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Omineca Miner Oct 14, 1911

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OCT 23 191"
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VOL. I, NO. 7.
HAZELTON, B. C. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1911.
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
I
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CHAN BUYS
NOIED GROUP
Original Bond Taken Up and
Property Transferred To
New Owner Yesterday
PLANS FOR DEVELOPMENT
Two Hundred Foot Tunnel Will Be
Driven During Winter. Compressor
Plant To Be Installed Early Next Season.    Frank Brown, Superintendent
The deal by which the ownership of the Rocher de Boule group
of claims passes into the hands
of John F. Cowan and associates,
was concluded kst evening. R. P.
Trimble and W. P. D. Pemberton,
who had a $25,000 bond on the
claims, paid that amount to W. S.
Sargent and C. H. Munro, and
transferred title in the property
to the Salt Lake capitalist for a
much larger consideration. They
will retain a stock interest.
During the year which has elapsed
since they took hold of the group
Trimble and Pemberton have succeeded in uncovering remarkable
showings of ore in the three
veins on the property, which has
become the show proposition of
the camp.
The new owner has made plans
for extensive development work.
A crosscut tunnel will be begun
at once, under the direction of
Frank Brown, who has been appointed superintendent. This
tunnel, which will be about 200
feet long, will tap the lower lead
at a depth of over 100 feet. In
the spring it is expected a road
to Juniper basin will be constructed, and a compressor and
air drills will be installed.
Mr. Cowan left for Salt Lake
City this morning. He will return early next season.
Whitney Goes To Province
Toronto: Premier Whitney
announces Ontario elections will
be held the first week in December.
WELCOMED BY FRIENDS
Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Sargent  Receive  An
Enthusiastic Greeting
After a brief honeymoon trip
to Portland and other coast
cities, Mr. and Mrs R. S. Sargent
returned to Hazelton on Monday
evening. They were greeted on
their arrival by a large crowd of
well-wishers, who attested the
popularity of the newly made
benedict by a spontaneous demonstration. On Wednesday evening a dance in honor of the
happy couple was held in the
auditorium. It proved to be the
success of the season, the largest
crowd of the year being in attendance. Unusually excellent
music was furnished by Mrs.
Harvey, F. J. Smyth and F. W.
Renworth, flutist. The latter
artist is the composer of the
Bathing Girl waltz, played for
the first time on Wednesday
evening, to general applause.
To Report On Disputed Surveys
Government Agent Allison will
leave in a few days for a visit to
the Bulkley valley, with the object of preparing a report for the
provincial government on the disputes resulting from the rectification surveys, which changed the
boundaries of a number of preemptions and purchase claims,
causing considerable dissatisfaction among a number of settlers.
It is understood the government
will make an effort to adjust conflicting surveys in a manner satisfactory to all parties concerned.
Grey's Farewell Message
Victoria, Oct. -12:���(Special to
the Miner) "I am touched by
your kind message. British Columbia has a warm place in my
heart," was the wire received
from Earl Grey by Premier McBride, in reply to a farewell message sent the retiring Governor-
general on behalf of the people.
C. N. R. Extending Construction
Victoria, Oct. 13: - (Special to
the Miner) The Canadian Northern railway will shortly call for
tenders for the construction of
forty miles of road north from
the end of the sixty miles now
under   construction   from here.
Satisfactory Tests
of Omineca Placers
Returning from his season's
work in the Omineca river district, H. E. Bodine reports good
developments on the fourteen
miles of placer leases in which he
is associated with G. H. Knowlton. Prospecting was continued
during the season, with the result
that over half the ground has
been tested. Empire drills are
used, a row of holes being drilled
across the creek every thousand
feet, with test holes between the
stations. By panning the drillings accurate pay estimates are
obtained. Eighty holes were
drilled this season; the depth
varying from 10 to 34 feet. Another and larger drill will be
taken in next spring, and it is
expected that the testing of the
ground will be completed next
season. The leases will be worked
with dredges.
California Gives Women Votes
San Francisco, Oct. 13:���The
indications at present are that
woman suffrage has carried in
California. The final result of
the vote will not be known for
two days.
A Long Aeroplane Journey
Kansas City, Oct 12:���Rogers,
the ocean-to-ocean aviator, landed here at noon, having covered
1480 miles since leaving New
York. 	
G. T. P. ANNUAL MEETING
Operations At Thit End Reported Satisfactory. Steel To Tete Juane Cache
Before End Of Year.    Hotel Plans
GROUNDHOG MOUNTAIN COAL
BEST ON THE PACIFIC COAST
Optimistic Report from Big Field North of
Hazelton���Engineers Declare Our Measures
Will Have Command of Western Market for
Seaborne Coal���Cai tpbell-Johnston Returns.
Fifth Cabin, B. C, Oct. 12:-
(Special to the Miner) Anthracite coal fields which are
most assuredly of international importance, have this year
been proven in northern British
Columbia. They lie along the
fifty-seventh parallel and are
distant in a direct line only one
hundred to one hundred and fifty
miles from the seaboard by proposed railway routes having
grades of less than one per cent
down the Naas river. This coal
being hard, smokeless and non-
coking is very suitable for use in
naval warfare, besides being
adapted for all steam purposes
under forced draft. Their fortunate position on a short northern   circle  of latitude,
working faces for miners to win
the product, so expediting the
rapid growth of the field and securing a large future output.
The hard anthracite, smokeless,
non-coking quality of the coal is
due to ultra superheated thermal
waters under incalculable pressure, originating from tertiary
basalts on the lower Stikine river after the laying down of the
coal, and also from porphyry
granites formed during the same
geological era in the ranges running parellel on the southwest.
Immense local railway activity is
certain. Roads must be built to
carry the coal to the coast, to
ii;i;;ing sul?I?'y the fleets of colliers of the
���j    ft* j British, Canadian, United States,
No Truce Arranged
Paris: The statement that
Italy and Turkey are about to
arrange an armistice is unconfirmed.
through the Aleutian islands, for T ,,, . ,   ,,
shipping to Asia,   makes  these i Japanese,  Chinese and   kussum
coalbeds, supplying bunker coal,
Montreal, Oct. 13:���The adjourned annual meeting of the
G. T. P. shareholders was held
yesterday, C. M. Hays presiding.
Track laying operations on the
western division were reported
satisfactory. It is expected
steel will reach Tete Jaune Cache
before the end of the year. The
company will build a chain of
first class hotels. The contract
has been awarded for one at
Winnipeg to cost $1,250,000.
Construction on the Ontario division shows 1200 miles main line
and 136 miles siding. The remaining portions are under contract. Tha-total length of main
line laid up to date is 3,300 miles.
masters of the markets of Si
beria, China, Japan and Hongkong, besides all the American
trade from Patagonia to Alaska.
In fact, undisputedly their quality and immense inexhaustible
quantity control the whole coal
situation seaborne on the Pacific
Ocean.
Ronald Campbell Campbell-
Johnston, accompanied by his
wife and son Alex, and Geoffrey
Francis Moncton, mining en
gineers, with a
packhorses
navies. Naval powers will find
this coal vitally important with
which to keep their dreadnaughts
supplied during war, obviating
the possibility of being cut off
from the smokeless fuel so absolutely necessary to successful
operations.
Those owning these coalfields
hold complete command of the
sea in the Pacific Ocean, having
no Suez or Panama Canals to pass
through   with   the consent   of
others.    The costs of winning
large party "frf-'^"6 coa' 's P'aceu at $2.50 per ton,
delivered free on board in Naas
Harbor.    When  organization
telegraph
Connaught Arrives
Earl Grey Departs
Quebec, Oct, 13:���Earl Grey,
the retiring Governor-general,
with his suite, sailed for England
at noon yesterday, boarding the
Victorian after meeting the incoming Empress of Britain and
greeting the Duke of Connaught,
Canada's new viceroy. The entire city was illuminated last
night in honor of the new
Governor-general, who took the
oath of office in the afternoon
and was entertained at dinner in
the evening, a reception at
Spencerwood following. Thy
Duke met the members of the
Borden cabinet. The vice-regal
party and the ministers will leave
for Ottawa tomorrow. The Duke
issued his warrants for necessary
expenditures, allowing the payment of salaries of public servants, which have been in arrears for two months, owing to
the election. The new ministers
will go to their constituencies for
re-election on November 1st.
Nominations will be held on October 28. Parliament is likely to
meet on November 15 for a short
session, which may not last over
thd thirty days necessary to entitle members to their sessional
indemnity. In the press generally there is only favorable criticism of the new cabinet. On all
sides pleasure is expressed at the
selection of Martin Burrell as
minister of agriculture.
ITALY MEETS
WITH DEFEAT
Report From Constantinople
of Check To Italian Army
of  Occupation  In   Tripoli
INVADERS'JEAVY LOSS
Another Force Landed At City Of
Tripoli. Turkey Has Serious Troubles
at Home. Government Faces War
Issue   In   Parliament  Today.
OVERSEAS CLUB
Hazelton   Branch   is   Organized   Under
Most Favorable Auspices.
On Tuesday evening the Hazelton branch of the Overseas club
was successfully inaugurated,
with a large membership. This
organization, although only a
year old, already numbers 60,000
members in hundreds of branches
throughout the overseas dominions of the British empire, the
largest club in Canada being that
organized in Vancouver, which
has a membership of over a thousand. The chief object of the
club is to draw together in the
bond of comradeship the peoples
now living under the British flag,
and it promises to be influential
in cementing the friendship
which exists between the states
of the Empire.
The officers of the local club
are: R. deB. Hovell, president;
J. Fall, first vice-president; Dr.
H. C. Wrinch, second vice-president; C. H. Sawle, secretary and
treasurer. J. F. Macdonald, who
was instrumental in enlisting the
large membership with which the
club begins its work, was made
honorary president. The executive committee includes: E. C.
Stephenson, Rev. D. R. McLean,
Major J. F. Leslie, A. H. Wyllie,
H. W. Sharpe, A. R. Macdonald.
A general meeting of the club
will be held on Monday evening:
at 8:30 in the reading room.        i
coals in all neutral Pacific  norts.
Quartz Creek Placers
In March last Charles Monroe
and Tom Harrison left Hazelton
for the Omineca river country,
where they have spent the intervening time prospecting. They
have claims on Quartz creek, a
tributary of the Fall river, which
miners   and   many   . ,,    ,
have passed the sixth cabin on ���or. wnen organization is
the Yukon telegraph line in! perfected the owners can chal-
Cassiar District, en route to Van-! &n*e those of Welsh, Australian,
couver. They have spent the I Pocappntas imd lVni.,."lvanmn
entire summer on the watersheds
at the head of the Skeena, Stikine, Naas, Klappan and Eagle
rivers, traversing, mapping, tabulating and correlating the geology and coalbearing rocks. Good
coal seams are so far knpwn to
underlie over twenty-one hundred
square miles of this territory.
The formation is all composed of
sedimentary rocks, such as stratified conglomerates, sandstones
and shales of the upper Jurassic
and lower Cretaceous periods in
geology. This is ascertained
from the evidence of fossils show
ing in the rocks without volcanic
stone being anywhere visible.
From parallel crumpling and contraction during the era of cooling,
combined with added lateral
pressure caused from the formation of later plutonic coastal
mountain chains, synclines as
troughs alternate with anticlines
as folds, thus exposing, from
sectional erosions made by glacial
ice and water, four large seams
of clean, hard coal, of sizes
twenty, ten, eight and six
CRISIS THREATENS CHINA
Disaffection Spreading Throughout
Empire. Manchu Dynasty In Peril.
Mutineers Sack Hankow.
Peking, Oct. 13:- The revolt
threatens China with an unprecedented crisis. It is believed
the fate of the ruling dynasty
hangs in the balance. Hankow
yesterday was a scene of desolation. Incendiary fires made a
night of terror. Many Manchu
families were massacred.     The
is   a   branch   of   the   Omineca.! prisons were opened  by  rebels.
They spent the summer trying to: 1 housands of soldiers joined  in
London, Oct. 13: According to
a Constantinople despatch the
Italian advance to the interior of
Tripoli has beeii checked. Sixteen hundred Italians were killed
and wounded. The Young Turks
are so eager to carry on the war
that they wil! depose the Sultan
if necessary. All Italians may
be expelled from Turkey and
their property confiscated. Parliament, which opens to-morrow,
will decide whether to continue
the war or surrender.
Army Of Occupation Lands
Tripoli, Oct. 12 : ��� Nineteen
transports today brought the
second part of the Italian army
which is to occupy Tripoli. The
troops were landed without incident. On Tuesday the Turks
made an ineffectual attempt to
recapture the city of Tripoli.
The Italian fleet turned its searchlights on the contending forces,
and opened a heavy fire on the
retreating Turks.
Early Storm In Montana
Butte, Oct. 13: -Southwestern
Montana is in the grip of a
terrific snowstorm.
reach the old channel, which is
believed to carry big pay; but
had not succeeded in getting
down to the gold-bearing gravel
when they ran out of supplies
and had to return. They will remain in Hazelton for the winter,
but will leave early in the spring,
and are confident of meeting with
success next season.
thick, besides eight clean seams
each three and more feet thick,
all workable commercially, and
other smaller ones.
On the surface each seam is I
again duplicated and repeated in
Going To Seattle
In   preparation for the campaign of publicity he intends to
conduct  in   Seattle   during the
winter, E. H. Hicks Beach issend-
feet i��g to that city a large display of
the mutiny.
Good Mail Service Promised
Arrangements have been made
by which Hazelton will receive
three mails a week during the
winter, 600 pounds being carried
on each trip. The mail contractors will meet each train at the
end of steel.
McNAMARA ON TRIAL
Alleged Dynamiter Charged With Complicity in Murder of Nineteen.
Los Angeles, Oct, 12: James
McNamara, the younger of the
accused brothers, is the first to
face trial on the charge of complicity in the murder of nineteen
men who were killed in the explosion    which    destroyed    the
roots, vegetables and fruit from
Hazelton and district. He expects to leave for the Sound in
about a week, and will take with
him an exhibit of ore, which is
intended to represent the princi-
seven similar exposed' troughs I pal mining properties of Omineca, I Times building here a year ago.
whose rims or anticlines average and which will include specimens; The prisoner is secretary of the
five miles apart. The axes of of all the rich ores in the district.' International association of
the anticlines trend north one i Miners who wish to have their bridge and structural iron work-
hundred degrees east, magnetic j ores displayed in Seattle should ers. Judge Bordwell is presiding
reading, and the same southwest. ! see that Mr. Hicks Beach is fur-
The local variation of the compass: nished with samples without de-
is thirty two degrees east.    The lay
dips are normal from the ��� axes,
unless faulted or curved by end
crushing movements geologically.
Analyses show eighty four to
eighty five per centum fixed
carbon; eight per centum ash;
non - coking, British thermal
units fourteen thousand three
hundred and eighteen, with blue
flame long in firebox. The estimated capacity of the field is
forty-three million tons of coal
per square mile, affording a
thousand years production at the
rate of three hundred thousand
tons daily output.
Future railway grades can intersect the synclines diagonally
on Benoit, Beirnes, Courier, Panorama, Hankin and Merry creeks,
enabling the starting of drifts in
clean coal along the seams at
close intervals,  to multiply the
LEAD KING PLANS
Will Run Working Tunnel on Cross Vein
Recently Discovered.
Plans for next season's work
on the Lead King have been prepared, and actual development
will begin about May 1. This
season has been devoted to prospecting the veins, with results
most satisfactory to the managing owner, P. J. Jennings. It is
intended to run a working tunnel
on the cross vein recently discovered, with the double
over the trial, which is expected
to be a long one, with a keen
battle between the lawyers for
the prosecution and defence.
Turks Have Home Troubles
London, Oct. 13:���A Constantinople despatch says the situation there is grave. Fears are
entertained that when the parliament meets tomorrow there
will be open conflict between the
committee of union and progress
and the revolutionary party. The
masses of the people are being
excited against the Young Turks
committee.
Yukon Gold Production
Vancouver, Oct. 13: -Inspector
Stockton, of the auditor-general's
department, who has just arrived
from Dawson, says the gold production for the season in the
Yukon will be four and a half
million dollars. This is a quarter
of a million in excess of last
year's output. The inspector
looks for a slow but steady increase in the gold production of
the territory.
Revolution Spreading
Pekin, Oct. 12: The revolt in
China is spreading rapidly. Hang
Yang, a city of a hundred thousand, near Hankow, is now in
the hands of the revolutionists.
Imperial troops are being despatched to Hankow, where a conflict is expected. Foreigners and
missionaries residing in the district affected are so far unmolested. The object of the revolutionaries is expressed by their
war-cry, "Down with the Man-
chus."
The   annual   meeting of  the
i-   i      i    ���      .. i   ��i*ecjl- Assembly Club will  be  held on
of developing the new lead and  Wo,i���Qori0��� ^���Q���;,���v
crosscutting the other veins.
The necessary surveys have just
been completed by Theodore Jennings.
Wednesday evening.
The suspension bridge across
the Bulkley is to be completely repaired and widened. [
Local News Notes
A meeting for the organization
of a literary and debating society
will be held on Wednesday evening in the reading room.
A meeting of property owners
will be held in Harvey & McKinnon's office on Monday night for
fire brigade business.
Archibald Basset has been appointed district manager for the
Hudson's Bay company, in succession to James Thomson, recently promoted.
John Blume, whose condition
is reported serious, is being
brought to the hospital. The
party accompanying him left the
third cabin yesterday.
The Hazelton left for the end
of steel this morning, with the
following among her passengers:
J. F. Cowan, It. P. Trimble, P.
J. Jennings. J. A. Riley, L. A.
Murphy, J. T. Bates.
Mrs. Donald McLeod, Mrs. Con-
key and son, and Messrs. Raymond, Cameron, Dunn and Stin-
strom of the Foley, Welch &
Stewart headquarters staff, have
come up the river and taken up
their residence at New Hazelton.
V. W. Smith, Donald McLeod, L.
J. Conkey and A. Ryan are expected next week. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1911.
The Omineca Mieer
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District op British Columbia.
Macdonald & Rauk, Publishers and Proprietors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada ami British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $1.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 15 cents per line for first insertion, HI cents per line for each subsequent
insertion.       Legal notices Inserted at li. C. Gazette rates.
Vol. I.
Saturday, October 14, 11111.
No. 7.
Panama Gates
Gates as tall as a nine-story
building and so thick that they
bear a concrete footwalk on their
upper edge; gates that weigh 700
tons apiece and swing on hinges
with pins of nickel steel ten inches thick; forty six of such
gates, costing over five million
dollars, weighing altogether sixty
thousand tons, and capable of
making a tower a mile and a
quarter high, if skilfully piled
such are the monsters that
American engineers are  prepar-
Our Great Mineral Resources
In all the world there is not today another country which offers' ing to hang in the Panama locks,
the opportunities that are to be found in the district tributary to, so well and accurately that they
Hazelton. To say nothing of the agricultural possibilities of our will open at a touch to welcome
fertile valleys, or the multifarious industries for which railway the world's commerce, writes an
construction is opening the way, Omineca district offers, in the j editorial correspondent of the
development of its remarkable mineral resources, unusual opportun-' American Machinist:
ities to share in the making of millions.
Of no industry other than legitimate mining can it be said that
the profits of the producer are won without a tax upon the consumer. In taking precious metals from the rocks, the miner adds job, like bridge-building or fabri-
to the wealth of the country. If he is enriched, nobody else!eating and erecting the steel
becomes poorer in the process.     There is truth in the declaration frame of a huge building.    Such,
"At first glance the building
of these gates may be looked upon as merely a structural  steel
however, is not the case. From
the fact that these gates are
moving members and that they
must fit to make reasonably wat-
' building job.
that  the profit gained in  mining is "the cleanest money in the
world."
There are other promising mining districts in the west, but it
may be declared in all seriousness that the country tributary to
Hazelton has demonstrated its right to a foremost place among the j er-tight joints, a greater degree
prospective mineral-producing areas of the continent. The devel- j of accuracy is required than is
opments and discoveries of the present season have shown to the!ca!led for h* the ordinary bridge-
satisfaction of all mining men interested that Omineca district has
a great many deposits of ore which may be worked with profit.
In nearly every case the ore occurs in such form that the mines
may be worked by small companies or individuals
enormous preliminary expenditures necessitated in many other
camps. This means that the profits from the exploitation of our
mineral resources will, in great part, remain in the district, instead
of being distributed far and wide among the shareholders of a few
big companies. Many of the veins of our camps, carrying pay ore
from the grass roots, can be worked at a profit from the very
beginning, given adequate transportation facilities, which will be
available on the completion of the Grand Trunk Pacific.
It is not only our silver-lead and copper ores which will bring
wealth to the district.     The gold placers of the Omineca river and I caulking to make the air-cham
its tributaries, with the as yet unproved Ingineca and Finlay river
district, will produce many thousands of dollars in the future, while
the immense coal fields which are being proved in v.
Omineca will in time surprise those who are unfamiliar
vast resources of northern British Columbia.
The time has arrived for the news of our undeveloped wealth I each gat. ,s divided by means of
to be published to the world. We have the resources, awaiting: vertical bulkheads into six series
only the application of energy and capital.     Let everyone in the;of compartments.    These com-
Our New Premier
It isn't every day in the year,
nor every year in the century,
that we wake up to find a new
Premier. When the change does
occur, the man who has been
given the reins of government
immediately steps into the very
centre of the limelight, and all
attention goes to him. Today,
says an exchange, it is Robert
Laird Borden who is the most
talked of man in Canada. The
news of his victory has also been
flashed around the world, and in
English-speaking countries at any
rate, there is doubtless a hum of
interest and a desire to see and
know the prime minister of the
Dominion of Canada.
Mr. Borden has done well.    It I
is only fifteen years ago that he
entered Parliament, and it isn't
fevery man who can raise himself j
from a plain M.P. to Premier in
fifteen  years.    Such a feat re-j
quires a combination of character
and ability, and Mr. Borden has|
both.
The most obvious and the truest
thing to say about the new Premier is that he is a gentleman.
Let no one think for a moment
that this does not mean a great
deal. In truth, it is one of the
highest compliments that can be
paid to a public man, and R. L.
Borden deserves it.
The new Prime Minister has
distinct administrative ability.
He showed this trait in his practice of law before he entered
politics. In Nova Scotia he is
known as a brilliant constitutional
r
=^
iFor
a gooc
Book or
lagazine
������ go to i���M
Adams' Drug Store
The   Choicest   Stationery,
Chocolates and Imported
Cigars.
J. Mason Adams
DRUGGIST
Hazelton
JOIN ONE OF OUR
SUIT CLUBS
You may get a $20 Suit
for $2 or $3
Drawing Takes   Place  Every
Saturday Night
Noel I. Rock
Hazelton, B. C.
^~.~.��
^
Royal
Soft Drinks
are  made  here -->
made anywhere"
" None  better
On the other hand,
the fact that the lower half of
each gate must be water tight to
form the air-chamber, puts part j lawyer.     It   was    at    Halifax
without the I of   the   work   of   framing   and ; (twenty years after he was born
sheeting in the class of ship- j? grand Pre), that he was called
,   .,,. .,       ., j. to the bar, and he worked up to
building   rather  than   ordinary Lhe positkm of head of his urm.
structural work. Thus we find Of his gift for executive busi-
a great deal of machine work be-������ ness there is no doubt. Is he
ing done in finishing the girders j equally endowed with the genius
and frames for these gates; in!0/ constructive power? Will he
���   , ,        ��� ��� .     .    ,  i be able to enunciate and  carry
facta number of machine-tools through national projects of mag-
were installed especially for this, nitude? Up to the present he has
job. To show still further the [not had an opportunity. There
likeness to a ship-building job, I no reason to doubt his   ability
Try our Ginger Ale
Lemon Soda
Cream Soda
On Sale Everywhere
Royal Bottling Works
Hazelton, B. C.
there will be millions of feet of
along these lines too.
As a speaker, the new Premier
will rank high. Above all else,
he is a cogent reasoner, and can
build up a case with  rare skill.
district help in the campaign of publicity which will bring the men
and the money required to develop our mines.
A Popular Cabinet Minister
bers  water-tight,  and at some
points, particularly  the ends oi
irious narts ofithe girders,   sheets   of   canvas!This is a style of oratory which
'    ..,   ..     soaked in red lead paint are being ! js becoming more and more popu-
witn the I.       ,   , ,   . '.,       , ,      .   i lar at the present time.
inserted  between  the  plates to     Peraonally> Ml, Borden has an
act as water stops.    Furthermore | attractive grave courtesy, and he
is engagingly modest.
It is just ten years ago since!
Mr. Borden was appointed leader |
of the Opposition. The decade
spent in the shades, doubtless,
seemed long enough, but all the
hardship will now be forgotten in
the glory of power.
In the selection of Martin Burrell as Minister of Agriculture in
the new cabinet, the Prime Minister has made a choice which will
meet with the approval of the people of Canada, and at the same
time has recognized the growing importance of this province in
agriculture. The new minister is one of the most popular men in
British Columbia, an effective debater, useful in committee and is
possessed of marked executive ability. We have every confidence
in his ability to administer the affairs of his important department
wisely and well. While, as a cabinet minister, he is to be regarded
as representing all the people, there is no doubt his accession to the
ministerial benches will result in great benefit to the agriculturists j doWn against the sides
of this province.     With a Minister of Agriculture  from  British j to it a towline to be earried
1  ��'i  '    '"""���', ,,|"""v ";  '"":'���'��"���.' the desired|across the top of the gates and
dragged thereon.
partments are connected by
moans of water-tight bulkheads,
and one compartment is connected with the top of the leaf by a
man-shaft, thus permitting of
inspection at any time.
"To remove any leakage which
may enter the air chambers or to
dewater in case a chamber should
be flooded, a centrifugal pumping
station is to be installed.
"As further interesting mechanical details, the hand railings
at the top of each leaf are provided with mechanism whereby
they can be collapsed and laid
This is
"" Coffee
House
^U Where everything is well
cooked and appetizing.
Our Pies, Cakes, Cookies,
Doughnuts, Bread and Buns, are
the best.
Try a pound can of our Special
Blend Coffee. There is none better anywhere.
Hazelton Bakery
Opposite Hazelton Hotel
Fifty-one Bunks of
Solid Comfort
Clean Beds, Clean Bunks,
Tobaccos, Cigars, Candies,
Nuts, Soft Drinks, Fruits in
Season, etc., etc.   ::   ::   ::
The Grand
Opposite  Hazelton Hotel
Ferguson  & Steele
Proprietors
v
A. Chisholm
General Hardware
Builders'   Material
Miners'  Supplies
Hazelton, B. C.
Why Buy a Ready-Made Mackinaw Suit when you can buy a
Tailor-Made
Mackinaw
Suit at <M 4
The beat Mackinaw %��j    JL *
manufactured If
Anger the Tailor
Hazelton, B. C.
experimental farms and stations. It behooves the residents of this
district to bring to the attention of Mr. Burrell, through our own
member, Mr. Clements, the claims of the Bulkley valley as the
proper site for an experimental farm. Such an institution will
prove of immense benefit to settlers in the agricultural sections of
Omineca district.
"A few of the provisions of the
specifications and contract dealing with the mechanical details
are of interest. The contract is
based on a pound price, and 2.62
cents per pound for structural
steel not erected. All material
after it is finished and ready
either for shipment to Panama
or for temporary erection at
Pittsburg, is carefully weighed
by Government inspectors. If
the final weight exceeds the
computed weight by a percentage
greater than (specified) factors,
the excess is not to be paid for.
"From the necessity of preventing rusting as much as possible, the specifications call for
the removal of all rust and mill-
scale by sand-blasting or by wire
brushing for surfaces that are to
be in contact after riveting, for
With the approach of cold weather and the consequent increase: the removal of all grease by
of danger from fire, it behooves townspeople to take steps for the means of gasoline, or other fluid,
protection of their property, The fire brigade, which has in the and the applying of a first coat
past proved its efficiency, should be assisted in its endeavor lo pro- of paint immediately after the
vide adequate (ire protection. It is also desirable that fire wardens cleansing has been finished and
for the season should be appointed. The position is one entailing1 before any oxidation has taken
a good deal of work; but it should not be diflicult to secure the ser- place. In order to hasten the
vices of responsible men. Residents of the town, when called work, pickling is also being used
upon, have always evinced the proper public spirit, and there is no for parts that are not in any
fear that they will be found wanting in this instance. I way assembled before shipping.
British Columbia University
In many respects British Columbia is in the front rank of
western provinces and states, and the institution of the new
provincial university, work upon which is about to commence, will
confirm her right to a foremost place. The university, which will
be located near Vancouver, will be modern in every respect, with
the additional advantage that to British Columbia students tuition
will be as free as in the public schools of the province. The
benefit of this innovation will be apparent to thousands who have
had to make sacrifices in order to obtain the higher education which
every intelligent man desires. The British Columbia University
will undoubtedly prove an important factor in the higher development of the province.
Season of Fire Danger
Quality Right
ARGENT
Prices Right
iSTf!
W
\
Automobile Scarfs
The latest and most sensible fad of the season is the
Automobile Scarf. We have just placed on sale a
large and varied assortment, in which you will find one
to suit you.
Mackinaw Suits
For the cold weather which will soon be here Mackinaw
Suits are the proper thing. Ours are of the best material
and manufacture.
Wagon Covers
The rainy season calls for wagon covers, which are exceeding useful, being convertible to many uses. We
have all sizes.
Buggy Robes in variety
.   The Famous Penetang Shoe Pacs
ARGENT
Hazelton
GENERAL MERCHANT
Telkwa THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1911.
6 i ���
K
i
Philips & Lindquist
Builders and Contractors
Plans and  Specifications.     Store and
Office Fixtures  a Specialty.
P. 0. box 812 Hazelton
Latest Jewelry Novelties in  Gold
and Silver.  High grade watches.
Watch Repairing.
O.A. RAGSTAD,   Hazelton
For Sale
Cordwood
Sawed in Stove Lengths if so
desired
Enquire of
H. COPPOCK, Hazelton
The Fast Launch
Kit-Ex-Chen"
Sealey-Hazelton
Route
Leaves Hazelton at 9 and 11 a. m., and
3:30 and 6:30 p. m.
Leaves Sealey 9:30 a. m., and 1, 4 and
7 p. m. Express Service.
O'Neill & Larocque, Props.
of lira
Recent Happenings���Topics
of General Interest Covered
in Condensed Form
WHATTHE WORLD IS DOING
Increase of American Emigration to
Canada���King May Lay Foundation
Stone of Provincial University���Rebellion in Persia
Hotel Premier
Prince Rupert
It is the best place to
stay. European and
American plan. Electric
lights, hot and cold running water on every
floor. No extra charge
for bath.     ::   ::    ::   ::
Rates:  $1 to $3 per day
Fred W. Henning, manager
~1
Mines and Mining
Good Properties for sale ��� Cash or on
Bond.       Development and
Assessment Work.
Carr Brothers
Six Years In This District.
Hazelton, B. C.
For Fine  Cigars,   Cigarettes
and Tobaccos go to
G.T.P.
Cigar Store and
Pool Room
Soft Drinks, Confectionery,
Books and Magazines
Baths In Connection
J. B. Brun,    - ���    Proprietor
For Sale
320 Acres of Land Locally Known
as
The Hart Cullen Ranch
In Kispiox Valley      Terms Easy
Price $10 Per Acre
H. Coppock, Hazelton
The copper mining interests of
the world are forming a merger,
with headquarters in London.
The provincial government will
add fifty acres to the site of the
university, making it 227 acres.
Sir Wilfrid Laurier, it is stated,
will be offered the position of
president of the Hague Peace
Tribunal.
Canadian customs receipts for
the first six months of the fiscal
year show an increase of ten'
million dollars.
The crew of the schooner El-
viera report seeing the formation
of a volcanic island off the Alaskan coast, near Bogoslov.
The fishery cruiser Kestrel,
well-known in northern waters,
has been condemned, and is not
likely to put to sea again.
The Canadian Pacific Railway
Company is making tests of oil
burning locomotives on the Pacific division west of Golden.
At the request of Mr. Borden,
Lord Strathcona will continue for
the present in the position of
High Commissioner for Canada
at London.
Dr. Joseph Bell, an eminent
Scottish surgeon, instructor of
Conan Doyle and the original of
the novelist's character of Sherlock Holmes, died last week.
One hundred and fifty thousand
dollars in gold bullion has been
recovered from the wreck of the
Ramona. The remainder of the
treasure, with the cargo, is a
total loss.
The Dominion government is
having forty-three reindeer from
Newfoundland conveyed to Port
Smith, on the Mackenzie. The
animals are intended for use in
carrying mail.
Preparations have been made
for taking a vote of all Presbyterians in Canada on the question
of the union of churches of that
denomination with the Methodists
and Congregationalists.
British Columbia will invite
King George to lay the cornerstone of the new provincial .university at Point Grey. Failing
the King, it is probable that the
Duke of Connaught will act.
The British navy is equipped
with a torpedo said to be effective at 10,0Q0 yards, or nearly
three times the range of the
most powerful projectile now
used in the United States navy.
Vancouver will be headquarters
for a large theatrical circuit,
managed by Alexander Pantages.
Vancouver is to have a theater
costing a quarter of a million,
while Victoria will have a $200,-
000 house.
The creation of a great fresh
water port out of the North Arm
of the Fraser River, as well as
the improvement of English Bay
and Burrard Inlet under municipal jurisdiction at a total expense
Of $10,000,000, is aproject which, Government to  stock  the  foresta of
is receiving consideration in Van- j
couver.   It is hoped to have the
plan   well   under  way for the'
opening of the Panama Canal.
Robert Bickerdike,  Liberal M.
British Columbia with red deer. A receiving station had been established in
New Westminster district and after
being kept there for a time the animals
were to be distributed to varions parts
of the province.     The  pending intro*-
,.,.���..       .       i iii    i duction  of these animals   to   British
P. for Montreal, when asked who \r ,    .. , . .   ,  ,   ,
r ,    ,       T .V ,   ��� Columbia has aroused a great deal of
caused  the   Liberal   defeat,   re- interest among sportsmen.���Province,
plied:    "I don't remember his
name; he's dead long ago, but
he's the man who wrote Rule
Britannia."
That the loss from forest fires
in the province of British Columbia during the past season has
been practically the lightest in
its history is the announcement
made by W. C. Gladwin, chief
provincial fire warden.
The second pulp plant in British Columbia, that at Powell
river, is ready to begin operations.   The plant, which is situ-
TOWNSITE POLICY
Land Agent Ryley Announces Plans for
G. T. P. Towns In Interior
The townsite of Ellison, situated not
far from the town of Hazelton at the
head of navigation on the Skeena River
on the route of the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railway, will probably be shifted to a
point about one mile east of the original location.
This announcement was made today
by Mr. G. U. Ryley of  Winnipeg, land
i commissioner of the Grand Trunk Paci-
I fie Railway.   Mr. Ryley. who has been
| on the coast for the last six weeks,
of
ated seventy-five miles from Van
couver, will employ 215 men, and (lurins which time he visited some
the northern townsites of the railroad
Acreage for Sale
Adjoining every important station on the Grand Trunk Pacific from
Prince Rupert to Fort George
FARM LANDS IN
Bulkley, Kispiox, Kitwangar, Nechaco Valleys, Francois Lake,
Ootsa Lake, Fraser Lake, Trembleur Lake and Lakelse Lake
BRITISH COLUMBIA BROKERAGE COMPANY
Box 20, Hazelton, B. C.
J
will produce 80 tons of paper a
day.
Persian despatches say a battle
between insurgents and government forces was fought fifty
miles from Teheran, with the result that the brother of the deposed Shah, who led the rebels,
lost 400 killed and 200 captured.
He is in retreat.
The National Industrial Peace
association, having as its chief
aim the adjustment of all industrial disoutes throughout the Dominion, has been inaugurated at
Vancouver. It is intended to organize the association in every
industrial center.
Professor Ostrand, of the geological department of the University of New York, after traveling through this district, by way
of Babine lake, to the upper plateau, has returned to New York
to tell of the wonderful mineral
possibilities of the northern interior.
During the first five months of
the current fiscal year 212,854
immigrants arrived in Canada.
Of these 71,833 were from the
United States. There is an increase of 42 per cent, in the number of American immigrants in
August over the same month
last year.
"British Columbia is second to
none in its resources and people,
and after having seen this wonderful province I congratulate
Canada doubly in not having
shared this magnificent heritage
with any other nation," said Lord
Charles Beresford, after a visit
to the northern interior.
Announcement is made of a
complete reorganization of the
executive of the Grand Trunk
railway. The old offices of vice-
presidents have been arranged so
that there are no longer first,
second or third vice-presidents,
each in charge of a department.
The official circle in the Grand
Trunk Pacific is also somewhat
changed.
company, left for his headquarters in
Winnipeg last night.
"We are now considering the removal of the townsite of Ellison," said Mr.
Ryley today. "We plan to carry it to
a more favorable location than the original position. One mile east of the
present site the ground is, we believe,
better suited to townsite purposes. The
townsite, in its new location, will be
only one and a half miles distant from
Hazelton.
"It is the intention of the company to
shortly place on the market the town-
site at the west end of Fraser lake.
This point is the center of a district of
rich agricultuial possibilities, about 130
miles west of Fort George. The surveys of this townsite have been completed and the Provincial Government
last week selected its lots in accordance
with the requirements of the land act
providing for the reversion to the government of a proportion of townsited
land. "���Province.
All members of Omineca Aerie,
1959, Fraternal Order of Eagles,
are requested to be present at
the next meeting, Tuesday, Oct.
18th, at Eagles Hall. Important
business.
L. L. DeVoin,   J. A. Macdonald,
President. Secretary.
A. Price Augustine, C.E.
British Columbia   Land  Surveyor
Will return to Hazelton about Nov. 1,
1911. Orders for land, timber or mineral claim surveys will be received at
the office of Aldous, Robertson &
Murray, Hazelton.
RED DEER BARRED
Late  Government   Blocked Importation
of Game for B. C.
Because the Liberal government at
Ottawa declared that red deer were
ruminating animals and might be infected with foot and mouth disease said
to be prevalent among sheep in Great
Britain the importation of a large herd
of these animals to British Columbia
from the old country this fall was prevented. It is intimated that now there
has been a change in the political complexion of the power at Ottawa the embargo will be removei', but so far as
immediate shipment of the deer is concerned the mischief has been done and
it will bo impossible to bring the animals
to thiB province till next fall.
Months ago the British Columbia government made arrangements for the
importation of the deer and a large
herd was picked, crated and landed on
the docks at Liverpool for shipment.
It was then the Dominion authorities
Btepped in with a claim that because
they were ruminating animals the deer
might be infected with foot and mouth (
disease. Veterinaries who examined j
the deer declared they were free from j
any disease and were in excellent con- j
dition, but the Dominion authorities i
remained obdurate, even in the face of j j
representations made by Hon. W. J. j
Bowser, attorney-general of British: [
Columbia, that the animals should be I \
permitted to land in Canada. | j
It ll the intention of the Provincial i 4
j It is important
| for you to
j |__ _,.. that I have stock and
1 IvllUW appliances to turn out
I all kinds of CARRIAGE WORK,
I special    Sleighs,    Wagon     and
j Sleigh  Brakes,   Etc.
j ���������
|   C. F.WILLIS
l      General Blacksmith
! Repairing Job Work
( Horseshoeing a Specialty
FRESHFRUIT
Bananas 75c a dozen
Lemons 60c "
Oranges 7 5c "
$10" case
Apples $4 50 to $5
a box
1
Onions $8 a crate
Hudson's Bay Company
���
Omineca Hotel
Hazelton
^ This hotel is headquarters for all mining and commercial men
visiting Omineca district.
Good Sample Rooms
Baths and Barber Shop
Hot and Cold Water
People desiring to visit Bulkley Valley and points south may
travel by the Bulkley Valley Stage, which leaves this hotel for Aider-
mere and Telkwa every Tuesday and Friday.
J. C. K. Sealy, Prop.
HAZELTON, B. C.
_!
Public Telephone
Hazelton
Two-Mile
Taylorville
Sealey
HAZELTON OFFICE:
SUNGER & AYERDE
CIGAR STORE
1
Draying
All orders promptly and carefully
executed
E. C. Stephens
Leave your orders at C. F. Willis'
Blacksmith Shop
"~*k#
MEN'S WEAR
that gives Satisfaction,
and Reliable
Boots and Shoes
are Specialties at
LARKWORTHY'S
STORES
Hazelton and Sealey
J
J. F. Macdonald     Furniture Dealer
Hazelton, B.C.
As our slock is insufficient to carry us through the
winter, we have decided to offer our goods at
Reduced Prices
while they last. We have a large assortment to select from, and would
advise you to select your winter's House Furnishings while procurable.
Come and inspect our goods, we guarantee our customers satisfaction
J. F. Macdonald     Furniture Dealer
&
FORWARDING
EXPRESS CO.
HAZELTON, B. C.
Stage leaves every Friday and every Tuesday morning
at 8 o'clock for. Aldermere and Telkwa. Returning,
leaves Aldermere and Telkwa Tuesday and Friday
arriving  here  Wednesday   and   Saturday   at   noon.
Horses for hire for private parties.
Horses, Oats, Wheat and Bran for sale.
E. E. Charleson, Manager
The Omineca Miner $2 a year THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER~14, 1911.
mmasm
The Hub of the Hazelton District of British Columbia
On the Main line of the Grand Trunk Pacific
REGISTERED TOWNSITE
The Prosperity of Every Great City is Due to its Geographical Location
HAZ
The most important Townsite!    The most talked of Townsite on the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
THE SPOKANE OF CANADA THE SPOKANE OF CANADA
New Hazelton Townsite
Section 1
Now being offered for sale is not a
Grand Trunk Pacific Promotion
Townsite. NEW HAZELTON Town-j
site was selected by the experts of
a syndicate of successful men as the
geographical location for a big city.
They bought the land, realizing the
wonderful resources of the HAZELTON
District, the Minks, the Distributing Centre for hundreds ok milks,
and mitfiy other reasons.
We ask you to investigate in your
own way all of the statements in this
advertisement. Should you join us
by buying lots you will know that
your investment is guarded by every
means known to human foresight,
and the judgment of a body of successful men known to you all.
Your profits should eclipse the story
of Edmonton, Calgary, Kegina, Moose
.law or Prince Rupert.
Don't bk CLASSED among thk fail-
urks who will say, "1 wish i had
known." Don't stand idly by and
see your neighbors reap the profits
on Real Estate while you reap
nothing but your salary. Put your
savings to work in that sure coming
City   NEW HAZELTON.
NEW HAZELTON is out of the
damp belt, aud many people who
spend the whole year in the district
say the winters are not severe plenty
of sunshine and dry air.
Taken from Official bulletin, B.C.,
No. xxii. Page xxiii:���
"lln the Upper Skeena, about a
distance of 60 miles, there are large
tracts of land on both sides of the
river, which, as far as soil and climatic conditions are concerned, I
Would consider ideal for successful
growing of fruit as well as for other
branches of agriculture. Potatoes,
anil all garden produce, grow to perfection."
HAVE YOU CONFIDENCE OF
MERCHANTS ON THE GROUND?
Many Lots alrkady purchased
by thk keenest business men of
Hazelton (Old Town). You can
safely follow the judgment of
SUCH MEN,
NEW HAZELTON should be the
centre of a busy population of thousands within a year. Why not? During the past year there was an average of over two new towns created
in the Canadian West every week.
We arc all here to share in this
most wonderful prosperity. We offer
you an opportunity to participate In
the progress of the best town for
investment on the line of the Grand
Trunk Pacific.
NEW HAZELTON Railroads Open
New Country,
Railroads have been the great feature
in the growth of Western Canada.
NEW HAZELTON, located on the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad is attracting the attention of the whole world, as
all important towns do on the main line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad.
Stores are going up. Newspaper
plant about to move on the Townsite.
Two or three General Merchandise
Stores, Drug Store, Bank, Restaurants, and in fact many lines of trade
are now arranging to open in NEW
HAZELTON, Section One. Activity
is in that part of the Townsite known
as Section One.
INVESTMENTS
Made in towns with the
Right Kind of Country
Right Kind of Resources
Right Kind of People
Will surely be big paying investments.   This is the kind
of town you find at
NEW HAZELTON, B.C.
The story of NEW HAZELTON is I The Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad is
well known to the public. It is a j now running regular trains over 100
Townsite being offered to the public | miles out of Prince Rupert. The G. T.
by successful business men. THERE IS i P. Officials, and also the G. T. P. Con-
PosiTlVELY NO Railroad COMPANY OR | tractors, say that the railroad should be
Townsite Promoter financially interested in THE land. The owners
have undertaken to make NEW HAZELTON a city of importance in British
Columbia. NEW HAZELTON promises to be the most profitable city to
the Grand Trunk Pacific along its main
lines.
Out of City Investors
Can reserve one or more Lots by
wire or letter. State price of Lots and
number required, and we will make the
best available reservation for you.
Remember NEW HAZELTON is
not a gift Townsite, and when you
buy a lot in it you are investing
your money on the business judgment of the most successful men in
British Columbia.
NEW HAZELTON Townsite had
over a QUARTER OF A MILLION
DOLLARS INVESTED by a few business men before the Lots were offered for sale. NEW HAZELTON is a
Business Man's Townsite. All the G.
T. P. and local history was carefully
considered. The Engineers' Reports as
to grades, opportunities for Side Tracks
necessary to handle the thousands of
freight cars were examined. Then
they invested in NEW HAZELTON.
They paid in Cash for NEW HAZELTON and nearby lands over TWO
HUNDRED AND FIFTY THOUSAND. DOLLARS.
That, is a wonderful sonnet written by
John J. Ingallson the subject of Opportunity, but the real fact is Opportunity
does not knock once on each man's
door. Opportunity plays a continual
anvil on every man's portals -but of
course, if he is knocking at the time he
will not hear Opportunity when she
knocks.
Pay Office Completed
Supt. Sheppard, of Foley, Welch &
Stewart has wired Prince Rupert office
to move everything AT ONCE.
Union Bank of Canada will open a
branch in NEW HAZELTON. Sectional
building and supplies en route for new
branch.
NEW HAZELTON, the hub of the
Hazelton District, will be the natural
headquarters for what promises to be
the    MOST    ACTIVE    AND    SENSATIONAL
new city in the fastest growing part
of the world today on account of the
wonderful Lead and Zinc Mines, the
Groundhog Mountain Coal Fields, the
vast agricultural country tributary to j
the coming principal city in British j
Columbia on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railroad.
running  to  Mile  164  this winter, and
will     reach     NEW    HAZELTON
next  summer.    Grading   is   now    under   way   as far   along   the   line  as
30 miles  east  of  NEW  HAZELTON.
The   grading   is  about   finished   from
Prince Rupert to NEW HAZELTON.
Many mines are getting ready to ship,.
ore.    Some of the mines being developed
are: Silver Cup, American Boy, Silver)    Where the Grand Trunk Pacific Rail-
Standard,   Sunrise   and  Sunset,   Lead j road has Sixty  Acres of. right-of-way
King, Erie,  Babine.    Most of the ore i and track grounds,
in  NEW  HAZELTON  mines  is high |    NEW  HAZELT0N  is   reported  by
grade Silver-Lead, similar to ore in the j EnKjneers to be the only avai|ttble 8pot
in   the   Skeena or Bulkley Valleys for
many miles each way where it would
New Hazelton
Slocan District in East Kootenay,
B.C., and similar to some ores found at
Leadville, Colo.
Buy Lots
Terms Are Easy
Look them over again,  and  think of
this money-making investment.
Prices:
Business Lots    -    $350 to $500
33 x 100 (according to location) Per Lot
Terms: One-third cash, balance 1 and 2 years at 6 per cent
Residence Lots  -   $100 to $300
Terms: $10 cash, $10 per month; No Interest; or One-
third  cash ;   balance 1 and 2 years at 6 per cent.
Make Cheques, Drafts, Money and Express Orders payable to NORTHERN INTERIOR LAND CO., LTD.
be possible to have Railroad Yards large
enough to handle the Hazelton District's
business.
NEW HAZELTON affords a long,
nearly level, stretch of land suitable for
Immense Yards, which will be required
to handle the thousands of cars of ore
and coal that will be shipped from the
mines in the Hazelton District.
The G. T. P.
CAPITAL of Grand Trunk Railway
and the Grand Trunk Railway Systems,
$447;898,932.
Over 50,000 Stockholders, G. T. and
G. T. P. Millions of people boost for
Grand Trunk Pacific Townsites.
Maximum grade of G. T. P. is 21 feet
to the mile, one-fifth of any other Transcontinental Railroad in Canada or the
United States.
NEW HAZELTON is the Town that
everybody is talking about, and there
are no two opinions as to its opportunities for investments.
NEW HAZELTON is situated near
the junction of the Skeena and Bulkley
Valleys.
THE NORTHERN INTERIOR LAND
CO., LTD., PAID CASH FOR AND
OWN (SECTIONONE) NEW HAZELTON TOWNSITE AND GUARANTEE
TO DELIVER TO PURCHASERS OF
LOTS AN INDEFEASIBLE TITLE
UPON RECEIPT OF FINAL PAYMENT.
V   \
ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO
Northern Interior Land Co., Ltd.
Prince Rupert, B.C.
P. O. Box 1515
Prince Rupert Agent for Sale of Lots
Jeremiah H. Kugler, Ltd.
Second Avenue between Fifth and Sixth Sts.
Hazelton Agent for Sale of Lot*
W. Kennedy
I
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'
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THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1911
\
|,
Tripoli Described
N Tripoli, over which war has
broken out, is a Turkish vilayet
or province in North Africa. It
occupies a position just west of
Egypt, and has an area of 400,000
square miles and a population of
about a million. It is almost a
purely agricultural country, having no manufactures whatever,
and no mineral products except
salt. There is a lucrative sponge
fishery in the Mediterranean.
Trade before the supression of
the oversea slave traffic was
largely in negroes brought across
the Sahara with other Sudan produce for the Turkish market. It
now consists chiefly in the export of barley, eggs, cattle,
sponges, mats, ivory, ostrich
feathers and gold dust from the
interior. Sheep are also exported
in large numbers. With Egypt
there is a large overland as well
as sea trade.
The imports consist of flour,
rice, tea, si r, cottons, tobacco,
metals and hardware. There is
also a contraband trade with
Greece and Malta in firearms and
gunpowder.
The people are principally Berbers and Arabs, with an admixture of negroes and negroid intruders from the Sudan. There
are also colonies of Turks, Italians,
Greeks, Maltese and other people
of South Europe.
Tripoli, the capital, is one of
the most ancient cities of the
world. It is situated on a promontory stretching into the Mediterranean and forming a small
crescent shaped bay, which shelters the harbor from the north
winds. The harbor contains
deep water, but shoals render
the entrance difficult. The city
is picturesque from a distance,
containing many Turkish mosques and minarets. It is oriental
in appearance though there are
some European buildings near
the shore.
Tripoli city is essentially a
trading center with a Berber,
Arab, Turk, Jewish, Italian,
Maltese, Greek and negro population of about 50,000. The
place was founded by the Greeks
earlier than the seventh century
before Christ, and was then
known as Oea. It owes its
stability in a large measure to its
position over against Sicily, from
which it is 450 miles distant. It
has been for centuries the northern terminus for three great
caravan routes, the first crossing
the narrowest part of the Sahara
to Lake Chad, the second running
southwest to Timbuktu, and the
third ending in the southeast in
Wadai. Near the port stands a
Roman triumphal arch which was
begun in the reign of Emperor
Antonius and completed in that
of Marcus Aurelius.
Cyrenaica, one of the provinces,
first colonized by the Greeks,
fell under the sway of the Egypt
of the Ptolemies. Tripoli proper
passed to the Romans after the
fall of Carthage, was conquered
by the Vandals in the fifth century and passed under Arab control two hundred years later. In
1510 Spain secured control. In
1528, the Knights of St. John
were given possession, but were
expelled by the Turks. The control of Constantinople weakened
in the succeeding centuries and
the city became the headquarters
of pirates. Half the states of
Europe seem at one time or another to have sent fleets against
these scourges. Early in the
last century the United States
became involved in a war with
the Pasha of the country because
of a refusal to increase the tribute
of $83,000 a year which the
American government had been
paying for the protection of its
commerce.
In 1835 the Turks took advantage of a civil war to reassert
their direct authority and since
that date Tripoli has been an
integral part of the Ottoman empire. There were rebellions in
1842 and 1844 but they were
unsuccessful.
The trouble between Turkey
and Italy, which culminated in a
declaration of war, dates back to
1878, when with the making of
the treaty concluding the Russo-
Turkish war the powers are
understood to have agreed to
permit Italy a "pacific penetration of Tripoli." Turkey claims
that this has been respected ever
since.
Italy has colonized Tripoli, and
her interests in the African
province are very great. She
has asserted, however, that her
subjects have been mistreated by
the Ottoman authorities and constantly discriminated against.
COAL NOTICES
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
licence to prospect for coal ancl petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted one-
quarter mile east of the east bank of
Moss river and one-quarter mile north
of the Skeena river, at the south-east
corner of Lot 2195, Cassiar district;
thence 80 chains north, 80 chains east,
80 chains south, 80 chains west to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less, known as Fred Hasler's
coal claim No. I. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 16, 1911.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of lot 2196, Cassiar
district, thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less, known as
Fred Hasler's coal claim No. 2.
Sept. 16, 1911. Fred Hasler.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner of Lot 996, Cassiar
district, thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west to point of commencement, containing 640 cres more or less, known as
Fred Hasler's coal claim No. 3.
Sept. 16, I9II. Fred Hasler.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner of Lot 2179, Cassiar
district, thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less, known
as Fred Hasler's coal claim No. 4.
Sept. 16, 1911. Fred Hasler.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 2195, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, 80 chains east to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 5. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, I9II.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 2196, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, 80 chains east to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 6. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, I9II.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 996, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, 80 chains east to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 7. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, I9II.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 2179, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, 80 chains east to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 8. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, I9II.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 2195, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 9. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, I9IL
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, mine]', intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petro
lonm over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 2196, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hnsler's coal
claim No. 10. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, 1911.
COAL NOTICES
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 996, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. II. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, I9II.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 2179, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 12. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, 1911.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted three,
miles east and one mile south of the
south-east corner of Lot 2195, Cassiar
district, thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres more or less, known as Fred
Hasler's coal claim No. 13.
Sept. 19, I9II. Fred Hasler.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 2195, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 14. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, I9II.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribedlands:
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 2196, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing C40 acres, more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 15. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, I9II.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 996, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 16. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, I9II.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
"Commencing at a post pl'inted four
miles east and one mile south of the
south-east corner of lot 2195, Cassiar
district, thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less, known
as Fred Hasler's coal claim No. 17.
Sept. 19, I9II. Fred Hasler.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 2195, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 18. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, I9II.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing nt a post planted four
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 2196, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 19. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, 1911.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribedlands:
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 996, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 20. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, 1911.
LIQUOR LICENCE APPLICATION
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the
fifteenth day of November next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for a renewal
of the hotel licence to sell liquor by retail in the hotel known as the Ingineca
Hotel, situate at Hazelton, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 7th day of October, 1911.
10 McDONELL & McAFEE.
LIQUOR LICENCE APPLICATION
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the
fifteenth day of November next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for a renewal
of the hotel licence to sell liquor by retail in the hotel known as the Omineca
Hotel, situate at Hazelton, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 7th day of October, 1911.
10 JOHN C. K. SEALY.
LIQUOR LICENCE APPLICATION
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the
fifteenth day of November next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for a renewal
of the licence for the sale of liquors by
wholesale in and upon the premises
known as the Hudson's Bay Company's
store, situate at Hazelton, B. C., upon
the lands described as lots 6 and 7,
Hazelton townsite.
Dated this 7th day of October, 1911.
10 J. C. BOYD, Applicant.
Sale of lands for unpaid
delinquent taxes in the
Omineca Assessment District, Province of British
Columbia.
I   HEREBY   GIVE    NOTICE   that
the above sale is postponed until
Thursday, the sixteenth day of
November, A. D. 1911.
C. W. HOMER,
Assessor and Collector, Omineca
Assessment District.
Hazelton, B. C, Sept. 20, 1911.
WATER NOTICE.
I, Daniel A. Harris, of Hazelton,
B.C., by occupation a miner, give notice
that I intend, on the 21st day of November next, at eleven o'clock in the
forenoon, to apply to the Water Commissioner at hisoffice at Hazelton, B.C.,
for a licence to take and use 20 cubic
feet of water per second from Robson
lake, Two Mile creek, a tributary of
the Bulkley river.
The water will be used on the American Boy Group of mining claims for
milling and mining purposes.
(Signature) Daniel A. Harris.
Dated this 20th day of September, 1911.
8
LIQUOR ACT, 1910
(Section 42)
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the
fifteenth day of November next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for  a renewal
of the hotel licence to sell liquor by  retail in   the  hotel  known  as   the   New
Telkwa Hotel, situate at Telkwa, in the
province of British Columbia.
Dated this 7th day of October, 1911.
GEORGE HENRY McDONELL,
10 Applicant.
LAND NOTICES
Omineca Land District���District of
Coast, Range V.
Take notice that Hugh McKay, of
Hazelton, B. C, contractor intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of Lot 913, Coast
Range V, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement and containing 320 acres
more or less. Hugh McKay.
August 21, 1911.
Omineca Land District.     District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Thomas Hurley, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a postplanted at the
n.-e. corner of lot 811, Cassiar, thence
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Sept. 7, 1911. Thomas Hurley.
13
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar
Take notice that Angus J. Chisholm,
of Aldermere, farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
s.-e. corner of lot 811, Cassiar, thence
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Sept. 7, 1911. Angus J. Chisholm.
13
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Alexander Chisholm,
of Aldermere, farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
s.-e. corner of lot 813, Cassiar, thence
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Sept. 7, 1911. Alexander Chisholm.
13
LIQUOR ACT, 1910
(Section 49)
NOTICE Is hereby given that, on the
fifteenth day of November next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for the transfer
of the licence for the sale of liquor by
retail in and upon the premises  known
as the New Telkwa  Hotel,   situate  at
Telkwa, British Columbia,  from W. S.
McDonell to George   Henry   McDonell,
of British Columbia.
Dated this 7th day of October, 1911.
W. S. McDONELL, (Deceased)
Holder of Licence.
R. J. McDONELL, Executor.
GEORGE HENRY McDONELL,
10 Applicant for Transfer.
"PUBLIC INQUIRIES ACT."
His Honour the Lieutenant-Governor
in Council has been pleased to appoint
the Honourable Albert Edward McPhil-
lips, K.C., President of the Executive
Council; the Honourable Price Ellison.
Minister of Finance; Charles Henry Lu-
grin, of the City of Victoria, Esquire;
and William Harold Malkin, of the City
of Vancouver, Esquire, to be Commissioners under the "Public Inquiries
Act" for the purpose of enquiring into
ami reporting upon the operation of the
"Assessment Act, 1903, with respect
to its practical bearings on the financial
requirements of the Province.
The said Commissioners will hold their
meetings on the dates and at the places
mentioned hereunder, namely:
Victoria,   at   the   Executive Council
Chamber,    Parliament    Buildings.
Monday and Tuesday, 26th and 26th
September   at   10   a.m.     At   the
Court-nouse   or    the   Government
Office at the following places:���
Nanaimo, Wednesday and Thursday,
27th and 28th September.
Vancouver, Friday and Saturday, 29th
and 30th September.
New Westminster, Monday, 2nd October.
Rcvelstokc, Wednesday, 4th October.
Golden, Thursday, 5th October.
Cranbrook, Saturday, 7th October.
Fernie, Monday, 9th October.
Nelson, Wednesday, 11th October.
RoBsland, Thursday, 12th October.
Grand Forks, Friday, 13th Obtober.
Princeton, Saturday, 14th October.
Merritt, Monday, Kith October.
Kamloops, Tuesday, 17th October.
Summerland, Thursday, 19th October.
Penticton, Friday, 20th October.
Kelowna, Saturday, 21st October.
Vernon, Monday, 23rd October.
It is requested that all persons who
are interested in the matter aforesaid,
and who desire to be heard, will not fail
to be present at the meetings  of  the
Commissioners.
PRICE ELLISON,
Chairman.
Treasury Department,
lUtli September, 1911. 8
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserves exist.
inK over vacant Crown lamis in Ranges -i and ft,
Coast District, notices .if which, bearing dates of
May 5th, 1910 and Mav 25th, 1810, respectivly, were
published in the issues or the British Columbia
Qasette of May 5th and May 20th. 1910, are eaneell- '
ed in so far as the same relates lo lands surveyed <
as Lots 7s!i, 786, 787, 7SS, 789, 790, 791. 7!Ua, 792 799
794, 796, 866, .sr,7, 966, 969, 860. mil, 882, MB, 864, 866
BOD, 867, 868, 869, 870, 871, B72,.878, 1168, 1169. 1160.
1164, 1166, 1166, 1162. 1168, 1169, 467, I(1K. 847. 1174
1176, llh2, II89, 1191, 1192, 12111a, 1188, 11K7, 1190,
788, 788, 784. 781. 781), 818, 777a, 711 and 1186. all in
Ran(?o4, Coast Distriel; and Lots 2188a, 1629, 1028
9814 and i!826, all in ItatiKe 5, Coast Distriet.
ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands,
Department of Lands.
Victoria. Ii. C��� Aujt. 16, 1911. n-30 <
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserve existing on vacant lands of the Crown, notice of which
was published In the British Columbia Gazette In the
issue of May r,th, 1910, and bearing date of
May 5th, 1910, is cancelled in so far as the
same relates to the lands surveyed as Lots 2:117,
2318, 2319, 2320. 2321, 2322, 2323. 2324, 2325, 2326,
2327, 2329, 2330, 2331, 2332. 2334, 2335, 2336. 2337,
2339, 2341, 2342, 2343. 2347, 2348, 2.148A, 8849, i860,
2358, 2369, 2468, 3113, 3114, 3115, 8116, 3117,3118,3119,
3120, 3121, 3122, 3123, 3124, 3125, 3126, 3127, 3128, 3129.
3130, 8181, 3132. 3133, 3131, 3135, 3136 3137. 3138, 3139,
3140, 8141, 3142, 3142a, 3143, 3144, 3146, 3146. 3147.
3148, 3148a. 3149. 3150, 3151, 3152, 3153, 3154. 3155.
3150, 3167, 3158, 3159, 3160. 3161, 3162, 8168, 3164, 3166,
3166, 3167. 3108, 3169. 3176, 3171, 3172,3173,3174,3175.
3170, 3177, 3178, 3179, 3184. 3187,3187 ami 3188. Range
5, Coast District. ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, Auk. 16, 1911. n-30
WATER NOTICE
We, Charles Monroe, Free Miner's
Certificate No. B20996, and Thomas
Harrison, Free Miner's Certificate No.
20997, give notice that we intend, on
the fourteenth day of November next,
at eleven o'clock in the forenoon, to
apply to the Water Commissioner at his
office at Hazelton, B.C., for a license to
take and use five and six-tenths cubic
feet of water per second from Canyon
creek, a tributary of Fall river.
The water will he used on the hydraulic lease situated on the left bank
of Quartz creek, two and a half miles
from its junction with Fall river, for
placer mining purposes.
CHARLES MONROE.
THOMAS HARRISON.
Dated this 22nd day of September,
1911. 9
FOR SALE
A copy of the latest edition of "The
Americana," compiled by the Scientific
American Compiling Dept., comprising
16 volumes, price $175.00, has been
placed in our hands for sale. Full particulars obtainable at our office.
R, Cunningham & Son, Ltd.
HAZELTON HOSPITAL^
for uny period from one month upward at $1 per
month in advance. This rate includes office consultations and medicines, as well as all costs while
in the hospital. Tickets obtainable in Hazelton
from E. C. Stephenson and Fred Field; in Aider-
mere, from Hev. F. L. Stephenson, or at the Hob-
pitnl from the Medical Superintendent,
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby Riven that the reserve existing on vacant Crown lands in Range 5, Coast District, notice of which, bearing date of May 25th,
1910, was published in the British Columbia Gazette
of May ::���'>', li, 1910, is cancelled In so far as the same
relates to the lands surveyed as Lots 187*5, 1S78,
1879, 1890, 1893, 189-1, IB96, 189o. 1897, 1898, 1900,
2507, 2608, 2509, 2510, 2ftU and 2512, Range 5, Coast
District. ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of Lands,
Victoria, B. C, Aug. 16, 1911. n-30
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
partnership lately subsisting between
us the undersigned, Allan Cameron
Aldous, Struan George Robertson and
William Pitt Murray, carrying on business at Hazelton, British Columbia, has
been dissolved as from Slat August by
mutual consent, so far as regards the
said Struan George Robertson, who retires from the firm.
All debts due to or owing by the late
firm will be received anil will be paid by
the said Allan Cameron Aldous and
William Pitt Murray, who will continue
the said business under the present style
of Aldous & Murray.
As witness our hands this 1st day of
October, 1911.
Allan CAMERON Aldous.
Stkuan George Robertson,
William Pitt Murray.
Stephenson & Crum
Undertakers and
Funeral Directors
Special attention to Shipping Cases
Hazelton, B. C.
"Everything in Canvas"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
Prince Rupert, B.C
FOR SALE
Ten Acres Cleared
Land, with House, two
miles from Hazelton.
Apply to
H. Coppock, Hazelton
F. W. HART & CO.
Furniture
and House Furnishings   Complete
Funeral Directors, Embalmers
Special attention to orders from out of
town.
Prince Rupert
Hudson's Bay Company's Steamers
"Port Simpson" and "Hazelton"
Flat Freight Rate $25 per ton, plus Railroad Charges
Passenger Fares:    Hazelton to Newtown $11, including berth
Newtown to Hazelton $12.50, including berth
The Str. Port Simpson meets the Wednesday train anil the Str. Hazelton meets
the Saturday train. Passengers   will find accommodation on hoard steamers.
(f~-
^
Fairbanks-Morse
Gasoline Donkey
The lightest, most compact
hoisting apparatus
obtainable
No Licensed Operator Required
Used by the Dominion and Provincial Governments
V
Can  be  also   used   to pump water, saw wood or
clear land
Largest stock of Gasoline Engines and Machinery west of
Montreal
For particulars write
The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd.
101-107 Water St.
Vancouver, B. C. ���t
THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 14, 1911.
CHURCH OF ENGLAND
ST. PETBU'S,  HAZBLTON
Sunday Services: Morning nt n o'clock; Sunday
School nt y.:(u p.m.; Native service, 3.80 p.m.;
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Rev, j. Field,
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
MAZMLTON
Services   ht'M   every  Sunday evening in   tilt
Church Room sii 7.30 o'clock.
Rev. I). R. McLean,
Sor
ii the church bullillii
Servlc
I'clock i
machine work at company headquarters.
Paul H. Moore, of San Francisco, has returned home, after
making investments in Bulkley
vallev land.
Twelve hundred feet of corduroy has been  laid  on  the new
CHURCH OF ENGLAND
HEALEY
held every Sunday nfternoonat8 o'clock   Section Of the mail! road through
, terson'a road. ,,        fT       ,.
NEW  HAZELTON Nt'W   Ha/.t'lton.
held every   Sunday evening at  "::��>
to Church Tent,
L. C. Li
Local and Personal
All river steamers are in operation.
W. J. Driver was in from the
Valley yesterday.
J. W. Austin has gone to Prince
Rupert for the winter.
Mrs. Boyce left on the Port
Simpson for Prince Rupert.
George McKenzie was in from
Morricetown during the week.
Mrs. St. Denis was a passenger
for Prince Rupert on the Conveyor.
George Cunningham of R.
Cunningham & Son, Ltd., is in
town.
Walter Williscroft returned on
Tuesday from his visit to the
capital.
Mr. and Mrs. E.'O'Shaughnessy
and Miss Moe have .none to Vancouver for the winter.
Mrs. A. 0. Franks came from
Prince Rupert on Thursday, to
join her husband here.
W. H. Stewart has left Prince
The Port Simpson arrived from
the end of steel on Thursday,
with a full cargo and a number
of passengers.
Fred Hasler left for Vancouver
on Tuesday, to transact business
in connection with his coal holdings in the Groundhog district.
The Hudson's Bay company is
shipping a large Sibley furnace
and pipe to the Silver Standard,
to serve as ventilating apparatus.
A. P. Augustine, the surveyor,
went to Bulkley valley on Tuesday, to survey a number of pieces
of land. He will return about
Nov. 1.
Deputy-registrar Kirby is sending to Prince Rupert a dozen
applications for naturalization.
These will be submitted to the
judge on November 6.
Frank Martin has gone to
Hudson Bay mountain, with the
object of bringing out a couple of
horse loads of the native silver
ore from the recent discovery
there.
P. B. Carr has gone up to the
Carr   Bros' ranch, accompanied
tive, has returned to Vancouver
to arrange for the development
of the new townsite across the
Bulkley river from Hazelton.
Frank Johnson's pack train
took a cargo to the Chicken lake
store of Broughton & McNeil,
and is now making the last trip
of the season, taking goods to
Aldermere for the same firm.
J. C. K. Sealy is sending out to
his ranch a large amount of powder for use in stumping. He has
now fifty acres under cultivation,
and 200 acres cleared, of which
as much as possible will be
plowed this fall.
D. D. Sprague has returned to
service in the engineering corps
of the G. T. P., after spending
several months at his home in
Ontario. With Mrs. Sprague he
has taken up his residence at the
headquarters camp.
T. J. Thorp came down from
Aldermere on Tuesday. He is
en route to the coast, with a probable trip to England in view, but
expects to return in the spring to
the Bulkley valley, where he has
a number of interests.
Mrs. Hirst, of Victoria, who
has been visiting her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Sharpe, has
has returned to her home in Victoria, accompanied by her son
Ivor and Mr. Sharpe, who will
spend the winter in the provincial
capital.
Arthur Skelhorne, of the B. C.
Brokerage company, returned on
w. tt. Stewart has ett Prince u,, T H Huruor;n��rfnn *-110-���+ ��"��""��*<�� "�����"��i ����*�������* ��..
Runert to ioin the draftinc force 7 r\ Heflwringjon. teller at Monday from a business trip of
Kupert to Join the drafting to. ce; the Union Bank> who Wl]1 spend * ��\
,    l   ..,1. imw-m-n '""', "seven weeks duration.    He visi-
'a bn,ef vacatlon as Suest at the ted the principal coast cities, and
at G. T
The Galena Club is offering a
Stetson hat for the highest score
at box ball up to October 20.
The G. T. P. hotel at Prince
Kupert is to be seventeen stories
high, and will cost $1,500,000.
Rev. J. Walter Guy. offelkwa,
returned home yesterday, after
spending a couple of days in town.
Seventy sacks of mail were received at the local postoffice during the first three days of the
week.
Nelson Gay, formerly at Skeena
ranch.
Cataract, resulting from the
recent injury to his eye, makes
it necessary for G. A. Rosenthal
to undergo an operation, and he
will leave for Vancouver on the
Inlander.
Arthur L. Ford, Dominion
government engineer, was in
town for a few days, passing G.
T. P. contractors' estimates. He
returned to Prince Rupert on
Wednesday.
J. G. Halleran, the Natural Re-
crossing,   is now engaged  upon sources Security Co.'s representa-
���ro��raif^tf>63Bifo��agi^3Kasaji
100 Cases
Rubber Goods
arrived on the
Inlander
R. Cunningbam & Son, Ltd.
Hazelton
BMttku^fcW2*&��*fcd
DRY LUMBER
Ready for Building in the
New Town
^
Get prices from us before you build in New Hazelton.        We
arc ready with the goods
V:
Interior  Lumber Company
Hazelton
found public attention attracted
to the lands and mines of this
district.
Frank A. Jackson, the Groundhog coal man, went to Sealey on
the Kit-Exchen on Tuesday and
caught the Conveyor for the
coast, where he goes to perfect
plans for the next season's operations on his company's big coal
property.
A despatch from Prince Rupert
states that the county court will
be in session there for at least
another week, and Judge Young
cannot fix a date for the expected
sitting in Hazelton. It is unlikely that court will be held here
before spring,
T. T. Dunlop, assistant superintendent of construction for
Foley, Welch & Stewart, returned on Wednesday from a
month's vacation, which he
spent in the north west provinces.
With Mrs. Dunlop, who accompanied him on his return, he will
take up his residence at Telkwa.
G. S. Malloch, of the Dominion
Geological Survey, who has been
engaged in making an examination of the Kispiox coal prospects
since his return from Groundhog,
is in town for a few days. Before leaving for Ottawa he will
pay a visit to Juniper basin, to
examine the showings on the
Rocher de Boule and other properties.
P. E. Sands and party left for
Seattle on Sunday, taking the
"Farthest North" car down on
the Port Simpson. They thoroughly enjoyed their brief stay
in Hazelton, and were pleased
with the hospitality they received. On Saturday evening, C. G.
Harvey gave a most enjoyable
The People of the
Bulkley Valley
are now enabled to procure at home everything
they require in General
Merchandise and Supplies, at prices which
mean a big saving on
every order.
The establishment of
our big store at Telkwa
with a stock as complete
and well assorted as that
carried in our Hazelton
store, affords the opportunity.
We buy in carload
lots, in markets of our
own choosing and get
the lowest prices. Our
knowledge of the requirements of our customers enables us to
select the commodities
best suited to their
needs. We can therefore supply the best
goods at the lowest
prices, and without any
delay.
Groceries, Clothing, Miners' and Farmers' Supplies
Quality Right
. S. Sargent
Telkwa, B.C.
��
dance   in   their   honor   at   the,
Hazelton   hotel.     Mrs.    Harvey j
and   F.   J.    Smyth    furnished
Bplendid    music    and   a   large
crowd was in attendance.
Dr.  A.   H.   Wallace,   medical
superintendent of Telkwa hospital, returned from the coast on j
Tuesday with his bride, and was
given a rousing reception by his
many Hazelton friends.   On Sept.!
31,   at   Vancouver,  Miss Louise
Lehrman,  daughter of  Charles
Lehrman, a terminal city capital-
ist, became the wife of the popu-
lar physician,   bride and bride-1
groom leaving almostimmediately j
for   the   north.     On   Thursday
morning Dr. and Mrs.  Wallace
started for Telkwa.
Superintendent Arthur Gris-
wold is down from the Sunrise.
He reports that the crosscut
started 50 feet from the mouth
of the upper tunnel has been
driven 25 feet and has tapped the
big Sunrise vein, which shows 6
feet wide, with considerable good
ore. Beyond surface work,
nothing has yet been done on the
other leads on this group. The
showing is greatly improved as
a result of the season's work.
Owing to the difficulty of getting
supplies up to the property it is
not probable that work will be
carried on during the winter.
if-
Hazelton's Favorite Retort
^S
.^ i ia, citon s ravorue nciori
*it3 GALENA CLUB
BOX BALL
POOL AND BILLIARDS
Soda Fountain Equipped tj serve Finest Ice Cream  Sodas,
Sundaes, etc., etc.
Our specialty is the best Confectionery,   including   unrivalled
Imported Chocolates.
Choicest Egyptian and other Imported Cigarettes    Fine Cigars.
Books, Magazines and Periodicals
V
D. J. McDougall
E. J. Tate
Ingineca Hotel
McDonell & McAfee, Props.
aBM^vS:^^'^^y^?^^s
JUST A WORD ABOUT PRINTING
'pjhere is no business that cannot be made more
profitable by well conceived printing. Let
us produce the kind of printed matter that you
need���the distinctive, effective kind���the kind
that talks. We have an up to date plant and do
printing of the better sort.
Cards, letterheads, envelopes, statements, billheads, hand bills,
time checks, pamphlets, wedding and society stationery, etc.
ioer produces the best
ClclSS   Ol   WOl*lC        Located opposite Government Office
mwmmi$mzmmm8mi!i*mBMa^
Hopeful of Settlement
Lethbridge, Oct. 13: The coal
strike situation is being discussed
in convention here. There is a
general feeling among the delegates that the end will be satisfactory to the miners and the
public.
LAND NOTICES
The only family hotel in the district.       Private  dining  rooms.
Night and day restaurant.     Modern conveniences.
Reasonable rates.    Good Stable in connection.
Hazelt
azcllon
Choicest of  Wines, Liquors and Cigars
.    always on hand.
Omineca Land District.    District of
Coast, Range 4.
Take notice that Jessie Lucy Wallace
of Vancouver, nurse, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about i
B miles up the Nadina River from the
head of Francois Lake on the north
bank and marked J.L.W., Ne. corner,
thence south 40 chains, west 80 chains,
north 40 chains, east 80 chains to point
of commencement containing 1120 acres
more or leas.      Jessie Lucy Walluce.
September 10, 1911.
Omineca Land District.    District of
Coast,   Range 4.
Take notice that Robert N. Dolhoy of
Vancouver, doctor, intends to apply tor
permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
C miles up the Nadina river from the
head of Francois lake on the north bank
and marked R.N.D. Nw. corner, thence
south 80 chains, east 80 chains, north
80 chains, west 80 chains to point of
commencement containing 64(1 acres
more or less, Robert N, Dolbey.
September 10, 1911.
ndustry
hull stock of all kinds and sizes of Window
Sash, Doors, Office Fixtures, Interior Finishings
on hand or Made to Order.
Large stock of Lumber and Building Materials, Tinsmithing, Plumbing and Stcamfitling.
Job and Shop Work a Specially.
Plans and Specifications.
Stephenson & Crum
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS
Hazelton
$2
a year

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