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Omineca Miner Jan 2, 1915

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 THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
mer
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VOL. IV, NO. 18
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, JANUARY 2, 1915
'RICE $2.00 A YEAR
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In
BRITISH AIRCRAFT RAID ON GERMAN COAST
HUNGARY PANIC-STRICKEN-BATTLESHIP LOST
-CONSTANTINOPLE IN DANGER OF CAPTURE
London, Jan. 2:���Following the decisive check administered to
the German advance in Poland, Russian forces are now invading
Hungary at four different points. Refugees are flocking to Buda-
Pesth, and there is a panic throughout the kingdom as the result
of the rapid retreat of the Austrian army before the new Russian
advance.
Turkey has abandoned all idea of taking the offensive against
the Allies, according to the Express correspondent, who reports
that Constantinople is panic-stricken. Holy relics have been
removed to Brusa, in Asia Minor, and the Sultan and government
are preparing to follow. All available forces; uumbering about
15,000, are at present concentrated in the capital. Adrianople has
been partly evacuated, the heavy guns there being removed to
Tchatalja. near Constantinople. Frenzied entrenching is in prog-
gress along the shores of the Dardanelles and Bosphorus, and
hurried preparations are being made to resist the passage of hostile
fleets.
The Turkish attack on Egypt has been definitely abandoned,
the troops intended for the invasion being recalled to defend the
Asiatic side of the straits and the new capital, Brusa. Everything
now points to Constantinople becoming a place of action, it being
generally anticipated that the allied fleet will shortly force the
passage of the Dardanelles. The German and Austrian embassies
have made every preparation for removal to Asia Minor. Foreigners are also preparing to leave for the interior.
The German war of attrition found another victim yesterday
morning, when the old, but still useful, battleship Formidable was
torpedoed by a submarine. The exact location of the disaster has
not been revealed, but as it occurred in the English Channel, it is
believed the Formidable was sunk while engaged in bombarding
German positions on the Belgian coast. Submarines have on several occasions attacked the ships engaged in these operations.
The captain of a trawler which brought survivors to shore states
that other fishing boats were in thf vicinity, and it is believed
quite a number of the crew may have betn rescued.
A Paris despatch says Dunkirk was again bombarded on Thursday, when four German aeroplanes flew over the port and dropped
bombs.   The amount of damage done is not stated.
There is a dearth of news from the western battlefront today.
President Poincare of France, addressing an assemblage of
diplomats who presented New Year's congratulations yesterday,
said he had "no doubt that next year at this traditional reception
we shall celebrate the establishment of a beneficial peace."
THE MINER'S TELEGRAPHIC BULLETINS TELL STORY OF GREAT WAR DAY BY DAY
London, Dec. 28:���The official press bureau has given out the
following statement regarding a British raid on the German coast:
"On Friday, Dec. 25, German warships lying in the Schilling
Roads, off Cuxhaven, were attacked by seven naval seaplanes,
piloted by Flight Commanders Oliver, Hewlett, Ross and Kilner,
Flight Lieutenants Miley and Edwards, and sub-Lieut. Blackburn.
The attack was delivered in daylight from a point in the vicinity
of Heligoland.
"The seaplanes were escorted by a light cruiser and destroyer
force together with submarines. As these ships were seen by the
Germans, from Heligoland, two Zeppelins and three or four hostile
seaplanes and several hostile submarines attacked them.
"It was necessary for the British ships to remain in the
neighborhood to pick up returning airmen, and a novel combat
ensued between the most modern cruisers and the enemy's air
craft and submarines. By swift manoeuvring, the enemy's submarines were avoided, and the two Zeppelins were easily put to
flight by the guns of the Undaunted and Arethusa.
"The enemy's seaplanes succeeded in dropping their bombs
near our ships, but without hitting any of them. The British ships
remained for three hours off the enemy's coast without being
molested by any surface vessel, and safely re-embarked three out
of the seven airmen with their machines. Three other pilots
returned later and were picked up by British submarines, which
were standing by. Their machines were wrecked. Six out of
seven pilots returned safely. Flight Commander Hewlett is missing.
His machine was seen in a wrecked condition about eight miles
from Heligoland, and the fate of the daring and skilful pilot is
unknown.
"The extent of the damage done by the British airmen's
bombs cannot be estimated; but all were discharged at points of
military significance.
"On Thursday last, Squadron Commander Richard B. Davies,
of the naval air service, visited Brussels in a Farman biplane, for
the purpose of dropping bombs at an airship shed, reported to contain eight German airships. Of the twelve bombs carried, eight
were discharged at the first attack, and six are believed to have
scored hits. The four remaining bombs were discharged on the
return flight,
"Owing to the clouds of smoke which arose from the shed on
the explosion of the bombs, the extent of the damage done could
not be distinguished."
London Dec. 29:���The Times declares, on excellent authority,
that the Parseval and a Zeppelin were destroyed in the Cuxhaven
raid, and that serious damage was done to the Zeppelin sheds.
The Daily Sketch publishes-the report that Commander Francis
Hewlett, who piloted one of the British seaplanes and has been
missing since the raid, is a prisoner in the hands of the Germans.
Hewlett's machine was'damaged by shell fire and came down in
the sea. When last seen, a German torpedo boat was approaching
Hewlett.
The fact that the attacking forces, in the recent -aid on the
German coast, were able to drive off the Zeppelins, is regarded as
highly significant. It is regarded as an indication that the great
German airships are untrustworthy in combat. '
. A counter raid is expected here, and the people have been ad
vised, in case of an aerial attack, to take refuge in their basements
owing to danger from fragments of shells fired at aircraft, as well
as from bombs dropped by the attackers.
English newspapers are enthusiastic over the Christmas raid,
which is declared to be the most remarkable action in twentieth
century warfare.
Eight vessels have been lost through striking mines in the
North Sea, since Christmas. It is officially stated that the mines
I were all German.   They had been insecurely anchored.
Violent storms have prevented any important operations along
the greater part of the front in Belgium and France, and the
positions of the opposing forces are practically unchanged. There
is every evidence that the Germans are about to begin another
desperate attack on the French center. For the last two weeks
the enemy has been strengthening his lines. In the same period
reinforcements have been leaving Paris daily for the vicinity of
Rheims and Soissons. The French general staff fully expects that
the Germans, having failed in their attempt to reach Calais and
other channel ports, will turn their attention to another dash towards Paris.
The underground defences at Paris, started at the beginning
of the war, are now completed, and the city is the center of armed
entrenchments sixty miles in diameter and two hundred in circumference. Behind the lines are light railways, for the transport of
troops and munitions of war,
In the East, Russians again hold the passes of the Carpathians.
Between the Pilica river and the upper Vistula, the Germans are
on the defensive.
Fugitives from Bokhara state that when Russians approached
the town, Turkish officers ordered the killing of the native Armenians. A terrible massacre followed, women and cnildren included.
Only thirty escaped.    Many atrocities were committed.
An official communication from the headquarters of the Russian
army of the Caucasus states that the Russian troops yesterday
crossed the Laurisan river and arrested the progress of a considerable Turkish force. Advantages have been gained on other parts
of the front.
Despatches from Basle say terrific fighting has been in progress for two days on the entire battle front in the Vo3ges mountains, the sound of the cannon being plainly heard in Switzerland.
Referring to the report, published in a Hamburg paper, that
British airmen dropped bombs on the island of Langeoog, killing
several civilians, a despatch to the Daily Mail states that investi-
has proved the bombs to have been dropped by German aviators,
who believed British torpedo boats were lurking off the island in
the fog. 	
Paris, Dec. 30:���German troops were defeated yesterday in two
battles of great importance, one for the possession of the village of
St. Georges, in Belgium, and the other for the approaches to
Steinbach, in Alsace. At St Georges, the Franco-Belgian troops
carried town by a storming attack, and drove the Germans into a
definite retreat. French engineers have created fortifications to
consolidate their hold on this section of the battle front.
With the successes announced to-day, it is clearly evident that
the Germans are unable to hold their lines at either the extreme
right of their positions in Belgium, or the extreme left in Alsace.
The most advanced line of the Ailies is on the sea coast, in the
vicinity of Mariakerke, about two miles west of Ostend.
There is no question that the Germans are evacuating Roul-
ers.
The arrival of heavy reinforcements of German infantry on the
line from the sea to Ypres, has been noted recently. These no
(Continued on Page Four)
HAZELTON WON THE FIRST
Takes Initial Game of Ross Cup
Series by Five Goals
to Two
Owing to lack of ice at Smith-,
ers, the first game of the Ross
Cup series, scheduled to be played by New Hazelton at the Valley town on Wednesday night,
was changed, the local Bextetti?
going over to New Hazelton to try
conclusions with their old rivals.
A large crowd, which accompanied the Hazelton team, was gratified to witness its victory by a
score of five to one.
But one score was made in the
first period, Captain Hume netting the puck after 14 minutes
play. In the second inning,
goals were scored by Percy Mc-
Dougall, O'Shea, and Irwin.
New Hazelton's only goal was
shot by McKenzie early in the
third period, Al McDougall making the final tally for Hazelton.
Every member of the team
scored, with the exception of the
veteran Hugh Taylor, who emerged from the has-been class to
play an excellent game at goal.
Hume pleased the fans by his
splendid work in conjunction
with the McDougall brothers,
their combination being faultless.
Irwin and O'Shea played the defence positions brilliantly.
The work of the referee, A. 1).
McLeod, and the judge of play,
E. B. Tatchell, pleased the players and spectators alike.
The line up was as follows:
HAZELTON NEW HAZELTON
Taylor goal Lofquist
O'Shea r. defence E. Harris
Irwin 1. defence Lavery
P. McDougall centre McKen2l'e
A. McDougall right
Hume left
Goal umpires���W.
and J. Dodimead.
Kinghorn and McKay were in
reserve for Hazelton.
Al. Harris
McDonell
Blackstock
Bachelors Defeat Benedicts
The chief event on New Year's
day was a keenly-contested hockey match between the Bachelors
and Benedicts. After three exciting periods, the score stood
four to one in favo- of the single
men.
The game was as strenuous as
though the Ross Cup depended
upon it, and provided an hour's
entertainment for a good crowd
of rooters.
Taylor scored the lone goal for
the Benedicts. Fuller netted
three for the victors, Captain
McLeod making the final tall�� in
the last minute of play. Tha
teams were as follows:
BACHELORS
MacCormick
Welch       r.
McDonald
McLeod
BENEDICTS
goal     G. G.Rock
defence        Taylor
. defence Ware
center        Sargent
Fuller right    Burrington
Blackstock      left Hall
Al. McDougall was referee and
James MacKay and Percy McDougall were goal umpires.
The sitting of the county court
which was to be held in Hazelton
on January 4 has been postponed
until January 14.
A more convenient train schedule goes into effect tomorrow,
when the G. T. P. begins running westbound trains on Sunday, instead of Tuesday. Both
Sunday and Thursday trains will
leave Hazelton station an hour
later than formerly. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 1915
neer
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING KATES: Display, $2.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 2(1 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazette rates.
Vol. IV.
Saturday. January 1, 1915.
No. 18
The Miner wishes all its Readers a
Happy  and   Prosperous  New  Year
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WHAT THIS WAR
MEANS TO CANADA
But the war is here, and Canadians are going. And why ?
The mother of us all is in need.
Of that reason, says the Halifax
Chronicle, we are not ashamed.
But that man searches the hearts
and minds of Canadians but superficially who finds in the marching
of our men but the response of
the brood to the tribal call. Slowly, but surely, it is being borne
in upon the minds of the thoughtful people of Canada that this is
no mere European war, no mere
accidental failure of an insincere
diplomacy, no mere brutal
struggle of the engaged nations
for a common coveted prize. The
enemy now held back behind that
swayinglineof French and British
bayonets will struggle valiantly,
desperately, frantically to break
through. But to what? To Paris!
to Low'on! For national prestige!
For cold cash!   For Empire!
That last demand brings the
Canadian gun up hard against the
Canadian shoulder. We have
here talked and bragged of Empire, but this longing that leaps
out across Belgium and down into Serbia is not the thing of our
childish boasting. We never connived at any scheme to rob a self-
respecting people of their rights
so to be. We are ourselves a
little people, less than 8,000,000
souls, scattered over thousands of
miles. We are free and self-
governing today, not because we
have sufficient power of defence,
but because we are British and enjoy British benevolence and the
British guarantee. But let us
never forget that the em my that
would humble Britain, deliberately sought to reduce Serbia into the degrading condition of a
vassal state���that that enemy
today glories over the humiliation
of an independent Belgium. We
are repeatedly told that Germany
does not intend, in the event of
victory, to take Canada. What
a good, kind wolf we have to deal
with. But mark it well. The
wolf is a wolf, and intends to eat,
but not us���not now, perhaps
never; still the  wolf intends to
eat.
Slowly but surely we are com
ing to realize that this is a Canadian war. It is no European
family quarrel. The old worn-
out imperialism which was ever
the enemy of the independence
and self-respect of small nations
and little peoples, is again rampant. The German aggression is
in direct defiance of that international righteousness, by virtue
of which we Canadians enjoy our
rights and liberties as a people.
Let that defiance once become
triumphant, and the war we now
wage for a principle, we shall
then be forced to wage, and desperately, for existence.
Platinum has advanced in price
so much in recent years that gold
is being used to alloy it to lessen
the cost of electrical apparatus
in which it is necessary.
Commercial  Printing  at  The
Miner Print Shop.
NOTICE
OMINECA ASSESSMENT
DISTRICT
NOTICE is hereby given, in accordance with the Statutes, that all assessed taxes and income-tax assessed and
levied under the "Taxation Act" are
due and payable on the second of January, 1915. All taxes collectable for
the Omineca Assessment District are
due and payable at my office, situated
in the Provincial Government Building,
in the Town of Hazelton, B. C.
This notice, i n terms o f law, i s
equivalent to a personal demand by me
upon all persons liable for taxes.
Dated at Hazelton, B. C,
December 24th, 1914.
H. WELCH,
Assessor and Collector
for the
Omineca Assessment District.
NOTICE
OMINECA ASSESSMENT
DISTRICT
NOTICE  is  hereby given  that a
Court of  Revision  and Appeal, under
the provisions of the "Taxation  Act",
respecting the  assessment rolls of the
Omineca Assessment  District  for the
vear  1915, will  be held in the Government Office, Hazelton, B. C, on Thursday, the  14th January,   1915,   at the
hour of 2 o'clock in the afternoon.
Dated at Hazelton, B. C,
December 24th, 1914.1
STEPHEN H. HOSKINS
Judge of the
Court of Revision and Appeal.
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The Favorite
Shopping place
SARGENT'S
We Lead���
Others Follow
MINERS' PROSPECTORS' and SETTLERS' SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY
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Wishing
All Our Friends and
Customers
Happy and Prosperous
New Year
General      D    Q   CARPENT    Hazelton
B.C.
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GOOD MORNING!
We   Are  Introducing
American Silk
American Cashmere
American Cotton-Lisle
HOSIERY
They have stood the test. Give
real foot comfort. No seams to
rip. Never become loosp or baggy. The shape is knit in���not
.pressed in.
GUARANTEED for fineness,
style, superiority of material and
workmanship. Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6months without
holes, or new ones free.
OUR SPECIAL OFFER
to every one sending us  $1.00  in
currency or postal note, to cover
advertising and shipping|charges,
we   will   send   post-paid,   with
written guarantee, backed by  a
five million dollar company, either
3 Pairs of our 75c value
American Silk Hosiery,
or      4 Pairs of our 50c value
American Cashmere Hosiery
or      4 Pairs of our 50c value
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery,
or      6 Pairs of Children's Hosiery
Give the color, size, and wether Ladies' or Gent's hosiery is
desired.
DON'T DELAY-Offerexpires
when a dealer in your locality is
selected.
THE INTERNATIONAL HOSIERY CO.
P.O. Box 244
DAYTON, OHIO, U.S.A.
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STUART J. MARTIN
Provincial Agsayer
HAZELTON
I P'P*|"t' |J1-I   I "t''t**r*kt*'t**t*,T
B. C.
S. S. PRINCE GEORGE
Leaves  Prince Rupert for Vancouver,   Victoria and
Seattle at 9 a.m. Fridays
S.S. "PRINCE_ JOHN "leaves Prince Rupert for Vancouver, fortnightly
PASSENGER TRAINS   leave  Hazelton  for Prince George.
��� Edmonton, Saskatoon,  Melville  and
Winnipeg, etc., on Wednesdays and Saturdays at 5:18 p. m., connecting
at Winnipeg for St. Paul, Duluth and Chicago. Use the Grand
Trunk Railway System, Chicago to Montreal, the Double-Track Route.
For through tickets and full information, apply to local agent or to
ALBERT DAVIDSON,     GENERAL AGENT,     PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
/f=
Bulkley Valley Farm
Lands For Sale
These Lands are close to the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, which is now running trains through the
Bulkley Valley. There is a ready local market for all produce. Land* prices are reasonable. Terms are easy.
Write for full particulars to
NORTH COAST LAND COMPANY, Ltd.
Suite 622 Metropolitan Building
p.u up c.pu.1 $1,800,000. VANCOUVER, B. C.
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HIGH-CLASS   PRINTING   AT  THE   MINER  OFFICE THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 1, 1915
V
1
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
A Kilkenny man has eighteen
sons in the British army.
The British censor's bureau is
handling 50,000 cablegrams daily.
Austria has repudiated the
payment of her obligations held
by alien enemies.
All subjects of Triple Entente
powers in Jerusalem have been
imprisoned by the Turks.
It is believed in Russia that an
alliance will be formed by Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
Rich discoveries of silver-lead
ore are reported on the upper
Stewart river, in the Yukon.
Italy is purchasing artillery
and cavalry horses in Montana,
and has given orders for ten
thousand head.
Tacoma lumbermen have received an order for twenty million feet of railway ties for delivery in England.
Efforts to arrange an exchange
of civilian prisoners have failed,
Germany demanding five Germans for one Briton.
The Russian government has
issued an edict prohibiting the
sale of all intoxicating drinks.
The law includes clubs.
The Canadian Patriotic Fund is
distributing $5000 a day as relief
In various quarters. The Fund
now amounts to $2,200,000.
Statistics for the month show
British unemployment to be less
than in November, and also less
than in December of last year.
Two Mexicans, who confessed
to the killing of Francis and
Dunn, British subjects, at Na-
cozari, were promptly executed.
Vice - Admiral Sturdee, who
commanded the victorious British
squadron in the battle off the
Falkland Islands, is a Canadian.
The German government has
notified the United States that
American ^consuls in Belgium
must be acceptable to the Kaiser.
At Winnipeg on Tuesday, Premier Borden inspected six thousand
recruits for the second contingent.
He praised the appearance of the
men.
An agreement has been reached, under which Roumania will
restore most of the territory she
acquired from Bulgaria as a result of the second Balkan war.
The Dominion Parliament has
been called for January 4. Business will be confined to war
measures, with probable tariff
changes and a stamp tax for war
revenue.
A company with a capitaliza
tion of $4,000, OOO'.has been organized in Seattle to take over the
coal and land holdings of the
Canadian Finance Co., in which
Alvo von Alvensleben was interested.
The names of ~a 'number of
Canadians,"appear* in the list of
New Year's""honors, including
that of Captain Clive Phillips-
Wolley, a well-known British
Columbian, who is made a Knight
Bachelor.
The demand for Canadian eggs
on the British market is far in
excess of the supply. The price
is 75c per dozen. Heretofore
Canada has supplied only $5000
worth a year, whereas the total
imports of eggs into the British
Isles reached a value of $45,000,-
000.
A Nation's Bread Line
Did you ever watch what is
called the "Bread Line" in a big
city? If so, the sight of scores
of hungry men and women waiting patiently for a morsel of food
must have been photographed indelibly on the memory. Did
you ever see a soup kitchen in
operation? Probably not, because
soup kitchens in Canada exist only in the imagination of orators
who draw verbal pictures of the
future at general elections.
Consider, however, that according to the reports of United
States consuls remaining in Belgium, between 1,250,000 and
1,500,000 of the people of that
heroic nation are now dependent
entirely on soup kitchens for the
food which barely keeps body
and soul together.
The whole civilized world is indebted to Belgium. The check
given by her brave soldiers to the
carefully calculated plans,of German militarism rendered possible
the gathering together of that
splendid army of the Allies which
sooner or later shall have demolished once for all time the doctrine
of rule by force, shall have banished barbarism, and compelled
respect for treaties.
Therefore there can be no talk
of offering charity to the starving
Belgians. To relieve their distress is but to attempt to repay
in some small manner what they
gave without thought of return,
but what civilization must regard
as a monumental sacrifice which
must be recognized, if it cannot
be repaid in full.
Canada is doing her share in
the world movement to express
admiration and sympathy in terms
of succor. But the need is so
great, the urgency so imperative,
that she cannot do too much. At
the present moment, citizens of
the Dominion have an exceptional opportunity to share in this
work in a special and particular
manner. In some parts of Belgium the wheels of half-ruined
grist mills are beginning to turn.
The cry is for wheat. Flour has
been sent, but flour is expensive,
and bleached flour is not what is
especially demanded. The staple
bread of the country is brown or
���'black" bread which is made
from a No. 4 wheat. Moreover,
large quantities of this wheat can
be transported in bulk, as compared with the amount of high-
priced flour in bags, and furthermore, by furnishing employment
for the Belgian mills, a beginning
is made toward the rehabilitation
of the denuded country.
The Belgian Relief Committee
has arranged for ships to convey
the wheat directly to Rotterdam,
but money is needed as it was
never needed before, to purchase
the cargoes. England has supplemented enormously the gifts
of clothing which have already
gone from Canada; what is required today, is money to buy
the wheat which is in the elevators readily available for loading.
Contributions in cash, whether
large or small, if sent to H. Prud-
'homme, Hon. Treasurer, Belgian
Relief Fund, 59 St Peter Street,
Montreal, will be gratefully received and promptly acknowledged.
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| Hudson's Bay Company I
HAZELTON, B. C.
LIQUOR
Let us suggest the following Selections:
1 Bottle Fine Old Highland Whisky      .       . $1.50
1 Bottle Negrita Rum  1.50
1 Bottle Canadian Club Rye Whisky      .       . 1.50
1 Bottle Old Duke Port  1.50
1 Bottle Navy Claret     .       .       .       .       . .75
1 Bottle Bodega Sherry  1.00
$7775
Our Special Price for the above tf�� *j r\f\
until the end of the year       ���       S> �� ��V U
CHAMPAGNE, Mumm's Extra Dry, per dozen pints $20.00
CIGARS CIGARETTES TOBACCOS
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About 72 per cent of the cities
and towns of Sweden are lighted
by electricity produced by water
power.
The highest bridge in the
world, 360 feet from the surface
of the water, is over a gorge at
Constantine, in Algiers.
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
We are prepared to supply private
and  public  conveyances   day  and
LIVERY and STAGES
night.     Our stages meet all trains at Soutli Hazelton or New Hazelton.
Best Dry Birch $7 a Cord.
Ruddy & MacKay
Consign  your shipments in  Our
Care  for  Storage  or  Delivery.
Address all communications to Hazelton.
a���ihii������*���������
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
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CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
BRITISH COLUMBIA  COAST STEAMSHIP SERVICE
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V
S.S. "Princess Maquinna" leaves Prince Rupert every SUNDAY at 8 p. m.
S. S. "Princess May" leaves Prince Rupert, at 8 p.m., Nov. 20th, Dec
4th, 18th, Jan. 1st,
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
Tickets to and from all parts of the world.
Steamship Tickets
J. G. McNab,   Cor. 3rd Ave. and 4th St.,
Atlantic and Pacific
Prince Rupert, B. C.
j��-
Sir George Paish states that
$2,500,000, 000 of British capital
is invested in Canada, of which
$300,000,000 was invested last
year. United States investments
in Canada aggregate $500,000.-
000. In the next fifteen years
the Statist estimates British investments in Canada will amount
to $5,000,000,000.
-iiOh-
-nO"-
uO��
Thorp & Hoops
Real Estate. Financial and Insurance Brokers
 ALDERMERE, B. C.	
Sole district agents for E. G. Prior & Co., Victoria, Agricultural Machinery and Implements, Wagons, Etc.
Fire,  Life,  Accident,  and Employer's Liability Insurance.
We represent the best companies.
IWe Can Locate You On a Good Pre-Emptton Near the G. T. P.
If you desire information about the Bulkley Valley write us.
On������mi������ mi������ nil������ uOn���-nil���hOii���mi������ion���-mi���~ mi������ mi���
DRY GOODS
MEN'S FURNISHINGS
HARDWARE       GROCERIES
C. V. SMITH
HAZELTON
"EverythinginCanvas"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
Prince ftuptrf. B.C.
STEVENS
Repeating Shotguns
The Stevens Hammerless
costs no mors than some hammer gun.
It has the celebrated
STEVENS RECOIL UNLOCK
providing safety against
"hang-tires."
HAMMERLESS
SOLID BREECH
Easy Take-Down
12 or 20 Gauge
EVERY GUN
GUARANTEED
J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co.
P.O. Its SOU
Chloopm Falls, Man.
Mines and Mining
Good Properties for sale ��� Cash or on
Bond.        Development and
Assessment Work.
Carr Brothers
Eight Years In This District.
nna*li��n,  n. C.
Assay Office and Mining Office
Arts and Crafts Building, 578 Seymour Street
 VANCOUVER, B.C.	
J. O'SULLIVAN, F.C.S.
Provincial Assayer and Chemist
Assayer for 26 years with Vivian & Sons, Swansea
Charges Moderate     ::    Correspondence Solicited
HAZELTON HOSPITAL
for any pitrio,] from anu month upward at tl per
month In ailvunct). Thin rati) inclutloii office consultations anil modirinos, as well as all costs while
in the hospital. TickoU obtainable in Ha?.chon
at the Poll Odlce or the Druu Store; in Aldurmero
from Mr. T J. Thorp; In Telkwafrom Dr. Wallace;
or by mail from the MimIIcuI Suporinten'tnnt at the
Hospital
issues
TICKETS
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion and British Columbia
Land Surveyors
Offices at Victo. ia, Nelson, Fort fJeorge
and New Hazelton.
The Miner is two dollars a vear.   B. C. Affleck, Mgr.  New Hazelton.
LAND NOTICE.
Hazelton Land District.        District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that James Scoging,
of Eudako, occupation railroader, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at n post planted
South West corner of Lot 3178 Cassiar
thence 40 chains east, thence 40 chains
south, thence 40 chains west, thence 40
chains north, to point of commencement, containing 160 acres of land.
Nov. 26. 1914.       13-21   James Scoging
EXPERT
Watch Repairing
WATCHES   -   JEWELRY
O. A. RAGSTAD,    Smithers
Orders may be kit at Noel & Rock's, Hazelton
DENTISTRY
DR. BADGERO
Smithers, B.C.
1
i
o
I
-o
Phone 300 P.O. Box 1635
HARRISON W. ROGERS
ARCHITECT
Special Attention to Out of Town Clients
Suite Onk, Federal Block,
PRINCE RUPERT. B. C.
Harold Price
J. R. Graham
PRICE & GRAHAM
B.C. Land Surveyors
and Civil Engineers
HAZELTON  AND  SMITHERS
London Building       ....       Vancouver
British Columbia THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 2, 1915
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
(Continued from Page One)
doubt account for the great number of sudden attacks of varying
degrees of fierceness which have been delivered along the line in
Belgium during the last few days. These attacks have evidently
sought to discover a weak place in the line.
In Joffre's general orders proof is given that the fifty-eighth
brigade of the Bavarian army corps received orders to kill all prisoners and leave no living man.
London, Dec. 30:���Official Russian despatches state that the
Austrian army in Galicia is struggling in disorderly retreat through
the passes of the Carpathians. The German losses on the front
extending from the Baltic to the Carpathians and the frontier of
Roumania are said to surpass anything in history. For a fortnight there has been a continuous nightmare of slaughter, the enemy in vain hurling masses of troops against the Russians, whose
lines remained unbroken.
All aliens and naturalized enemies, to the second generation,
residing in the'fyneside and Sunderland district, have been ordered
to withdraw thirty miles inland.
Lloyds' is insuring against war between Great Britain and the
United States within a year, the premium being fifteen per cent.
A Sofia despatch gives details of the German-Turkish treaty,
under which the former agreed to supply money, war material,
officers and engineers. In case of victory Turkey will receive one
fifth of the indemnity. In case of defeat Germany is pledged to
defend the territorial integrity of Turkey.
Toronto, Dec. 30:- -Sir Allan Aylesworth, discussing the protest of the United States against the British action in searching
shipping for contraband, expressed the opinion that the protest
was inspired by the copper trust and the big interests, and lhatthe
Washington government was forced to do something to satisfy
their demands. Sir Allen believes the protest was intended for
public consumption only.
London, Dec. 31:���Four German aeroplanes hovered over Dunkirk, France, yesterday afternoon, dropping bombs filled with
shrapnel. Fifteen were killed and 32 wounded, many women and
children being included. After doing considerable damage, the
aeroplanes escaped, only one being hit.
A report from Friedrichshaven says one of the latest super-
Zeppelins was destroyed by bombs in the recent raid on Cuxhaven.
In a despatch from Venice it is stated that the Austrian dread-
naught Viribus Unitis, one of the four largest ships of the Austrian
navy, was torpedoed in Pola harbor by a French submarine.
On behalf of Great Britain, the Prince of Teck has officially
thanked the French aeroplane corps for their co-operation with the
British war vessels on the coast of Belgium. They aided the ships
to get the range of German shore batteries, and assisted in the
successful bombardment of the enemy's positions by showering
bombs on the railway depots and military trains, and arrows on the
trenches of the Germans.
France is reported to be preparing two great air fleets for the
invasion of Germany in the spring.
The third great attempt on Warsaw has been definitely checked,
the Germans suffering heavy losses in their ineffectual efforts to
break the Russian lines.
The Russian positions in Poland are maintained, in the face of
repeated violent attacks. In Galicia, the Austrians failed in simultaneous attempts to recover lost ground in Western Galicia and in
the Carpathians. Trainloads of captured German guns and munitions pass through Lemberg daily.
The Princess Patricia regiment is now at the front, quartered
within sound of the guns, and awaiting its turn in the trenches.
The next Canadian troops to leave will be the field artillery, dragoons and the Strathcona HorBe.
A Basle report says there is rioting in various parts of Austria-
Hungary, with demonstrations against war and in favor of peace
negotiations. In Vienna the police dispersed several such gatherings,
Germany has issued orders closing the frontiers of Belgium to
all except those holding military passes. It is supposed the order,
which takes effect tomorrow, is intended to prevent espionage.
An indication of the straits of the Austrian army is found in
the statement by the chief of the general staff, that no further
operations will be undertaken against Servia, in order to avoid the
diversion of troops from the north. This order is made in spite
of the demands of the Austrian press for revenge for the defeats
received at the hands of the despised Servians.
The British cabinet yesterday held a special meeting to consider the American protest against interference with neutral shipping
supposed to be carrying contraband. Holland. Sweden, Denmark and Norway have also entered protests. Britain's reply is
not expected for several days.
Washington, Dec. 31:���It is officially stated that there was
nothing peremptory in the wording of the note to Great Britain.
Officials are surprised that the intention was considered anything
but amicable. President Wilson states that no difficulty is possible if American shippers will give honest manifests.
HOSPITAL DANCE
WAS SUCCESSFUL
The masquerade dance given
in aid of Hazelton Hospital, on
New Year's Eve, fulfilled all
hopes of its promoters, being a
success in every respect. Assembly Hall was filled by a merry
crowd, a majority of which was
in costume, and the program of
dances, which lasted until after
two in the morning, was thoroughly enjoyed. A number of
New Hazelton  people attended.
Prizes for costume were awarded to Miss Hogan, as a Senorita,
Miss Barbara Crawford, as Topsy
and W. H. Burken,  as  'Rastus.
Excellent music was furnished
by Miss Sharpe, Mrs. Hoskins,
and Mr. Matthews.
A ladies' committee served refreshments on the stage, which
had been converted into a handsome dining-room.
The proceeds, which total a
handsome sum, will be handed to
the treasurer of the Hospital.
"Francois Lake John," a well-
I regarded  Indian  living   on   the
! south side of Francois Lake, and
| his wife were found dead, in circumstances which suggested that
they had  eaten  poisoned  meat.
Coroner Hoskins  has instituted
an inquiry.
OPERATOR DIES ON
TELEGRAPH TRAIL
One hundred and thirty men
have been drafted from the 30th
Battalion, now at Willows Camp,
for service at the front, as reserves for Princess Patricia's
regiment. Two of the Hazelton
section, James Turnbull and
Andrew Moncur, are included.
Another page of tragedy has
been added to the history of the
Yukon telegraph line. Yesterday the body of E. Elphinstone,
operator at Third Cabin, 76 miles
north of Hazelton, was found on
the trail, where he had died of
exposure,
l'he unfortunate man had been
covering the southern portion of
his section, and had evidently
left hislhalf-way cabin on Tuesday
morning, to return to Third
Cabin, ten miles north. Getting
no response from him on Wednesday, search was begun, and
his fate was discovered by Operator Kenney, of Fourth, and
Operator Perry, of Second. Elphinstone had evidently become
exhausted in traveling through
the deep snow, and had discarded
I aek and snowshoes when within
two miles of his cabin. He had
progressed to within three-quarters of a mile of Third Cabin,
when he evidently laid down and
slept, the cold proving fatal.
Little is known of him, save that
he was a newcomer in the district, and had worked with a
survey party near Sixth Cabin
last summer.
Chief Constable Minty will
send a dog team to bring the remains of the dead man to Hazelton for burial.
Just Arrived
j FOR  FALL AND WINTER
WEAR
in
On Monday afternoon the fire
brigade was called out to extinguish a fire which had started
from sparks on the roof of the
Hudson's Bay store. The damage was slight.
A SPLENDID ASSORT-
** ment of the celebrated
JAEGER UNDERWEAR,
SOCKS, SWEATER COATS
VESTS, PAJAMAS, etc.
These goods require no recommendation. They are
the best manufactured
England. 	
IF vou have not inspected
our HOBBERLIN samples for Fall and WinterTail-
ored Clothing, you cannot
realize how nobby they are.
! NOEL & ROCK
Hazelton, B. C.
<
n ifr��lt*<"M'i|"|liH"|iai��itii|ll|illii|'ifc����itnWP
1 The Up-To-Date f
j     Drug Store     j
x Wish its many friends a 4
I* PROSPEROUS J
NEW YEAR |
Thanking them for their past *
% patronage f
04mi4uMu����i|'>l"l"l"l"l"l"l"1"M"t"l">">"��l''O
The Miner is two dollars a year
to any address in Canada; to
United States, three dollars.
r
I
4
London, Jan. ];���A general lull in the war is reported today.
For the third time the Russians have crossed the Carpathians after
the retreating Austrians. In Poland the great opposing armies are
in a death grip, with no decided advantage, save that the German
advance has been checked.
An unconfirmed report says the battleship Formidable has been
sunk by a torpedo or mine, with the loss of nearly the whole crew
of 780. The Formidable was built in 1901, and was of the same class
as the Bulwark, lost some weeks ago through a magazine explosion.
It is officially announced in Pretoria that the South African
government will, if necessary, commandeer men for military service. Reports say Colonel Maritz, who fled to German territory
after his defeat, is returning with German soldiers and artillery.
A strong British force has recaptured Walfish Bay, a British
possession on the west coast of Africa, which had been occupied
by a German force.
Princess Patricia's regiment has been in action and had one
officer arid several men killed. Twenty of the men stalked German snipers, returning safely after killing their men.
A Berlin renort says thirty British and French warships are
bombarding Pola and Bovigne, Austrian ports on the Adriatic.
R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd.
PORT ESSINGTON
Established 1870
HAZELTON
FOOTWEAR
We have received this week a shipment of Ladies'
Slippers and Pumps that will appeal
No. 5816 presents a Patent Chrome Mary Jane
No. 5817, a Dull Kid Pump
No. 5818, a Black Velvet Pump
No. 5819, a White Kid Pump
These represent the best values we have to offer in
dressy footwear.
Our import shipment of CROCKERY has arrived, and
will be opened up for sale as soon as we are finished
stocktaking. This shipment contains every article required for the table, represented in a dozen patterns and
and  designs,   in   Porcelain,   Semi-Porcelain and China.
GROCERY DEPARTMENT
<��Om Grocery department is busy supplying the
good things for the Holiday Eats ���JHave you tried
our Noel Jams and Chutney, just in? They are very fine
^Shipments of Fresh Fruits arriving every Friday.
This week we have Grapes, Jap Oranges, Apples,
Grapefruit, Cranberries.
R. Cunningham & Son, Limited
^tTTTTTTtTTTTTTTTTTTTTtTTTTTTTTTTtTTTTT'I

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