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Omineca Miner Sep 23, 1916

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 CI     ,<^.s^~~
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THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
o
mer
VOL. VI, NO. 4
HAZELTON. B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1916
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
AMONG THE MINING MEN
News   Of   Development   From
Various Properties in Hazelton District
By a deal which is being closed
today.the well-known Owen Lake
group,controlled by Harris Bros.,
will be acquired by F. H. Dakin,
representing New York capitalists. Work is to be commenced
without delay. Mr. Dakin is
much taken with the district.
y Jack Mullan and Jim Beaman
have returned to Manson creek,
to resume work on the Steele-
Mullan property. The old channel, which has yielded considerable gold this season���$2200 was
taken out in 18 days���was reached by tunneling 760 feet. At the
Hospital, W. B. Steele is rapidly
recovering from the attack of
rheumatism  which incapacitated
him.
��
The long tunnel on the Rocher
de Boule is reported in 1000 feet,
and is expected to tap the ore
very soon.
On the Amargosa group, E. P.
Spalding has new camps under
construction.
Ben Peterson and Fred Griffin
yesterday brought in some very
high grade copper ore from the
Copper King group,on the Telkwa
river. On the three claims comprising the group there is a ledge
15 feet in width, carrying a good
proportion of the red metal.
Alexander Sharp, M. E., who
was here during the fair, said the
display of ore was the finest he
had seen.
Joseph Briand, who was here
from Burns Lake the other day,
says there is a 40-foot lead of
quartz,carrying considerable copper, on the Mountain Glory group,
two miles south of the east end
of Babine lake. He hopes to secure capital for exploration by
means of a diamond drill.
Concentrator Proposed
W. G. Norrie, superintendent
of the Silver Standard, accompanied by Hugh Harris, made an
inspection of a number of properties on Nine-mile mountain. Mr.
Harris states that the examination was made in connection with
a project for the installation of a
concentrator to handle the ores
of that section of the damp.
No definite plans have been
made, but it is understood the
matter is receiving careful consideration by interested mining
men. Power may be obtained
from Salmon river.
Railroaders in Khaki
The railroaders' battalion commanded by Jack Stewart is attracting many fine recruits from
this and other districts. Among
the latest to join the corps are
the following well-known men,
who left Smithers on Sunday:
James A. Macdonald, J. A. McDonald, H. E. Wallace, Harry
Smith, Peter Graham, George
McKenzie, Jack Henry and Jack
Preece.
CANADIANS DRIVE HUNS
ALLIES AGAIN PRESS SOMME OFFENSIVE-
HINDENBURG TRYING TO BREAK RUSSIAN LINE
Ottawa: The Canadian representative at the front has cabled:
"The Canadian troops who are
actively participating in the battle
of the Somme, in a series of
brilliant attacks forced the Germans back over a mile beyond
their original lines and captured
1200 prisoners. Vancouver units
were prominent. His Majesty's
landship Creme de Mentha led a
fleet of tanks in the action, doing
deadly execution."
London: On the Somme front
the Allies are again on the offensive. Haig's men made progress
in the direction of Bapaume, advancing on a front of about a
mile, south of the Ancre river.
Our front now runs in an approximately direct iine north o f
Flers and Martinpuich.
Raiding parties entered German trenches south of Arras,
taking prisoners and inflicting
many casualties.
The number of prisoners taken
by the French and British on the
Somme front between July 1 and
Sept. 16 is over 55,800.
Paris: German infantry, advancing in waves, made renewed
efforts yesterday morning to beat
back the French from the positions recently captured north of
the Sommei The attacks were
broken by French artillery before
the Germans could reach the
French lines, compelling them to
retire to their own trenches.after
sustaining heavy losses. Attacks
by Germans in strong force were
centered on the French positions
between Lepriez farm and Rau-
court.
General Foch's forces have begun an effort to eject the enemy
from Combles salient.
Petrograd: Fierce fighting continues in Galicia where Hindenburg is making a tremendous
effort to pierce the Russian lines.
So far he has failed. Quiet prevails in the Caucasus.
London:     German, Bulgarian,
and Turkish troops, under Von
Mackensen, have stopped their
retreat in Dobrudja, and are fortifying their positions.
The Bulgarian attack on Zborski
was checked by the Allies.
French and Servian troops operating in western Macedonia
have scored new successes. The
Servians continue to advance on
the Broda river and have reached
Urbania.
Along the British front in the
Doiran region an artillery duel
of increasing intensity is in progress.
British warships bombarded
Bulgarian positions near Nechari.
HAZELTONJSTRICT FIRST
Our Ore Exhibit Wins in Competition at Prince
Rupert
Amsterdam : Constantihe's
authority over Greece is almost
gone. Venizelos will soon be
supreme. A conspiracy to kill
the latter has been discovered.
Two lines of trenches have been
constructed around Constantine's
palace, which is guarded by large
forces.
Third in Agriculture
At Prince Rupert exhibition
this week there was much competition in the agricultural classes,
especial interest attaching to the
district exhibits of field and garden produce. In ihis section
Hazelton was awarded third place
although the exhibit,hastily made
up at the conclusion of the local
fair, could not be shown at its
best. The local exhibitors will
do better next year.
Secretary Martin was obliged
to leave for Prince Rupert on
Sunday.in charge of the Hazelton
exhibits, so that work on the
prize list of the local fair had to
be postponed, and The Miner is
unable to print the list of awards
at Hazelton until next week.
W.A. TO GIVE TEA
FOR SOLDIERS' AID
Visited Rupert Fair
Among the Hazelton people
who went to Prince Rupert for
the exhibition were Dr. Wrinch
and Stuart J. Martin, president
and secretary of Hazelton fair
association; Mr. and Mrs. J. C.
K. Sealy, Misses Agnes and Jean
Grant, Mrs. and Miss Hogan, W.
G. Norrie, James O'Shea, H. A.
DuHamel, J. A. Macdonald, W.
G. Hamblin and Howard Guest.
El Paso: Villa is again prominent in Mexico. Another raid
is feared.
The ladies of  Hazelton W.A.
will give a Tea in   St.  Andrew's;
Hall  on  Wednesday   afternoon, [
Sept.  27,   from 3 to 5:30, atai
charge of 25 cents for each  person.     The net proceeds will be
handed to the local  treasurer of I
the Soldiers' Aid,for the purpose]
of sending Christmas comforts to j
the brave boys who have left this j
district to serve  the Empire on I
the firing line.
Show your appreciation of our
men in khaki by patronizing the
Tea, or, if you cannot attend,
send along your share.
Any lady wishing to assist by
contributing refreshments may
send articles to the hall at 2:30
on Wednesday afternoon.
"Do your bit" to make Christmas bright for our soldier boys.
Ottawa: The second Canadian
war loan of $100,000,000 has been
taken up without the aid of the
banks. -
Victoria: The Dominions commission now in session here is
considering the bridging of Seymour Narrows as a measure of
Imperial defence. The commission is also investigating the
settlement of returned soldiers
and other Imperial subjects.
Donors of Special Prizes
The directors of Hazelton Agricultural and Industrial Association
acknowledge the following donations of special prizes for the recent fair:
Canadian Explosives Co..  Prince
Rupert���box of stumping powder. .
Canadian Swift Co.���case of Silver Leaf lard.
H. Birks & Son, Vancouver���cut
glass tobacco jar.
I.   Anger,  New   Hazelton���pair
Regal shoes.
Johnson Bros.. Vancouver���eiderdown quilt.
Kelly Douglas, Prince Rupert-
Nabob coffee and tea.
Marshal Wells & Co., Edmonton
���100 Peters shells.
McClary Mfg. Co.,  Vancouver-
tea-kettle.
McKay, Smith, Blair, Vancouver
���two silk hankerchiefs.
Paterson Mfg. Co., Vancouver���
Congoleum rug.
R. G.  Moseley, Hazelton���silver
cup.
Storey & Campbell, Vancouver-
English bridle and bit.
Tepoorten & Co.,   Vancouver-
manicure set.
Union  Bank of  Canada���silver
cup.
W. H. Malkin, Vancouver���Ten
pounds of tea.
A selection of ores from the
mineral display at Hazelton fair
was sent to Prince Rupert exhibition, in charge of Stuart J. Martin, and news was received yesterday that it had been awarded
first prize for a district exhibit of
minerals, in competition with a
number of other northern districts. It is gratifying to find
that even the incomplete assortment of ores which was hastily
collected for our own fair was
good enough to carry off the palm
at the larger show. The fair
association and the Progress Club
are determined to have a display
for next year's exhibitions that
will excel anything that can be
exhibited in competition with it.
Another important prize was
taken by S. J. Martin, who secured the first award for his
splendid collection of prospectors'
specimens.
At the Hazelton fair the following awards were made in the
mineral classes:
Copper ore���White Heathergroup
Gold-Copper���Rocher de  Boule.
Gold-Silver-Lead���Silver  Standard.
Silver ore���White Heather group
Silver-Lead���Harris Mines.
Lead ore���Debenture group.
Zinc ore���Brian Boru.
Antimony ore���Silver Pick.
Molybdenum ore���Chicken  Mtn.
group.
Cobalt ore���Hazelton View group.
Platinum���Karl Fredrickson.
Placer Gold���Joe Chung.
Commercial Coal���Groundhog An-
thracite.
Mining Map���F.B. Chettleburgh.
Gagne-Carr
A pretty wedding took place at
Smithers on Wednesday, when
Bert Gagne, the popular G.T.P.
conductor, and Miss Katherine
Carr were married. The happy
couple, who were showered with
good wishes, are on their way
east for an extended trip. They
will reside at Prince George.
Methodist Church
Rev. T. Ferrier, superintendent of Methodist Indian schools
and hospitals for Canada, will
preach tomorrow evening.
Special Music. All are most
oordially invited.
Panama: Irregularities in the
canal customs service have been
discovered.
Quebec: A verdict of accidental death was brought in by the
coroner's jury which investigated
the loss of thirteen lives in the
collapse of the Quebec bridge
span.
Inspector T. G. Wynn, of the
provincial police, formerly chief
constable here, is in town for a
day or two, on his inspection trip
through the district. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23. 1916
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and Hritish Possessions. Two Dollars a
year: Foreign. Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $2.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices. 20 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazatte rates.
Vol. VI.
Saturday, September 23, 1916.
No.
PLUNGING INTO PEACE
"Rebounding from two years and more of the most destructive
and wasteful war in history, the world will plunge into a trade and
economic contest in which forces will assume totally new alignments, when competition will be keener and stronger than ever,
and when science and organization will play a leading part in any
successful role. For this struggle Canada must gird up her loins
and make ready her full equipment of preparedness. She has the
advantage over many other countries in richness and abundance of
resources, in geographical world position, in vigor of race and in
robustness of intellectual and moral fiber, while hope, verging on
pronounced optimism, is an abiding and stimulating force with our
people.
"I doubt, however, if we yet sense adequately the unnatural
situation in which we have become involved, or the wrench and
strain that will accompany the resumption of our natural and
normal position.
"The question which it seems to me each should face is this:
'What will be the situation as regards our industry in Canada when
the war ends, and how can we best meet it?' "���The Right Hon.
Sir George Foster in his Call to Action.
not be in a position to operate to
the best economic advantage until, let us hope, after peace has
been declared. Exploration and
development will go on and installation of equipment will proceed without regard to war or
peace. The confidence of these
interests south of the line is such
that they believe British Columbia mines can be operated on an
"I economic basis in competition
41 with mines that are working on
low operating costs.
It is our confident expectation
that we are at the beginning of a
mineral development in British
Columbia that will bring this
province to the fore as one of the
largest, if not the largest undeveloped fields for mineral exploitation that remains.
While most of the mining activity is along the southern boundary of the province,considerable
interest is being taken in newer
fields along the line of the Grand
J'runk Pacific.     Here,   although
THE VOTE IN OMINECA DISTRICT
A somewhat larger vote than generally expected was polled in
Omineca district,the total number of electors who cast ballots being
711. The soldiers' vote will bring this number well over 800. Below
is given a detailed statement of the votes cast at the various polling
places in the constituency. It will be noted that Hazelton holds
its place at the head of the list.
Suffrage
PliOHIHI
HON
Polling Place ft
ANSON
Dockrill
Rej
Yes No Rej
Yes No
Rej.
Votes
Babine Post
2
1    1
o
2
Burns .Lake ..
8
11
13   5
1
10   9
19
Endako	
16
15
1
21 11
19 13
32
Francois N. ..
27
12
36   1
2
17 20
2
39
Francois S.   ..
7
12
15   3
1
10   8
1
19
Glentanna.. ..
18
1
1
11   5
4
10   6
4
20
Hazelton   .. ..
84
53
3
89 30
21
55 66
19
140
Houston    .. ..
22
12
1
27   6
2
23 10
2
35
Howson Camp
2
2
2
6
5   1
6
19
1
1
17   3
1
16   4
1
21
Kispiox	
13
6
13   6
16   3
19
Lake Kathlyn
7
8
12   3
11   4
15
Manson Creek
2
1
3
3
3
New Hazelton
5G
11
1
49 13
6
32 30
6
68
N. Bulkley   ..
4
2
6
3   3
6
Ootsa Center
9
11
18   2
7 13
20
Ootsa West ..
14
9
15   4
4
12   9
2
23
Rocher de Boult
15
6
10
26   4
1
23   7
1
31
Skeena Crossing 3
5
5   3
2   C
8
Smithers  .. ..
74
36
1
78 24
9
67 40
4
111
S. Bulkley.. ..
7
11
14   4
10   7
1
18
25
31
37 12
7
31 20
5
56
432
258
21 509 143
59
379 284
48
711
Manson's majority, until the soldiers' vote is counted,stands at
174, which makes his election certain.
One deputy returning officer issued ten tendered ballot forms,
which were rejected by the returning officer. In the suffrage and
prohibition referenda there were many rejected ballots, most of
which had been left blank by the voters.
The final count was completed yesterday, having been delayed
by the necessity of waiting for the ballot boxes from the outlying
polling places.
MINING WILL
GO RIGHT AHEAD
There is little reason to suppose
that the mining revival now being experienced in this province
will come to an end on the conclusion of the war. While high
prices have exerted a tremendous
stimulus to mining, they seem to
serve the purpose of calling to
the attention of the mining world
the immense possibilities of mining in British Columbia. The
great interest being taken in the
United States in the producing
mines of British Columbia is evidenced by the numerous purchases by American interests of our
mines. Certainly these many
interests have not the object of
retiring from the field on the
advent of peace. In fact several
of these mines purchased   will
there are practically no developed
and permanent shipping mines, \
the prospects are very bright. A
great deal of development work |
is being carried on; and the justification for this work, where intelligently applied,is beingamply
repaid in the form of large
bodies of pay ore being-uncovered.
This is true of the Hazelton and
Rocher de Boule field, and it is
expicted will prove true of other
districts that are now being
actively prospected. Low grade
properties can now be expected
to be developed.
It is to be hoped that local
capital would see the advantage
of taking up and developing mineral claims that hold out promise
and that eastern Canadians would
take more interest. But if mining in British Columbia can alone
be developed by outside capital,
we must congratulate ourselves
that this outside capital is taking
hold. The important thing is to
get our mineral resources opened
up to the world.���B.C. Financial
Times.
In the two years pf war there
have been 41 zeppelin raids over
England. The casualties caused
have been 356 killed and 980
wounded.
Addressing Soldiers' Mail
In order to facilitate the handling of mail at the front and to
ensure prompt delivery, it is requested that all mail be addressed as follows:
(a) Regimental Number.
(b) Rank.
(c) Name.
(d) Squadron, Battery or Company.
(e) Battalion, Regiment (or
other unit), Staff appointment or Department.
(f) Canadian Contingent.
(g) British Expeditionary
Force.
(h) Army Post Office, London
England.
Unnecessary mention of higher
formations, such as brigades,
divisions, is strictly forbidden,
and causes delay.
HAZELTON
The Distributing Point
for the Great Northern
Interior
Prospectors, Miners
Landseekers, Surveyors
and Sportsmen will find
the merchants of Hazelton prepared to meet
every requirement in
outfit and supplies. Having been engaged for
many years in outfitting
parties for the Northern
Interior, Hazelton business men are qualified
to give valuable advice
and assistance to newcomers.
Hazelton is situated at
the confluence of the
Bulkley and Skeena
rivers, a mile and a
quarter from Hazelton
station on the Grand
Trunk Pacific railway.
Enquiries may be addressed to
Hazelton, B. C. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1916
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
Admiral Beatty has been knighted.
Ontario went dry on Saturday
last.
Canada may remit the duty on
steel rails.
The waters of the Nile are unusually high.
More food riots in Hamburg
are reported.
The U.S. will build an $11,000,-
000 armor plant.
A coalition government is being
urged in Germany.
German bankers are seeking a
big loan in Switzerland.
An incendiary fire destroyed a
canning plant at Sarnia.
The prairie wheat crop will be
over 170,000,000 bushels.
The new French war loan has
been issued at 88 fr. 75 c.
In August the Germans lost 120
aeroplanes and the Allies 60.
Many were hurt in a riot by
street-car strikers in New York.
A powder mill exploded at
Huntingdon, Pa..killing six men.
Portuguesetroops are operating
in Mozambique, German East
Africa.
Arrangements are being made
to enlist Canadians in the Imperial navy.
In Mexico, General Obregon's
forces defeated Villa, who lost
600 men.
Lieutenant Asquith, son of the
British premier, has been killed
in action.
The Australian government has
chartered ninety vessels to transport wheat.
Von Haenisch,commanding the
14th German army corps, has
been retired.
There is a marked decrease in
the infantile paralysis epidemic
in New York.
Lord Brooke, who is in command of a Canadian brigade, has
been wounded.
The New York Giants on Wednesday won their fifteenth
straight game.
A dam near Gablonz, Bohemia,
burst on Monday. Two hundred
lives were lost.
General Gaeda, commander-in-
chief of the German troops in
Alsace, is dead.
Lord Shaughnessy says Canada
must prepare for large immigration after the war.
King Haakon of Norway declares the Scandinavian nations
will remain neutral.
Seven thousand refugees from
the island of Thasos are fleeing
from the Hungarians.
Allied airmen who bombarded
Sofia, capital of Bulgaria, flew
330 miles in five hours.
A medal will be issued to
Canadians discharged from the
army for wounds or infirmity.
The military hospitals commission has taken over the Sir Oliver
Mowat sanatorium at Kingston.
McClure, the American magazine publisher, who has just visited England,says the damage and
loss of life by 'accidents and fires
in the city of New Yorkjs many
times greater than the destruction caused in England by zeppelin raids.
Negotiations for the settlement
of disputes between Sweden and
the Allies have not been successful.
The Stefansson expedition discovered immense copper deposits
near the mouth of the Mackenzie
river.
The new foreign minister of
Greece, Carapanos, has been dismissed at the request of the
Allies.
The people of Asiatic Turkey
are reported to be starving as a
result of last year's plague of
locusts.
A Copenhagen report says German soldiers are seizing food sent
from America to the starving
Belgians.
Belgian forces operating in
German East Africa have captured Tabora, the principal German fortress.
During the first seven months
of this year U. S. trade wiih the
British Empire aggregated two
billion dollars.
Washington is afraid the Entente powers will divide the trade
of the world among themselves
after the war.
It is expected that 40,000 more
Canadian troops will be sent to
England this fall, to complete
their training.
All the Allied nations have
awarded war decorations to the
city of Verdun, in recognition of
its heroic defence.
It is reported that Hindenburg
has advised the Kaiser to confine
his activities to visiting hospitals
and making speeches.
In reprisal for treatment of
Germans in Italy, the German
government, it is said, will expel
ten thousand Italians.
The wrecked span of Quebec
bridge is to be rebuilt, and it is
expected the structure will be
finished within a year.
Germany sent many railroad
cars to Roumania for grain. The
cars were sent to Transylvania,
loaded  with Roumanian soldiers.
Sir Thomas Tait has heen appointed director-general of national service, to take charge of
Canada's new recruiting system.
Australia is to take a referendum on the question of conscription. Soldiers will vote, the
British Columbia system being
followed.
INSURANCE
of all kinds.
Lowest   Rales.     Strongest   Companies.
Prompt and Liberal Settlements.
Mining Machinery and Supplies.
Cradock's Wire Cables.
Estimates given for Tramways.
LOST
A sorrel horse branded double
I on left hip. Finder will be
rewarded for its return to Hag-
uel-Get or to Mooseskin Johnny
at Moricetown. **
The Miner is two dollars a year.
TELEPHONE^
A Telephone saves time and
money. Get on the lines of
progress. Ask for full information.
NORTHERN TELEPHONE Co.
Head Office   -   -   Hazelton.
J. F. MAGUIRE,   Hazelton
Insurance and Manufacturers' Agent.
The Prince Rupert Fair
 September 20,21,22	
$3000 in cash prizes, cups, medals, etc.
$900 in cash prizes for Indian contests.
+
MINERAL ACT
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
DEBENTURE, MOGUL. GALENA,
B. & M. MINERAL CLAIMS, situate
in the Omineca Mining Division of
Omineca District.
Where located:���On Babine slope,
about 24 miles from Moricetown, on the
Cronin Trail.
TAKE NOTICE that Dalby B. Morkill, B. C. Land Surveyor, of Hazelton,
B. C, acting as agent for A. H. Morten, Free Miner s Certificate No.
95906B, and Henry Bretzins, Free
Miner's Certificate, No. 95907B, intend,
sixty days from the date hereof, to
apply to the Mining Recorder for a
Certificate of Improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining a Crown Grant
of the above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements. 48-5
Dated this 29th day of July, A. D.
1916. D. B. Morkill.
SPORTS
Baseball, Football; Vaudeville Show,
Fireworks, Baby Show, Etc.
ONE GATE COVERS ALL
Three Screaming Days of Fun
REDUCED TRANSPORTATION ON ALL LINES
FREE TRANSPORTATION OF EXHIBITS
f ��� t* f ��� f *sr
ARE YOU A MEMBER? It costs One Dollar per annum and no more.
MINERAL ACT
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
VICTORIA, BELLE, VIEW FRACTION, BELLE FRACTION MINERAL!
CLAIMS,   situate in the Omineca Min-
ing Division of Omineca District.
Where located:���On the  West  slope!
of Rocher de Boule mountain.
TAKE  NOTICE  that  I,   Dalbv   Ii. ;
Morkill, B.C. Land Surveyor, of Hazel-j
ton, B.C., Free Miner's Certificate No. |
1979C, acting as agent for New  Hazelton Gold-Cobalt  Mines, Ltd.  (non-personal liability), Free Miner's Certificate
No. 5598C, intend sixty days from  the
date   hereof  to  apply   to  the   Mining
Recorder for  a Certificate of Improvements for the purpose  of  obtaining a
Crown Grant for the above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this 11th day of September,
A.D. 1916. 3-11
Address the Secretary, P. O. Box 394, Prince Rupert, B. C.
oiiiiiiiniiiirjiiiiiiiiiiiirjiiiiiiiiiiiicoiiiiiiiiiiiiicoiiiiiiiiiiiiicoiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiiico
j Hudson's Bay Company |
HAZELTON, B. C.
I
; 8    Groceries, Drygoods, Boots and Shoes, Hardware, Wholesale Liquors    8
Commercial Printing at
THE   MINER  OFFICE
9  We have our new stock of  =
1 20 j?a., 16 ga., and 12 ga. SHOT GUN SHELLS |
�� .22 cal. CARTRIDGES, short, long, long rifle, extra long. 8
1 SHOT GUNS 1
I .22 cal. RIFLES |
j HUNTING   COATS 1
1 INDIAN   &  FACTORY - MADE   MOCCASINS 1
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f     CANADIAN  PACIFIC  RAILWAY      '
Lowest rates Prince Rupert to all Eastern Points via steamer
to Vancouver and Canadian Pacific Railway.
Meals and  berth included on steamer
Synopsis of  Coal Mining Regulations.
COAL mining rightsof the Dominion,
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and
Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the
Northwest Territories and in a portion
of the Province of British Columbia,
may be leased for a term ot twenty-one
years at an annual rental of $1 an
acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will
be leased to one applicant,
Application for a lease must be made
by the applicant in person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district in which
the rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must
be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for shall be
staked out by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied by a fee of $5, which will be refunded if the rights applied for are not
available, but not otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable
output of the mine at the rate of five
cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the
royalty thereon. If the coal mining
rights are not being operated, such
returns should be furnished at least
once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee* may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at
the rate of $10.0C an acre.
For full information application
should be made to the Secretary of the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa,
or to any Agent or Sub-Agent of
Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B.���Unauthorized publication of
this advertisement will not be paid for.
-58782.
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
S.S. "Princeu Maquinna" leaves Prince Rupert every SUNDAY, at 6 p.m.
S.S. "Princess Alice", or "Princess Sophia" leaves Prince Rupert
Sept. 9th, 16th, 23rd, 30th, Oct. 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, Nov. 4.
J. I. Peters, General Agent, 3rd Ave. & 4th St., Prince Rupert.BX
\  ��� ��� -y
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Express, General Drayage and Freighting
/ IVFRY /in//   ST A (1FV We are Prepared to supply private ,
LilTLiIXi   UllU  OlfWJluO and  public conveyances   day and
night.      Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
BEST DRY BIRCH, $5.50 A CORD
Consign your shipments in Our
Care for Storage or Delivery.
Address all communications to Hazelton.
Ruddy & MacKay
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
RAILWAY and STEAMSHIP LINES.
mm
TRWHK
Prince Rupert Exhibition
September 20th, 21st and 22nd
One way first class fare for round trip, from
all stations including Pr. George and West.
Tickets on sale Sept 18th to 22nd inclusive.   Return
limit, Sept. 25th.
Steamers sailing between  Skagway, Juneau,  Wrangell,   Ketchikan,
 Anyox, Prince Rupert, Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle, etc.���	
Leave Prince Rupert: for Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle, Monday and
Saturday,  at  10.00 A.M.      For Anyox,   Friday, at 10.00 A. M.     For
Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau, Skagway, Wednesday, at 12 noon.
Connections made between Trains and Steamer*.
For further information apply to any Grand Trunk Pacific Agent.or to
G. A. McNicholl,As��t. Gen. Freight and PaSBcnirer Agent, Prince Rupert, B.C. THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY. SEPTEMBER 23, 1916
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
\\      MONDAY, SEPT. 18
I 4>
London: As a result of the recent smash by the British, along
a six-mile front, Bruleaurs wood,
Flers, High wood, Martinpuich
and Courcelette have fallen into
our hands. The prisoners taken
include 65 officers, six of whom
were battalion commanders.
Additional gains along a front
of over a mile and a half were
scored last night, when British
troops took the "Danube" trench,
a mile long,and captured further
territory on a 1000-yard front
near Courcelettie. The big battle
is still raging. Thousands of
prisoners are being passed back
through the British lines.
For the first time the British
are using the new armored cars,
called "tanks". These remarkable motors can plow through
fences, cross over stumps and
fallen trees,cut down smajl trees,
cross shell craters and trenches.
They did tremendous execution
and captured many prisoners.
The "tanks" are declared to be
a wonderful success.
Paris: Unsuccessful German
counter-attacks were made on the
positions newly won by French
troops. North of the Somme we
accomplished a further advance,
north of Lepriez farm, where we
took a system of trenches to a
depth of 500 meters. This advance, in conjunction with the
British operations, marked the
beginning of the movement to
encircle Combles. There was
lively fighting today east of the
Bethune road and north of Bouchavesnes, which enlarged our
positions. Yesterday the French
took 400 prisoners. In one trench
the bodies of 86 Germans were
picked up.
The French have captured all
trenches between Vermandovillers and Demicourt on one side
and Demicourt and Berny on the
other.
Saloniki:. The brilliancy of the
Servian victory over the Bulgarians is now apparent. Routed on
the Macedonian'front, the Bulgarians are falling back in disorder
on Monastir. Their losses are
enormous. A large number of
prisoners and 39 guns, many of
large caliber, have been taken by
the Servians.
The Servian army descended
into the plain of Fiorina,  where
the cavalry demoralized the Bui
garians.
Franco-Russian troops, by a
swift movement,have cleared the
Ostrovo region of the enemy for
a distance of forty miles.
London: Berlin admits the
defeat of the Bulgarians. The
German government cannot hide
the defeats sustained on the
British and French fronts. Hindenburg's appointment to supreme command means a fight for
life. Gloomy excitement prevails
in the German capital.
<r
II
TUESDAY, SEPT. 19
London: The new thrust by
the French, south of the Somme
river in Northern France, where
the important railway town of
Chaulnes is the objective, has
resulted in the complete encircling
of the village of Denicourt. Further progress was made by the
French in this region. Heavy
counter-attacks by the Germans
on the new French positions, both
north and south of the Somme,
have been repulsed. The enemy
sustained enormous losses, two
battalions being nearly wiped
out. The French have taken 1200
prisoners and ten machine guns.
The|British are keeping up their
forward push north of theSomme,
scoring in their advances. An
appreciable gain has been made
on f.he left bank, where the British line has driven further to
wards Le Sars along the Pozieres-
Bapaume road, north of Martinpuich.
Saloniki: A further advance by
the Servian forces on the western
end of the Macedonian front is
reported. The first and second
line trenches of the Bulgarians
at Karmakalan have been taken
by the Serbs, who have crossed
the Broda river. Heavy fighting
continues in this sector.
London: The defeat of Turkish
forces in a minor engagement on
the Sinai peninsula, 65 miles east
of the Suez canal, is announced.
Rome: Italian troops have occupied Palio Cresto, five miles
from Argyo Castro,  in Albania.
London: In a raid by British
naval aeroplanes at St. Denis and
Westrehom a large number of
bombs was dropped with successful results. One of our machines
was forced to land in Holland.
Athens: Kalageropulos, the
new premier, made the following
declaration today: "The new ministry will follow a policy of very
benevolent neutrality towards the
Entente Allies." lie indignantly
repudiated the suggestion that he
is pro-German in his sympathies.
The first load of Greek soldiers
from Kavala arrived here today.
Copenhagen: Norwegian newspapers warn the Scandinavian
public that there is a probability
of increased blockade pressure
against Scandinavia since Roumania joined the Allies.
WEDNES., SEPT. 20
London: Heavy and continuous
rain has fallen in Picardy during
the last twenty-four hours,checking all operations on the Somme
front. The general situation is
unchanged.
The Germans attempted an offensive in the Champagne last
night, making five successive
attacks on the Russian troops.
The latter, with machine guns
and artillery fire,drove back each
attack.
The British line has advanced
a thousand yards on a one-mile
front,a powerfully fortified work
known as the Quadrilateral having fallen into the hands of the
British troops. Progress has also
been made north of Flers. Heavy
counter-attacks on our new positions were repulsed.
Fierce fighting occurred on
some sectors of the Peronne-
Bapaume road. On Sunday and
Monday the French took more
than 1600 German prisoners in
the Denicourt sector.
Since yesterday's report five
more of our aeroplanes failed to
return.
In the neighborhood of Riche-
bourg l'Avoue we entered the
enemy's trenches in three places,
capturing prisoners and amachine
gun, and inflicting many casualties.   Our casualties were slight.
On the Verdun front the French
have captured a German trench
on the southern slope of Dead-
man Hill.
Petrograd: Stubborn fighting
is in progress between Russian
and Austro-German troops in the
region of the Narapuvka river, in
Galicia. All Teuton attacks on
our line have been repelled
The German general staff has
been moved from the western to
the eastern front.
Paris: On the Macedonian
front the Bulgarians made two
counter-attacks against the Servians, without success.
Athens: In northwest Macedonia, the Bulgarian forces are
practically surrounded by Franco-
Servian troops. The Bulgars are
falling back precipitately on Monastir.
It is reported that the Bulgarians are beginning the evacuation
of Monastir. The archives are being hastily transported to Uskub.
London: Servian successes in
the Fiorina region continue. The
Serbs have captured Krushnad
and Neokazi, and their cavalry
have reached Rosna. The advance continues.
London: It is stated in the
most reliable diplomatic circles
that the Austrians, in consequence
of the Italian advance, are preparing for the evacuation of
Trieste.
Bucharest: On the Roumanian
north and northwest fronts,along
the Danube, skirmishes are reported. Artillery has been active
at Dobrudja since Sunday night.
The Austrians have been beaten
in two engagements and have
suffered heavy losses. Fighting
continues.
Norfolk, Va.: A foreigh ship
arriving here reports encountering a German commerce raider
in the Atlantic.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 21
lieve that the Greek government
has sent an ultimatum to Germany and Bulgaria demanding
tha immediate return of the soldiers taken prisoner at Kavala.
The Entente Allies refuse to
recognize the new Greek cabinet,
and the Greek coast from the
mouth of the Struma to the
Graeco-Bulgarian border is being
blockaded as a result.
London: In Macedonia the
trend of trje campaign appears to
favor the Entente armies. The
Servians continue their advance
along the western end of the line,
driving the remaining Bulgarians
out of Fiorina and capturing the
highest peak in the Kaimakcalan
range, north of Lake Ostrovo.
Petrograd: Fierce fighting in
Galicia continues, marking a desperate effort by Von Hindenburg
to pierce the Russian lines.
=^
FRIDAY, SEPT. 22
Madrid: Spain has forwarded
a strong protest to Germany concerning tha sinking of Spanish
vessels by submarines.
The London chamber of commerce proposes that- after the
war the Empire and its Allies be
granted a minimum tariff,friendly neutrals pay double tariffs,
other neutrals a still higher rate,
and enemy countries maximum
duties, running up to thirty per
cent.
London : The Germans on
Wednesday made attack after
attack against the French in an
offensive on a three-mile front in
the region of Priez farm and Bouchavesnes, north of Somme. At
the end of the day the French
were everywhere holding their
positions on a battlefield covered
with German dead. Germans
penetrated part of Bouchavesnes,
but the French met them with
the bayonet and the enemy was
dislodged with horrible slaughter.
On the British front inclement
weather holds the opposing sides
to artillery duels.
Canadian wounded just arrived
declare the British will soon be
in a twelve mile stretch of open
ground, when some exciting
movements may be expected.
Phillip Gibbs, war correspondent says: "The Canadians gained great glory in their recent
attack on the German front. The
French-Canadians went away like
wolves, though swept with gun
fire and meeting stubborn resistance."
London: British troops south
of Arras yesterday captured 200
yards of German trenches.
Paris: Determined attacks by
the Germans were made last night
on the French positions on Hill
36, north of the Somme. The
enemy gained a foothold at some
advanced points, but was sub'
sequently ejected.
Athens:   There is reason to be
HOTEL PRINCE RUPERT
THE LEADING HOTEL IN NORTHERN B. C.
:: EUROPEAN PLAN ::
One Dollar per day and upwards
25c. auto service to and from all trains and boats
PRINCE RUPERT B. C.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion, British Columbia,
and Alberta Land Surveyors
Offices at Victoria, Nelson, Fort George
and New Hazelton.
F. P. Burden,
New Hazelton
London : Bucharest advices
confirm reports that the great
battle in the Dobrudja region,
whicli began last Friday, ended
in the defeat of the forces of the
central powers, after six days of
fighting. The struggle gradually
increased in intensity until Tuesday evening, with the result that
on Wednesday evening the Germans, Bulgarians and Turks,
crushed by the Allied offensive,
were forced to withdraw. They
retreated, burning all villages in
their line of retirement,to retard
the pursuit.
A Roumanian force has entered
Orderhei, fifty miles northeast of
Kronstadt. One fourth of Transylvania is now in the hands of
the Roumanian troops.
Greek military officials regard
the capture of the Kaimakaelan
plateau by the Russians and Servians as the most important event
in the present Balkan campaign.
Venizelos may take the leadership of the Greek revolutionary
party.
London: The general situation
on all battlefronts except in the
Balkans is unchanged today.
The Germans thought the Canadian attack at Courcelette was
over, and did not anticipate the
second charge in which the place
was taken. The Canadians took
more than their own number of
prisoners in their swift charge
through the village. Enemy losses
at this point were nearly 2000.
Many Canadians have been
awarded the military cross.
Amsterdam: The German administration in Belgium has introduced a new war tax, which
is levied on banknotes.
Petrograd : Turkish troops
have appeared on the Riga front.
Washington: Secretary Lansing has informed the American
committee for Armenian and
Syrian relief that supplies for
the starving populace of those
nations would be distributed by
the Red Cross and Red Crescent,
with headquarters at Beirut, by
permission of the Turkish government.
STUART J. MARTIN
I       Provincial Assayer
i    Hazelton,      -      -      B.C.
-o
I
1
I
I
J
THE ROYAL LUNCH
Gives the Best Meal
For the Lowest Price
Opp.  Police  Office,   Hazelton.
MRS. SAMMONS  ::   Prop.
Wm. GRANT
Has been appointed agent for the
B. C. Nurseries Co.
Any orders for Fruit Trees,Berry
Bushes,   and   Plants   will have
Careful Attention.
DALBY B. MORKILL
British Columbia Land Surveyor
m   MINE SURVEYOR   m
Hazelton, B. C.
Surveys of Mineral Claims, Townsites,
Timber and Coal Leases, Etc. and General Engineering Surveys.
The obtaining of Crown Grants attended to. tf
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IIH MB������IIH
Tread the Footpath I
of Peace        j
This is the path of him who wears  t
"Invictus"       l
THE BEST GOOD SHOE
NOEL & ROCK j
Hazelton, B. C. |
II���Mil���UH��� UH���.1111���mi���ua
i *l*r|"ttTf|f '|ss|*Tj��TjfTf f rpT|tl^^^rS^*J*^t|*ri'r|*tjfti7r|*ff* }��
WEDD'S GRAPE SALTS
Clear the Skin of all
Blemishes
Such As
Pimples, Blackheads,
SKIN ERUPTIONS, ETC.
| Wedd's Salts Purify the Blood.
Up-to-Date Drug Stores |
HAZELTON B.C. |
I jt'i"t"|i'i"i"i"i"i"t"i"i"i''i"i"iii|ii|ii|ii|inmi|atmiy
Assay Office and Mining Office
Arts and Crafts Building. 578 Seymour Street
Fall and Winter Suits
We have just received our Fall
Samples of men's suitings.
Owing to the scarcity of good
woolen goods on the market, we
advise you to make your selection
now. * *
R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd.
-VANCOUVER, B.
The Estate of J. O'Sullivan
Provincial Assayer: and Chemists
Established 1897 by the late J. O'Sullivan,  P. C. S., 26 years with
Vivian & Sons, Swansea.
ISSUt>
TICKETS
HAZELTON HOSPITAL
for any period from one month upward at II per
month In advance. This rate includes office con.
lultatlom and medicines, as woll as all costs while
In the hospital. Tickets obtainable In Haieltoti
at the Post Offlco or the DruK Store; In Aldermere
from Mr. T. J. Thorp; in Telkwafrom Dr. Wallace-
or by mall from the Medical .Superintendent at the
Hospital.

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