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Omineca Miner Feb 3, 1917

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 '
THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. VI, NO. 23
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1917
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
���
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,
i
PRISONERS RECAPTURED
Petzl and Cunningham Did Not
Have Long Career as
Outlaws
Only a brief span of liberty
was enjoyed by the two prisoners, Martin Cunningham and Joseph Petzl, alias Smith, who
escaped from custody last Friday
morning. They were recaptured
on Monday night by Constables
Mead and Kelly. The fugitives
were located in a track-watchman's cabin about two miles west
of Walcott station, on the G.T.P.
While one officer thrust his rifle
through the window, covering
both men,the other went through
the door and had them disarmed
before they realized what had
happened, the capture being so
quickly completed that neither
man was able to use the revolvers
or rifle which they had with them.
After leaving the police station
the two men made their way to
New Hazelton, where they stole
a speeder. This they took as far
as Moricetown. Deserting the
railroad at that point, they followed the wagon road until they
came to a cabin, near the 37-mile
post, which they broke into and
in which they evidently stayed
until Saturday evening. Here,
besides extra clothing and food,
they obtained a rifle and a good
supply of cartridges. Traveling
only at night, they spent Sunday
in a shack at Smithers and passed
Telkwa about 10 o'clock the same
night. After resting for a few
hours in the schoolhouse at Hubert, they traveled along the track
until they reached the trackman's
cabin, where they were making
themselves comfortable when
surprised by the police. In spite
of the very severe weather, the
police were out night and day
tracing the fugitives.and deserve
great credit for the way in which
they captured the two men, who
were heavily armed and determined to resist arrest. The prisoners were brought into Hazelton on Tuesday and are now
awaiting trial.
TRAINS HELD UP
BY SNOWSTORMS
Unusually heavy snowfall between Hazelton and Prince Rupert played havoc with the train
schedules this week. The passenger train from the coast due
here on Wednesday evening did
not arrive until after 2:30 today.
The railway officials hope to keep
the line clear for the following
trains, but find their task a difficult one.
UNITED STATES ON VERGE OF WAR
FRIENDLY RELA TIONS BROKEN OFF AS RESULT
OF GERMANY'S INHUMANITY IN SUB CAMPAIGN
Washington: Diplomatic relations with Germany have been
broken off by handing Bernslorff,
the German ambassador,his passports and recalling Ambassador
Gerard from Berlin. This does
not necessarily mean war, but
may easily lead to war. The
country will stand solid behind
the president in any further action he may take.
A joint session of congress will
be held this afternoon and will
be addressed by the president.
Many guards are watching Panama Canal points, fearing an attempt to damage locks and render
the waterway useless. Secret
service men are active everywhere, keeping tabs on Germans
suspected of plotting,all over the
United States.
Movements of warships will be
kept secret hereafter. A bill
will be introduced in congress
providingfor a hundred additional
submarines.
Berlin: Germans do not believe Paris: German assaults in
the United States will fight. Itis Lorraine were fruitless. There
Hindenburg's conviction that all was artillery activity in the Ver-
neutrals desife the quick end of dun region. Dunkirk was bom-
the war and he says they should barded by enemy aircraft, with
welcome the German submarine slight damage,
blockade. .    One hundred thousand men are
Rotterdam: The Dutch govern- bein^ added to the French a���y-
ment has provisionally forbidden \ French airmen brouSht down
the sailing of all vessels. The!��ver40�� German ^planes last
Holland - America   liner   Nieuw ^eal ���
Amsterdam, which sailed on
Thursday, was recalled to port
by official orders.
More German troops are massing on the Dutch border, adding
to the general apprehension in
Holland.
Washington (3 p. m.):    While
friendly  relations with Germany
LOCAL NEWS PARAGRAPHS
Items Of General Interest From
Hazelton and Surrounding District
R. S. Sargent returned on Tuesday from a visit to Snr.hers.
J. F. Maguire is returning
from an extended visit to the
coast cities.
D. B. Morkill, the surveyor, is
expected to return from the coast
this evening.
Among the latest invalided
soldiers to reach Victoria is Sam
Olsen, of Smithers.
This winter's snowfall is already greater than Hazelton has
seen for some years.
Ingineca miners are preparing
for their annual trek to the
northern placer district.
The reconstruction of the Moricetown   bridge on  the  Bulkley
are at an end,   actual  hostilities Valley  road has been completed
London: All neutrals are a-
waiting the final action, of the
United States. Holland fears she
is doomed to be crushed between
the German land and undersea
forces. Switzerland is fearful of
invasion by the Teutons.
The London press says Prus-
sianism has gone mad and humane
man is faced by a brutal savage.
London: Sir Edward Carson,
first lord of the admiralty, says
the navy js ready for the new
warfare.
Observers declare that Germany's doom is approaching. The
people frankly admit that the
potato crop, in which reliance
was placed, is a failure.
Rio Janeiro: Reports of the
sinking of the German raider are
repeated.
London: German troops, attacking in ghostly garb in the
neighborhood of Wylschaete, were
repelled with heavy loss. Elsewhere there was nothing of importance on our front.
depend   on   Germany.     Gerard
'and all consuls have been ordered
home, and steps have been taken
' to protect American civilians in
Germany.
There is profound excitement
from coast to coast. The government has seized the German
wireless   plants  and  has  taken
' formal possession of the Appam.
; There is feverish activity in all
navy yards. A war vote of $500,-
000,000 has been introduced.
The president is addressing
congress this afternoon. He holds
Germany firmly to the "Sussex"
memorandum concerning rights
of Americans to safe travel on
the seas. He says the course
taken was the only one consistent
with the dignity and honor of
America.
Coming Events
Feb. 20 - Hospital Concert ant)
Assembly Hall.
Piny,
Board of Trade Officers
The annual meeting of Hazelton Board of Trade was held on
Tuesday evening. There was a
good attendance of members, who
manifested keen interest in the
business of the evening. The
election of officers resulted in the
choice of the following: President,
A. R. Macdonald; Vice-president,
Chas. V. Smith; Secretary-treasurer, Stuart J. Martin; Council,
Dr. H. C. Wrinch, H. H. Little,
R. J. Rock, H. F. Glassey. J. C.
K. Sealy, J. Naylor, Wm. Ware,
J. Newick, It. S. Sargent, Jas.
MacKay. The following were
elected to membership in the
board: H. B. Campbell, J. E.
Gilmore, Wm. Grant,R. G. Moseley.
1 kindness is appreciated  by the
boys at the front."
The military medal for bravery
was awarded posthumously to
Gilbert   Burrington,    who   was
wounded  very soon after receiving his commission.
BOYS APPRECIATE
XMAS PARCELS
The Soldiers' Aid is receiving
many letters of appreciation from
the front, written by local men j killed in action,
who received the Christmas par-1 Lieutenant T. VY Hivuer was
eels forwarded by the committee.
"I can tell you," says one, "that
vour work makes us proud of the
little burg we come from." Another says: "It is worth four bits
just to see the crowd around the
lucky man with a Hazelton parcel. The boys all say they are
the best they ever helped to kill."
"Everything was just what we
wanted," was another comment.
Cheerful letters also come from
the wounded, Colin Munro's be-
At the annual meeting of Kispiox Farmers' Institute the following officers were elected:
Matt. Halliday, president; Fred
Janze, vice-president; P. H. Shee-
han, secretary-treasurer; John
Love  and  J. E. Janze, auditors.
PREPARING FOR
HAZELTON FAIR
Five hundred were killed by
an earthquake in the island of
Bali, Malay Archipelago.
John Oliver proposes a law requiring the muzzling after sunset
of all dogs in the country.
German newspapers claim the
destruction of Woolwich Arsenal
in the recent explosion in the
east of London.   This is officially
ing  typical.     He   says:    "You! denie(1     The explosion occurred
people have no idea how your I jn the works of a private firm.
Plans for the annual fall exhibition are already being laid by
the directors of Hazelton Agricultural & Industrial Association,
and every effort will be made to
set a new standard for Interior
fairs. Besides the comprehensive
premium list of last year, there
will be new classes, including
special classes for Indians. An
effort will be made to arouse a
healthy rivalry between various
native villages hy giving substantial prizes for the best live
stock and soil products.
The treasurer's report showed
total receipts o f $1141.75,
and expenditures of $1127.79.
The assets are $110 and the
liabilities only $22.99. Membership numbers 117.
Arrangements for the coming
exhibition are in the hands of
committees with the following
chairmen: Mining,Stuart J. Martin; Live Stock, J. C. K. Sealy;
Produce, Jas. Swann; Prize List,
H. F. Glassey; Domestic Products
and Fine Arts, Dr. Wrinch; Program, F. B. Chettleburgh; Horse
Racing, Jas. MacKay.
Smithers Theater Burned
The most serious fire Smithers
has had for some time occurred
on Sunday evening, when the
Prince Theater and the electric
light plant were completely destroyed. The loss to W. J. O'Neill,
the proprietor, is serious, as
there was no insurance on either
plant or building. THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1917
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $2.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 20 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazette rates.
Vol. VI.
Saturday, February 3, 1917
No. 23
In his speech at Bristol, Bonar Law said: "The Germans . .
tore up treaties which they themselves solemnly signed. They
strewed mines in the open seas. They committed every atrocity on
sea and land against the Hague convention, which they themselves
had signed. They made war on women and children. They
destroyed neutrals as ruthlessly as they did their enemies. They
are at this moment driving the population of a conquered territory
into slavery, and, worse even than that, they are making some
subjects of their enemies take up arms against their own country.
"All this has been done and no neutral power has been able to
stop it, no neutral power, indeed, has made any protest against it.
We must then take other means to secure future peace of the world.
"We have rejected the German offer to enter into negotiations,
not from lust of conquest or desire for shining victories. We have
rejected not from a spirit of vindictiveness or a desire for revenge,
but because peace now would mean a peace based on victory. It
would be a peace which would leave the military machine unbroken
with a halo of success surrounding it. It would leave control of the
machine in the hands of the same men who, for a generation,
prepared for war, who would make the same preparation airain,
and who would choose their own time to plunge the world into the
horrors which we are now enduring.
"Our aim is the same as President Wilson's. What he is longing
for we are fighting for. Our sons and brothers are risking their
lives for it, and we mean to secure it. The hearts of the people of
this country are longing for peace; we are praying for peace, for a
peace which will bring back to us in safety those who are fighting
our batt'es, and a peace which will mean that those who will not
come back have not laid down their lives in vain."
Commenting on the speech, the Daily Chronicle says:
"Mr. Bonar Law has made a prompt and pertinent reply to
President Wilson's address and has indicated with great clearness
the main differences between the president's viewpoint and our own.
"In the practical world we cannot safely shape our plans for
the future without reference to the past and present, and Mr.
Bonar Law is justified in his reminder that for that past and the
present the United States has a share of the responsibility. We
are bound to ask ourselves what sort of value the concurrence of
the United States in international agreements has been to their
maintenance in the past and the present, and the answer is that
under President Wilson's own administration it has proved
valueless.
"We still think that the president has made a miscalculafion
under this head. He has acted on the reckoning that if he stood
so far outside the struggle as never to protest except airainst direct
infringements of American interests he would be able to intervene
with greater acceptance at the end of the war. That might have
conceivably happened if a drawn ending of the war were likely.
But that being in the nature of things nearly impossible, his
reckoning was an error which is bound to diminish and not increase
the influence he might exercise over the final settlement."
BURRELL'S APPEAL
TO THE FARMERS I
"For two years and a half war,
red and ruinous, has raged through
the world, and still no decision
has been reached. There is
reason to hope that before 1917
closes the struggle for liberty
will have been won, or greatly
advanced. Amid the varying
phases of this titanic conflict the
fact stands out more clearly than
ever that agriculture isof supreme
importance. Extraordinary measures are being taken by the
Allied countries to increase and
encourage production. It is
earnestly hoped that every farmer in Canada will strive to
increase the food supply of the
Empire. A still powerful and
unscrupulous enemyopenly avows
its intention to try and sink all
ships carrying supplies to England during the coming year. In
the tremendous strain yet to come
a vital factor will be an ample
and unfailing flow of food to
England and France. No matter
what difficulties may face us, the
supreme duty of every man on
the land is to use every thought
and every energy in the direction
of producing more, and still
more."
MAKE YOUR DOLLARS
FIGHT
AT   "THE   FRONT.
BUY
DOMIHIOW OF CANADA
THREE-YEAR
War Savings Certificates
$ 25.00   for   $21.SO
BO.OO      " 43.OO
100.00    "       se.oo
INDIVIDUAL PURCHASES LIMITED TO J150J.
TOR FULL PARTICULARS APPLY AT ANY BANK
OR ANY MONEY ORDER POST OFFICE
JAN. 9,  1117
flNANOE    DEPARTMBI
Ottawa
Five hundred were killed
an earthquake in the island
Bali, Malay Archipelago.
John Oliver proposes a law requiring the muzzling after sunset
of all dogs in tiie country.
German newspapers claim the
destruction of Woolwich Arsenal
in the recent explosion in the
east of London. This is officially
denied. The explosion occurred
in the works of a private firm.
BLACKSMITH WANTED
For part time; pay 50 cents an
hour. Other work obtainable.
Good position for old man or one
with family,if willing to do other
work. Ruddy & Mackay, Hazelton, B. C.
INSURANCE
of all kinds.
Lowest   Rates.     Strongest   Companies.
Prompt and Liberal Settlements.
Mining Machinery and Supplies.
Cradock's Wire Cables.
Estimates given for Tramways.
J. F. MAGUIRE,   Hazelton
Insurance and Manufacturers' Agent.
HOTEL PRINCE RUPERT
THE LEADING HOTEL IN NORTHERN B. C.
%
: : EUROPEAN PLAN : :
One Dollar per day and upwards
25c. auto service to and from all trains and boats
PRINCE RUPERT B. C.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion, British Columbia,
and Alberta Land Surveyors
Offices at Victoria, Nelson, Fort George
and New Hazelton.
F. P. Burden, New Hazelton
STUART J. MARTIN
Provincial Assayer       I
I
I
Hazelton,
B.C.
DALBY B. MORKILL
British Columbia Land Surveyor
:::   MINE SURVEYOR   :::
Hazelton, B. C.
Surveys of Mineral Claims, Townsites,
Timber and Coal Leases, Etc. and General Engineering Surveys.
The obtaining of Crown Grants attended to. tf
IF YOU CANT FIGHT
YOU CAN AT LEAST
STAND BEHIND THE
MAN WHO FIGHTS
FOR YOU!
THE CANADIAN PATRIOTIC FUND
Which assists the wives and families of Canada's gallant
soldiers, requires millions of dollars to Keep  the soldiers'
home fires burning.
District Treasurer: Stephen H. Hoskins, Government Agent
Hazelton Committee:
J. E. Kirby, H. H. Little, R.E.Allen, J. Naylor, Wm. Ware
and C. V. Smith.     Monthly Subscriptions are Solicited
THE CANADIAN RED CROSS
The Hazelton Branch requests the support of all in its
efforts to assist in the noble work of this great humanitarian
organization.
Honorary Presidents: Mrs. (Rev.) John Field; Mrs. (Rev.)
W. Hogan
Chairman:   Dr. H. C. Wrinch
Vice-Presidents: S. H. Hoskins; Mrs. E. R. Cox; W.J. Carr
Honorary Secretary: Miss J. C. Grant
Honorary Treasurer: H. H. Little, Manager Union Bank
Executive Committee:
Mrs. H. C. Wrinch,  Mrs. R. G. Moseley,  Mrs. Chas. Reid,
Miss Hogan, Rev. John Field, Rev. M. Pike, H. H. Phillips
Large or Small Contributions will be Gratefully Received
SOLDIERS'AID & EMPLOYMENT
COMMITTEE
Endeavors to supply soldiers from Hazelton district with
such comforts and necessities as cannot be readily obtained
at the front, and will assist them to re-establish themselves
in civil life when they return. The Committee is acting in
co - operation   with  the   Provincial   Returned   Soldiers'
Commission and the Military Hospitals Commission
Contributions to the Soldiers' Aid Tobacco Fund are Welcome
Chairman: A. R. Macdonald
Honorary Secretary-Treasurer: R.E.Allen, District Forester
S. H. Hoskins,  A.  E.  Player,  Wm.  Ware,  Jos.  Naylor,
H. H. Little, J. K. Frost, F. B. Chettleburgh
SOME CAN FIGHT, SOME
CAN WORK OR PAY ���
ALL CAN SERVE
%i THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1917
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
MINERAL ACT
o]iiiiiiiiiiiirjiiiiiiiiiiiirjiiiiiiiiiiii[o]iiiiiiiiiiiico]iiiiiiiiiiiicoiiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiuiiiiir:o
Certificate of Improvements     =
Minnesota has gone dry.
Pittsburg had a $4,000,000 fire,
miners have resumed
will   tax   theater
Fernie
work.
Vancouver
tickets.
Boston had a $500,000 fire on
Monday.
Arizona is urging state-wide
prohibition.
Belgians are still being deported to Germany.
The U.S. will make its own
nayy projectiles.
Earl Cromer, formerly British
agent in Egypt, is dead.
The Calgary coal miners have
decided to return to work.
Ex-governor McLennan of New
Brunswick is dead, aged 87.
The steamer Prince John went
ashore at Wrangell Narrows.
A new French airplane is said
to be far swifter than any other.
Nine millions will be required
for Canada's pensions this year.
The "bone dry" prohibition law
for Alaska has pJssed in congress.
The German - American Mercantile Bank of Seattle has closed
its doors.
Premier Clark of New Brunswick has resigned on account of
ill-health.
Vancouver reported the severest snowstorm of the winter on
Wednesday.
Rio Janiero reports say German
submarines have reached the
South Atlantic.
Five hundred millions will be
required to finance Canada during
the coming year.
Three snowslides near Juneau
caused two deaths and much
property damage.
George Bury, vice-president of
the C. P. R.. is to take charge of
Russia's railroads.
A Washington despatch says
the American troops in Mexico
have been ordered home.
A blizzard raged throughout
Oregon early in the week. Many
trains were 36 hours late.
Joe Martin will return to London. He has resigned the federal nomination for Cariboo.
Lord Devonport, Britain's food
controller, denies that a ration
system is to be instituted.
Britain's casualty list for January was 12,314 killed, 17,764
wounded and 2928 missing.
There is a growing agitation in
eastern Canada for a "national"
government during the war.
As a result of the political crisis in Japan, general elections
have been called for April 20.
Mexican bandits who crossed
the border at Arivaca, Arizona,
were driven back by soldiers and
cowboys.
Austria-Hungary is reported to
have forbidden the payment of
any private or commercial debts
to neutrals.
Cabinet and diplomatic changes
in the U. S. after March 4 are
predicted. Reports say Lansing
will succeed Page as ambassador
to Great Britain.
An unsuccessful attempt was
made to wreck a train on which
King Alfonso was traveling,near
Granada, Spain.
Forty-eight persons were injured ia a rear-end collision on
the N.Y. & N.H. at Waterbury,
Conn., on Sunday.
('apt. Hans Boehm, a German
officer arrested at Falmouth, had
an American passport issued to a
fictitious Georgia man.
A bill to enfranchise all Canadian soldiers,, whether on the
voters' lists ur not, has been introduced in the Dominion parliament.
Mayor Gill of Seattle, with
Beckingham, chief of police, and
Hodge, ex-sheriff, have been indicted for violation of liquor laws
and acceptance of bribes. All
obtained bail.
Sevigny, the government candidate, was elected in the Dorchester by-election by a substantial majority. The Conservative
victory is regarded as a blow to
Laurier's prestige.
Practical steps will be taken to
secure the,return to Canada of
the thousands of soldiers' wives
who went to England to be near
their husbands, and whose presence proves embarrassing.
Mrs. Temple's Telegram
To those who are married, to
those who hope some day to be,
and to all who enjoy a irood
laugh, we say, "See 'Mrs.
Temple's Telegram,' in Assembly
Hall, on Feb. 20."
This screaming farce-c.imjdy
shows the folly of wives in not
believing any and everything
their husbands may sa��', thereby
demonstrating the truth of the
old adage, "Where ignorance is
bliss 'tis folly to be wise." To
husbands it shows the advisability of making sure of all facts
before commencing to lie to their
wives, lest they find themselves
surrounded by such an army of
small, insignificant fibs as to be
beyond all control.
Don't forget the date, Feb. 20,
in Assembly Hall, Hazelton.
New Canadian Metals
Ottawa, Jan. 29:��� Canada is
producing two new minerals as a
direct result of the war.according
to a statement made by Dr.
Adams, town planning commissioner, at a meeting of the commission on conservation.
One is magnesium, which is
now being used to make star
shells for the Canadians on the
western front, and the other is
ferro-molybdenum, which is now
being exported both to Russia
and Britain.
MINERAL ACT
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
HAZELTON VIEW. LEAD PICK,
MOOSE.ELK MINERAL CLAIMS.sit-
uate in the Omineca Mining Division of
Cassiar District.
Where located:���On the West slope
of Rocher de Boule Mountain.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Dalby B.
Morkill, of Hazelton, B.C., B.C. Land
Surveyor, acting as agent for New
Hazelton Gold-Cobalt Mines, Limited,
(N. P. L.), Free Miner's Certificate
No. 5598C, intend, sixty days from the
date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements. 21-29
Dated this 15th day of January, A.
D. 1917.
D. B. Morkill
NOTICE
AJAX MINERAL CLAIM, situated in
Omineca mining division of Omineca
district; located on Rocher de Boule
mountain, on Juniper creek, adjoining
the Iowa mineral claim on the south.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Ja<>. E. Dean
of Hazelton, Free Miner's Certificate
No. 43174B, acting as agent for Charles
F. Booth, Free Miner's Certificate No.
43178B, intend sixty days from the
date hereof to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant for the above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this second day of December,
A.D. 1916. Jas. E. Dean.
! Hudson's Bay Company j
I HAZELTON. B.C. ��
o Groceries, Drygoods, Boots and Shoes, Hardware, Wholesale Liquors 5
I Try our Fruits and Preserves in glass jars! 1
o o
S T" sf> 1 "
i lea Garden: =
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations.
COAL mining rightsof the Dominion,
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and
Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the
Northwest Territories and in a portion
of the Province of British Columbia,
may be leased for a term of twenty-one
years at an annual rental of $1 an
acre. Not more than 2,660 acres will
be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made
by the applicant in person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district in which
the rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must
be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for shall be
staked out by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied by a fee of $5, which will be refunded if the rights applied for are not
available, but not otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable
output of the mine at the rate of five
cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the
royalty thereon. If the coal mining
rights are not being operated, such
returns should be furnished at least
once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at
the rate of $10.0C an acre.
For full information application
should be made to the Secretary of the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa,
or to any Agent or Sub-Agent of
Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B.���Unauthorized publication of
this advertisement will not be paid for.
-5S782
SAUCE:    Cranberry,  Apple Butter,   per jar, .35
PRESERVES:    Apricot, Pineapple,
Apricot with Pineapple   per jar, .35
o
s
=   JELLIES, HONEY, MINCEMEAT, GRAPE MARMALADE   |
0   o
j        Crosse & Blackwell's Fruits:        |
H Apricots, Cherries, Peaches, Raspberries, bot. .40, .60 g
1 Fresh, Choice Grapefruit     -    10c each or 3 for .25    =
o]iiiiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiii[o]iiiiiiiiiiiico]iiiiiiiiiiii[o]iiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiimiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiico
CANADIAN  PACIFIC  RAILWAY      '
Lowest rates Prince Rupert to all Eastern Points via steamer
to Vancouver and Canadian Pacific Railway.
Meals and  berth  included on steamer
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
S.S. "Princess Maquinna" leaves Prince Rupert every SUNDAY, at 6 p.m.
S.S. "Princess Sophia" leaves Prince Rupert 6 p.m. Nov. 11th,
25th; Dec. 9th, 23rd; Jan. 6th, 20th; Feb. 3rd.
J. I. Peters, General Agent, 3rd Ave. & 4th St., Prince Rupert, B.C   j
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
/ 1VFRY nnA  *\TA (IF** We are Prepared to supply private
Lj&VLaIXI    UllU OltlULisJ  and  public conveyances   day  and
Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
1 night.
BEST DRY BIRCH, $6.50 A CORD
Consign your shipments in Our
Care  for  Storage or  Delivery.
Ruddy & MacKay
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
Commercial Printing at
THE  MINER OFFICE
RAILWAY and STEAMSHIP LINES.
Steamers sailing between Skagway, Juneau,
Wrangell, Ketchikan, Anyox, Prince Rupert,
Ocean Falls, Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle.
Leave Prince Rupert for Ocean Falls, Vancouver Victoria, Seattle,
Friday at 9:00 A.M. For Anyox Wednesday at 12 midnight. For
Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau, Skagway, Wednesday, January 10, 24,
February 7, 21, March 7, 21, at 1 p.m. Fortnightly sailings to Port
Simpson, Stewart, and Queen Charlotte Island points.
Arrive Prince Rupert from the South every Wednesday at 10:30 A. M.
Eastbound trains leave Hazelton: Passenger,Wednesday and Saturday,
7:10 P.M. Mixed 1:56 p.m. Tuesday.     Wayfreight 12:30 p.m. Saturday.
Westbound  trains leave Hazelton:  Passenger Tuesday and Thursday,
9:4G A.M.    Mixed 6 a.m. Sunday.    Wayfreight 11:35 a.m. Sunday.
For further information apply to any Grand Trunk Pacific Agent.or to
G. A. McNicholl.Asst. Gen. Freight anil Pasnenger Agent.PrinCe Rupert, B.C.
I  DPMI
TO INVESTORS
THOSE WHO, FROM  TIME  TO TIME. HAVE
FUNDS   REQUIRING    INVESTMENT
MAY   PURCHASE   AT   FAR
DOMINION OF CANADA DEEENTURE STOCK
IN SUMS OF $500, OR ANY MULTIPLE THEREOF
Principal repayable 1st October, 1910.
Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and 1st October by
cheque (free of exchange lit any chartered Bank in Canada) at
the rate of five per cent per annum from the date of purchase.
Holders of this stock will have lhe privilege of surrendering
at par and accrued Interest, as the equivalent of cash, in payment of any allotment made under any future war loan issue in
Canada other than an i.isue of Treasury Bills or other like short
date security.
Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only.
A commission of one-quarter of one per cent will be allowed
to recognized bond and stock brokers on allotments made in
respect of applications for this stock which bear their stamp.
For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of
Finance, Ottawa.
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA
OCTOBER 7th, 1916. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1917
f
MONDAY, JAN. 29
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
and Le Transloy, and one by the
French around Verdun.
Word comes from Macedonia
that General Sarrails combination
of French, British and Servian
forces  has struck once more and
London: In a successful oper-
ation on the Somme front, in the
neighborhood of Le Transloy, a"
a
, .     . , ,.     i is advancing toward Prilep.
objectives  and   a   commanding     ^.^ ed 3Q officera
portion of the enemy aitrenches I and more than one thousan(] Ger.
were captured.    Over 350 prison-,man   ^.^  .���   ^   vjcto,.y
,',s:,mls,x """���"'���������1  UV1V  ,ak''"- 'north of Jakobeny on  Saturday.
British   troops   defeated   the
were
Vigorous counter-attacks by the
Germans to regain  the ground
were defeated with heavy losses
to the enemy.     Our planes did I
much useful work.     Two enemy
machines   were   destroyed   and |
another forced to land.     Two of
our machines are missing.
Many German soldiers are anxious to be taken prisoners of
war. They say they do not like
the war any more.
It is reported Germany intends
to issue a statement having refer
British   troops
I Turks near Kut-el-Amara.
London:   In anticipation of an
extension of the German submarine campaign,  the admiralty is
preparing for a trial of strength,
with British brains.skill and dashj
opposed to the German undersea j
fleet. The North Sea danger zone
has been extended.   The new line
cuts off the entire northeast coast
of Germany, with the object of j
checking raiders.     It is believed
voting of a war credit is the main
business before the house.
A bill for the expropriation of
unclaimed balances in banks is
to be introduced.
Washington: The senate voted
against discussion of the president's peace speech. Senator
Cummins delivered a strong attack on the Wilson utterances,
declaring that the proposals
meant the giving up of national
traditions.
t.
THURSDAY, FEB. 1
along the frontier. The Dutch
feel some anxiety on account of
these military preparations.
Newspapers and shippers are
not perturbed by the new British
mine blockade, some even considering it advantageous. Holland supports the action.
r
FRIDAY, FEB. 2
ence to Wilson's senate speech, i anew system of armingmerchant-
The nature of the statement is
not yet known.
There was no uncertainty as
to how England viewed Wilson's
peace speech. The streets flared
with newspaper bills protesting
against the president's suggestions. Even those who have
suffered most are determined that
victory must be won before peace
will be considered.
Paris: There was spirited artillery action on the left bank of
the Meuse, in the region of Hill
304 and Deadman Hill and on the
right bank in the sectors of
Louvemont and Bois Caurrieres.
In Lorraine our batteries destructively shelled German organizations in Parroy forest. The
remainder of the front was quiet.
On the Belgian front there
was a great artillery action in
the region of Dixmude during
night and dav.
Bratiano, the Roumanian pre-
mier.in Petrograd for conference
with the Russian authorities,
says he is glad to find in Russia
the same feeling of unshakable
faith in the outcome of the war,
as in the beginning. The Roumanians will soon be reformed
and with the aid of Russia will
drive the enemy from their territory. The war booty fallen into
German hands has been greatly
exaggerated. It will not improve
the economic situation in Germany. The Roumanian army
lost one-fourth its strength.
men will be an effective means of
dealing with the submarine menace.
The auxiliary cruiser Laurentic
was sunk by a mine or torpedo.
The crew of 109 was saved.
Manchester: The Lloyd George
administration was endorsed by
the Labor congress by a vote of
six to one.
Washington: The arming of
merchantmen and the carrying of
deck guns by submarines may
result in a change of American
policy regarding armed merchantmen.
London: A plot to poison Lloyd
George and Hon. Arthur Henderson was revealed today on the
arr ignment at Guildhall of three
women and one man, charged
with conspiracy to kill the ministers. The women are suffragettes
and the man "a conscientious objector to war and war service."
j many has from three to five hun-
Berlin:   Germany has formally |dred submarines ready for the
served notice on the United States
and other neutrals that she has
been forced to "do away with the
Washington: Diplomatic relations with Germany may be severed at any moment and Berns-
torff may be handed his passports,
but a decision has not yet been
reached. No more passports are
being issued for Europe. No hint
is yet forthcoming of the president's course of action. If he
stands by his note on the "Sussex" he must break off diplomatic
relations with Germany.
From German quarters last
night it was  learned  that  Ger-
steamer Trevean and the Belgian
steamer Euphrates were"sunk.
A London newspaper suggests
shooting Von Tirpitz's son.
Asquith says the situation is
grave, but he is confident the
navy can handle it.
London: Patrol encounters only
are reported from the western
front. There is no news from
the eastern fronts.
Charleston, S.C.: The interned
German freighterLiebenfels mysteriously began sinking and sank
in a few minutes. The commander of the vessel refused the
assistance of tug-boats.
r
WEDNES., JAN. 31
TUESDAY, JAN. 30
=%
London: Allied victories on
five different fronts are cited as
another evidence of the new
policy of co-operation and co-ordination of effort among the nations of the Entente. British,
French, Servian and Russian
troops each won distinct victories
in every field of fighting save the
South African and Egyptian.
There were no reports from these
two theaters.
The most spectacular of the
victories was the smashing by
the. Russians of two miles of the
German front along the Roumanian-Carpathian line. The Czar's
forces assumed the offensive in
spite of bitterly cold weather and
snow.exactly the kind of weather
that forced the stoppage of the
German campaign in Roumania
recently. The Russians successfully broke down an attempted
German attack on the Riga front.
On the west front there were
three successful raids,two by the
British near Neuville St.   Vaast
^   J
London: Saturday's raid on
the German trenches near Le
Transloy was a brilliant and
bloodless affair. It took the
British only four minutes to cross
No-man's-land. They found the
Huns at breakfast, and it was
evident the enemy believed the
British were also engaged in
trying to keep warm. Six officers
and 352 men of picked regiments
were captured.
Petrograd: The third of the
Allied conferences, to effect the
co-operation of all forces of the
Entente nations, is in progress
here today. Britain is represented
by Lords Revelstoke and Milner,
France by General Castelnau.and
Italy by General Landeschi and
Senator Scialoja.
Paris: Fighting continues in
the Verdun region. There were
artillery actions on both sides of
the Meuse and grenade fighting
occurred in the sector of Hill 304
and on the left bank of the
Meuse. There was the usual
cannonading on the rest of this
front,
A German plane was brought
down by our artillery in the
region of Dannemarie.
Artillery fighting occurred in
the sectors of Dixmude, Hetsas,
and Steenstraate.
Several deaths from extreme
cold are reported in Paris.
There is no news from the
eastern or southern fronts.
New York: A squadron of
British warships is reported to be
maintaining a sharp vigil for
lurking German raiders in the
waters adjacent to this harbor.
The "leak" investigation leads
in the direction of Bernstorff.
Ottawa: Premier Borden will
ask for extra sessions to expedite
war business before his departure
for the Imperial conference.  The
campaign.
Lansing excused himself from
seeing Spring-Rice and the Japanese ambassador yesterday afternoon.
A British fleet is ready to meet
the German threat. A great
squadron of cruisers lies outside
New York harbor, ready to act
as convoys. Close watch is kept
on interned German ships. Two
United States destroyers turn
back all shipping leaving port.
Thousands of Americans are on
the Atlantic,their lives endangered under Germany's latest proclamation.
Many ships are approaching the
aclivo around Les | d��?*? z0.ne'   !t is u"know" whf
shipping is approaching this side
owing to orders of the admiralty
veiling in secrecy all movements
of British ships.
New York: Leading papers of
the country demand that Bernstorff be given his passports, and
say the U. S. must maintain its
honor.
restrictions which have been imposed  upon her fighting on sea"
after   February  1.     Britain   is
blamed  for the continuance o
the war.
London: The British foreign
office has requested the United
States government to inform Germany that reprisals will follow if
Germany carries out her threat
to sink hospital ships.
London: The British made another successful raid on the
Somme front, entering German
trenches and capturing prisoners.
Artillery
Boeufs.
Three German aeroplanes were
brought down  and   three more
were driven  down  in damaged j
condition.
In the sinking of the Laurentic
260 were lost, many being killed
by the explosion.
Paris: French forces penetrated the first and second lines
of German trenches north of Lin-
trey and captured prisoners.
Elsewhere on the French front
the day was quiet.
San Francisco fears a German
raider in the Pacific. The Japanese liner Nippon Maru, from Yokohama, is some days overdue.
DENTISTRY
DR. BADGERO
Smithers, B.C.
-O
I
I
6
TRY
OUR
Wampole's Cod   Liver  Oil
(Tasteless)
UTOD   ATE
DRUG STORE
HAZELTON, B.C.
Amsterdam: Germany accepts
the challenge to fight to a finish,
staking everything, says Beth-
mann Hollweg in a speech to the
reichstag.
American Ambassador Gerard
Petrograd:    Advancing waist-, met Hollweg and held  a  confer-
deep in snow, Russians stormed ence,  concerning which nothing
and captured at the point of the lis published,
bayonet German positions on the     Londor).   Germany's new sub-
heights east of Jacobeni.
marine campaign of ruthlessness
The Hague: The Germans have ��� is under way. The Dutch steamer
made new trenches near the Hoi-1 Epsilon was the first victim in
land border, and German troops,the "barred zone". Three Brit-
have arrived  at various places ish  fishing smacks,   the British
The Miner is two dollars a year.
Assay Office and Mining Office
Arts and Crafts Building, 578 Seymour Street
 VANCOUVER, B.C.	
The Estate of J. O'Sullivan
Provincial Assayers and Chemists
Established 1897 by the late J. O'Sullivan,   F. C. S., 26 years with
Vivian & Sons, Swansea.
"ii-
-1IK
j      Just Arrived
I A Full Line of
[ WINTER MITTS     ���
-      AND GLOVES
Come in and see them!
I
NOEL & ROCK
Hazelton, B. C.
Kill-
HAZELTON HOSPITAL^
for any period from onu month upward at $1 pur
month In advance. This rate Includes office consultations anil medicines, as well as all costn while
In ili��' hospital. Tickets obtainable in Hazelton
at the 1'nnt Office or the Drutr Store; In Aldermere
from Mr. T. J. Thorp; in Telkwa from Dr. Wallace;
or by mail from the Medical Superintendent at the
Hospital.
P-
THE     MINISTER    OF    FINANCE
REQUESTS
THE
PEOPLE    OF    CANADA    TO
BEGIN NOW
TO
SAVE   MONEY   FOR   THE
NEXT WAR LOAN
JAN. 9, 1117
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
OTTAWA

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