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Omineca Miner Sep 25, 1915

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 '
THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. V, NO. 4
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1915
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
MORE HAZELTON MEN
OFFTOTHE FRONT
Twenty-two more names were
added to the list of men who
have gone from Hazelton to "do
their bit" at the front, when a
squad of recruits for the 1st
Canadian Pioneers and the B. C.
Highland battalions left yesterday for Vancouver.
Government Agent Hoskins has
been busy for a couple of weeks
receiving applications for enlistment, with the result that a fine
squad was waiting for Lieut.
Cooke of the 67th and Sergt.
Frost of the Pioneers, who arrived during the week. The men
who have previously gone from
this district have well borne their
part on the battlefront, and the
latest recruits will certainly make
good. They look fit to go anywhere and do anything.
On the eve of their departure
the people of the town gave the
recruits a rousing send-off at a
banquet in the Hazelton Hotel.
Chief Constable Minty was in the
chair, and the big crowd was
well entertained by a program
of songs and patriotic speeches.
Following are the names of the
men comprising the squad, who
left in charge of Colin Munro:
Western Pioneers
Colin Munro
William C. English
Gustave Sanborn
George Walker
Harry James
Shel. G. Robinson
G. A. McKay
William Berry
Robert Hadden
J. J. Mclnnes
A. D. MacaKy
Samuel Mathias
James Matthews
George Rex
D. Mcintosh
George Berts
Thomas Harrison
72nd Battalion
K. Burton Forster
67th Battalion
Charles Mcintosh
Chris. Fox
Peter Enoch
George McGrath
Annual Fire Meeting
The annual meeting of Hazelton Fire Association will be held
on Tuesday evening next, at 8:30
sharp, in St Andrew's Hall. This
organization of citizens is charged
with the duty of supporting the
fire brigade, and it is important
that there should be a good
attendance.
CZAR'S FORCES ARE NOT BEATEN
TEUTON INVADERS CHECKED IN RUSSIA
-BALKAN SITUATION MUCH INVOLVED
London: "The battle north of
Lutsk was a great success for
the Russians. We took 4,000
prisoners and recaptured the
town of Lutsk," says the Petrograd correspondent of  Renter's.
The successes which the Russian general Ivanoff has been
having in Galicia and Volhynia,
it is considered in military circles
here, may still have an influence
in more than one way in the Bal
kans. General Ivanoff has been
so successful that the German
field-marshal Von Mackensen.
who is fighting north of the
Pripet marshes, eastward o f
Brest-Litovsk, according to the
German official report has been
compelled to withdraw his line
somewhat, as it was in danger
of being encircled, while the
Austrians have been driven back
across the Styr and, according to
one account, have evacuated the
fortress of Lutsk in the Volhy-
nian triangle of fortresses which
they captured during the great
drive.
These successes, which extend
to the Roumanian frontier, will,
in the opinion of military observers, serve to ease the situation in
the Roumanian flank should Rou-
LOCAL AND DISTRICT
NEWSJARAGRAPHS
Fire   meeting   next   Tuesday
evening.
A. E. Player is taking in the
fair at Rupert.
Mrs. Graham Rock is visiting
relatives in Seattle.
Miss   Pearl Allen  is   visiting
mania join Russia, and in addition j border.    The national sentiment
might well prevent the Austro- j is strongly in favor of the Allies,
Germans from sending an army, j and violent anti-Teutonic riots in' Prince Rupert this week.
which, it is estimated, must con-! Bucharest  followed  rumors of a
sist of at least half a million men, | German agreement.
to make an attack on Servia. In Paris t��ere are fears that
I
In the center the Russians are j the mobilization in Greece may
still falling back, while in the;mean a coup d'etat in favor of
north Von Hindenburg continues ' Germany, King Constantine be-
to make progress with his offen- ing the Kaiser's  brother-in-law.
sive against Dvinsk. although at
a much slower rate than formerly, as the Russians are stiffening
their resistance.
East of Vilna the Germans
admit a temporary check during
which they lost guns to the Russians.
At Vilieka the Russians captured eight big'gnns, four howitzers, nine artillerv ammunition
wagons and several machine guns
which were turned against the
Germans.
Vienna : A great Teutonic
I movement against Servia will
begin in a few days. Heavy
artillery, to demolish defenses
constructed in Servia by the
Britishisbeingrushed to the front.
Constantine, however, has warned Ferdinand of Bulgaria that
Greece will support Servia in the
event of a Bulgarian attack.
French  reports say Bulgarian
troops have invaded Macedonia.
J. S. Bagg, of Skeena Crossing,
was in Hazelton yesterday.
Washington : A statement
cabled by Premier Radoslavoff
announced that Bulgaria does not
intend aggressive action against
any of her neighbors and that
the mobilization is not to be construed as indicating that she is
about to enter the war.
Stockholm: There are rumors
of a naval battle near the Aland
Islands. A large German cruiser
is reported to have been torpedoed
London: THe Balkan situation
is still most involved. Roumania
is moving troops to the Bulgarian ' dawn today
Amsterdam: British warships
began a terrific bombardment of
Zeebrugge  and  its defenses at
PROGRESS OF THE GREAT WAR DAY BY DAY
Deal On for Red Rose
Report  says  negotiations   by
Edmonton men for a bond on the
Red Rose, one of the star properties on  Rocher de Boule moun
tain, have been successfully con
eluded.
I        MONDAY, SEPT. 20
German* Occupy Vilna
Berlin, via London: The Russian city of Vilna, at which the
armies of Field-Marshal von Hindenburg had been driving and
which was stubbornly defended
until nearly surrounded by hostile
forces, has been occupied by the
Germans, it was officially announced by the German army
headquarters today.
Vilna, a city of some 170,000
inhabitants on the Warsaw-Pet-
rograd railway line, has been the
object of a German offensive
movement for weeks past in the
course of the operations of Field-
Marshal von Hindenburg.
The Russian Retreat
Petrograd : Vilna has beer,
evacuated and is now in the hands
of the Germans. Von Hindenburg is again advancing on his
200 - mile front, the Russians
retiring in order.   The movement
resembles the retreat from Warsaw, as the Germans are  losing
two men to one Russian.
Sir John's Report
London: A report from Field-
Marshal Sir John French issued
last night says:
"Since my last communication
of Sept. 15, no change has occurred in the situation on our
front. There has been considerable mining activity on both
sides. Particularly opposite the
southern portion of our front, to
the east of Ypres, our own artillery and that of the enemy
have been active."
Canadians All in France
Ottawa : General Sir Sam
Hughes announced today that the
second Canadian division was
now all over in France. The
various brigades made the passage from Shorncliffe between
Tuesday and Friday last.
sion results in the formation of
the greatest underwriting syndicate ever organized, for the
flotation of a loan of $800,000,000
to the Allies. The issue will bear
five per cent interest, and will be
sold at par. The bonds are to
run five and ten years. Bankers
regarded as pro-German have
offered to help the issue, if jt is
agreed that the proceeds are not
for munition purchases.
James J. Hill, who is one of
the negotiators, says the loan is
more vital to the prosperity of
the United States than to the
success of the Allies, as the latter
can buy food and supplies elsewhere, on credit.
A Berlin Report
London: A report published
in Berlin, as a despatch from
Stockholm, says eighteen members of the Russian duma have
been arrested, the duma buildings
and all railway stations in Petrograd being occupied by the mili-
Mrs. Goddard left on Wednesday for a visit to the coast.
H.C.Kinghorn was amongthose
who went to Rupert for the fair.
Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Hall are in
Prince Rupert for the exhibition.
Mr. and Mrs. J.C. K. Sealy left
on Monday for a visit to Prince
Rupert.
Dr. Wrinch returned on Thursday from a brief visit to Prince
Rupert.
H. A. DuHamel was among the
Hazelton men who went to Prince
Rupert for the fair.
H. Welch, provincial assessor,
is again at his post, after a vacation spent in the east.
Henry Avison, provincial sani-
tory inspector, is paying an official visit to the district.
Constables Lavery and Mead
are engaged on patrol duty in the
vicinity of Salmon river.
Miss Ward, of the government
office staff, left on Monday for a
vacation trip to the coast.
At Telkwa fair S. H. Hoskins
won three first prizes for vegetables from Lis Hazelton  garden.
Mr. and Mrs. ,1. H. Kirby and
their son Ernest returned on
Saturday from a holiday visit to
the south.
Constable W. R. Henley, of
Quatsino, has been transferred to
Hazelton district and assigned to
Endako station.
Mrs. Sinclair and children, R.
G. and Mrs. Moseley and Mrs.
Scrimgeour accompanie 1 the ball
team to Prince Rupert on Wednesday. 	
Dr. Donahue, assistant physician at Hazelton Hospital, expects
to leave next Thursday for Montreal, for at least six weeks. He
has volunteered for surgical service at the front.
A Great Bond Issue
New York:   The mission of the j tary.
Anglo-French financial com mis-1       (Continued on Page Four)
John Newton, inspector of
mines, arrived from Victoria on
Monday. Accompanied by Gold
Commississioner Hoskins, he visited and examined Rocher de
Boule mine, finding everything
in connection with the plant and
workings in excellent condition. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1915
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $2.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 20 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C
Gazette rates.
Vol. V.
Saturday, September 25, 1915.
No. 4
HOW DANGER OF FIRE MAY BE MINIMIZED
The season is fast approaching when cool evenings will demand
the starting of fires in our homes. September and October have
become known to firemen as the months when chimneys and flues
cause the most trouble.
The following suggestions of a practical nature, if faithfully
followed, will do much to prevent damage to property and loss of
life.
Stoves���Place a metal stove-board on the wood floor under the
stove, and extending at least twelve inches in front of the ash pit
door. Protect all walls and partitions within two feet of any stove
with a metal shield, leaving an air-space between the shield and
the wall. Leave no kindling or other wood in the oven over night.
Do not hang clothes too near the stove or stovepipes.
Pipes���See that the lengths of stovepipe are well fitted together, free from rust, holes and parted seams, wired firmly and
fitted perfectly into the chimney. Stovepipes passing through
partitions, walls, floors, attics and roofs are dangerous at best.
Where these must pass through partitions, walls or floors, always
use a large, ventilated double thimble. You should examine the
stovepipes in the attic. They may come apart or rust. Fluff and
spider webs are likely to gather on and around them, to be set on
fire when you least expect it.
Chimneys���Chimneys should be built from the ground up, and
never rest on wooden supports. The settling of woodwork will
cause cracks in the chimney. Nor should the chimney walls be
used to support joists or other woodwork. Soft brick and poor
mortar are often responsible for defects in the chimney. Use a
good quality of brick and cement mortar. Chimney walls should
be at least eight inches thick, the flue of ample size and lined with
fire clay or terra cotta. Never stuff up the flue holes with rags or
paper, nor cover them with anything but a metal stock. Chimneys
should be cleaned frequently.
Defects���Defective stovepipes, boilers, furnaces, pipes and
chimneys should be promptly repaired or replaced.
Overheating���Beware of overheating stoves, boilers, furnaces
and pipes.
Ashes���These should never be placed in wooden receptacles or
bins, on wood floors or against wood partitions, walls, fences,
buildings or any other woodwork. Use metal receptacles only, and
dump ashes away from all buildings.
Care���These matters are technical, but very simple and merely
call for ordinary care. You cannot afford to be careless, when the
lives of your loved ones, and the property of yourself and neighbors
is at stake. Let "Care and Caution" be the watchword and in this
way assist in reducing Canada's enormous fire loss.
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We Lead���
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MINERS' PROSPECTORS' and SETTLERS' SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY
PRESERVING
Qur laft advertisement concerned the
preserving of fruit, etc.
We have also food and clothing to
preserve the body���If you take good
care   of  it,   it   may   last   a   long
time.
WE ARE RECEIVING
Dry Goods���Rugs���Window Blinds
Ladies' Cashmere Hosiery
Infants' Wool Shawls
School Supplies, Scribblers,
Erasers, Etc.
Big Assortment of Flags Jus!
Received
fiSi R. S. SARGENT, LTD. H^ton
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B. C. Timber for Export
Under the direction of the
minister of lands, an attractive
pamphlet entitled "British Columbia Timber," has been prepared for distribution among the
buyers in overseas markets. It
is intended to draw the attention
of importers overseas to the forest products of the province, and
especially to the facilities for
exporting British Columbia lumber. Consisting of nearly forty
pages and containing nearly thirty
illustrations, the pamphlet treats
of the principal exportable woods,
their qualities and uses, together
with information concerning their
strength, values and' suitability
for various uses.
American Munitions
According to Hudson Maxim,
whose  sources   of  information
ought to be exceptionally good,
American plants for the production of explosives, cartridges,
shrapnel and rifles have increased
their capacity since the war to
ten times their former capacity,
and by the middle of the coming
winter the increase will be thirty-fold. Yet even so, he says,
their contributions to the supplies
of the Allies amounts so far to
only about two per cent of what
they are consuming.
Increasing U.S. Army
Washington Sept. 18:���Secretary Garrison asks $250,000,000
to strengthen military defenses.
This is more than double last
year's army appropriation.
One of the new farm tractors
is featured by a gasoline motor
running inside a large wheel,
which it moves over the ground.
PRINCE RUPERT FAIR!
1915 J
ARE YOU A MEMBER? It
costs $1 and no more to join the
N. B. C. Agricultural and Industrial Assn., payable at any time
before October 1st next.
MEMBERSHIP SPELLS
STRENGTH
The Government base the Fair
grant each year on Membership
strength.
450 was the membership for
1914, $400 the Goverment grant,
and 1000 members is the number
wanted for 1915, which means a
corresponding increase in the
Government grant for 1916.
WILL YOU JOIN AND HELP
DEVELOPMENT???
Your dollars mean a better and
larger Fair.
Your dollar means more dollars
spent on the Fair in September
next.
Your dollars will aid development, increase payrolls and bring
profit and prosperity to yourself
and your community.
WILL YOU SEND IN YOUR
NAME AT ONCE
to the Secretary, P. O. Box 1657,
Prince Rupert, as one of those
who are boosting for a prosperous Northland.
Or hand your subscription in at
The Miner office.
CANADIAN  PACIFIC RAILWAY
Lowest rates Prince Rupert to all Eastern Points via steamer
to Vancouver and Canadian Pacific Railway.
Meals and berth included on steamer
>
^=
S.S. "Prince���� Alice" or "Princess  Sophia"  leave* Prince Rupert every
SATURDAY at 6 p. m.     S. S. "Princess Maquinna" leaves
Prince Rupert every Sunday at 6 p.m.
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
J. (i. McNab,  Cor. 3rd Ave. and 4th St.,   Prince Rupert, E C.
J
The Omineca Miner is two dollars a year anywhere in Canada.
<r
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Bulkley Valley Farm
Lands For Sale
These Lands are close to the main Kne of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, which is now running trains through the
Bulkley Valley. There is a ready local market for all produce. Land prices are reasonable. Terms are easy.
Write for full particulars to
NORTH COAST LAND COMPANY, Ltd.
Suite 622 Metropolitan Building
Paid up Capital* 1.6OO.0O0.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
=^ THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1915
WATER NOTICE
TAKE NOTICE that the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway Company, whose ad-
dresB is Winnipeg, Man., will apply for
a license to take and use 120 acre feet
per annum of water out of Mosquito
Lake, also known as Bigelow Lake.
The water will be diverted from the
Lake at a point about 1,000 feet south
of the N.W. corner of the S.W. i Lot
4266, T.4, R.5, Coast District, and will
be used for Railway purposes. This
notice was posted on the ground on the
16th day of July, 1915. A copy of this
notice and an application pursuant
thereto and to the "Water Act, 1914,"
will be filed in the office of the Water
Recorder at Hazelton, B.C. Objections
to the application may be filed with the
said Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria, B.C., within thirty
days after the first appearance of this
notice in a local newspaper. The date
of the first publication of this notice is
August 28, 1915.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railway Co.,
Applicant.
52-3 By H.H.Hansard, Agent.
LAND NOTICES
Hazelton Land District.        District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Charl.es F. Law, of
Vancouver, occupation broker, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at post planted on the
north shore of Tacla Lake, one mile
east of Driftwood River, thence 80
chains west, 40 chains north, 80 chains
east, 40 chains south to point of commencement, containing 320 acres more
or less.
July 24, 1915. Charles F. Law.
Applicant
Hazelton Land District.        District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Frank Wooliver,
of Vancouver, occupation prospector,
intends to apply for permission lo purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on
the north shore of Tacla Lake, one
mile east of Driftwood River, thence
south 80 chains, east 40 chains, north
80 chains, west 40 chains, to point of
commencement, containing 320 acres
more or less.
July 24, 1915. Frank Wooliver,
Applicant.
The Miner is two dollars a year.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations.
^""OAL mining rights of the Dominion,
^-" in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and
Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the
Northwest Territories and in a portion
of the Province of British Columbia,
may be leased for a term of twenty-one
years at an annual rental of $1 an
acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will
be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made
by the applicant in person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district in wnich
the rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must
be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for shall be
staked out by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied by a fee of $5, which will be refunded if the rights applied for are not
available, but not otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable
output of the mine at the rate of five
cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mineel and pay the
royalty thereon. If the coal mining
rights are not being operated, such
returns should be furnished at least
once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at
the rate of $10.0C an acre.
For full information application
should be made to the Secretary of the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa,
or to any Agent or Sub-Agent of
Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B.���Unauthorized publication of
this advertisement will not be paid for.
58782.
NOTICE TO DELINQUENT CO-
OWNERS
To George Fryer and H. A. Wilson, or to any
person or persona to whom you or either of you
may have transferred your interests. Take notice
that I, the undersigned co-owner with you in the
North Star No. 1 and North Star No 2 Mineral
Claims, situated on Skeena mountain, in the
Hazelton Mining Division of Omineca District,
Province of British Columbia, have done the
required amount of work on the above mentioned
claims for the year ending August 28, 1915, in
order to hold the same under section 24 of the
Mineral Act, and if within 90 days of the publication of this notice you fail or refuse to contribute
$13(1.67, your portion of such expenditure, together
with the costs of this advertisement, your interests
in the said mineral claims will become the property
of the undersigned, under section 28 of the
Mineral Act. 62-12
Dated at Skeena Crossing, B.C., this 28th day
of August, 1916. M.R.Jamieson, Co-owner,
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
Thanksgiving day  will  be on
October 11.
Nine Haytian towns are   held
by American marines.
The Czar has granted amnesty
to all political prisoners.
The  war is now costing Great
Britain $21,000,000 a day.
Gompers urges organized labor
to fight for woman suffrage.
Ex-President Taft predicts war
between the U. S. and Mexico.
South Carolina, by a large
majority, has adopted prohibition.
The body of Sir William Van
Horne was interred at Joliet, 111.
This year's cut of cedar in B.C.
will be one of the heaviest on
record.
Seattle won Hip championship
of the Northwestern baseball
league.
Germans are using silk and
velvet for sandbags, jute being
exhausted.
Depositors in the Dominion
Trust ask an early hearing in
their cases.
Russians have the names of
70,000 Germans taken in recent
operations.
High explosives were found
concealed on the liner Lapland,
at New York.
Anti-suffragette leaders say
the suffrage wave in the United
States is receding.
More than fifty vessels were
held up for ten days by slides in
the Panama canal.
Prince Edward Island returned
its Conservative government with
a reduced majority.
Germany is making every
effort to bring Sweden into the
war against the Allies.
Eighty-four spies, mostly Germans and Austrians, have been
arrested in Switzerland.
Molyb.lenum is to be produced
in commercial quantities at the
Molly mine, near Salmo.
On London stock exchange bets
are made that the Dardanelles
will be open next month.
A sub-committee of the federal
cabinet is dealing with the problem of marketing Canada's crops.
Great Britain has increased the
income tax 40 per cent and has
raised customs tariffs on many
articles.
The Princess theater in Montreal was partially destroyed by
fire on Wednesday. Damage,
$100,000.	
Dr. McGuire, M.L.A., of Vancouver, has been appointed provincial organizerof theprohibition
movement.
The- British government is
operating 715 factories making
war material and employing 800,-
000 persons.
For the first time in history,
Vesuvius, Aetna and Stromboli
were all in eruption at the same
time, on Monday.
Fire in the Exhall colliery at
Nuneaton, England, resulted in
the entombing of several hundred
miners on Tuesday.
Admiral Jellicoe is reported to
have under his orders three
thousand vessels, of which 300
at least are warships.
The crew of the fishing schooner Myrtle Emdersson, burned a
I few days ago near Rose Spit, has
'arrived at Prince Rupert.
By means of a new "radiographic compass," a French surgeon has successfully extracted
a bullet from a soldier's heart.
Attorney - General Bowser is
touring the southern interior of
the province. He will shortly
visit Ottawa and New Brunswick.
New charges are to be laid a-
gainst Roblin, Montague and How-
den, ex-ministers of Manitoba,
in the graft cases now being tried
at Winnipeg.
Louis Rota, an Italian engineer,
is reported to have solved the
problem of holding objects motionless in space, by the action !
of electric currents.
London reports say the Russian
shortage of munitions was caused
by the blowing up of the great
ammunition factory at Oklita,
with the loss of thousands of
lives.
A conspiracy for the overthrow
of the Brazilian government has
been discovered in Rio Janeiro.
Many arrests have been made.
Arms and stores have been unearthed.
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Shunting!
= The season will soon be open,  and you will s
= need some of the following: =
3 12, 16 or 20 guage shot gun  Shells, Cartridges for ��
= Rifles, Shot, Powder, Wads,   Sights,  Grease,  Ther- 3
�� mos   Bottles g
1 SHOTGUNS RIFLES I
I Hunting  Coats,  With Large  Pockets,  Only $3.50 =
P. 3
j Hudson's Bay Company |
| HAZELTON, B.C. |
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Express, General Drayage and Freighting
LIVERY and STAGES Z*are-?^-1 <- *����&.��*��<���>:
night.
d public conveyances  day and
Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
G. Walker '" connection General Blacksmith
Consign  your shipments in  Our
Care  for   Storage  or   Delivery.
Address all coniinunk'atiuns to HazelUm,
Ruddy & MacKay
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
-
Three Trains Weekly
iTo Edmonton, Saskatoon, Regina, Winnipeg, St. Paul,
Chicago, Eastern Canada & U.S., Monday, Thursday
Saturday 6:08 p.m.
THREE RflAT\ WFFKI V To Vancouver- Victoria, Seattle,
i lillUX DUAlJ H ttlVL I San Francisco San Diego Exposition
Tuesday, Thursday, Sa'urday, 10:00 a. m. from Prince Rupert
! UNEXCELLED EQUIPMENT ��� CHARACTER SERVICE
Full particulars cheerfully furnished by Local Agent or
ALBERT DAVIDSON, GENERAL AGENT, PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
China, it is announced, will
retain a republican form of government, in name, but will appoint Yuan Shi Kai permanent
president and make the office
hereditary.
A dynamite explosion in the
new 7th Avenue subway in New
York, caused a cave-in, which
engulfed a streetcar and a number of pedestrians. Seven are
reported killed.
The British trades union congress, by an overwhelming vote,!
defeated a resolution calling upon
labor representatives in parliament to formulate and present
peace proposals.
Refuting the statement that
the Hesperian was sunk hy a
floating mine, the captain of the
steamer Crossby states the liner]
was sunk by a submarine, which
also chased the Crossby.
T. V. O'Connor, president of I
the International longshoremens'
union was offered by foreign
agents a million dollars to order
a general strike of his men along
the Atlantic and Pacific coasts. ���
Five thousand Armenians, a
majority being women and children, were rescued by French
warships from the Turks, whom
they had kept at bay in the Djebl
Mousha mountains for two weeks.
The tonnage of the world's
mercantile marine is now only
78 per cent of what it was before
the war. Great Britain has gained
a tonnage of 343,316, while Germany and Austria have lost 23
per cent of theirs.
Documents from  the  German
and Austrian embassies at Washington,   taken  from   Archibald,
the American war correspondent
i who carried  the Dumba letter,
! are to be made public in London.
Ross rifles have not been dis-'
I carded by the Canadian military
j authorities, but it has been found
' necessary to make alterations before issuing them, owing to differences in the diameter of the j
.shells,
A commission ot three, one of
whom will be named by the trades
and labor congress, will investigate workmen's compensation
laws, on behalf of the provincial
government, which proposes new
legislation.
Hazelton Coffee
House
Opposite Police Office
BEST   MEALS  IN TOWN
No other place
can surpass us
PRICES LOW
Fresh Bread Every Day
Assay Office and Mining Office
Arts and Cults Building. 578 Seymour Street
 VANCOUVER, K.C.	
The Estate of J. O'Sullivan
PrOTtsdkl Assayer* and Chemists
Established 1897 by the late J. O'Sullivan,  F. C. S., 2t> years with
Vivian & Sons, Swansea.
WATER NOTICE
ISSUES
TICKETS
(Diversion and Use.)
TAKE NOTICE that Sydney Child,
whose address is P. O. Box 288, Victoria, B. C, will apply for a licence to
take and use fifty inches of water out
| of Lost Creek Lake, which drains into
Manson Creek, ahout three miles from
Manson town. The water will he diverted from the stream at a point at the
West end, about 100 yards from Lost
Creek Trail, and will be used for mining
purpose upon the placer land described
as Lease No. 273, Manson Creek, "Mosquito Bar." This notice was posted on
the ground on the 2nd day of August,
1915. A copy of this notice and application pursuant thereto and to the I
"Water Act, 1914," will be filed in the
office of the Water Recorder at Hazel-
ton, B.C. Objections to the application
may be filed with the said Water,
Recorder or with the Comptroller of
Water Rights, Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B.C., within thirty days of
the first appearance of this notice in a
local newspaper.
Wild Government land in the Omineca
Mining Division of B.C,
The date of the  first publication  of
this notice is August 21st, 1915
Sydney Child, Applicant.
50-3 By Francis T. Child, Agent.
HAZELTON HOSPITAL
for any period from one month upward at SI per
month in advance. Thin rate Includes ollico con-
inllntions and medicines, as well a* all costs while
In the hospital. Tlckcta obtainable In Hazelton
at the Post Office or the YtrwK Store; In Aldermere
from Mr. T.J. Thorp; in Telkwa front Dr. Wallace;
or hy mall from the Medical Superintendent at the
Hospital
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion and British Columbia
Land Surveyors
Offices atVicto.ia, Nelson, Fort fieorge
and New Hazelton.
B. C. Affleck, Mgr.   New Hazelton.
WILLIAM P. OGILVIE
B. C. L.
BARRISTER AND SOLICITOR
NOTARY PUBLIC
Fort George
B.C.
EXPERT
Watch Repairing
WATCHES   -   JEWELRY
O. A. RAGSTAD,    Smithers
Orders may be left at Noel 4 Rock's, Haiellon THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1915
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
(Continued  from Pago One)
War Notes j attack  but was repulsed.     We
London :     On   the   western. made bayonet attacks  and  cap-
battlefront heavy artillery fight- tured   700   prisoners  and  three
ing continues. ! machine guns.
The French blew up a German      "During  attacks  against   the
ammunition supply at Perthes.    | villages of Berezowka and Bos-
Swiss watch factories are now toki,   northwest of Wycznewo.e
turning out war munitions. 'the enemy, notwithstanding our
In the Dardanelles the French! violent machine gun and artillery
have   carried    "Hill    60,"   the [fire,   reached  our trenches  and
Turks losing 5000 men.
f 	
TUESDAY, SEPT. 21
Russians Get Away
Petrograd : Evading the onslaught of the German cavalry,
which made dashing raids on
their flanks, the Russian army of
300,000 which retired from Vilna
has escaped from the coils of
Von Hindenburg, after inflicting
considerable damage to the invaders.
Von Mackensen has been unable
to unite his scattered forces after
their march through the Pripet
marshes.
Spies Condemned
London: Several German spies
have been convicted and sentenced. One man has been ordered shot and a woman has
been sentenced to ten years'
imprisonment for attempting to
communicate news of the movements of the fleet. Names have
been withheld from publication.
Fell Form Zeppelin
London: In a recent aerial
raid over London, a member of a
Zeppelin's crew was blown or
fell from the airship, being
mangled beyond recognition. The
victim is supposed to have been
Dr. Joseph Sticker, noted for
researches in aeronautics, whose
death is announced in Germany.
Minor Notes
London: The British steamer
Linkmoor, 4000 tons, was torpedoed.    The crew escaped.
A German submarine operating
in the Black Sea was sunk by
Russian warships.
A report from Stavanger says
a German submarine off that
port was torpedoed and sunk,
with her crew, by another German submarine.
rushed upon us with shouts and
hurrahs. A bayonet fight followed and resulted in the expulsion of the enemy, who suffered
great losses. We then counter
attacked and, taking the enemy
on the flank, overthrew him, and
pressing closely on his heels,
reached and entered his trenches.
Unable to withstand our impetuous dash, part of the Austrians
fled and the remainder surrendered or were bayoneted. We
took ten officers and 600 men
prisoners."
Bulgaria Sides With Huns
Athens: Perturbation ia caused
by the news that Bulgaria has
mobilized 100,000 men on the
Servian frontier. She appears
to have definitely cast in her lot
with the Austro-German alliance.
A meeting of the cabinet which
King Constantine attended, decided, it is understood, to mobilize
four divisions of infantry, totalling 100,000 men, as well as
several cavalry regiments.
Traffic on the Bulgarian railroads was suspended last Saturday.
borhood of Lyscha, leaving in
our hands many prisoners and
machine guns."
Destroy Enemy Positions
Paris: The violent bombardment which has been in progress
along the western battlefront for
three weeks shows no diminution.
The cannonading is very heavy in
the vicinity of Roclincourt and to
the north and south of the Avre
river. Germans taken prisoner
describe the havoc and destruction in the enemy positions as
terrible.
Constantinople Conditions
Geneva:     Swiss  citizens,   returning from Constantinople, say
; conditions of life in  the Turkish
'capital are intolerable.   There is
no gas or electricity.    Two thousand  workmen   from the Krupp
facto-y, brought in to make ammunition, are
of material.
TIGERS LOSE OUT
AT PRINCE RUPERT!
The ball team played two
games with Prince Rupert, as a
fair attraction, and lost both contests, Thursday's by 4-2 and
yesterday's by 8-7.
Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Hall, Fred
Brewer, C.N.Donohue, and J.W,
Morison, of the Hazelton Tennis
Club, went down to take part in
the tennis matches, no report of
which has been received up to
the time of going to press.
Social Next Friday
The ladies of the Methodist
Church are preparing for a pie
social, to be held in St. Andrew's
Hall on Friday evening, October
idle, owing to lack '}> at 8 ��'c]ock- A good concert
program and the best of refreshments should draw a good crowd.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 24 | AH are invited.
ii
Methodist Church
Balkan Sitnation Rev. W. M. Scott  will   preach
Athens:      Anticipating   Bui-1 tomorrow evening on the subject:
garia's entry into the war on the | ..The Heaven)v Vjsi0n."
Turkey,
Hazelton Is the Best
According to the Vancouver
Province, A. D. Wooler, a prospector who spent some time in
the Hazelton district, and has
been through Oregon, California
and Nevada in the last year,
believes that the mining possibilities of this province are greater
than those of all the northwestern
states. He will return to Hazelton shortly.
For Red Cross
A Red Cross tea will be given
at the home of Mrs. Sargent on
Tuesday afternoon next, from 3
to 5, and 25 cents will be charged
for ice cream, cake and tea. All
are cordially invited.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 23
-J
I
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22
Effects of Gunfire
Paris: Countless German works
were destroyed and other enemy
positions  were made untenable1
and the way has been paved   for'
a possible Anglo-French offensive
movement by the furious bom- j
bardment of the past three weeks
all  along the  battlefront.     An
official  statement  issued    today
contains   the   reasons   for the
cannonade,   which,   for duration
and  number of shells poured in
upon the enemy's  trenches  surpassed   any   previous   artillery
storm of the war.
Russians Check Enemy
Petrograd (official): "In the
region northwest of Dvinsk we
drove the Germans from their
trenches by a vigorous attack.
Southwest and south of Dvinsk
the fighting continues on the
front of Novo Alexandrowsk and
Lake Drismiata. German heavy
artillery bombarded certain sectors of this front, discharging
poisonous shells.     East of Vilna
Raid on Stuttgart
Paris:     French  aviators have
bombarded Stuttgart, capital  of
the   kingdom   of   Wurtemburg,
according to the  French official
communication issued last night.
They  dropped  about a hundred
shells on the royal palace and the
station.     They  also dropped  a
number of  bombs   at   different
points along the way.     The aircraft were subjected to shell fire
at   various   points   during   the
expedition but all returned safely.
Successes for Russians
Petrograd (official):     "North-
j west of Friederiehstadt.   in the
course of the occupation   of  the
'village of Stryj in the region of
I Birshalen,    we   captured   many
| prisoners and arms.      Desperate
i engagements are incessant in the
j region west of Dvinsk,  in   many
iplaces at close quarters with the
l bayonet.
"In some sectors on this front
the enemy artillery is developing
gusts of fire. In our attack on
the village of Lebedevo, west of
Molodechno, the Germans were
overthrown by a vigorous bayonet
attack. We occupied the village
and captured ten machine guns,
a quantity of material, and a
number of prisoners We also
captured by a bayonet, a! tack,
after a stubborn resistance, the
village of Smorgno, from which
the Germans fled in disorder toward the river fords. Here wl
made prisoners of four officers
and 350 men, took nine machine
guns, 40 cycles, many horses,
telephones and material.
"East of Lida, in an engagement in th'e region of Govia, the
enemy, who had crossed the
river, was thrown back. In the
region east of Oginski canal, the
the fighting continues.     On the
front of Teremmo-Podhaice, east J enemy was driven from the village
of Lutsk, the enemy began an|0f Retchki and from the neigh-
side of Turkey, Roumania and
Greece are preparing for even-i
tualities. A general order for:
the mobilization of the Greek
army has been issued and twenty
classes of reservists, from 18901
to 1912, have been called to the-
coles. There is great enthus-j
iasm.
It is reported from Nish that
Germany is preparing to invade
Servia, with 800,000 men.
Roumania will resist to the ut-!
most any violation of her territory
and  is expected  to  mobilize at j
once.
If Bulgaria takes definite action I
in favor of Turkey, it is thought:
Russia will   immediately  strike
through the fortified port of Var-
n a,    thirty   hours'   sail   from[
Odessa.     Bulgarian warships in j
the Black sea are seeking shelter.
The Retreat from Vilna
London: Describing the Vilna
retreat, the correspondent of the j
Times at Petrograd characterizes'
it as one of the most difficult and
brilliant Russian exploits during!
the present war, but says the!
withdrawal was none too soop.
"The Germans not only had!
almost encircled the city," the!
correspondent says, "but by:
throwing out huge masses' of
cavalry, followed by infantry,'
had swept round from the north,
far into the rear of the Russian
communications at Moledechnol
and Lebdevo,
"The  Germans  had  prepared
an enveloping movement depending on   the occupation of Mole-
dechno, but in the advance from
Lida the Russians foiled this  by
retreating along the Viliva river I
due east from Vilna,   instead of!
southeast as the enemy anticipated.     Thus the plan of a sudden   blow  on our northern flank :
was  paralyzed  at its inception.
Thanks  to our  withdrawal due
east the enemy was obliged toen-i
gage in a frontal  battle on our|
left wing.     Thus we succeeded
not only in  passing through a
narrow corridor thirty-three miles
wide   between   Biniakony   and
Soly,  but also in  widening  it.
For this reason the enemy failed
to envelop a single Russian corps.
Smorgon,   where  the  Germans
reported a Russian attempt to
break through had been frustrated
is actually in our hands."
A mixed quartet will sing,
are invited to attend.
All
Miss Louise Astoria, who has
been a guest at the Grant home
for several weeks, returned to
Prince Rupert on Monday, accompanied by Miss Agnes Grant.
who will spend a few days at
the coast.
J. J. Dore. operator at Fifth
Cabin, has returned from a vacation trip to the coast. Operator
Germaine, of Hazelton, has been
in charge of the station at Fifth,
during Mr. Dore's absence.
Aerial Activity
Paris (official): One of our
dirigibles bombarded last night
several stations wheremovements
of the enemy were reported. Our
aeroplanes have compelledsevera
of the enemy's captive balloons
to descend. Flotillas of aeroplanes have bombarded railway
stations at Oflenburg, Conflans
and Vouziers, as well as enemy
cantonments a t Langemarcke
and Middlekirke."
W.A.
The sewing party in aid of the
Red Cross will meet at the Mission House on Thursday, at 3 in
the afternoon. This is open to
all who care to help. The meeting
will be held fortnightly at the
Mission House for this winter.
I Tread the Footpath I
I
of Peace
I
This is the path of him who wears
"Invictus"
THE BEST GOOD SHOE
NOEL & ROCK
Hazelton,
���iiii���mi
ls. C.
���n ii���
0++*+***++***+++**'t,*++**+O
I       Large Assortment of       I
| Patterson's f
f CHOCOLATES f
f  HighestGradeEverManufacturecl  4
���fc 4
I    Try our Noted Ice Cream    *
and Soda Drinks |
* Up-to-Date Drug Stores *
I   HAZELTON       ::        NEW HAZELTON   f
jt..i..;.^..i..:..!..i..i..*r,+.i..;..i..i..:..[.4.^.^.4,.l.,j..i.5
"Everything in Canvas"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
Prince Rupert. B.C
;: .vervvry*vr.**.yye*me..*e.t.t...n*meye.
DENTISTRY
Dr. BADGERO will be in Hazelton
for a few days more���Over Drugstore
+
[we
The Miner is two dollars a year.
WE ARE AGENTS FOR
THE NEW
EDISON
DIAMOND DISK
MACHINES
A SHIPMENT, INCLUDING
150  NEW RECORDS
IS NOW HERE
Cunningham & Son, Limited
Fort EsjIiikIod and rLnelton, B.C
3
\R. Cm
I     Established 1870
3
i

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