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Omineca Miner Jan 23, 1915

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 THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. IV, NO. 21
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, JANUARY 23, 1915
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
HAZELTON STILL WINNING
On Wednesday night at the
local arena the Hazelton and
New Hazelton teams'met for the
second time this season. The
result was sixty minutes^of grand
hockey, unmarred by anythingfin
the nature of rough work or foul
play. The New Hazelton team
showed great improvement Tover
previous games,'"and the fact
that?!it !Jtooka'thirty-six minutes
of actuarplaying'time'before'the
first goal was scored by Al. McDougall shows the class'of hockey
played. This'was the only'goal
scored until six minutes of the
third period"had been]!*played,
when P. McDougall, on a short
pass from Kinghorn, again netted the puck for the locals. New
Hazelton came right back, however, and ofter some'nice stick-
handling, Roy McDonell notched
the first goal for his team in two
minutes. With the score 2-1,
the locals went out to increase
their lead, and after several attacks, during which Harris made
some splendid saves, Hume
slipped one through, which was
followed shortly after by another
by Percy McDougall. The score
stood this way until thirty seconds before the final whistle,
when McDonell lifted one from
centre ice that fooled Taylor,
making the final count 4-2. A
feature of the game was that not
one player was ruled off during
the entire game, and during the
first period, the game was only
called once, when the puck went
over the fence. The teams lined
up as follows:
HAZELTON NEW HAZELTON
Taylor goal      E. Harriis
Kinghorn      point       McDonell
Irwin cover Lavery
P. McDougall center    McKenzie
Hume 1. wing        Warner
A. McDougall r.wing    A. Harris
Referee: Duke Harris
Judge of play: McLeod
The Hazelton Hockey team,
with thirty-five supporters, made
a trip to Smithers last Saturday,
to play that team in their first
home game of the season. Although the Smithers team were
handicapped by lack of practice,
they put up a splendid exhibition
against the fast local team for
the first two periods, holding the
score to one all at the end of the
second. In the last session however, the Hazelton team played
their opponents to a standstill,
and when the final whistle blew,
had collected five more goals,
making the total score 6-1. Both
teams played fast, clean hockey,
only one penalty being handed
out and that for a minor offence.
P. McDougall, A. McDougall and
Hume did the scoring for Hazelton, and McFarlane scored Smith-
er's lone tally. The officials
handled the game splendidly, no
complaints being registered a-
gainst their decisions. Following
are the teams and officials:
Hazelton: Taylor, Irwin, Kinghorn, P. McDougall, Hume, A.
McDougall.
Smithers: Crandall, Morison,
Keddie, Jardine, McEwen, McFarlane.
Referee, Warner; Judge of
play, McLean; Goal judges, Fuller and Drummond; Tim keepers,
Wallace and Martin.
GERMAN AIRMEN STILL ACM
DROP BOMBS ON DUNKIRK-
GERMAN AUXILIARY SUNK
Rome, Jan. 23:���The German
offensive movementon theBzura-
Rawka line before Warsaw has
been definitely repulsed, says a
despatch from Messagero. The
German armored autos which
made an attack on the Russian
left wing on Rawka were destroyed after sharp action.
Geneva:���The Russian government has placed an order with
Swiss firms for medical requisites
and drugs worth a million
crowns. AH Rumanians, mostly
students, have left Switzerland.
Those from Germany and France
continue to arrive at Buchs, on
the Swiss frontier, bound for
Bucharest.
London, Jan. 23:���A despatch
to the Exchange Telegraph company from Copenhagen says:���
"The mine peril in the Baltic Sea
is spreading. In addition to the
loss of the Swiss steamer Drott,
which struck a mine off Raumo,
Finland, on Thursday and sank,
with the loss of six men, the
steamer Apus is supposed to have
met the same fate, with the loss
of twelve of her crew. It is
feared the steamer Hammar is
also lost, either in rough water
or by hitting a mine."
Paris. Jan. 23:���A semi-official
note says a number of German
aviators attacked Dunkirk today,
throwing   eighty   bombs.     The
victims numbered twenty, six of
whom are dead. A large warehouse was set afire by one of the
bombs. The French and British
aviators, who chased the German aeroplanes, brought one
down at Bay-Dunes on the Belgian frontier. Its two occupants
were made prisoners.
London:���A Melbourne despatch to Reuter's Telegram company, states that an Australian
cruiser captured and sank a supply ship, which had been acting
as an auxiliary for German cruisers. The officers and men of the
German ship are now prisoners
aboard the cruiser.
STORY OF THE GREAT WAR TOLD DAY BY DAY
Petrograd, Jan 18:���Official
communication���In the region of
Kara-Urgan, the fighting is developing, with the advantage
resting with our troops. In a
bayonet attack we annihilated
the'fifty-second.Turkish'regiment
the survivors of which, including
the commander and several officers, were made prisoners.
In one direction, where we
were pursuing the defeated Turkish troops, we took more than
5,000 prisoners, 14 cannon, an
enormous quantity of supplies,
and nearly 10,000 head of cattle.
Petrograd:���The following report has been received from Tif-
lis:���The army of Caucasus has
covered its flags with glory by a
fresh heroic exploit, having completely annihilated the Eleventh
Turkish army corps, with the
exception of several insignificant
elements, which are fleeing in
disorder. We have captured all
the artillery of this corps.
Paris, Jan. 18:���Official statement���There is nothing to report. From Argonne to Vosges
there have been snowfalls. We |
have continued to progress in the
region of Nieuportand Lombaert-
zyde, along a depression about
200 yards in length. Our artillery have forced the Germans to
evacuate their trenches in a
great dutje, destroyed Roudan,
which lies to the north of the latter, and bombarded the enemy's
works in this part of the battle-
front and to the south of St.
Georges. In the region of Ypres,
as in that of La Basseeand Lens,
there have been artillery engagements. At Blangy, action has
been vigorously maintained. The
Germans captured a foundry at
Blangy. which was soon re captured by our forces, after an
energetic counter-attack.
We have maintained our position
there.   Our artillery continues to
demolish the enemy's trenches
near La Boisselle. In the region
of Soissons there is nothing to
report. Between Vailley and
Caronne, the enemy delivered
without success, an attack near
the sugar refinery of Tryon. and
another against our trenches at
Beaulme, being repulsed on both
occasions. In the region of
Perthesand Beausejour, our progress continues in spite of a violent storm.
Paris (official communication),
Jan, 19:���Following the blowing
up of an ammunition depot,
caused by a bursting shell, that
part of the village of La Boiselle
(about twenty miles northeast
of Amiens) occupied by our
troops was burned, and we
were compelled to evacuate it.
The evacuated territory was recaptured by us, in a vigorous
counter-attack on the morning
of the 18th.
The enemy bombarded St.
Paul, near Soissons. In the
Champagne district, German
aeroplanes have flown over our
positions. They were received
by our cannon and machine guns
and two were brought to the
ground, inside our lines, near
Bar-le-Duc. The aeroplanes were
slightly damaged and the aviators in them were made prisoners. In Argonne, some desultory
cannon and rifle fire has taken
place. From Argonne to Vosges
snowstorms prevail.
Petrograd. Jan. 19:���The German force before Warsaw is
greatly weakened by the withdrawal of troops to protect its
rear from an attack by the Russian army north of the Vistula.
This army is sweeping all before it in its advance to the border of East Prussia. The Russians have advanced past Pzeln-
racz, seventeen miles west of
Plock,   and   hold the  territory
along a line  reaching from Vistula to the border on the north.
Petrograd:���Statement of the
general staff, Russian army in
Caucasus:���We continue to pursue the Turkish army which was
beaten by us at Kara-Urgan. A
stubborn battle took place atJen-
ikio, which lasted two days. We
defeated part of the 32nd Turkish division, which retreated
precipitately, suffering heavy
losses in men killed and prisoners, and leaving behind two machine guns and the baggage of
the officers. In one single charge
of a regiment of Siberian Cossacks, the enemy lost 300 men.
On the other fronts only unimportant engagements have
taken place. The correspondents
with the Russian army in Caucasus send their newspapers
stories of the terrible plight of
the retreating Turks, after the
defeat of the Eleventh Turkish
Corps in the Kara-Urgan region.
They recount that large numbers of prisoners, taken through
capture, were without victualling
transports, which left the regiments concerned no alternative
but starvation or surrender. The
rear guards, which attempted to
cover the Turkish retreat on
Erzerum, have been virtually
destroyed. A few disorganized
remnants of the army are said to
be fleeing in the direction of
Erzerum, flinging artillery and
stores over precipices, or burying
them under the snow.
Amid snowstorms, which obliterated every feature of the
roads, the Russians are reported
to have pressed relentlessly upon their beaten foes. In one
stretch of woods, the Russians
found the bodies of 9,000 Turks,
who had frozen to death. They
still grasped their rifles. It is
rumored that the Turks, despairing of holding Erzerum fortress,
(Continued on Page Pour)
LOCAL NEWS PARAGRAPHS
"Buck" Irwin left for Prince
Rupert Thursday morning.
R. S. Sargent is expected to
return from Victoria tonight.
J. F. Pooler and A. D. McPhad-
en of Prince Rupert, arrived on
Saturday's train.
Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Allen of
Prince Rupert spent the past
week in Hazelton.
Judge Young, who bas been
'holding County Court here, left
for the coast Sunday.
T. G. Wall, representing the
McClary Mfg. Co.. spent the first
part of the week in town.
Archie McDougall, Alex McDonald and Rill Watson left on
Sunday for Alaskan points.
S. H. Hoskins left for Smithers
Wednesday night to hold a small
debts court, returning Thursday
morning.
W. S. Mpnnie. manacrer of the
Hudson's Ray post at Rabine, is
in Ha7Plon on a business visit,
and will leave for Babine on Monday.
Miss Mav Lindahl, of Blaine,
Wash., who has many friends in
the district, is spending a few
weeks with Mr. and Mrs. J, E.
Kirky.
Chief of Police Minty left for
Fort Fraser Wednesday night to
meet Inspector Owens, and will
accompany the inspector over
this district.
E. F. W, Heath, who is connected with the Forestry Department at Fort George, is spending
a few days in town. He is returning to Fort George from
Victoria.
On Thursday, in a City league
game, the Greys defeated the
Red by 3-2. The next game is
called for Jan. 28, between the
Reds and Blues.
Hospital Annual Meeting
The Annual Meeting of the
Hazelton Hospital will be held on
Thursday of next week, the 28th
inst, at the Hospital,
The staff and management of
the Hospital hope that the many
friends who assisted in obtaining
the X-ray Apparatus and Electric
plant will take this apportunity
of seeing it, now that everything
is in working order.
New Year't Dance
The Citizens of Hazelton are
cordially invited to attend the
Annual New Year's dance given
by the Merchants of New Hazelton in the assembly hall, New
Hazelton, Friday evening, Jan.
29th. Dancing will commence
at 8:30 sharp.
W. A.
The sewing party in aid of the
Belgium Fund wiil be held at
Mrs. Sealy's house on Thursday
afternoon next, Jan. 28, at 3
o'clock. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 23, 1915
e umimeca
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $2.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 20 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazette rates.
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The Favorite    CARP FISTF <J      We Lead""
Shopping place   gjgjUUjjjj  J   Others Follow
MINERS' PROSPECTORS' and SETTLERS' SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY
Vol. IV.
Saturday, January 23, 1915.
No. 21
The Hon. W. J. Bowser, the Attorney-General of British Columbia, has just made public figures which give a striking picture
of the agricultural development of that province, particularly in
the districts opened up by the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway.
Before the railroads in British Columbia were built, he says, the
Government withdrew from the market many large tracts of
agricultural land. Following the reservation of these lands, they
were surveyed so that the pre-emptor could go in and select his
land without danger of rival and interlapping claims which had
caused confusion where there had been no surveys.
This had been done along the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific
and in the last two years there had been filed at the land offices at
Prince George, Fort Fraser, Hazelton and Prince Rupert no less
than 3,643 pre-emption records in the land so reserved, which was
four times the number of pre-emptions recorded in the whole of
the province five years ago.
There were other thousands of acres of land waiting for the
settler, surveyed and still under reserve, In four years the government had surveyed for settlement no less than 3,789,372 acres,
and the total amount of land surveyed and ready for the pre-emptor
and the pre-emptor alone amounted to 91,128,567 acres. One-third
of the total area of land under cultivation in the Dominion of Canada, he said, was only 3P,000,000 acres, and yet in British Columbia
the Government had provided three times that area and it stood
ready for the pre-emptor today.���Journal.
In a statement covering the
activities of the Province during
1914, the Premier, Sir Richard
McBride, summarizes the developments in part:
"Taking up the natural industries of the Province and dealing
with the production of mines, I
find the estimated output for last
year is nearly $26,000,000, as a-
gainst a little over $30,000,000 in
1913, or about 15 per cent decrease. It must be remembered
however, that the average market prices of metals were much
lower in 1914 than in 1913, which
accounts for about $1,250,000 of
the decrease. The first six
months showed a greater production than ever before during a
similar period, and promised to
be a record breaker. The war
had the effect of reducing the
output and the closing of smelters
for a time, and consequently
affecting the output of coal.
Recently, as a result of readjustment to new conditions, mining
and smelting have been resumed
and we find that in Rossland, the
. Boundary and the Slocan there is
less unemployment than in most
other parts of the Province. In
this connection, let me say that
the dividends of the mining
companies  of  the   Province   in
1914, notwithstanding the war,
have been $1,690,000, as against
nearly $2,400,000 in 1913 and
$465,000 in excess of what they
were in 1912, This, to me, is a
re narkable showing under the
cirotm tances.
Under normal conditions the
industries of Germany consume
about l,000,000,000-~pounds of
cotton a year.
Explorations within recent
years have indicated that China
has coal fields containing more
fuel than all the rest of the world
combined.
s^&mm^
Synopsis of  Coal Mining Regulations.
(^OAL mining rights of the Dominion,
'-' in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and
Alherta, the Yukon Territory, the
Northwest Territories and ih a portion
of the Province of British Columbia,
may he leased for a term of twenty-one
years at an annual rental of $1 an
acre. Not more than 2,,r)(it) acres^will
be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must'he'made
by the applicant In person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district in which
the rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory Jthetland must
be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for shall be
staked out by the applicant'himself.
Each application must beaccompani-
ed by a fee of $5, which will be refunded if the rights applied for are not
available, but not otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable
output of the mine at the rate of five
cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the
royalty thereon. If the coal mining
rights are not being operated, such
returns should be furnished at least
once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at
the rate of $ 10.00 an acre.
For full information application
should be made to the Secretary of the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa,
or to any Agent or Sub-Agent of
Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B.-Unauthorized publication of
this advertisement will not be paid for.
-58782.
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CHEER UP
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Hazelton is still on the Map
We have the Goods and
OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT
Some Broken lines of FELT
FOOTWEAR now selling
at greatly reduced  prices
General       D    C    CADfTNT     Hazelton
B.C.
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GOOD MORNING!
We   Are  Introducing
American Silk
American Cashmere
American Colton-Lisle
HOSIERY
They have stood the teat. Give
real foot comfort. No seams to
rip. Never become loose or baggy. The shape is knit in���not
pressed in.
GUARANTEED for fineness,
style, superiority of material and
workmanship. Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6months without
holes, or new ones free.
OUR SPECIAL OFFER
to every one sending us $1.00 in
currency or postal note, to cover
advertising and shippingjeharges,
we   will   send   post-paid,   with
written guarantee, backed by a
five million dollar company, either
3 Pairs of our 75c value
American Silk Hosiery,
or      4 Pairs of our 50c value
American Cashmere Hosiery
or     4 Pairs of our 50c value
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery,
or      6 Fairs of Children's Hosiery
Give the color, size, and wether Ladies' or Gent's hosiery is
desired.
DON'T DELAY-Offerexpires
when a dealer in your locality is
selected.
THE INTERNATIONAL HOSIERY CO.
P.O. Box 244
DAYTON. OHIO, U.S.A.
0��-��~ -
-~o
DRY GOODS
MEN'S FURNISHINGS
HARDWARE       GROCERIES
C. V. SMITH
HAZELTON
GXP. Steamers Prince Georgeand PrinceJohn,for
Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle
Steamer "Prince George" leaves Prince Rupert at 9
a.m. every Friday.        Steamer "Prince John" leaves
Prince  Rupert, 7 p.m. Sunday, Jan.   3,  17, 81,  etc.
Reservations  and  through  tickets  may be obtained from any G.T. P.
Agent or from Train Agent.
G T P   Railway   .Wc8tDound tra>n leaves Hazelton at 11.07 a,i
vs. s.s. naiinav���Thursdays and Sundays, connecting with abo
,m,
j above
steamers for the south.
Eastbound train leaves Hazelton at B.41 p.m. Wednesdays and Saturdays, for Edmonton, Winnipeg, etc, connecting with trains for St. Paul,
Chicago, etc. - - For Toronto, Montreal, Buffalo, etc., use the
GRAND    TRUNK    SYSTEM,    the    DOUBLE   -   TRACK     ROUTE
For full information regarding the ab>ve services, also thiough tickets,
reservations, etc, apply to Local Agent, or to
ALBERT DAVIDSON.     GENERAL AGENT,    PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
Agency for all Atlantic Steamship Lines        ~ ������
(F
~'*\
Bulkley Valley Farm
Lands For Sale
These Lands are close to the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, which is now running trains through the
Bulkley Valley. There is a ready local market for all produce. Land prices are reasonable. Terms are easy.
Write for full particulars to
NORTH COAST LAND COMPANY, Lti
Suite 622 Metropolitan Building
f.u up c.pit.1 $1,500,000. VANCOUVER, B. C. THE OMINEGA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 23, 1915
The World's Doings in Brief
News Note* from Many Sources
Queen Victoria of Spain is confined to her apartments with
scarlet fever.
The total dividends paid by
British Columbia mines for 1914
amounted to $1,689,307.
Advices received in Switzerland from Germany state that
copper, owing to the great demand and limited supply, is now
selling at $626 a ton.
Canned rabbitist he latest Antipodean delicacy being furnished
the Canadian Navy and they are
calling for more. The Navy Department is laying in an extra
supply secured from Australia.
The House of Representatives
at Washington, by a vote of 204
to 174 refused to submit to the
states an amendment to the Federal Constitution to enfranchise
women.
The sum of $2000 for the purchase of a motor ambulance for
the troops at the front has been
subscribed by the women of Alberta, on the basis of a 25c individual subscription.
The Lake of the Woods Milling
Co. has arranged to ship 100
tons of flour a month to New
Zealand and a similar amount to
Suva, Fiji. The shipments will
be made through Vancouver.
Four negroes, two of them
women, who clubbed a police
officer when he attempted to arrest one of their number, were
lynched by a mob of twenty
masked men at Monticello, Ga.
j An amendment to the Independence of Parliament Act is
, under consideration by the Gov-
. ernment at Ottawa, to overcome
the technical difficulty created by
the five members of parliament
wno have gone to the front.
The minister of militia has announced that Prince Rupert will
be one of the places for recruiting for the third contingent from
British Columbia. Subsequently,
the forces will be mobilized at
Vancouver, Victoria and New
Westminster.
Rudyard Kipling is to write
new war songs for the British
troops, to be set to old English
airs. This announcement was
made at a meeting held in London, to discuss means of providing recreations for Kitchener's
new army.
Work on the Provincial University is to be stopped, pending
the return of better financial
conditions. The announcement
was made by Sir Richard Mc-
Bride after a conference with
President Westbrook and the
board of governers.
Another conspiracy against the
Republican Government of China
and President Yuan Shai-Kai,
has been discovered and numerous arrests are being made in
Pekin. The plot, which is alleged
to have been hatched in Japan,
aimed to depose President Yuan
Shai-Kai.
The new" Hudson Bay railway
is now graded for 300 miles and
the rails 'laid for a distance of
200 miles. The grading to Port
Nelson will be finished next
summer, but the road will not be
completed for eighteen months.
Good headway is being made on
the Port Nelson terminals.
The revolutionary movement
in Hayti, headed by the leaders
of the government recently overturned by President Theodore, is
apparently finding support, Cape
Haytien has been attacked, and
reports have been received that
other points are up in arms.
According to a French officer,
German prisoners taken now are
devoid of brass buttons|and badges
and even to the points of the
famous helmets. The state has
ordered them to hand over every
thing containing copper to the
authorities, and also to search
abandoned houses for similar objects, however trifling.
That the last year has been a
bad one for the diamond trade
and the DeBeers Co. probably
will not pay its dividends at the
close of the financial year ending
June 30 next, was the statement
made by the chairman at the
annual meeting of the DeBeers
shareholders..
Arrangements for the purchase
of remount horses in this province have been completed by Lt.-
Col. A. 1). McRae, chief remount commissioner for the
Canadian government, according
to an announcement made by
Capt. F, H. Cunningham, remount purchasing agent of New
Westminster. Horses will be
purchased in Vancouver, Victoria, New Westminsterand Lad-
ner.
American Attitude   .
Chicago, Jan. 21:���The United
States is awakening to the fact
that it has incurred the enmity
of all the belligerent nations by
its attitude over the trade protest after ignoring the devastation of Belgium, the inhumanities to women and children, the
destruction of private property,
and the strewing of the merchant seas with mines. The Daily
News quoting its own correspondent says; ��� "The indictment
against us is that we abdicated
ignominiously, and rap away
when great questions of, morals
and humanity are concerned, but
promptly recovered our sense of
duty and courage when the state
of war threatened the profits of
the copper kings.
WILL NOT GO TO
FRONT FOR MONTH
London, Jan. 21: ��� Although
the intention of the' authorities
was to'send the. Canadian troops
to the" front this week,'a change
has been made in the plans and
' w Jl;
a delay of. at least a month is
probable.
The Fourth Infantry Brigade
of the "Canadian "contingent is
moving into barracks, the quarters at Salisbury having been condemned on account ol the epi-
demicfof meningitis.
Fifty-two'members'of the Can-
dian Scottish have secured commissions' SinX.British' Highland
regimentsorjin Kitchener's army.
SeveraPregi merits"1 "are'!now discouraging J transfers, "owing to
the difficulties'ofjfilling'the gaps.
PrivateTA.fB. Palmer";of Toronto is one of those promoted to
a lieutenancy in  the  new army.
Death Amongst Soldiers
Ottawa, Jan. 19: -To date,
there have been fifty-seven
deaths among the Canadian troops
at Salisbury, twenty-one from
meningitis, a number from pneumonia, several accidental deaths
and two suicides. With the removal of many troops from
swampy quarters it is expected
that the number of deaths will
decrease.
Canadian Patriotic Fund
Ottawa, Jan. 12:���Up to the
present time Hon. W. T. White,
who is honorary treasurer of the
Canadian patriotic fund, has received on account of contributions $2,316,318, and has disbursed $523,000 of this amount.
General Election
Dawson, Jan. 18:���Governor
George Black has announced
that he has decided to hold the
election of members to the Yukon
Legislature within a few weeks
and has appointed officers to revise the voters' lists. Several
candidates are in the field for
each of the five constituences.
The term of the old legislature
expires in May, and the next
session will be held in March.
The Miner is two dollars a year.
STEVENS
Repeating Shotguns
The Stevens Hammerless
costs no more than tome hammer guns.
It has the celebrated
STEVENS RECOIL UNLOCK
providing safety against
"hang-tires."
HAMMERLESS
SOLID BREECH
Easy Take-Down
12 or 20 Gauge
EVERY GUN
GUARANTEED
J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co.
P. 0. Box 5006
Chloopoe Falli, Maaa,
S]iiiiiiiiiiiiQiiiiiiiiiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiiico]iiiiiiiiiiiito]iiiiiiiiiiiito]iiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiinico
j Hudson's Bay Company I
RYE WHISKEY:
Draught   .
Seagrams 83    .
Corby's    .
SCOTCH WHISKEY:
Draught   .
H. B. SPECIAL     .
Finest Old Highland
John Dewar's .
King George    .
O.O. .       .       .
PORT WINE
Old Duke
per gall,
per case
per case
per gall,
per case
per case
per case
per ease
per case
5.00
15.00
13.00
7.00
20 00
14.00
15.00
18.00
16.00
per case $ 15.00
3    We will sell you 6 bottles of assorted liquor at whole-case    I
=    rates.       .        .        .       Mail orders promptly attended to.    =
| HAZELTON, B. C. |
oiiiiiiiiiiiii��iiiiiiiiiiiico]iiiiiiiiiiiic3iiiiiiiiiiiiEoiiiiHiiiiiiico]iiiiiiiiiiiirjiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiimiiico
VI n_
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
11VFRY find *\TA fiFV We are Prepared to supply private
HVCiM atlU Ol/iUEiiJ and public conveyances day and
night.      Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
Best Dry Birch $7 a Cord.
Consign your shipments in Our
Care for Storage or Delivery.
Address all communications to Hazelton.
issisa
Ruddy & MacKay
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
<f=
V
CANADIAN  PACIFIC  RAILWAY
BRITISH COLUMBIA  COAST  STEAMSHIP SERVICE
S.S. "Princess Maquinna" leaves Prince Rupert every SUNDAY at 8 p.m.
Connecting with G. T. P. train arriving at 6.30 p.m. Sunday
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
Tickets to and from all parts of the world.     Atlantic and Pacific
Steamship Tickets
J. G. McNab,   Cor. 8rd Ave. and 4th St.,   Prince Rupert, B. C.
Jll-
On      mii-
-no>
���UQII-
Thorp & Hoops
Real Estate, Financial and Insurance Brokers
         ALDERMERE. B. C.	
I". Sole district agents for E. G. Prior & Co., Victoria, Agricultural Machinery and Implements, Wagons, Etc.
?   Fire,  Life,  Accident,  and Employer's Liability Insurance.
We represent the best companies.
5       We Can Locate You On a Good Pre-Emption Near tbe G. T. P.
I   If you desire information about the Bulkley Valley write us.
On���mi���.mi���mi���-non������ mi���-iiQh������ ml������ion���mi���-iiii���nn���-
MO
"Everything in Canvas"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
Princt Rupert. B.C.
Mines and  Mining
iood Properties for sale ��� Cash or on
Bond.       Development and
Assessment Work.
Carr Brothers
Eight Years In This District.
Hsmelton,  II. O.
The Miner is two dollars a vear.
Assay Office and Mining Office
Arts and Crafts Building, 57S Seymour Street
 VANCOUVER, B.C..	
J. O'SULLIVAN, F.C.S.
Provincial Assayer and Chemist
Assayer tor 26 years with Vivian & Sons, Swansea
Charges Moderate     ::    Correspondence 5slidted
HAZELTON HOSPITAL
for utiy period from ons month upward St II ysff
month in advance. This ruts includes uaTlc* <���(>���-
*ultatinnn and medicines, ss ivkII as all costs wails
in the hospital. Tickets obtainable in Hazsltoa
at the Post Office or the Dnia- Store; in Aldarmsre
from Mr. T. J. Thorp; In Telkwa from Dr. Wallacs;
or by mall from the Medical Superintendent at the
lloppiral.
ISHUKS
TIClBTf
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion and British Columbia
Land Surveyors
Offices atVicto.ia, Nelson, Fort George
and New Hazelton.
B. C. Affleck. Mgr.   New Haxelton.
LAND NOTICE.
Hazelton Land District. District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that James Scoging,
of Endako, occupation railroader, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted
South West corner of Lot 3178 Cassiar
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south, thence 40 chains west, thence 40
chains north, to point of commencement, containing 160 acres of land.
Nov. 26, 1914.       13-21   James Scoging
EXPERT
Watch Repairing
WATCHES   -   JEWELRY
O. A. RAGSTAD,    Smither��
Orders may be left at Noel Jr. Rock's, Hazelton
DENTISTRY
DR. BADGERO
Smithers, B.C.
-O
I
I
O
I
I
-o
Phone 300 P.O. Box 1636
HARRISON W. ROGERS
ARCHITECT
Special Atfcntion to Out of Town Clients
Suite One. Federal Block,
PRINCE RUPERT. B. C.
Harold Price
J. R. Graham
PRICE & GRAHAM
B.C. Land Surveyors
and Civil Engineers
HAZELTON   AND  SMITHERS
London Building
British Columbia
Vancouver THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 23, 1915
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
(Continued from I'age One)
are removing the  new  German
artillery recently mounted there.
London. Jan. 20: -German aircraft made their long-threatened
raid on England last night and
attempted to blow up with
bombs the King's residence at
Sandringham, in the county of
Norfolk. This intention was ill-
timed, for King George and
Queen Mary, with the royal family, who have been staying at
Sandringham, had returned to
London yesterday morning, to
Buckingham Palace. It is not
definitely known whether the
raiders were Zeppelins or aeroplanes, but Zeppelins were reported yesterday passing over
the North Sea in a westerly direction.
The night was calm, but very
dark and cloudv. The whir of
propellers and the droning of
motors could be distinctly heard.
A Zeppelin is reported to have
been brought down by a warship at Hunstanton, a few miles
north of Sandringham.
Bombs were dropped at Yarmouth, Kings Lynn, Sandringham, Cromer, Shearingham, and
Briston, and everywhere but
Briston, casualties and damage
to property resulted. The first
place visited was the well known
seaside resort and fishing town
of Yarmouth, where the people1^
were taken completely by surprise at the sudden visit. Two
persons, a man and woman were
killed, and a number of other
persons were injured, and much
damage to property was done by
the raiders in their visit, which
lasted   less  than  ten   minutes.
Lorette. northwest of Arras, a
French trench, two hundred
yards long was captured. In
the Argonne district, the German troops occupied a few
trenches. In one place, the
ground gained in the last few
clays was five hundred yards.
In Alsace, north of Cernay. the
German attack made good progress. Aitzstein has been taken
by the Germans, who captured
two officprs and forty men. The
situation in the western arena
remains unchanged.
Constantinople: During anight
attack on the English forts at
Shatt-ell-Rab river, the British
were taken by surprise and lost
one hundred in killed and wounded. An English cavalry division
attempted a surprise on a Turkish
cavalry division near Kurna, advancing under the protecting
fire of a gunboat, but the English
suffered heavy losses and the
gunboat withdrew.
Copenhagen:���Albert Ballin,
director-general of the Hamburg-
American line, has taken over
the management of the entire
railroad system of Germany, and
the delivering of food supplies to
the army.
Mont Beliard, France:���A second earthquake shock occurred at
I eleven o'clock last night. People
were shaken out of their beds
and crockery was smashed.
Lausanne:���A slight earthquake occurred at Berne and
Zurich last night.
Amsterdam, Jan. 21:���The
Germans continue to remove their
big guns from Ostend to Heyst.
Two 28 centimetre guns were
Four or five bombs were dropped '��� transferred Sunday to the coast
in Yarmouth. j near Heyst.     These changes are
All lights were extinguished, 'taken to indicate that in case the
and other precautionary meas-j Allies advance along the roast,
ures were taken to safeguard the. no defence will be attempted in
populace. Little evidence of j the present position before Os-
panic was seen in the raid near j tend, but that the Germans will
Yarmouth.   Apparently the raid-; fall back nearly to the border of
era, after visiting Yarmouth,
proceeded to Cromer, where they
also dropped bombs, and thence
westtoShearingham and Briston.
Then turning inland, they made
for Sandringham, dropping explosive missiles there and at
Kings Lynn, where a boy was
killed, a man, woman and child
injured, and twohouses destroyed
It is reporLed that from five to
seven bombs were dropped at
Kings Lynn. The damage at
Sandringham is not reported.
The royal palace, however, escaped. At Spt'ingham, a bomb
penetrated a house, but did not
explode.
Reports reaching London are
to the effect that a squadron of
six Zeppelins crossed over the
North Sea and on reaching the
coast line separated, some taking
a southerly direction, and others
the opposite course. These reports are not confirmed. The
above towns are all in the county
of Norfolk, which abuts on the
North Sea, about 150 miles
northeast of London.
London:���The German airship
raid on the English coast towns
last night resulted in four or
five deaths, injury to several persons and considerable property
damage. The Germans apparently escaped unscathed.
Berlin, Jan. 20���Today's official statement says that between
the sea and Lys, nothing more
than artillery exchanges have
taken place.   At Notre Dame de
Holland
London, Jan. 2]:���A Bucharest
despatch to the Daily Mail, describing the Russian invasion of
Hungary, says: "During the
night of January 16 the Russian
force, decending from Funoul
Moldwi, in the southwest corner
of Bukowina, passed over Mount
Colacul and advanced as far as
Czkaneschtie, near Jacobini,
where the Austrian artillery was
massed. These troops were supported by two other columns and
their front ran through Czkaneschtie, Jacobini and Pitni. To
avoid being surrounded, the Austrians retreated toward Jacobini.
Fighting continued night and
day during Sunday and Monday
and is still proceeding."
Petrograd, Jan. 20: ���Official
statement���"There is nothing of
importance to report on the operations of Jan. 19 along our entire front except the usual rifle
lire and cannonading. In the
region north of Rawa, the Germans made two partial offensive
attempts. These were stopped
by our fire and the enemy were
compelled to fall back. During
the evening of Jan. 18, Germans
in the region of the village of
Vitkoritze (on the left bank of
the Bzura) made an attack on
the head of the bridge under the
glare of searchlight, rockets and
straw, which had been set on
fire at a distance of three hundred paces. This attack was repulsed by the efficient fire of our
artillery.
The same evening in western
Galicia, the Germans, after cannonading heavily our positions,
south of the small town of Rad-
loff and setting on fire two villages behind our positions, made
an attack on them. Compact
detachments of the enemy reach-
edour barbed wire entanglements
but our destructive fire prevented
further progress. They suffered
heavy losses and were compelled
to fall back on their position.
In Bukowina our troops are advancing with success. They
have occupied, after some fighting, the village of Ichaneschti,
about ten miles north of Watra-
dorna, where they captured and
made prisoners, both officers and
mm.
London. Jan. 22:���TheRussians
are unfolding a new plan of campaign, says the Daily Telegraph's
Warsaw correspondent, and within a month a fresh offensive
movement will develop. It will
not be trench fighting, but the
operations will be particularly
suited to the composition of the
Russian army, cavalry bearing I work
| an important share. The new
Jplan contemplates operations extending over at least six months.
London: ���lelegraphing from
Bucharest, the Daily Mail's correspondent says, "Strong forces
of Hungarian troops are proceeding to the Bukowina frontier by
way of Bistritz, to arrest the
Russian invasion."
The Bucharest correspondent
of the Times telegraphs that the
German contingent in the new
army formed to invade Servia, is
said there to number 80.000 men.
This force is well equipped with
siege artillery.
Athletic Dance
The pound dance, held under
the auspices of the Athletic Association, on Wednesday night,
was well attended, although
dancing did not commence till
midnight. A number from New
Hazelton stayed over from the
hockey game, and the official
weighing caused much amusement.
An Appointment
Montreal, Jan. 23:���A cable
from London to the Star says:
"It is announced here, although
no official confirmation is, so far,
forthcoming, that Sir Max Aitken
has been appointed to the position of official reporter to the
Canadian forces."
"Sir Max," the despatch says,
"will begin work at the camp at
Salisbury Plain, issuing statements for publication as to the
of  the   Canadian   troops
"He will also issue official reports upon the operations of the
Canadian troops when they get
into action at the front. It is
not known, however, whether he
will accompany them to the continent or remain here."
Just Arrived
-���
i
FOR
FALL AND
WEAR
WINTER
1 A
League Standing
Won Lost
Hazelton 4 0
New Hazelton 1 2
Smithers 0 3
The Miner is two dollars a year.
SPLENDID ASSORT-
ment of the celebrated
JAEGER UNDERWEAR,
SOCKS, SWEATER COATS
VESTS, PAJAMAS, etc.
These goods require no recommendation. They are
the best manufactured in
England. 	
you have not inspected
our HOBBERLIN samples for Fall andJWinterTail-
ored Clothing, you cannot
realize how nobby they are.
NOEL & ROCK
Hazelton, B. C.
F
| The Up-To-Date
j     Drug Store
I For NYAL'S REMEDIES
From
VICTROLAS
$20.00   to   $52.00
Latest Records
HAZELTON���NEW HAZELTON  A
The Miner is two dollars a year
to any address in Canada; to
United States, three dollars.
 "" tf
f
R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd.
PORT ESSINGTON           Established 1870                 HAZELTON
SHIPMENT OF CROCKERY
^ You cannot help being pleased with  the
Crockery as represented in this new shipment
to hand.   New and staple patterns and designs.
Porcelain : Semi-Porcelain : China
^ The  stock is so  graded  as to allow any
quantity in any particular line being purchased.
^ A shipment of  Noel's Jams,  Marmalade,
Chutney and preserved whole Fruit on sale.
^ A  shipment of Wagstaff's and  C. & B.
Jams and Jellies.    These three offer the best.
FRESH FRUITS EVERY WEEK
Fresh Vancouver Eggs    :    :    per dozen 50c
R. Cunningham & Son, Limited
.ffir^y^Kyyyyyyyyy^

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