining department of the fair, only failure can attend efforts to make it
successful. Another important question is that of premiums.
There should be definite and fair regulations for the guidance of
the judges, if prizes are to be awarded.
There is no reason why the mining exhibit should not become
one of ahe great attractions of the Vancouver fair, provided the
management is prepared to give the industry its duo. If assured
of fair treatment, the mining men of Omineca district will next
year send an exhibit of ores that will be worth inspection. Let
the exhibition directors do their part and the miners will cooperate
in making the mining department one of the big features of the
fair,
State Owned Railways
Nationalization of the. railroads is to be the remedy of the
English government against the
recurrence of the recent great
strike. The cabinet today has a
scheme prepared by experts. This
will be submitted to the next
session of Parliament. The
present time offers an opportunity for which administrations have
been seeking for many years.
The shareholders are also favorable to the national control of
railroads. They say that to be
"bought out" at this time would
mean rich fortunes, because the
roads have been making much
money. This would mean that
the government would be forced
to pay fabulous prices.
The British taxpayer could
afford almost any burden because
strikes like the last one are runt.-
ous to the country and force
prices to the sky. Another big
railroad strike lasting a week
would paralyze the country as
much as an hostile invasion. No
one believes that the present
truce between the railroads and
their workers is more than temporary. Government ownership
of the roads would operate them
so satisfactorily that strikes
would be at an end, according to
general opinion.
Military authorities have for
years been urging that the government acquire the railroads
from the point of view of national defence and military transportation in time of war. Lord
Haldane, secretary of war, is
unremitting in his advocacy, and
his influence with the cabinet is
great.
Present intentions' are to give
the shareholders a choice -either
to be bought out for cash or to
take government stock. If the
former method is chosen it will
mean that a large loan will have
to be floated, but the second alternative would cost the nation
relatively little.
Oldest Mine in B. C.    ���
The statement that the Monarch mine at Field is the oldest
lode mine in the province has
been shown to be erroneous, the
Blue Bell mine, on the eastern
shore of Kootenay lake, having
been worked 21 years earlier.
Another instance of early lode
mining in the province has since
come to light. On July 15, the
Victoria Colonist reprinted the
following extract from the Colonist of July 15, 1861:
"It is with pleasure that we
chronicle the return of C. B.
Young from Harrison lake, more
particularly as he brings the
cheering intelligence that the silver vein which he has been prospecting there as-manager for the
British Columbia & Vancouver
Island Silver Mining company,
proves to be an entire success.
It meets the most sanguine expectations. Already there is a
wharf 120 feet long, on which is
piled 30 tons of silver ready for
shipment. The highly encouraging news brought by Mr. Young
will not fail to create quite a silver excitement."
The gold quartz mining done in
1852 and again in 1859 at Gold
Harbor, Moresby Island, of the
Queen Charlotte group, appears
to have been the first recorded
instance of lode mining done in
British Columbia. An account
of this may be found in the "Annual Report of the Minister of
Mines," for 1909, page 76.
tain property rights in large
mining districts as yet undiscovered, where new and valuable
claims will be located 100 years
from now. The unit of disposition should be the claim, preferably square, limited on its four
sides by vertical planes, and of a
size sufficient to allow the miner
occupying two continuous claims
to follow the vein or lode to considerable depth, even if its dip is
only 45 degrees. Such definition
of a mining claim is found practicable in both Mexico and British
Columbia, and in the latter
country the change from the
apex law was effected without
trouble or confusion.
On this subject the provincial
mineralogist says:
"I have been all over British
Columbia and have probabty come
in contact with a greater number
of mining men, operators, miners,
and prospectors than anyone else,
and I have only found one man
who even suggested a preference
for the 'extra-lateral rights' system. This gentleman had lived
the greater part of his life in
California, and is by profession a
hydraulic placer miner, to which
branch alone he has confined his
attention in British Columbia.
"This public endorsement of
the vertical boundaries system is
the more emphatic, inasmuch as
the majority of our mining men
are from the United States, or
have had their experience there.
They came with preconceived
ideas and have been converted.
The public in British Columbia is
firmly fixed in its adherence to
this principle.
"Personally, from the standpoint of a disinterested observer,
obliged to officially observe, I
have not the slightest hesitancy
in endorsing most emphatically
vertical lines, in preference to
extra-lateral rights, as giving a
more secure title, freedom from
'litigation, and the doing away
with the crushing, through
weight of expensive litigation, of
the poor by the richer individuals
or corporations.''
A Strange Transaction
A woman teacher in a Georgia
school, according to not incredible report, has accepted from a
northern institution of medical
research the price offered by it
for her brain ��� after she isthrough
with it, of course. This is an unusual though not an unprecedented business tiansaction, and
whether it excites horror or ap
proval in those who hear of it
depends on their possession or
lack of the scientific spirit.
The medical researchers want
the teacher's brain partly because
they find it so hard to get what
may be called good brains, and
partly because this particular
brain is peculiar, not in any pathological way, but in enabling its
present owner to perform wonderful feats of memory. In all
probability they do not expect by
dissection to discover just how it
is that after reading a long chapter in any book she can repeat it
word for word, but they want to
look about and see whatever may
be seen.
As for the teacher, she has the
offered price to gain and nothing
of any value to her to lose- except possibly a little sleep if she
is of a temperament at all nervous, or has an inconveniently
vivid imagination.
uEverythingin Canvas"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
Priact Riiptrl, B.C.
J. W. AUSTIN
Provincial Assayer
Prompt and reliable work
Hazelton, B. C.
Beautiful Designs in Engagement
and Wedding Rings. High grade
Watches. - - Watch Repairing.
O. A. RAGSTAD,   Hazelton
ISSUES
1CKKTS
HAZELTON HOSPITAL,!
for any period from one month upward at $1 per
month in advance. This rate includes office consultations and medicines, as well as all costs while
in the hospital. Tickets obtainable in Hazelton
from E. C. Stephenson and Fred Field; in Aider-
mere, from Rev. F. L. Stephenson, or at the Hospital from the Medical Superintendent.
^
go to m
Adams' Drug Store
The   Choicest   Stationery,
Chocolates and Imported
Cigars.
J. Mason Adams
DRUGGIST
Hazelton
Jf
Royal
Soft Drinks
are  made  here ��� "None  better
made anywhere"
Stephenson & Crum
Undertakers and
Funeral Directors
Special attention to Shipping Cases
Hazelton, B.'C.
B. C Mining Law Is Good
George Otis Smith, director of
the United States Geological Survey, in an address on "The Mining Industry and the Public
Lands," dealt with the subject
of "the law of extralateral
rights." He said: "This law has
proved more productive of expensive litiagation than of economical mining. In many of the
more recently established and
more progressive mining districts
this statute has been made inoperative by eiiher common agreement or compromise between adjoining owners. Its repeal could
not affect established equities under patents already granted, but
would render possible more cer-
For Fine  Cigars,   Cigarettes
and Tobaccos go to
G.T.P.
Cigar Store and
Pool Room
Soft Drinks, Confectionery,
Books and Magazines
Baths In Connection
J. B. Brun,
Proprietor
Try our Ginger Ale
Lemon Soda
Cream Soda
On Sale Everywhere
Royal Bottling Works
Hazelton, B. C.
^Coffee
House
*J| Where everything is well
cooked and appetizing.
Our Pies, Cakes, Cookies,
Doughnuts, Bread and Buns, are
the best.
Try a pound can of our Special
Blend Coffee. There is none better anywhere.
Hazelton Bakery
Opposite Hazelton Hotel
Quality Right
Prices Right
R. S. SARGENT
GENERAL MERCHANT
r
fjL^ well assorted and complete
stock of General Merchandise
including every requirement of
prospector, miner and rancher.
Buying in carload lots, we can
sell the best goods at ordinary
prices. Years of experience in
this district enables us to anticipate the needs of all classes, and
we can supply everything you
need.
Care is taken in filling mail
and telegraphic orders and in
packing goods for shipment by
river, road or trail.
R. S. SARGENT
Hazelton
Telkwa
��� w
i THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1911
I  '
:>*
���t
}
CHURCH OF ENGLAND
ST. PETER'S,  HAZELTON
Sunday Services: Morning at 11 o'clock; Sunday
School at 2.30 p.m.; Native service, 8.80 p.m.;
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Rev. J. Field.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HAZELTON
Services   held   every Sunday evening in   the
Church Room at 7.30 o'clock.
Rev. D. R. McLean.
CHURCH OF ENGLAND
SEALEY
Services held every Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock
in the church building on Peterson's road.
NEW HAZELTON
Services held every   Sunday  evening  at   7:30
o'clock in the Church Tent.
L. C. LUCKBAFT.
It is important
for you to
1 that I have stock and
IVOOW appliances to turn out
all kinds of CARRIAGE WORK,
special Sleighs, Wagon and
Sleigh  Brakes,   Etc.
C. F. WILLIS
General Blacksmith
Repairing Job Work
Horseshoeing a Specialty
HAZELTON, B. C.
Mines and Mining
Good Properties for sale ��� Cash or on
Bond.       Development and
Assessment Work.
Carr Brothers
Six Years In This District.
Hazelton, B. C.
j     Praying
All orders promptly and carefully
executed
E. C. Stephens
Leave your orders at C. F. Willis'
Blacksmith Shop
FOR SALE
Ten Acres Cleared
Land, with House, two
miles from Hazelton.
Apply to
H. Coppock, Hazelton
Local and Personal
George McDonell has returned
from the coast.
E. Brickenden, of Kitseguecla,
was in town on Monday.
Mrs. S. B. Slinger has returned
from a visit to the coast'
J. W. Davis left on Wednesday
for a business trip to the coast.
The Hazelton brought quite a
number of passengers on Monday.
Jabez K. and John Ashman
came down from their coal claims
for the election.
Mrs. Brownlee, of Francois
lake, has gone to the coast for an
extended visit.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Nation were
among the outgoing passengers
on the Port Simpson.
C. H. Munro and W. S, Sargent have returned from a trip
to the Babine mountains.
Road Superintendent W. A.
Williscroft is in Victoria, transacting departmental business.
Seth Godfrey, returning from
the Copper river coal field, was a
passenger for the coast on Wednesday.
Frank Johnson brought his
pack train in from Groundhog
mountain, reaching Hazelton on
Monday.
F. C. Elliott, of Victoria, is
spending a couple of weeks in the
district, looking after his mining
interests.
Herbert Hankin spent a few
days on business in the valley,
returning to Glen Meadow ranch
on Tuesday.
Walter Noel,J,P., spentseveral
days along the river swearing in
the deputy returning officers for
the election.
The H. B. C. steamer Port
Simpson left for the end of
steel on Tuesday with a small
passenger list.
The steamer Inlander, operating between Hazelton and Prince
Rupert, announces a further reduction in the through freight
rate, which now stands at $35 a
ton.
G. U. Ryley, Land Commissioner of the Grand Trunk Pacific,
who spent ten days in Hazelton
and the Bulkley, left for the
coast on Tuesday, en route to
Winnipeg.
Harry Winfield, foreman at the
Groundhog Mountain coal property, returned to the coast on
Tuesday, development work being
discontinued for the season. He
states the coal measures of the
district are the greatest he has
ever seen.
F. Dallas, inspector for the
Bank of Vancouver, arrived on
Monday for his first visit to the
local branch. Mr. Dallas was
much pleased with what he saw
on a trip to the west slope of
Nine Mile mountain, where he
looked over the American Boy
group.
Charleson's pack train, having
completed its work on the Babine
trail for this season, has been
placed on the Bulkley valley
route. The larger division of the
train, which is packing to Telkwa,
left on Tuesday with fifty-three
packs for Frank L. Charleson, the
Telkwa merchant.
An Omineca Pathfinder
George Gaffney, one of the
pioneer prospectors of this district, arrived on Monday from the
Omineca river country, where he
spent the last year prospecting
and trapping. George has not
been in Hazelton since 1908, when
he went to the Findlay river.
He found good placer prospects
in that district, and hopes to return when better means of transportation are available.
Freight by Mail
Settlers have shown rare ingenuity in circumventing the
high packing costs, as is the case
of one Nechaco colonist, who has
made a practice of getting in his
seed oats by parcel post, postage
on his five-pound packages being
but six cents per pound, whereas
if brought in as freight his oats
would cost him double that sum
in transportation charges. Last
season this one ingenious settler
received by mail no less than five
huudred pounds of oats, to the
infinite disgust of the mail carrier,
who happened also to be the
common carrier.
the v"'-.:- of the 1909 lumber cut.
Or . - o, as in former years,
holds ihe premier position as a
lumber province. Its forests are
made up of diversified species,
which enabled it to produce one-
third of the lumber for the Dominion. British Columbia, however, will soon take Ontario's
place, from predictions based on
the 1910 report. In 1909 the
western province produced a
trifle over half as much lumber
as was cut in Ontario, while for
the last year the amounts returned from the two provinces were
practically the same.
Although one-quarter more
lumber was cut in Quebec in 1910
than in the year previous, the increase was not sufficient to maintain it in second place of importance, which position was usurped
by British Columbia. The remaining provinces, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Saskatchewan, Alberta, Manitoba and
Prince Edward Island cut lumber in the order of importance
given, but together supply only
one-sixth of the amount for Canada.
NEW FOREST RESERVE ACT
Comprehensive Law to Regulate Rre<
serves and Parks which Come Within
Jurisdiction of Dominion Government
��� Rangers   Given   Greater   Powers.
Council power to purchase and expropriate (under the Expropriation Act)
land within a reserve which is not the
property of the crown. Exchange was
formerly the only method of dealing
with such lands.
The rights of holders of leases and
licences within the reserve are specifically protected. Denuded timberlands
may be withdrawn from such leased or
licensed areas by the Government, upon
notice being given the holder of the
licence or lease.
It is enacted that railway companies
must pay one-half the costof fire patrol
along their lines under construction,
and rangers, when on duty on such patrol, are to be carried free.
Rangers are given summary power to
arrest and bring before a magistrate,
or to remove from the reserve, any offenders against the Act. They may
seize, in any place, any timber cut
within the reserve or removed therefrom, any minerals removed and any
game taken or killed within the reserve,
and, within the reserve, may confiscate
firearms, fishing tackle, etc., unlawfully
there. The rangers are given the right
of search of buildings, etc., in the reserve and within ten miles of its boundaries.
Lands may be withdrawn from the reserve for railway purposes.
The powers of the Governor-in-Coun-
cil to make regulations for reserves and
parks are defined.
The Governor-in-Council is given
power to designate, by proclamation,
areas for parks and to make regulations
for their management.
Sale of lands for unpaid
delinquent taxes in the
Omineca Assessment District, Province of British
Columbia.
I    HEREBY   GIVE    NOTICE   [hat
the above sale is, by Ordej-in-
Council, postponed until Thursday, the sixteenth day of November, A. D., 1911.
C. W. HOM^R,
Assessor and Collector, Omireca
Assessment District.
Hazelton, B. C, Sept. 20, 19l|l.
The Quality of Our Printing Leaves Nothing To Be Desired
L-^   wJ
Opposite Government Office
IT was not established lo fill "a long felt want." It was
only the desire of down-to-the-minute men, whom you all
know, to run an up-to-date plant of their own to produce
Commercial Printing and Advertising Matter of the better
sort. We can improve your printing and would be glad to
execute your next order.
OUT prices are right-made on the cost finding system���a detailed account is kept of each job and when it is
finished we know the exact cost. Then a small percentage
of profit is added. This is the only fair way���fair to ourselves and our customers.
Drug Store for the Valley
An incident of the growth of
the Bulkley valley is the establishment at Telkwa of a modern
drug store.   The proprietor  of
the new  enterprise is J. Mason
Adams, the progressive druggist,
whose store in Hazelton is well
, known to the people of the dist-
; rict.   At Telkwa Mr. Adams will
carry the same variety of stock
| as is to be found in the local store,
and there is no doubt the people
j of the valley will show their ap-
I preciation of his enterprise by
giving his new store liberal patronage.   A well equipped prescription department, in charge of
a competent chemist, will be a
j feature of the Telkwa store.
The late session of Paliament has seen
the passage of a new Dominion Forest
Reserves and Parks Act. As may be
inferred from the title, the scope of
this bill is broader than the Forest Reserves Act of 1906, and by it are superseded both the Forest Reserves Act of
1906 and the Rocky Mountains Park
Act.
In the new bill the first six sections
of the original Forest. Reserves Act are
left practically unaltered. These relate
to the withdrawal of lands from sale
and occupancy for the purpose of creating forest reserves, the constituting of
forest reserves and the provision for
their control by the Director of Forestry, authorizing the appointment of
forest rangers and granting them the
powers of a Justice of the Peace and
providing for the ranger's oath.
Section seven give3 the Governor-in-
NOTICE to Creditors, Devisees, Legatees, Next-of-Kin, and Others Having
Claims Against the Estate of Frederick Roeger.
Notice is hereby given that all creditors, devisees, legatees, next-of-kin, and
others having claims against the estate
o'' Frederick Roeger, deceased, late of
Edson, in the Province of Alberta, who
died at Edmonton, in the province of
Alberta, on the twenty-third day of
August, 1911, are required before the
expiration of two months from this advertisement, to send by post, pre-paid,
or to deliver to the National Trust
Company, Limited, Edmonton, Alberta,
Public Administrator, their names, addresses and descriptions, and a full
statement of particulars of their claims
and the nature of the security (if any)
held by them, duly verified by Statutory
Declaration, and that after the last
mentioned date, the administrator will
proceed to distribute the assets of the
said estate amongst the parties entitled
thereto, having regard only to the
claims of which they shall then have
notice.
Dated at Edmonton, this 26th day of
August, A. D. 1911.
National Trust Company, Limited,
Public Administrator,
Edmonton, Alberta.
Griesbach, O'Connor & Co.,
Solicitors for Administrator.
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
Province ok British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all Public Highways in unorganized Districts,
and all Main Trunk Roads in organized
Districts are sixty-six feet wide, land
have a width of thirty-three feet on ifach
side of the mean straight centre linp of
the traveled road.
THOMAS TAYLOR.
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., July 7th, 1911,
CANCELLATION OK RESJ3RVE,
NOTICE] is hereby given that the reserve cast
ins on vat-ant Crown lands in Range ���". Coast District, notice of which, bearing date ..f May :Bth,
1910, was published in the British Columbia Gaiette
nf May 2i>th, I'.il'l, is cancelled in so far as the tame
relates to the I.mils surveyed as Lota 1870, 878,
1879, 1890, is:*;. 1894, 1896, !��%, iKSI7. 1898, !��Kl,
2.MI7. 8508, 8509, 2510, 8611 ami 2.112. Ranire ... (List
District. ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department nf Lands.
Victoria. II. C., Ann. Hi. 11111. n-IHJ
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby givon that the reserves a) ist-
Ing over vacant Crown lands in Ranges I an I 5,
('east District, notices of which, bearing datei of
May 6th, 1910 and May 2',th, 1810, respecUvly, v
published in the issues of the Rritish Columbia
Gazette of May .".111 ami MaylMth. 11110, are cancelled in so fur as the same relates to hinds survived
as Lots 786, 788, 7X7, 7SS. 780. 7!U. VIM. 701a, 79-2. 7!):l.
794. 7115, 866, 867, 968, 858, 880, Mil. 888, B93, B64, 886,
Slid, 8U7. stiti, 869, 870, 871, 872. S7:i. 1158, 1168, 1180,
HIM, lira. U68, 111.2. 1168, ll.'.'.i. 467, 458. 847. 1174.
117C, 1182. 1189. Illll. 1182, 120U, 11S8, 11S7, listo,
782. 783, 784, 7S1. 780, 818, 777a. 70 and 1186. a! in
Ranire 4, Const District: and Lots 218SA, 1020, |o23
:'.814 and :l82��i. all in Range "-. Coast District.
ROBERT A. RF.NWICK.
Deputy Minister of Lands,
Department of Lands.
Victoria. H. a, Aug. 10. 1I>11. t)-30
o
0
Cataline in from North
Jean Caux, the veteran packer,
who is known throughout the
north country as "Cataline." has
returned with his pack train from
the Ninth Cabin, having completed his contract for freighting
i supplies to the telegraph cabins.
He will take his train to the Cariboo for the winter, packing supplies to the Hudson's Bay post at
Fort Fraser on his way. Cataline,
who has reached an age at which
most men are willing to retire
from service, has spent more than
half his life on the trail, being
one of the original Hudson's Hay
packers in Washington and British Columbia.
A reminder, we print
Letterheads, envelopes, cards, statements, billheads, posters,
circulars, booklets, programs, invitations, wedding and society
stationery, etc.     If it is to be printed the Miner can do it.
Our Lumber Industry
A highly encouraging view of
the future of British Columbia's
lumber industry is to be gained
from the report of the lumber
cut of Canada, just compiled by
the forestry branch at Ottawa.
Reports for 1910 were received
from 2,763 firms operating sawmills, which is nearly 700 more
than reported last year. Thus
the 1910 report is a better estimate of the actual lumber production than ever before. Nearly
five billion feet of lumber was cut
during 1910 throughout the nine
provinces of Canada, which represents a total value to the country of seventy-seven and a half
million dollars. This is about fifteen million dollars more that!
Telkwa Drug Store
Open about Oct. 1
��� TOR the convenience of the
4^ People of the Bulkley Valley, J. Mason Adams will open a
modern Drug Store in Telkwa,
where a new and complete Stock
of Drugs, Druggists' Sundries, Kodaks, Photo Supplies, Stationery,
Confectionery and Cigars will be
carried. : : : : :
���J Prescription Department in charge
of a competent chemist.       :        :
J. Mason Adams
Hazelton
Telkwa
o
ion THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1911.
Phillips & Lindquist  WI1DI ll'S
Builders and Contractors 11 UHLlJ   U
Builders and Contractors
Plans  and  Specifications.     Store  and
Office Fixtures  a  Specialty.
P. 0. box 812 Hazelton
OF THE WEEK
+���-
For Sale
Cordwood
Brief and Newsy Paragraphs
Covering the Activities of
All Nations
Sawed in Stove Lengths if so  j
desired i
Enquire of
TOPICS INTERESTING ALL
H. COPPOCK, Hazelton     j
1
The Fast Launch
'Kit-Ex-Chen"
Sealey-Hazelton
Route
Steamer Ramona Wrecked    Mount Etna
In Eruption    Cholera   Riots   In Italy
Legal Battle Between Mackenzie-Mann
lntererests   and   Dunsmuirs      Bullion
Robber Caught
Leaves Hazelton at 9 and 11 a. m., and
3:30 and 6:30 p. m.
Leaves Sealey 9:30 a. m., and 1, 4 and
7 p. m. Express Service.
O'Neill & Larocque, Props.
+.,���
 +
Hotel Premier
Prince Rupert
It is the best place to
stay. European and
American plan. Electric
lights, hot and cold running water on every
floor. No extra charge
for bath.     ::   ::   ::   ::
Rates:   $1 to $3 per day
Fred W. Henning, manager
i
J
The Canadian Pacific has
inaugurated a system of forest
protection along its lines.
St. Andrew's university, of
Scotland, has just celebrated the
five hundredth anniversary of its
founding.
By a close vote Maine has decided to repeal the prohibition
law, which has been in operation
for nearly fifty years.
Sir Donald Mann denies that
the Canadian Northern has made
any deal for an interchange of
traffic with American roads.
The first party of refugees
from the disaffected Cheng Tu
district in China has found protection on a British gunboat.
Vancouver city council has decided not to allow Sunday concerts, the churches having objected to the entertainments.
A unique flood swept several
streets in New Orleans wher a
tank containing a million gallons
of molasses burst with a tremendous report. Market street
was flooded for nearly a mile.
SWEEPING REDUCTION IN
HOUSE FURNISHINGS
J. F. Macdonald, Furniture Dealer,   Hazelton
Offers a 25 per cent Reduction in the Price of
Furniture for One Month Only
Now is the time to purchase your Furniture for the winter. We!
have a large and varied stock to select from, and we are confident that
OUT prices will appeal to you. Give us a call or write for quotations.!
We guarantee prompt service, satisfaction and attention.
People in the villages flanking
Mount Etna are abandoning their
homes, in fear of destruction
from the eruption of the volcano.
France stands firm in her refusal to submit to the conditions
proposed by Germany for the
settlement of the Moroccan dispute.
Officers of the ill-fated Cottage
City have been committed for
trial on charges of looting the
vessel after it was wrecked near
Cape Mudge.
Edmonton Conservatives claim
thirty ballot boxes designed to
allow of ballots being switched
were sent to outlying polling
places for the election.
Representatives of two thousand retail cooperative stores in
Great Britain are now in British
Columbia, buying products of
this province for their trade.
Captain Ota, a prominent Japanese naval officer, has resigned
because the authorities paid no
heed to his report on the deficiencies of the Japanese navy.
A large party of prominent
British journalists, which has
been touring Canada, spent some
time in southern British Columbia, and is now returning to
England.
Resenting cholera regulations,
mobs in the Italian city of Massa-
fra have burned the cholera hospital and carried off the
patients. Martial law has been
proclaimed.
The International Waterways
Commission, a new bodv formed
to determine disputed questions
between the United States and
Canada, is now complete and a
date for its first meeting will
soon be set by Canadian section.
The agriculturists of the province favor the proposal of the
provincial government to send a
potato exhibit to the Madison
Square exhibition in New York
in November, to compete for the
Stillwell trophy and a prize of
$1,000.
Vancouver Island coal properties, lying between Nanaimo and
Ladysmith, embracing 2,400
acres and estimated to contain
approximately 30,000,000 tons of
fuel, have just been consolidated
into an operating proposition by
Spokane capitalists.
The mystery of the theft of
$96,000 in bullion on the steamship Humboldt on August 10, has
been cleared up by the confession
of Charles Everett, a bank forger
of many aliases, who admitted to
Burns detectives that he had
been concerned in the bullion
robbery. Gold amounting to
$15,000 was recovered by the
detectives.
The Mackenzie-Mann interests,
which acquired the Dunsmuir
coal mines, have brought suit
against Dunsmuir, claiming money and plant to the value of a
million. On the other hand,
Dunsmuir is suing the new company to recover money alleged to
have been collected by it and to
be due to him.
The wooden steamer Ramona
of the Pacific Coast Steamship
Company, bound from Skagway
to Seattle with passengers and
freight, went ashore on one of
the Spanish Islands, opposite
Cape Decision, Alaska, and is a
tatal loss. The passengers and
the crew were taken off by the
steamer Northwestern.
tuutfttin
Hudson's Bay Company's
When you require a H. B. C. blanket see that you get the
genuine article.      Our Blankets have our trademark on them.
Don't take a "just as good blanket," get the real goods.
These blankets are all wool.
3 point Blanket 8 lbs.    66 x 72 in.
3 1 -2 point Blanket    10 lbs.    66 x 84 in.
4 point Blanket 13 lbs.    74 x 84 in.
We also carry other grades of blankets from $5.00 to $10.00
I per pair.
Look for the Trade Mark.
Quality Right
SARGENT
TELKWA ST^��
Prices Right
Having two freight outfits bringing freight to our Telkwa Store, we are enabled to carry a full stock
fjL^ well assorted and complete
stock of General Merchandise
including every requirement of
prospector, miner and rancher.
Buying in carload lots, we can
sell the best goods at ordinary
prices. Years of experience in
this district enables us to anticipate the needs of all classes, and
we can supply everything you
need.
Care is taken in filling mail
and telegraphic orders and in
packing goods for shipment by
river, road or trail.
1
ARGENT
Telkwa
Hazelton
BRITISH COLUMBIA AHEAD
Our Road System Will Eclipse Any In
the West Our Share In the Pacific
Highway California Following Our
Example
The road policy of British Col-
1 umbia is the envy of Washington
' and Oregon.    Without burdening
j the people with taxes, this prosperous province is carrying out a
program   of  highway  improvement which will in a few years
give us the best system of roads
in the west.
We talk about good roads, says
the Portland Telegram, but Brit-
tish Columbia builds them.
That province spent more than
$5,000,000 on roads last year.    It
has also made provision for the
expenditure of $5,000,000 in 1912,
and another $5,000,000 in 1913,
making a total of   more   than
I $20,000,000 in four years.
' ' British   Columbia with about
,400,000 souls has less than two-
thirds the population of Oregon.
j Its main item of good roads con-
I struction is a provincial rdad expending from Vancouver, B. C,
| northward to   Hazelton,  a distance of   more than  700 miles.
The northern   terminus will be
within eighty miles of the Alaskan boundary.   A stretch of 200
miles will  complete   the  work,
and be the northern part of the
proposed   Pacific   highway,   extending from   Hazelton   on the
north to Tiajuana,   Mexico,   on
the south.
Other good roads activity in
the province include the construction of civilized roads for
civilized men in all directions, including one that is to extend to
Alberta, and ultimately to Superior. The amount spent for road
purposes in British Columbia is
$10 per capita for every man,
woman and child in the province.
In Oregon we have been trying
for years to build roads with hot
air, and have lamented about how
much they are costing us. In
California, the people of the
state have voted a bond issue of
$18,0(111,000 to be used in building
good roads by expenditure of
cash, and with a prospect of getting roads that  will be roads.
In Oregon we shall ultimately
decide that good roads are a
priceless invesment, and that the
only way they can be built is by
spending coin in their construction.
Hudson's Bay Company
oMK!
mmeca
Hotel
Hazelt
on
���J 1 his hotel is headquarters for all mining and commercial men
visiting Omineca district.
is and Barber Shop
Hot and Cold Water
People desiring to visit Bulkley Valley and joints south may
travel by the Bulkley Valley Stage, which leaves this hotel for Aider-
mere and Telkwa every Tuesday and Friday.
J. C. K. Sealy, Prop.
Route Your Freight via the
Steamer "Inlander"
Flat Rate $35 per ton
Prince Rupert to Hazelton
Fast Freight and Passenger Service
H. B. Rochester
Manager
R. Cunningham & Son
Hazelton Agents
(F
MEN'S WEAR
that gives Satisfaction,
and Reliable
Boots and Shoes
=^
^=
are Specialties at
LARKWORTHY'S
STORES
Hazelton and Sealey
J
New Train Service
The train service between
i Prince Rupert and the end of
steel has been increased, the
schedule now providing for three
trains a week in each direction.
On Monday, Wednesday and Saturday the passenger trains leave
Prince Rupert, with return trains
on Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. The passenger traffic is
| steadily growing, and each train
carries practically a full complement.
Flannelette seven yards lor one dollar
at the H. B. C. store. 3
I
ngineca
Hotel
McDonell & McAfee, Props.
���J The only family hold in the district. ^ Private dining
rooms. ���J Night and day restaurant. <J Good Stable in
conneclion.      (jj Reasonable rates.      <J Modern conveniences.
Hazelt
on
Choicest of  Wines, Liquors and Cigars
always on hand.
Hudson's Bay Company's Steamers
"Port Simpson" and "Hazelton"
Flat Freight Kale $25 per ton, plus Railroad Charges
Passenger Fares:    Hazelton to Newtown $11, including berth
Newtown to llazellon $12.50, including berth
The Str. Port SimpBon meets the Wednesday train and the Str. Ilazcllnn meets
the Saturday train.        Passengers  will lind accommodation on board steamers.
>
\
!�� THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1911
V*
LIKES WESTERN CANADA
"Frenzied Finance" Lawson Is Enthusiastic Over British Columbia and Its
Resources ��� Would Jail Easterners
Who Neglect   Western   Opportunities
Returning to Boston from the
West, where he spent most of
the summer, Thomas W. Lawson,
copper magnate and author of
"Frenzied Finance," lauded Canada and the west to the skies,
proclaiming from the hilltops,
figuratively speaking, the glories that Canada and the west
hold for young and old alike.
He says that the west has it on
every corner of the globe from
the Garden of Eden to Egypt,
Massachusetts.
Note a characteristic Lawson
exclamation when he landed in
the Bean City: "'Young man! if
you don't go to a ticket office and
buy yourself a ticket for the west
within the next week, you ought
to be dragged before a judge and
given 90 days at hard labor.
Opportunities lie unheeded along
the railroad tracks, on the mountain sides, in the gutters, crying
to be snatched. Opportunities
are as plentiful as the leaves upon
the trees, as the fish within the
bounding brooks, as the grass
upon the earth.
"Western Canada offers the
greatest opportunities. Out there
they have actually put into practice the things that I have been
advocating for years in banking,
in insurance, in taxation ��� in
everything. That country is being run for the people. The
people will own Western Canada
���all of the people, instead of one
or two rich men.
' 'The wealth is in the land and
the land is to be had for the asking. Go to the Canadian Pacific
and ask them what they'll do for
you. I don't believe there's anything they wouldn't do, if you
really want to go west and live.
"Those people hustle so assiduously out there in Western Can
ada that they never buy less
than three pair of shoes at a time.
I got on a train at Vancouver,
bound for Lake Louise. Three
men from Vancouver got on the
train with me. There was a cyclonic disturbance, and when the
dust had cleared away the three
men had got something spread
out on a table. I looked it over.
It was a $12,000,000 proposition^
all there���lying calm and cold
right where you could poke it
with your finger. Coal lands!
Uh-huh!   Coal lands!
"Greatest thing you ever
heard. The three men outlined
it. I listened. By the time I
reached Lake Louise I had closed
with them, and made arrangements to have engineers start for
the coal lands the next day.
Hustle! Well, well, well, I should
say yes.   Yes.   Yes.    Yes.
' 'To tell the truth, my head is
so full of the west that there
isn't room for much of anything
else. To my mind the far western United States and Canada���
and especially Canada���is the
most wonderful section of the
world. When Horace Greeley
told young men to go west, he
was right. He would be right in
exactly the same degree if he
were alive today and said the
same thing. I say again that any |
young man who does not go to a
ticket office and buy a ticket
which will carry him to the far
west, with its glorious opportunities for the people ��� the
masses���ought to be locked up,
for he is committing a crime
against himself."
FOR THE WORLD'S PEACE
Advocates of Disarmament Propose
Scientific Study of the Problem of
War and Its Political and Economic
Consequences
Low Tax Rate for Prince Rupert
Prince Rupert people are congratulating themselves on the
comparatively low tax rate of
twelve mills, which has just been
fixed by the city council. This
rate compares very favorably
with those of other municipalities
in the province.
A number  of  new   Moore  gasoline
lights for sale at   McDougall & Tate's.
The peace advocates at their
conference at Berne agreed upon
the essentials to be incl uded in a
declaration to the world, in which
their hopes and their programme
will be set forth. The members
of the conference believe that important consequences will follow
this meeting of economists, and
that for the first time the problem of war will be studied scientifically by the deepest thinkers
of all nations.
Effort, time nor abundant
funds will be spared to carry on
the research work, the result of
which, it is expected, will illuminate the whole subject and have
authoritative value. The final
act of the conference was to send
a telegram to Andrew Carnegie,
at Skibo Castle, whose peace
foundation made the peace gathering possible.
The declaration asks that all
nations concentrate their atten- J
tian upon the value of serious
and scientific study of the causes
of war and as to the best method
for the promotion of peace. It
adds that the work has only been
begun, but that it will be pushed
vigorously and systematically.
"Study of the causes and con-1
sequences of war," the declaration continues, "constitutes only
a part of the work. Peace will be |
studied in the same method.
Efforts will be made to determine
and measure with the same scientific precision the action of the
forces working toward unity of
mankind, which daily is becoming more and more intense."
The problems to be studied are
distributed in three sections:
first, the causes and effects of
war; second, armaments, and
third,  influences tending to the
unification of the peoples in their
economic life.
In the first division the studies
will comprise research into conflicts of economic interests, the
influence of obligatory military
service laws, prizes, war loans
issued by neutral countries, the
effects and consequences of wars
on the civilized world as a whole,
and also on the life of each nation in the destruction of life and
wealth.
In this section also will come
studies of conquests, colonizations
and derangements to international commerce through war.
The section of armaments will
study the history of armaments
of modern times, the needs for
armament and the possibilities of
their being reduced; military
budgets resulting from loans for
armaments in preparation for
war and the general effects of
armaments on the economic and
social life of peoples.
CO.
HAZELTON, B. C.
**jj Stage leaves every Friday and every Tuesday morning
at 8 o'clock for Aldermere and Telkwa. Returning,
leaves Aldermere and Telkwa Tuesday and Friday
arriving  here   Wednesday   and   Saturday   at   noon.
Horses for hire for private parties.
Horses, Oats, Wheat and Bran for sale.
E. E. Charleson, Manager
/f=
�����
JOIN ONE OF OUR j
SUIT CLUBS j
You may get a $20 Suit [
for $2 or $3 I
Drawing Takes   Place  Every ���.
Saturday Night :
Noel & Rock
Hazelton, B. C.
F. W. HART & CO.
Furniture
and House Furnishings  Complete
Funeral Directors, ���Embalmers
Fairbanks-Morse
Gasoline Donkey
The lightest, most compact
hoisting apparatus
obtainable
No Licensed Operator Required
Used by the Dominion and Provincial Governments
Can  be  also   used   to pump water, saw wood or
clear land
Largest stock of Gasoline Engines and Machinery west of
Montreal
For particulars write
The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd.
101-107 Water St.
Vancouver, B. C.
Special attention to orders from out of
town.
Sj-
Prince Rupert
$2 a year
m
��s^jg^^siyMt^Wffi^f^ 3
It takes only $25 cash and $25 monthly papents to purchase
====== five lots in live
I
WSMEawsvmatimt
Grand
msjxsmiKSEmwuBiisa
ffiM^ErSR'.-SS--*: sa
Real Estate
Mines
A Good Example for Yom
One shrewd and successful investor
has just purchased from me fifty
lots in these towns
Insurance
Loans
im&tfifcJE&��m&3mWlMiii-.SM -. iIMi,<9HIW.
For full information, maps, circulars, etc., call or write to
E. H. Hicks Beach
, Agent for Grand Trunk Townsites
Investments Hazelton, B. C. Notary Public
B ^gBBB^B^^BI^BBBt^^^^^^^^^^^^^SMls^^^^B^^^^^SMMMiS^s^^^^BS^SS^^gBBBIB S THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER'23, 1911.
The Hub of the Hazelton District of British Columbia
On the Main line of the Grand Trunk Pacific
REGISTERED TOWNSITE
The Prosperity of Every Great City is Due to its Geographical Location
The most important Townsite!    The most talked of Townsite on the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
THE SPOKANE OF CANADA THE SPOKANE OF CANADA
New Hazelton Townsite
Section 1
Now being offered for sale is not a
Grand Trunk Pacific Promotion
Townsite. NEW HAZELTON Town-
site was selected by the experts of
a syndicate of successful men as the
geographical location for a big city.
They bought the land, realizing the
wonderful resources of the Hazelton
District, the Mines, the Distributing Centre for hundreds of miles,
and many other reasons.
We ask you to investigate in your
own way all of the statements in this
advertisement. Should you join us
by buying lots you will know that
your investment is guarded by every
means known to human foresight,
and the judgment of a body of successful men known to you all.
Your profits should eclipse the story
of Edmonton, Calgary, Regina, Moose
Jaw or Prince Rupert.
Don't be classed among the failures who  will SAY, "I WISH   I   HAD
known." Don't stand idly by and
see your neighbors reap the profits
on Real Estate while you reap
nothing but your salary. put your
savings to work in that sure coming
City-NEW HAZELTON.
NEW HAZELTON is out of the
damp belt, aud many people who
spend the whole year in the district
say the winters are not severe���plenty
of sunshine tnd dry air.
Taken from Official Bulletin, B.C.,
No. xxii, Page xxiii:���
"On the Upper Skeena, about a
distance of 50 miles, there are large
tracts of land on both sides of the
river, which, as far as soil and climatic conditions are concerned, I
would consider ideal for successful
growing of fruit as well as for other
branches of agriculture. Potatoes,
and all garden produce, grow to perfection."
HAVE YOU CONFIDENCE OF
MERCHANTS ON THE GROUND?
Many Lots already purchased
by the keenest business men of
Hazklton (Old Town). You can
safely   follow  the   judgment of
SUCH MEN.
NEW HAZELTON should be the
centre of a busy population of thousands within a year. Why not? During the past year there was an average of over two new towns created
in the Canadian West every week.
We are all here to share in this
most wonderful prosperity. We offer
you an opportunity to participate in
the progress of the best town for
investment on the line of the Grand
Trunk Pacific.
NEW HAZELTON Railroads Open
New Country.
Railroads have been the great feature
in the growth of Western Canada.
NEW HAZELTON, located on the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad is attracting the attention of the whole world, as
all important towns do on the main line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad.
Stores are going up. Newspaper
plant about to move on the Townsite.
Two or three General Merchandise
Stores, Drug Store, Bank, Restaurants, and in fact many lines of trade
are now arranging to open in NEW
HAZELTON, Section One. Activity
is in that part of the Townsite known
as Section One.
INVESTMENTS
Made in towns with the
Right Kind of Country
Right Kind of Resources
Right Kind of People
Will surely be bipr paying investments.   This is the kind
of town you find at
NEW HAZELTON, B.C.
The story of NEW HAZELTON is
well known to the public. It is a
Townsite being offered to the public
by successful business men. There is
j positively no railroad company or
Townsite Promoter financially interested in the land. The owners
have undertaken to make NEW HAZELTON a city of importance in British
Columbia. NEW HAZELTON promises to be the most profitable city to
the Grand Trunk Pacific along its main
lines.
Pay Office Occupied Oct. 1st
Offices of Foley, Welch & Stewart, contractors building the Grand
Trunk Pacific Railroad, are now
under construction. fifteen carPENTERS AND Foreman rushing buildings to be completed by Oct. 1st.
NEW HAZELTON, the hub of the
Hazelton District, will be the natural
headquarters for what promises to be
the most active and sensational
new city in the fastest growing part
of the world today on account of the
wonderful Lead and Zinc Mines, the
Groundhog Mountain Coal Fields, the
vast agricultural country tributary to
the coming principal city in British
Columbia on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railroad.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad is
now running regular trains over 100
miles out of Prince Rupert. The G. T.
P. Officials, and also the G. T. P. Contractors, say that the railroad should be
running to Mile 164 this winter, and
will reach NEW HAZELTON
next summer. Grading is now under way as far along the line as
30 miles east of NEW HAZELTON.
The grading is about finished from
Prince Rupert to NEW HAZELTON.
Many mines are getting ready to ship
ore. Some of the mines being developed
are: Silver Cup, American Boy, Silver
Standard, Sunrise and Sunset, Lead
King, Erie, Babine. Most of the ore
in NEW HAZELTON mines is high
grade Silver-Lead, similar to ore in the
Slocan District in East Kootenay,
B.C., and similar to some ores found at
Leadville, Colo.
Buy Lots
Terms Are Easy
Look them over again,   and think of
this money-making investment.
Prices:
Business Lots    -    $350 to $500
33 x 100 (according to location) Per Lot
Terms: One-third cash, balance 1 and 2 years at G per cent
Residence Lots -   $100 to $300
Terms: $10 cash, $10 per montu; No Interest; or One-
third   cash ;   balance 1 and 2 years at 6 per cent.
Make Cheques, Drafts, Money and Express Orders payable to NORTHERN INTERIOR LAND CO., LTD.
Out of City Investors
Can reserve one or more Lots by
wire or letter. State price of Lots and
number required, and we will make the
best available reservation for you.
Remember NEW HAZELTON is
not a gift Townsite, and when you
ruy a lot in it you are investing
your money on the business judgment of the most successful men in
British Columbia.
NEW HAZELTON Townsite had
over a QUARTER OF A MILLION
DOLLARS INVESTED by a few business men before the Lots were offered for sale. NEW HAZELTON is a
Business Man's Townsite. All the G.
T. P. and local history was carefully
considered. The Engineers' Reports as
to grades, opportunities for Side Tracks
necessary to handle the thousands of
freight cars were examined. Then
they invested in NEW HAZELTON.
They paid in Cash for NEW HAZELTON and nearby lands over TWO
HUNDRED AND FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS.
That is a wonderful sonnet written by
John J. Ingallson the subject of Opportunity, but the real fact is Opportunity
does not knock once on each man's
door. Opportunity plays a continual
anvil on every man's portals���but of
course, if he is knocking at the time he
will not hear Opportunity when she
knocks.
New Hazelton
Where the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad has Sixty Acres of right-of-way
and track grounds.
NEW HAZELTON is reported by
Engineers to be the only available spot
in the Skeena or Bulkley Valleys for
many miles each way where it would
be possible to have Railroad Yards large
enough to handle the Hazelton District's
business.
NEW HAZELTON affords a long,
nearly level, stretch of land suitable for
Immense Yards, which will be required
to handle the thousands of cars of ore
and coal that will be shipped from the
mines in the Hazelton District.
The G. T. P.
CAPITAL of Grand Trunk Railway
and the Grand Trunk Railway Systems,
$447;898,932.
Over 50,000 Stockholders, G. T. and
G. T. P. Millions of people boost for
Grand Trunk Pacific Townsites.
Maximum grade of G. T. P. is 21 feet
to the mile, one-fifth of any other Transcontinental Railroad in Canada or the
United States.
NEW HAZELTON is the Town that
everybody is talking about, and there
are no two opinions as to its opportunities for Investments.
NEW HAZELTON is situated near
the junction of the Skeena and Hulkley
Valleys.
THENORTHERN INTERIOR LAND
CO., LTD., PAID CASH FOR AND
OWN (SECTIONONE) NEW HAZELTON TOWNSITE AND GUARANTEE
TO DELIVER TO PURCHASERS OF
LOTS AN INDEFEASIBLE TITLE
UPON RECEIPT OF FINAL PAYMENT.
ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO
Northern Interior Land Co., Ltd.
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Prince Rupert Agent for Sale of Lots
Jeremiah H. Kugler, Ltd.
Second Avenue between Fifth and Sixth Sts.
P. O. Box 1515
Hazelton Agent for Sale of Lots
W. Kennedy
i THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1911.
tr
Sale of Lands for Unpaid Delinquent Taxes in the Omineca Assessment
District, Province of British Columbia.
I HEREBY GIVE NOTICE, that on Thursday the 12th day of October, A.D. 1911, at the hour of two o'clock in the afternoon, at the Court House, in the Town of Hazelton, I shall sell at public auction, the lands of the persons in the list hereinafter set out, for the delinquent taxes remainining unpaid on the 31st day of December, A.D. 1911, and for interests,
costs and expenses, including the cost of advertising said sale, if the total amount due is not sooner paid.
List Ahove Mentionkd.
Statu
Inter
tory
Name of Person Assessed
Short Description of Property
Taxes
est to
date of
sale
Costs
and
Expenses
Total
Spencer, V Lot 177, R. V Coast District  $ 8.00    $0.38 $2.00
  "   178, R. V           "            16.00 .76 2.00
 _   "2125, R. V         "   16.00 .76 2.00
 ...  "2126, R. V         "           32.00 1.52 2.00
 _   "2127, R. V         "          __ 16.00 .76 2.00
   "2128, R. V         "           8.00 .38 2.00
      "2130, R. V         "          _  16.00 .76 2.00
 :   "2131, R. v         "   16.00 .76 2.00
 -   "2132, R. V         "            16.00 .76 2.00
   S 1-2  S E 1-4 Sec. 35, Tp. 5, R. V, Coast
Dist    8.00 .38 2.00
._           Lot   252, R. V Coast District  6.00 .28 2.00
 ,...          "    337, R. V         "            3.60 .15 2.00
Heal, Fred. G-
Silverthorn, J. 1
Stuart, Geo. M.
E 1-2
"W 1-2
-N 1-2
729,
728.
R. V
R. V
Jarvis, Jr.,  Arthur M.��� W 1-2
Thompson, Robt  _.l-5
Ellis, Claude P  2-5
Fraser, David E  -1-5
Burns, E. J  -1-5
Holmes, G. G... -	
Grand Trunk Pac. Dev. Co	
Stewart, Jeanie C	
Brown, Julius - -S 1-2
NW1-4
 FrSWl-4
Heal, Jr., F. G..
Kane, F. B	
' 730, R. V
' 731, R. V
" 799, R. V
" 828, R, V
" 828, R. V
" 828, R. V
" 828, R. V
' 1139, R. V
' 1148, R. V
" 2098, R. V
Sec. 25, Tp. 5,
25,      "
36,      "
58.60       2.78      2.00
R. V Coast District
N1-2SE1-4 Sec. 26, Tp. 5, R. V Coast Dist.
S1-2NE1-4       "        "      R. V
o       u ,,  u u r. SW1-4 Sec. 30, Tp. 6, R. V Coast District
Campbell, Robt. F - NW1-4 Sec. 19,    "
16.00
30.40
16.00
.80
1.60
.80
.80
64.00
3.60
8.00
32.00
17.90
16.00
4.80
Sl-2 Sec. 7.
��� Sl-2 Sec. 8.
15, Tp. 8, R. V Coast District     64.00
22,    "   8,     " "      59.20
Tp. 9, R. V Coast District..
Spencer, V.,   Broughton, L., Ouelet J.
A. & Fink, H	
4 to 20     "    2, 8 to 20, Block 8
1 to 10     "    4, Lot 18, Block 4
"   15 to 20     "    4, Lot 6 to 15, Blk. 6a
.    "     lto20     "     7, Lot 1 to 20. Block 8    11.40
"     1 to 20     "     9,  __ _
"     4 to 13     "   11, Lot 15, Block 11...
" 18, Block 11, Lots 1 to 18,  Block 14      Q 55
-    " 1 to 20, Block 15, Lots 5 and 6, Bk 16
" 8, 11, 12, 14, 16 to 20, Block 16	
" 1 to 8, 11 to 20, Block 17-	
" 1 I08, 11 to 20, Block 18	
.    " 1 to 20, Block 19, Lots 1 to 20 Bk 20    21.15
" 1 to 20, Block 21, Lots 1 to 20 Bk 22
" 1 to 20, Block 23, Lots 1 to 5 Bk 24
" 13 to 20,   Block 24, Lots 3 to 6 Bk 25
Lot 9, Block   25, Lots  11  to 19, Block 25      Q 05
"Lots 1 and 2, Lots 6 to 20, Block 26	
Blocks 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33,and 34	
1.20
.90
1.20
1.20
.60
McCroskie, Alice .Lot 3, Block 2	
Smith, G. W     "13,    "    16 -	
Rood, Kenneth     "15,    "    16.	
Hemsworth, J. H -Lots 9 and 10, Block 18, Lot 20, Block 25
Flewin, Helen  .Lot 7, Block 24 	
Burns, R. M Lots 11 and 12, Block 24.       1.35
Frizze'll, Sarah-.- Lot 10, Block 25... .....        .90
Phelan, Oli. E Lots 4 and 5, Block 26.     14.40
Hazelton Townsite
Mcintosh, Angus Lot 55, part of Lot 52  $    6.00
Sub-division of Lot 38, Cassiar District
Charleson, A. J Lots 27 and 28, Block 24  $    1.35
Sub-division of 1). L. 102, Cassiar District
Plan No. 812
Charrist. A. W. Block    3 ..
Dickey, A. F.-""	
G. L	
Cannon, J..
Hewiston, Mrs.
Hall, C. M	
Adleberg, Philip & Martin, Morris
Labiossie, A	
3
7
8
9
12
21
32
Williams, D. G.
Sub-division   of   Dist.    Lot  103,    Cassiar
District.    Plan No. 805.
Lots 6 to 10,  Block 2, 23 and 21, Block 7
- "   23 and 24, Block 15, 1 to 3, Block 16
"   8 to 12,  Block 19, 7 to 11, Block 2(i
- "   32 to 36, Block 26, 2o to 24, Block 80
"   5 to 9,' Block  86,   1  to 4, Block  43
- "   24 to 28, Block 48, 11 to 14, Block 52
"   16 to 20, Block 56, 35 to 39, Block 62
- "   5 to 9, Block 67, 14 to 18,  Block 70
Hammersley, A. St. G.
Lots 11 to 15, Block 2,
35 to 39,
6 to 10,
45 to 48,
33 to 37,
15 to 19,
24,
18 to 24
16 to 20
8 to  7,
12 to 16,
11 to 15,
1 and 2,
12 to 14,
40 to 44,
11 to 15,
1 to  3,
4,
12,
16,
19,
24,
28,
34,
38,
44.
47,
49,
51,
59,
62,
68,
70,
Lois 15 to 19,
" 13 to 17,
"      2 to   6,
1,
"     6 to  9,
"    27 to 31,
"      1 to   4,
1 to   3,
11 to 15,
13 to 17,
4 to 8,
26 to 28,
Ilk 4
"   7
30 to 39,
5 and li,
8 to 12,
21 to 22,
5 to  9,
18
24
26
80
35
39
44
48
49
57
60
1 64
68
74
.60
2.40
.60
2.4o
1.20
1.2o
2. to
$ 7.2o
12.oo
I0.80
12.oo
9.oo
7.7o
7.7o
8.4o
8.I0
4.5o
.76
1.40
.76
.03
.06
.03
.03
3.04
.15
.38
1.52
.85
.76
.22
3.04
2.80
Sarel, C. W   - -Sec.
Kealy, A. E       "
Diplock, A. B.
McCroskie, E._ -- _.l-2Lot42, Cassiar District   4.80 .22
Williams, D. H. & Hoare, J. H 1-4                ��� 12.00 1.80
Ainstie, B 3-4 Lots 294 and 297, Cassiar District  24.00 1.14
Williams, G. E.._ Lot 397, Cassiar District   123.60 8.76
Stevenson, James     "425,       "          "       32.00 1.52
Kirkland, Elizabeth     "503,      "         "    ���  16.00 .76
Telkwa   Townsite.     Sub.   of  S.   W.   1-4
Sec.   35,  Tp. 5, R. V, Coast District
(Map No. 817)
Stewart, G Lot 14, Block 15 $      .45
Aldermere  Townsite.     Sub. of N. 1-2 of
N. E. 1-4 Sec. 26, Tp. 5, Range V, Coast
District
Lots 1 and 2, Block 2
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
64.00       3.04       2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
$ 10.00
18.76
18.76
35.52
18.76
10.38
18.76
18.76
18.76
10.38
8.28
5.75
63.38
18.76
33.80
18.76
2.83
3.66
2.83
2.83
69.04
5.75
10.38
35.52
20.75
18.76
7.02
69.04
64.00
69.04
7.02
15.80
27.14
134.36
35.52
18.76
Name of Person Assessed.
Short Description of Property.
Taxes
Interest
to Date
of Sale
Statu-
ory
Costs
and
Expenses
McOroskiei Edward.
Sub-division   of   Dist.   Lot   103,   Cassiar
District.    Plan No. 805.
Lots 21 to 25, Block 2, Lots 6 to 12, Bk 3
23 to 27,
20 to 24,
8 to 12,
9, 10 & 13,
1 to  5,
22 to 24,
14 to 18,
3,
4,
7,
8,
12,
14,
16,
33 to 37,
2 to   6,
18 to 22,
19,
7 toll,
1 to 12,
7 to 11,
3 $21.00
6
17 to 24, and 28 to 48, Block 18
1 and 2, 18 to 27, Block! 19	
5 to  9, Block  20,  Lot 8,   Block
1    to   4,    20    to    34,    Block
7
8
14
15
18
22
24
40 to 44, Block 24, Lot 42 to 48, Bk 26
1 to 3, 18 to 22, Block 28
9    to   13,    19    to    23,    Block    27
15 to 19, Block 30, Lot 1 to 5, Bk 31
21 to 24, Bk 31, Lot 1, \1 to 21, Bk 32
13 to 17, Block 34, Lots 14 to 18 and
Lot 24, Block 35
3 and 4, 20 to 22, Block 36, Lots 11 to
15, Block 38
30 to 39, Lot 48, Block 38, 21 to 24
Block 39
29, 35 to 39, Block 39,! Lots 15 to 18
Block 43
42 to 44, Block 43, Lots 1 and 2, Bk 44
8 to 12 and 28 to 32, Block 44
7 to 11, Block 45, Lots 28 to 37, Bk 45
Lots 43 to 46, Bk 45, Lots 1, 17 to 21,
.   "   1 to   5, "   49,    "     3 to 12,
"  22&28, "  51,    "     1 to  4,
25 to 28,
22 to 26,
6&10,
52,
53,
56,
7 to 10,
16 to119 & 23,
21 \o 30,
Bk 47
" 51
" 52
53
55
56
36 to 40 and 46, Block 66
1 to  4, Bk 57, Lots 45 and 46, Bk 57
11 to 13,   " 58,
7 to 11,
12 to 21,
19 to 23,
1 to 5,
4 to 8,
3 to  6,
1 to 4,
10 to 11,
60,
63,
66,
68,
70,
71,
72,
' 74,
19 to 23,
20! to 28,
181 to 22,
10 to 14,
16 to 20,
19 to 22,
22,
8 to 12,
58
62
64
67
68
70
71
73
Lots  5 to  9, Bk  4, Lots 45 to 48, Bk   4
Beattie Alice M -    "1 "6     "    li to 15    "12
"   18 to 17  "    19     "    48 " 19
G. W. London, F. Kirkland���
C. Aslbertson & W. P. Ogilvie.
$ 1.00    $    1.45
$   7.00    $   .27   $ 1.00   $   8.27
.49       1.00
.33       1.00
12.89
10.88
.94       1.00       23.09
.29       1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
9.34
1 to 4
1 to 5
2to 6
20 to 24
3to 6
10 to 14
16 to 20
14
27&28
11
20
39
47
57
59
72
12
28
47
56
\l to  6
4 to  8
13 to 17
24
IB to 19
11 & 12
6 &   6
21 to 22
16 to 19
Hoare, J. H  �� ���� <���
' 40 to 44,
'.'. u t0 1S-
"                 " 17 to 21,
" 19 to 28.
44,
20   to  22.
2   lo     II,
Lot.  28  to 82,   Block  3,   Lots  43 to
22 to
5 to
8  to
19 to 23,
1 to 6.
3.
33 to 37.
22 and 23,
18  to  21.
17 to 21,
20 to 22,
10 and 11.
4.
4,
8.
14.
16.
16,
20.
30.
34,
85,
38.
40.
44,
46.
61.
63.
66.
57.
84,
12 to
Block
32
40
51
58
67
20
43
49
72
8
4
14.80
32.4o
22.6o
21.oo
19.4o
21.8o
I8.00
19.8o
18.80
12.4o
23.4o
14.8o
6.60
13.4o
17.4o
12.4o
6.60
3.oo
$   .33   $ l.oo
l.oo
10 to   14,
18 to   22.
34 to   38,
38 to   42,
1 and 2.
12 to   16,
8 to
6  to
9 !to
15  to 19,
40 to 43,
29 to 36,
12 to 19,
38 to 42.
15  to 24,
9 And 10,
31  to 36,
17   to 19,
11
15
16
19
22
26
27
31
36
36
39
43
46
45
62
66
66
67
Lota    1 and   2,  Block 59.   Lots   7  to   11, Block   59
12.
45 to 48,
13 to 17,
1 to 4,
23 and 24.
17 to 21,
23 and 24,
1  to    4,
Bennett, Elizabeth-	
Mason, Henry	
Mason, William	
2.20 I Coraveau, G	
1 qq  Lindseth, Clara E   ������   stud (4,
���'0A Jackman,  W. T    ������   si to 33,
I20 Barber'"��� J  "   et. a,
1.60 I Barber, H. J. & Ogilvie, W. P	
9 as
Hatney, P. T. & Ogilvie W. P .---Lot" I3��nd 14, Block n
1.50
.43
.05
1.90
16.90
$ 1.00
$ 1.00
$ 1.00
1.00
l.oo
l.oo
1.00
1.00
l.oo
$  1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
7.43
2.40
11.
20 and 21.
1  to
10.
60,
62.
64,
67.
68.
71.
72.
74
19,
63,
63,
8.
49,
4,
88,
48,
K
2  to   14.
1.
24.
20 to   24,
23 llnd 24,
23 ami 24,
13 to   18.
62
"   10,
20
(, .   .  .  - -
i.     Lots     14,
Block
40
11.80
11.40
r..80
.45
1.00
1.211
.00
.110
.90
1.60
3.40
L60
Brown, E. N	
Gable, w. G	
Oxley, Thomas   II.
30,
16  to  19.
411.
02.
49,
18,
1.60
1.80
Bauer,W.A., Roberts,J.P.
     "    26  to 27,
Sub-division of E.  1-2 of Lot 104, Cassiar
District.    Plan N��. 797.
,& Filldley.J.BIockn 1. 2. 3, 4, 6. 6, 7. 8, t, ID,  II, 15, lO anil 17 $ 64.23
Sub-division  of  Lot 507, Cassiar District
I). A. Mcl'hatter Block 6 1 8
llutton,  (ioorge     "    11 !	
; Emerson,   E Lou 1 to 8, Hiock45 -  - .  -
"     "  10 to 12,     "  45
3.4o  Ward, Mrs.  C    "  It, "  46
2.20  Emotion,  E    " ��. " <6
2.2o |
3.4o  Hazelton, B. C, August 29, 1911
8.20
13.oo
11.80
13.00
l.oo      lo.oo
l.oo
.22      l.oo
l.oo
.22       l.oo
l.oo
8.7o
���8.92
9.4o
9.32
5.5o
C. W. HOMER,
Assessor and Collector,   Omineca Assessment District.
.33
.33
.33
.63
* 9.75
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Total
$22.33
15.8o
1.4o       l.oo       34.8o
.78       l.oo       24.38
.63       l.oo      21.63
l.oo      2o.4o
.33      l.oo      23.13
l.oo      19.33
l.oo       21.13
l.oo      2o.l3
1.00
13.4o
1.00
25.o3
1.00
15.8o
1.00
7.6o
1.00
14.4o
l.oo      18.4o
l.oo      13.4o
7.6o
4.oo
18.62
1.00
13.00
1.00
17.78
1.00
12.80
1.00
12.40
1.00
7.06
1.00
1.46
1.00
2.00
1.00
2.20
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.80
1.00
1.80
1.00
2.90
1.00
4.00
1.00
7.45
1.00
2.60
1.00
2.80
.45
t 1.00
��   1.46
.45
i.00
1.46
.72
1.00
1,72
.27
1.00
1.27
.30
1,00
1.30
.26
l.lll)
1.26
THie Oinmioeca Miner
Commercial Printing
in the latest approved style <\
THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1911
Why Buy a  Ready Made Mack
inaw Suit when you can buy a
Tailor-Made
Mackinaw
Suit at
Local and Personal
The beat Mnckinnw
manufactured
$14
Anger the Tailor
Hazelton, B. C.
A. Chisholm
General   Hardware
Builders'   Material
Miners'   Supplies
Hazelton, B. C.
Fifty-one Bunks of
Solid Comfort
Clean Beds, Clean Bunks,
Tobaccos, Cigars, Candies,
Nuts, Soft Drinks, Fruits in
Season, etc., etc.    ::   ::    ::
The Grand
Opposite   Hazelton   Hotel
Ferguson & Steele
Proprietors
II. Coppock lias disposed of his
livery stable to Harry Sykes.
Sixteen children are in attendance at the Hazelton public
school.
An.u'iis Beaton, who has been
down river for several days, returned on the Hazelton.
(1. Reid Mackay, paymaster for
Foley, Welch & Stewart, is the
father of a baby boy, born September 18.
Miss Morison and Miss O'Neill
arrived on the Inlander at noon
today, and will spend a few days
visiting friends.
The Glen mountain trail is being widened for use as a sleigh
road. George McBean is in
charge of the work.
J. F. Adams, of Winnipeg,
brother of J. Mason Adams, arrived on Monday, and will spend
the winter in Hazelton.
W. R. I'ou 1 ton came in from
PleasantValley early in the week.
He is making preparations for a
trip to the Peace River country.
Hay is reported to be selling
at $50 a ton in the Bulkley. One
fortunate rancher sold 200 tons
at that figure, paying for his
ranch in one season.
The employes of the Hudson's
, Bay Co. on Monday evening gave
;a dinner to H. Neergard, who
leaves the employ of the company to take a trip to Germany,
At a depth of 10 feet ore is
coming into the winze which is
being sunk 85 feet from the surface in the long tunnel on the
Babine Mining Co.'s group at
; Four mile.
The second service of the
j Church of England at New Hazelton was held in the church tent
last Sunday evening. There was
a good attendance. Rev. L. C.
Luckraft conducts the services in
New Hazelton and Sealey.
After part of this issue had
been printed, notice was received
of the postponement of the sale
of lands for unpaid taxes. The
sale will take place on Thursday,
Nov. 16, giving those who have
neglected to pay their land taxes
an opportunity to do so.
Citizens who wish to register
as voters have only a day or two
to get their names on the list, as
all applications must be posted in
the registrar's office in Prince
Rupert thirty days before November 1st, the day of revision.
Those who neglect this opportunity cannot be registered until
May, 1912.
A prospect shaft is being sunk
on the Queen vein on the Lead
King group. The vein dips at
40 degrees. The shaft, which is
making 2 feet a day, is now 25
feet deep, and shows ore all the
way. The vein is 3 1-2 feet wide,
and in the bottom of the shaft
carries 15 inches of galena on the
hanging wall and 14 inches on
the footwall. More or less galena
occurs in the balance of the vein.
J. C. K. Sealy returned on
Sunday from Bulkley valley. He
reports a splendid season in the
district, with large crops of hay,
grain and vegetables. In addition to a new house and two of
the largest hay sheds in the valley, Mr. Sealy has constructed
during the season four and a half
miles of fence, and his ranch
takes a leading position in the
matter of improvements. One
of his steers, brought in with the
southern cattle of the Burns company, outweighed any, tipping
the scales at 821 lbs.
((	
jtU_                                   Hazelton's Favorite Resort                                 |A
 ^
*f$ GALENA CLUB J\
b
f    |                 BOX BALL                  /
f       ���"      POOL AND BILLIARDS      J
\
Soda Fountain Equipped to serve Finest Ice Cream   Sodas,
Sundaes, etc., etc.
Our specialty is the best Confectionery,   including   unrivalled
Imported Chocolates.
Choicest Egyptian and other Imported Cigarettes     Fine Cigars.
Books, Magazines and Periodicals
[   D. J. McDougall                                                E. J
.Tate
 )J
Aeroplane Fatality
Elmira, N. Y., Sept. 22:���
Aviator Castellane met instant
death here today, in the presence
of his wife. t His machine careened and fell, Castellane being
buried in the wreckage.
The Quality of Our Printing Leaves Nothing To Be Desired
THE MINER PRINT SHOP
Opposite Government Office
IT was not established to fill "a long felt want." It was
only the desire of down-to-the-minute men, whom you all
know, to run an up-to-date plant of their own to produce
Commercial Printing and Advertising Matter of the better
sort. We can improve your printing and would be glad to
execute your next order.
OW prices are right-made on the cost finding system���a detailed account is kept of each job and when it is
finished we know the exact cost. Then a small percentage
of profit is added. 1 his is the only fair way���fair to ourselves and our customers.
Redmond'i Home Rule Idea
London, Sept. 21:���Continuous
government in Ireland according
to Irish ideas, carried out by
Irish ministers responsible to the
Irish people; servants of the
crown but not holding office at
the will of the parliament at
Westminster, is Redmond's latest
definition of Home Rule.
To Restore Manuel
Lisbon, Sept. 21:���The discovery of a formidable royalist plot
against the Portuguese republic,
has been followed here by wholesale arrests. Documents seized
implicate personal friends of ex-
King Manuel, who is said to be
encouraging the royalists from
his haven in England.
A reminder, we print
Letterheads, envelopes, cards, statements, billheads, posters,
circulars, booklets, p.ograms, invitations, wedding and society
stationery, etc.      If it is to be printed the Miner can do it.
A Donnybrook Fair
Sydney, Sept. 21:���As the climax of several days of obstruction by the labor party and opposition, members of the legislature
yesterday indulged in a free fight.
Four made a fistic onslaught on
the speaker and a general riot
followed. Police were required
to extricate the struggling members on the floor of the house. A
truce was finally declared. The
speaker was badly cut. A score
of the members sustained scalp
wounds.
Woman Would Practice Law
Vancouver, Sept. 22:���(Special
to the Miner) British Columbia
may have a woman lawyer, if
Justice Morrison so decides. The
formal application of Miss Mabel
French to be allowed to practice
in the courts of B. C. will be
heard by him next week. Miss
French is a member of the bar of
New Brunswick. The counsel
for the law society says she must
apply to the local legislature for
a special act in order to practice
in this province.
1
HARVEY & McKlNNON
Real Estate
and Mines
i#
Hazelton, B. C.
$ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^M s
saved by prompt closing of her
collision doors. Over three
thousand were on board.
Passengers and crew were all
unharmed. The damaged cruiser was able to reach Portsmouth.
IF
Live* With Pierced Brain
On Sunday last a Montenegrin
named Widat Wiganovich, employed on railroad construction
at Paget's camp, through carelessness oi' ignorance, tamped a
loaded hole with an iron rod.
The detonator and dynamite intended to explode the black
powder charge were discharged,
driving the rod through the unfortunate man's brain. As others
rushed to pick him up the black
powder exploded, inflicting slight
injuries to one or two of them.
Wiganovich was taken to the
hospital, where he was still living last night, though growing
weaker. For a person injured
in such a manner to survive
for five days is considered remarkable by the physicians.
DRY LUMBER
Ready ror Building in the
New Town
V
Get prices from us before you build in New Hazelton.       We
are ready with the goods
Interior Lumber Company
Hazelton
J
Our Fall Stock of Boys' and Children's
Suits
Olympic in Collision
Southampton, Sept. 21:���The
White Star liner Olympic, the
largest passenger vessel afloat,
collided with the British cruiser
Hawke off the Isle of Wight,
while en route to New York.
The big vessel returned safely to
Southampton with a great hole in
her   starboard quarter,    being
LAND NOTICE
Omineca Land District���District of
Coast, Range V.
Take notice that Hugh McKay, of
Hazelton, B. C, contractor intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of Lot 913, Coast
Range V, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement and containing 320 acres
more or less. Hugh McKay.
August 21, 1911.
in pretty patterns of warm Tweeds and Serges, embraces some
of the best values that have ever been offered to the public.
We wish specially to draw attention to the quality of the
material, the style and finish of every garment
Quality, Style and Value
R. Cunningham & Son. Ltd.
Hazelton
Ls
U
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE la hereby iriven that the reserve existing on vacant lancla of the Crown, notice of which
waB published in the British Columbia Gazette in the
issue of May 6th, 1910, and bearinK date of
May 6th, 1910, is cancelled in so far as the
same relates to the lands surveyed as Lots ��117.
2318. 2319, 2320, 2321, 2322. 2323, 2324, 2326, 2826,
2827, 2329, 2330, 2831, 2332, 2334, 2136, 2330. 2337,
2389. 2341, 2342, 2343, 2347, 2348, 2348*, 2319. 2350,
2368, 2369. 2408, 3113, 3114, 3115, 3110, 3117.3118,3119,
8120, 8121, 8122, 3123, 3124, 3125, 3126,3127,3128,3129,
3180, 3131, 3132, 3133, 3134, 3185. 3136 3137, 8138. 3139,
8140. 3141, 3142, 3142a, 3143, 3144. 3146, 3146, 3147,
3148, 3148a, 8149, 3160, 3151, 8162, 3153, 3164, 3155.
8166, 3157, 8168, 3159, 3160, 3161, 3162, 3163,3164, 3165.
3166, 3167. 8168, 3169, 3170, 8171, 3172,3173,3174, 3176,
3176, 3177, 3178, 8179, 3184, 8187,3187 and 3188, Range
6, Coast District. ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of LandB.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, Ant". 16, 1911. n-30
bash and Door Factory
Hazelton's New Industry
Full stock of all kinds and sizes of Window
Sash, Doors, Office Fixtures, Interior Finishings
on hand or Made to Order.
Large stock of Lumber and Building Materials, Tinsmithing, Plumbing and Steamfitting.
Job and Shop Work a Specialty.
Plans and Specifications.
Stephenson & Crum
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS
Hazelton
I
if
J
I
Ik
, )
l, .;V, .Wt~��~-

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ominecaminer.1-0211839/manifest

Comment

Related Items