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Omineca Miner Jun 20, 1914

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 ^^OmAtLW-t      &~Cfa
*1
THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER IN NORTHERN BRITISH, COLUMBIA
Ju;i 2 j/ .      *
VOL. Ill, NO. 42
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1914
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
Prospects Bright For Season
At Manson Creek���Miners
Bring Out Coarse Gold
Reports of favorable developments in the Manson Creek district are confirmed by Ed Kohse
and Arthur, and William Leverett, who returned from the gold-
field last evening. With Walter
Aitken and George Hauck, they
hold leases at the old town of
Manson, and their prospecting
operations this season have resulted very favorably. They
brought out some coarse gold
from the rim, and state that
there appears to be plenty of
pay dirt. It is necessary, however, to get water at a higher
point, necessitating the construction of 2. miles of ditch and
flume. Aitken and Hauck remain on the ground to drift to
bedrock. Future plans will depend upon the result of their
work.
The Kildare company is reported to be doing well on Slate creek.
The late arrivals from the camp
state that Manager Otterson got
a $82.50 nugget the day they left.
F. T. Child has good pay on
his ground below Skeleton Gulch.
There has been a shortage of
food supplies and tobacco in the
district, but packtrains have arrived with supplies, and there
will be no further inconvenience.
BREACH OF FAITH
CHARGED TO LIBERALS
Seriously Injured In
Runaway Accident
In a runaway accident last
night Uavid Miller, who drives a
stage between Hazelton and
New Hazelton, was seriously���
perhaps fatally���injured. About
midnight Miller was returning
from Hazelton when his team
ran away on Two-mile hill,
throwing him out of the stage.
His chest was badly crushed,
several ribs being broken. Dr.
McAuley rendered first aid, and
the victim was removed to the
Hospital. The extent of his injuries is not yet known, but there
appears to be little hope of his
recovery.
Pre-emptions for Many
McBride, June 15:���The rush
for the pre-emptions thrown
open by the provincial government on the south fork of the
Fraser River, in this vicinity, is
on in earnest.
Eighty-one applicants were
lined up before the government
office here on the day of the first
drawing, awaiting their turn.
Ottawa, June 15:��� There is
great indignation in government
circles over the action of the
Liberal majority in the Senate in
so amending the address to the
Imperial parliament asking for
amendments to the B. N. A. Act
to increase Western senatorial
representation that it could not
be accepted by the cabinet. It
is directly charged that there has
been a distinct breach of faith,
and that the Liberals have violated a definite agreement made
between the two parties. It is
said that agreements were made
between the leaders that the bills
providing for increased representation of the four Western provinces in the Senate should be a-
mendments to the B. N. A. Act
so as to provide for such increased representation. This agreement was carried out by the government with scrupulous fidelity.
The Conservatives allege that
a more deliberate and cynical
breach of faith has seldom been
witnessed in Canadian public life.
Local and District News Notes
TWO MORE LINERS COLLIDE
New York, June 14: ��� The
American liner New York, with
650 passengers, was rammed yesterday by the Hamburg-American liner Pretoria, while the New
York was motionless, in a heavy
fog, 400 miles east of Ambrose
Lightship. The Pretoria, bound
east, ran into her and ripped a
hole twelve feet high and thirty-
two feet long in her port side.
The hole is Hush with the main
deck andis fifteen feet above the
water line. So great was the
force of the collision that the
Pretoria's anchor was torn from
her bow and left hanging inside the gap that had been torn
in the New York.
Practically all of the passengers on board both ships were
asleep. Immediately after the
collision the engines of both ships
were ordered full speed astern,
and passengers came hurrying
to the decks. The passengers of
the New York were able to reach
over and touch the bow of the
Pretoria as she pulled away from
her dangerous position. There
was no panic.
Fortunately the watch, which
occupied the quarters abaft of
the ship which was crushed in
was on duty in the stokehold.
Had the collision occurred while
this watch was off duty, a number of lives would probably have
been lost. The Pretoria was less
damaged by the collision than
the New York.
The New York docked here tonight.
Voted For Union
Woodstock, Ont., June 15:���
Presbyterian General Assembly,
after an animated debate voted
on church union, passing the
original motion favoring union
by 286 to 109. It is thought that
the Rev. Dr. Grant, general superintendent of missions, whose
influence was thrown against the
union, will resign at an early
date as a result of the vote.
The Miner is two dollars a year.
Trains Run to Priestley
Tuesday's train went through
to Priestly, Mile 337, track
troubles having been overcome
up to that point. It is expected
that a regular service to Endako
will be instituted* next week.
Ballast trains are operating all
along the line between Smithers
and Prince George, and the railway officials hope to have a
through service within a very
short time.
R. E. Allen is spending a few
days in Rupert.
Walter Boms is visiting Prince
Rupert this week.
R. O. Miller spent Sunday and
Monday in Hazelton.
Michael Lauzon, of Kitwangak,
came up on Saturday.
R. J. McDonell spent a few
days at his ranch this week.
Robert Marion, of Chicken
Lake, is a visitor in Hazelton.
Frank Johnson, the packer, is
spending the week in  Hazelton.
Henry Bretzins took supplies
to his Babine claims on Tuesday.
A. H. Maclsaac, of Kitwangak,
was in Hazelton for the weekend.
J. F. Woods, of Vancouver,
came in on Tuesday for a business
visit.
C. Muldoon and E. Andy, of
Smithers, came down on Sunday's
train.
Shel. Robinson has gone to his
Francois lake ranch for a few
weeks.
A. E. Lund, of Prince Rupert,
was among Saturday's arrivals in
Hazelton.
H. G. Smith, of Smith & Eggleston, is down from Smithers
this week.
Dr. Wallace, of. Telkwa. left
on Sunday for a business trip to
Vancouver.
H. J. Macdonald, the Babine
mining man, arrived from the
lake on Tuesday.
Theo. Salomo, the blacksmith,
is having a new shop built in the
west end of town.
J. L. Christie, of Broughton &
McNeil, left on Sunday for a
visit to the coast.
Frank Martin has gone to Hudson Bay mountain, to do some
work on his silver property.
Ed. Dalton, who has been in
the Manson district for some
weeks, came in on Tuesday.
J. C. K. Sealy and W. H.
Burken leave today for a visit
to the Sealy ranch near Smithers.
W. J. Carr, district road superintendent, returned on Wednesday from a visit to the Bulkley
Valley.
Government Agent Hoskins is
in attendance at the Masonic
grand lodge meeting in Prince
Rupert.
The first through freight from
the east arrived on Tuesday. It
brought machinery for Prince
Rupert.
Dr. Badgero, the dentist, is
here for a couple of weeks. He
has opened an office opposite the
drugstore.
Rev. J. R. Hewitt spent several days in the Kispiox Valley this
week, gaining an acquaintance
with the settlers.
B. R. Jones, the Skeena Crossing merchant, and Jas. A. Riley,
editor of lhe Chalcopyrite, were
in town yesterday.
Paddy Creagh had a narrow
escape at the Brian Boru on
Thursday. A stick of dynamite,
inadvertently left near the stove,
exploded while Creagh was cook
ing, inflicting minor injuries,
which were attended to by Dr.
Wrinch.
James Cronin is expected to
resume development on his big
galena property in the Babine
range this season.
Al. Halligan, the motor car
operator, arrived from Prince
Rupert on Saturday, and will
spend the summer here.
Wilson Bros, are reported to
have uncovered a big showing of
copper ore on their group of
claims near South Bulkley.
Negotiations are in progress
for the freighting of fifty tons
of high grade silver ore from the
Hunter property to the railway.
Robert Watson, the Smithers
contractor, was here early in the
week. It was his first visit, and
he was much pleased with the
town.
Rev. John Field and Mrs.
Field, who have spent the last
year in England, will return to
Hazelton in the course of a week
or ten days.
J. T. Place, Socialist member
of the legislature for Nanaimo,
delivered an address on Socialism
to a small audience in Assembly
Hall on Saturday.
Gilbert Velge and Leslie Acrea
arrived last evening from the
Francois lake country, with their
packtrain. They intend to spend
the season packing out from Hazelton.
An Ottawa wire says E. A.
Price, the efficient and popular
mail clerk .on the Prince Rupert-
Smithers division, has passed
the qualifying examination for
the outside division of the civil
service.
Rev. W. S. Larter, who has
been in charge of St. Peter's
Church during the absence of
Rev. John Field, will leave for
Prince Rupert on Tuesday next.
He will conduct his last service
tomorrow evening.
Methodist Church
Beginning tomorrow evening,
regular Methodist church services will be held in the building
formerly occupied by the Union
Bank. Rev. J. R. Hewitt, who
recently arrived to take charge,
will conduct the opening service
at 7:30 tomorrow evening.
ACTIVE VOLCANO
IN CALIFORNIA
Working Bond on
Nine-Mile Property
It is announced today that W.
F. Brewer, of Hazelton, has
taken a bond on the Silver Pick,
a promising galena property on
Nine-mile mountain. The claim,
which is located a mile and a
half fmm the Silver Cup, is to
be developed this season. The
owners are Ben Peterson and
Sperry Cline. The price has not
been made public.
Tremendous Storm in Paris
Paris, June, 16:���A thunderstorm of phenomenal violence
raged over Paris for three hours
causing great loss of life and
enormous damage to property,
Rain flooded the streets and
caused tl'e bursting of sewers.
In the central and fashionable
quarter a city street caved in,
engulfing several pedestrians.
The number of the victims is unknown owing to the danger of
approaching the immense pits
resulting from the collapse of
sidewalks and roadways.
Redding, Cal., June 15:���Rocks
and volcanic ashes, smoke, fire,
and deadly gases are believed to
come not only from the crater of
Mount Lassen but from two new
craters that burst shortly before
dark. More than a mile of new
craters makes the newest and
most active volcano in the world.
The volcano claimed as a victim L. Graham, who climbed up
to view it. He was struck by a
rock from the mouth.
FOR HUERTHMCESSOR
Niagara Falls, Ont., June 13:���
The crux of the Mexican problem���the selection of a man for
president acceptable to all factions in Mexico and foreign governments generally���was reached
today in a conference between
the mediators and the American
and Mexican delegates.
For more than an hour names
of various individuals were discussed, but on none was there
a semblance of agreement. Tomorrow there will be another
conference on the same subject.
General Carranza's note transmitted by Rafael Lubaran, his
representative in Washington,
arrived today, advising the mediators that Constitutionalist delegates were on their way to the
mediation conferences with full
instructions.
At present the mediators have
accomplished only one step in
their journey toward the pacification of Mexico. This was the
adoption yesterday of the first
protocol dealing with the transfer of authority from the hands
of the present regime to a new
provisional government.
The second protocol, defining
the composition of the new government, its form and personnel,
was discussed today by the
American and Mexican delegates
in an informal talk with the mediators.
Discussion has continued about
the type of man for the provisional presidency. It practically has
been resolved to abandon generalities about types and search for
the man whom all would accept.
REPEAL TOLL
President Wilson Signs Bill
To Eliminate Obnoxious
Clauseof Panama Canal Act
Washington, June 15:���Only
President Wilson's signature is
necessary to repeal the clause of
the Panama Canal Act exempting
coastwise shipping from tolls.
The long and bitter fight in
Congress ended when the House,
after brief debates and without
the formality of a conference,
accepted by a vote of 216 to 71
the Senate amendment, specifically reserving all rights the
United States may have under
the Hay-Pauncefote treaty or
otherwise.
The President is expected to
sign the measure Monday. It
was just a little more than three
months ago that he addressed
the House and Senate in joint
session, urgently asking for repeal of the exemption clause that
the nation might keep its treaty
obligations.
Before ending the contest by
concurring in the Senate amendment, the House voted down,
174 to 108. a proposal advanced
by Representative Moss of West
Virginia to attach to the repeal a
flat declaration of the right of
the United Slates to exempt its
vessels from tolls and ofthe sovereignty of the United States
over the canal zone.
Washington, June 16:���President Wilson has signed the bill
repealing Panama Canal toll exemptions.
AUGUST JOHNSON
ACQUITTED BY JURY
For Women Preachers
Winnipeg, June 16: The Methodist conference recommended to
the general conference the advisability of opening up the way
for women to become ministers
of the Methodist Church.
Niagara Falls, June 16:���The
three South American mediators
formally advised General Caran-
za that they would not admit his
representatives to the conference
until  an armistice was declared.
The internal as well as the international phases of the Mexican
problem is accepted in the scope
of mediation.
As a result of a dispute near
Decker Lake some weeks ago,
August Johnson was tried at
Prince Rupert assizes on Monday,
on a charge of attempted murder. Following a quarrel between Johnson and John and
Alfred Wright, the latter two
went to Johnson's cabin to demand goods which they claimed
belonged to them. They threatened to break in the door, and
the defendant fired a rifle through
the wall, wounding Alfred Wright.
The jury brought in a verdict of
not guilty, and the prisoner was
discharged.
Wireless Prospecting
Gottingen, Germany, June 9:���
The society for investigating the
internal structure of the earth
yesterday declared it had discovered by wireless telegraphy
subterranean springs and ore deposits. It states that it also has
ascertained their depth by the
use of electrical waves applied
according to the method invented by Prof. Leimbach of this
city.
Prof. Leimbach, on March 23,
1911, used wireless telegraphy
for underground communication
between the Potash mines in the
northern Ha'rz mountains, when
he sent messages a distance of
nearly a mile and a half ata level
of 1000 feet below the surface. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1914
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year: Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $_.,r.U per ineh per month; Reading
Noli, us, 20 rents per line for each insertion. Legal notices Inserted at B. C.
tiazette rates.
Vol. ill.
Saturday, Junk 20, 1914.
No. 42.
The wireless ore finder which is apparently to be tested in the
United States and Canada by a group of German scientists, is said
to be capable of detecting the presence of ore and water hidden in
the earth. Some ten years ago in London considerable interest
was aroused by what was known as an electrical ore finder, which
seems to have been based on the same principle. The process oi
surveying a field was comparatively simple, says an exchange.
Two electrodes were placed in the ground so many feet apart, the
distance being gauged by the strength of the waves to be discharged and the extent of the field to be surveyed. An instrument for
discharging regular and separate waves was attached to these
electrodes and waves discharged through them over the field.
These waves were audible in a telephone receiver attached to another electrode which similarly to a walking stick was used by a
trained operator crossing the energized field. The idea was that
if metalliferous bodies which were electrically conductive were
met with, the waves thus thrust through the earth would give a re- j sourrounding country for an oil
action. The wave would be audible in the telephone. Each wave | field, but the writer is not con
was of the same length and force so that any disturbance could | versant with the exact details
distillation in nature has been
duly reached. It is true that
from Lava Lake, an extinct
crater of a volcano, near the
the head of the Kitsumkalem,
for a distince of thirty-five miles
a flow of lava once occurred. The
Naas Indians tell us that this
happened about one hundred and
thirty years ago, that it diverted
the mouth of the Naas River,
destroying completely^their old
village. However, this flow
covers gravel of recent date and
is too shallow in thicknesss, only
twenty feet or more, to injure
the deep-seated oil layers, lying
below at three to five thousand
feet.
In fact, the Naas Valley and
its ancient delta has an ideal
conglomeration of conditions in
evidence to induce a corporation
to put down an experimental
bore-hole to great depth on some
site, most carefully chosen by a
skilled geologist. Going north
still farther conditions may be
favorable around Teslin Lake and
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m
easily be detected. If the substance met with was conductive the
wave would be deflected, if the substance were non-conductive the
wave would be reflected. The deflection of a wave would cause an
increase of sound in the telephone receiver.
Experiments made on these lines by Professor Sylvanus Thomson, the electrical expert, were entirely satisfactory. In Wales
lead deposits were traced and in the lake district copper was found.
The instrument, however, was obviously uncertain for the purpose
of locating ore highly disseminated, or spread in small quantities
over a large area. Its action when worked over certain geological
formations was also rather uncertain. But the principle was there
and if it had been properly developed by experts and  along corn-
Enough has, however, now been
related to cause experienced oil
men to look into these rivers of
British Columbia mentioned, all
of which drain more or less favorable watersheds.
Noted Expert Coming
Vancouver, June 16:��� J. B.
Tyrell of Toronto, explorer, author and mining engineer, is on
his way north. He is the Canadian representative of the Anglo-
mereial lines undoubtedly a most valuable mining adjunct would J French Exploration Company of
have resulted. The principle has been applied with success under; London, Eng., which has mining
various conditions since then, but it seems that this new develop-; interests all over the world, and
ment is of German origin and if so it is possible that Germans during his present trip he will
working on this theory have been able to improve the method i go as far north as Juneau to look
beyond recognition. \ over the property of the Alaska-
Its value in a country such as British Columbia is obvious. In i Mexico Mining Company,
mining not only is it difficult to lind ore bodies in commercial quan-1 "While here I intend to look
tities, but there is much speculation and heavy expense in develop- i into the mining situation of Brit-
ing mines. Faults are frequently met with even in the best of ish Columbia," he stated to an
mines and it is in the location of such faults and the consequent j interviewer. "There is every
saving of huge sums spent in trying to relocate the vein that wire- j appearance of a revival of interims prospecting of this kind would prove so valuable. It is to be lest in mining, and reports re-
hoped that the further development of this most valuable principle' ceived about several properties
will be closely watched by those interested in the development of Jin this province are excellent. I
British Columbia mines. Science by means of the spectroscope I ��'-��0 intend to inquire into con-
might be able to detect emanations proceeding from various metals ditions in the Yukon as well as
and may be able in the near future to locate minerals, oil or
other buried treasure by some sort of divining rod which is scientifically constructed to give a reaction whenever such emanations
are met with.
The Favorite    C APfFNTQ
Shopping place  gftgUgg * ��
We Lead���
Others Follow
MINERS' PROSPECTORS' and SETTLERS' SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY
We can furnish the Miner, Prospector and Settler with his wants
such as Provisions, Meats, Dried
Vegetables. Canvas goods including Tents, Blanket Covers, Flys, Mosquito Tents, Pack Sacks and Saddles. Cooking Utensils, including
Granite and Tin.
GUNS AND AMMUNITION
Glad to show you and quote prices
General      D    C    CADfTNT     Hazelton
Merchant      K.   &.   OAKULIN 1 R  C
B.C.
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W. J. JEPHSON
I BARRISTER and SOLICITOR
of British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan
NOTARY  PUBLIC
Room 11, Postoffice Bldg., Prince Rupert
and Hazelton, B.C.
Oil Possibilities
The recent oil discoveries in
Alberta have caused many to
turn their attention to the oil
possibilities of British Columbia,
country during the Cretaceous
period. The Bulkley is a later
creation of Tertiary time. This
same ancient Naas Valley  then J near Johannesburg, and  that is
Alaska.
"There seems to be a general
impression that British mining
syndicates are well satisfied with
a return of five or six per cent.
This is a mistake. Our company,
for instance, receives a dividend
of 11  per cent from our mines
has all  the earmarks'of an ex-
and there is likelv to be more or .tensive field of store petroleum,
less prospecting for oil in various |    Groundhog coal to the north,
parts of  the province.    In this and   in   fact every^river forming
not an uncommonly large return.
In view of the risks run in mining investments, the investor
feels he should receive a good
Harold Price J. R. Graham
PRICE & GRAHAM
B.C. Land Surveyors
and Civil Engineer*
HAZELTON  AND  SMITHERS
illuildilitf        ....        Vanc-uv-I
BritUh Columbia
Londt
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion and British Columbia
Lund Surveyors
Offices at Victo.ia, Nelson, Fort George
and New Hazelton.
B. C. Affleck, Mgr.   New Hazelton.
connection, Oniineca district may ' originally this chain of lakes was return for |,ja money.    If British
become prominent.    In an article  fed   from  a coalfield  of today,
on the subject,   R.  C. Campbell- and   helped to all'ord vast oppor-
Johnson, a prominent mining ex- .-unities to provide the raw ma-
pert, says: terial in   the shape of terrestrial
The present Skeena river from  vegetation  and  driftwood, from I hope  to secure some definite in-
the Bulkley valley coming south  which under favorable conditions ' formation  along this line before
Columbia can furnish such investments, there will be no lack
of British capital to carry on
the mining enterprises here.   I
through    tha   massive   Kitselas could    be   generated   pelroleum
gorge is a quite comparative  recent river  bed  of Tertiary con-
with a paraffine base.     The for-
I go East."
Mr. Tyrell achieved'fame as an
mation correlates truly with that explorer several years ago, when
struction.     Kitimat valley has a of  the  Rocky Mountains, which j |ie  was connected with the geo-
small chance for a confined oilfield, but the expectations are
none too encouraging owing to
the  back  country  drained    not
chain crosses the province to the logical survey. He made several
north forming the Cassiar Range difficult exploratory trips into
and more distant backbone of tbe I the far north. In 1892 he tra-
Seward Peninsula of Alaska.  An-[versed the hitherto unexplored
being sufficiently extensive. Con-, other article by the writer about j region southeast of Lake Atha-
tinuing north again, now we come the   Naas  has   previously  gone; ba3Ca and in the  following year
to the probable site of a really more fully iii the favorable struc-j he   crossed   the  Barren   Land
from that lake to  Chesterfield
Naas valley.   It is apparent that jits porous strata with impervious Inlet and came down the west
the rivers of the Naas,   Kispiox,! shale roofs alternating between shore of Hudson Bay in a canoe,
Salmon  and  Babine,  fed by the many layers of petroleum  for-
present Skeena system from the, mation.   The dome-shaped anti-
Croundhog  coalfields,   together ;clinal structure is in plain evi-
with the  Bear and other large dence.    Katella in Alaska and
tributaries, as a continuous chain Graham   Island  of  the   Queen
of   lagoons,   formed   the   main Charlotte group demonstrate in
sluggish drain of a vast  back .the vicinity that the stage of oil
traveling in all 3200 miles. He
made several other extensive
journeys in the unknown north
before he left the government
service in 1898.
Oranges and bananas at Sargent's
McRAE BROS., LTD.
STATIONERS &  PRINTERS
At, Int.. I.' and Enalnaar*' Suppllaa
Kodak., l.oo.r Leaf Sratama
Reminaton Typewritera, Offlca Furniture
Prince Rupert, B. C.
_____________  i.  i.  a    ........  a    .....  ..  a  .a    ................. ^.
*^i|ii|ii|ii|ii|ii|ii|   igi ��� j-.-p-^..jBB-p.jB-|..-pi|.i|i ijiifiipi|iijii|i tn
Assay Office and Mining Office
Atls .ml Crafts liuildlii., .78 Seymour Sired
VANCOUVER, B.C.
J. O'SULLIVAN, F.C.S.
Provincial Assayer and I'hemisl
Assayer for U years with Vivian It Sons, Swansea
Charges Moderate Correspondence Solicited
EXPERT
Watch Repairing
WATCHES   -   JEWELRY
O. A. RAGSTAD,    Smithers
SINGER
Sewing Machine
*  AGENCY:
329 2nd Ave.,  Prince Rupert
Machines sold on easy
monthly payments
The GALENA CLUB
Hezelton.
Favorite
Reeort
��� Under New Management
POOL AND AMERICAN BILLIARD TABLES
Finest Cigars, Cigarettes, and Tobaccos, Choice
Confectionery,   Fruits,   Ice Cream,   Soft Drinks
GRAHAM ROCK-
-PROPRIETOR
Bulkley Valley Farm
Lands For Sale
These Lands are close to the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, which is now running trains through the
Bulkley Valley. There is a ready local market for all produce. Land prices are reasonable. Terms are easy.
Write for full particulars to
NORTH COAST LAND COMPANY, Ltd.
Suite 622 Metropolitan Building
Paid up Capital $1 BOO.OOO. VANCOUVER,  B. C.
__^
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TRI-WEEKLY
Through Service to South I
^^^       Train-leave Hazelton at 10:18 a.m. on Tuesdays, Thurs-
m*~" dByB> an<- Sundays, connecting at Prince Rupert with
modern Steamships Prince Rupert, Prince George, Prince John and Prince
Albert, leaving Prince Rupert on Mondays and Fridays at 9 a.m.,  and
I
The Miner is two dollars a year
to any address in Canada; to
United States, three dollars.
Tuesdays at 9:30 p.m. for VANCOUVER, VICTORIA and  SEATTLE
Special Summer Excursions East in connection with Grand Trunk System Double Track Route
3    For full information, reservations,  etc.,   apply  to  local  Agent or
| ALBERT DAVIDSON, General Agent, PRINCE RUPERT, B.C.
j-r Agency (or *ll Atlantic Steamship Linet
S_iiiiiiiHiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiir.ojHiiiiiiimto_iiiiiiiiiiiiro.iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiimiiiriHiiiimmio
to =
1  *
"Everything in Canvas"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
Prince Rupert. B.C
ISSUES
TICKETS
HAZELTON HOSPITAL
for any period from one month upward at 11 per
month in advance, Thfi rate Include! office con-
iii.tnt loni and medlctnee, aa well aa all coeta while
In the hoipltal. Tickete obtainable In Hazelton
at the Podt Office or the Drug Store; In Aldcrniere
from Mr. T.J. Thorp; In Telkwafrom Dr. Wallace;
or by mall from the Medical Superintendent at the
Hoipltal.
_^____________________l___.____________________\    a   ___    _     _.._     .  ^y..
I Skeena Laundry
I,ec J nek man  Prop.
Our Work is flood and our Rata*
Reasonable
I   Suits Cleaned and Pressed   f
Call and sec us.        Next door to
Telegraph office.
?      I THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, JUNE 20. 1914
COAL NOTICES.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B. C, intends to apply
for a license to prospect for coal  and
fletroleum over the following described
ands:
Commencing at a post planted about
4 miles east and 4 miles south from
the southeast corner of Lot 2194, Cassiar,
thence north 80 chains, 80
chains weBt, 80 chains south, .0 cliains
east to. point of commencement, 640
acres, known as claim 10.
March 10, 1914.      Harold A. RobinBon.
Omineca Land District. Distric t of
Cassiar
Take notice that Harold A. Rnblnso"i,
of Vanoouver, B. C, intends to apply
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described
lands:
Commencing at a poat planted about
4 mileB east and 4 mileB south from
the southeast corner of Lot 2194,
Cassiar, thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east. 80 chains south, 80 chains
weat to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, known aa claim 11.
March 10, 1914.     Harold A. Kobinson.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson
of Vancouver, B. C, intends to apply
for a license to prospect  for coal and
fletroleum over the lollowing described
ands:
Commencing at a post planted about
4 miles east and 4 miles south from
the southeast corner of Lot 2194,
cassiar, thence Bouth 80 chains, west
80 chains, north 80 chainB, east 80
cliains to point of commencement, containing 640 acrea, known as claim 12.
March 9, 1914.        Harold A. Robinson.
Omineca Land District.   DiBtrict of
Cassiar
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B. C, intends to apply
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
4 mileB east and 4 miles south from
the southeast corner of Lot 2194,
Cassiar, thence south 80 chains, east 80
chains, north 80 chains, west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres, known as claim 13.
March 9, 1914.       Harold A. Robinson,
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B. ft, intends to apply
for a  license  to prospect for coal and
fletroleum over the following described
ands:
Commencing at a post planted about
6 miles east and 4 miles south from
the southeast corner of Lot 2194,
cassiar, thence north 80 chains, west
80 chains, south80 chains, east80 chains
to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, known as claim 14.
March 9, 1914.      Harold A. Robinson.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B, C, intends to apply
for a Hcense to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
6 miles east and 4 miles south from
the southeast corner of Lot 2194,
cassiar, thence north 80 chains, east 80
chain.-., south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, known as claim 15.
March 9, 1914.       Harold A. Robinson.
Diatrict of
OminecaLand DiBtrict. ,^,, ,���������_,������.,,.��������� ,,. ���, :	
..     .u -ij     11 a   i.-i,!���_-_    of Vancouver,  B. C.   intends to apply
Take notice that Harod A. Robtnson    fo_ _   ���.,__.��� fc t fo_ ...^
of Vancouver  B. C, intends  toapply  pL,troleum overthe fo ,owinK deacribed
for a license to Drospect for  coal and  r_nds. B
Commencing at a post planted about
' miles east and 6 miles  south of the
for a license to prospeel  ior  coat anu   [___.,
petroleum over the following described      Co_;
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
the southeast corner of Lot 2194,
cassiar, thence south 80 chains, west
80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80
chains to point of commencement,
containing 640 acres, known aa claim 16.
March 9, 1914.       Harold A. Robinson.
Omineca Land District.    Districtof
Caasiar.
TaKe notice that Harold A. Robinson,
ior a license i- uniami .��. -.#_. ��..��
petroleum over the following described
lands:
6 miles east  and 4
the   so_	
CaBBiar,    tlience  80   chains   south,   80
chains
west t-   k ���
taining 640 acres, known hb claim 17
March 9, 1914.       Harold A. Robinson
COAL NOTICES
Omineca Land District.   Districtof
Cassiar
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B. C, intends to apply
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
6 miles east and 2 miles south of the
southeast corner of Lot 2194, Cassiar,
thence south 80 chains, east 80 chaina,
north 80 chaina, west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, 640 acres, known
as claim 21-.'
March 9, 1914.       Harold A. Robinson.
*P
Omineca Land District.   District of
Casaiar
Take notice that Harold A. Roliinson,
of Vancouver, B. C, intends to apply
for a license to prospect for coal antl
petroleum over the following deacribed
landa:
Commencing at a post planted about
5 miles east and 5 miles south of the
southeaat corner of Lot 2194, Caasiar,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, to point
of commencement, 640 acres, known as
claim 22.
March 9, 1914.       Harold A. Robinson.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar
Take notice that HaroldA. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B. C, intenda to apply
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
5 miles east and 5 miles south of the
southeast corner of Lot 2194; Cassiar,
thence south 80 chains, eaat 80 chains,
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, to
point of commencement, 640 acres,
known aa claim 211.
March 9, 1914.       Harold A. Robinson.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Caasiar.
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver; B. C, intends to apply
for a licenae to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
7 miles east and 6 miles south of the
southeast corner of Lot 2194 Cassiar,
thence 80 chains north, 80
chains west, 80 chains south, 80 chains
east, to point of commencement, containing 640 acrea, known as claim 24.
March 9, 1914.       Harold A. Robinson.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B. C., intends to apply
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following tlescribed
landa:
Commencing at a post planted about
7 miles east and 6 miles south of the
southeast corner of Lot 2194, cassiar,
thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west, to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, known as claim 2G.
March 9, 1914.      Harold A Robinson.
Omineca Land Diatrict. District of
Cassiar
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B. C, intends to apply
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum over tlie following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
7 miles east and 6 miles aouth of the
southeast corner of Lot 2194, cassiar,
thence 80 chains south, 80 chains
west, 80 chains north, 80 chains east,
to point of commencement, containing 6��<0 acres, known as claim 26.
March, 9, 1914.       Harold A. Robinson
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Harold A, Robinson,
Commencing at a post planted about  southea8t corner of ^ 2194  cassiar
6  miles  east and  4 miles south from   .hence      -fl     ch���jm)      __uthj      ___t
80 chainB, north 80 chains, weBt 80
chaina, to point of commencement, containing 640 acrea, known as claim 27.
March 9, 1914.       Harold A. Robinson.
Omineca Land District.  Diatrict of
Cassiar.
Takenotice that Harold A. Roliinson,
of Vancouver, B. C, intenda lo apply
for a license
TaKe notice that HaroldA. Robinson, for a license to proapect for coal and
of Vancouver, B.C., intends to apply petroleum over tne following deacribed
for a license to prosiiect for coal  and  |ands:
  '        ''-'      Commencing at a post planted about
ist and'4 miles Bouth of the
corner of Lot 2194, Cassiar,
vuuiunuwiiiB "i- " i'"."    j......*. ..  ..I......
una: H miles east and'4 miles Bouth of the
Commencing at a post planted  about  southeast comer of Lot 2194, Cassiar,
���Mes east  and 4  miles  south  from  thence    north   80    chains,   weat    80
southeaat  corner   of   Lot   2194,   chains, south 80 chains, east 80 chains,
ir,    uiBiiuv o"   -imiiin   -uu-,,  v. io  point of   commencement, contain
t east, 80 chains  north, 80 ehains mg 640 acres, known as claim 28.
to  point of commencement, con- March
mm   i' ill   .,,..-...        L.tn.ii-ii    -i.      i-l-iirri    IV 	
Omineca Lantl Diatrict.
Caaaiar.
Take notice that Haroltl A
District of
Robinson,
i 10, 1914.     Haroltl A. Robinson.
Omineca Lantl District.  Diatrict of
Casaiar.'
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, H. C, intenda  to apply
Take notice that Haroltl A. Robinson,   for a licence  to prospect  forcoal and
of Vancouver, B. C intends to   apply j petroleum over the followingdescribed
for a license   to  prospect for coal and, |an(|8;
petroleum  over the following described I    Commencing at a post planted  about
lands; 8 miles east and 4 miles south of the
Commencingata |ioat planted about southeast cornerof Lot 2194, casaiar,
6 milea east antl 2 mileB Bouth from thence north 80 chains, eaht
the southeaat comer of Lot 2194, j go chains, south 80 chains, west 80
/,___;_�����   ii,i.>ic. nnrth 80 chains, weat 80  chaina    to   point    of
casaiar, thence north 80 chains,
chainB, soutii 80 chains, east 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing 640 acreB, knowii as claim 18.
March 9, 1914.       Harold A. Robinson.
Diatrict of
Omineca Land District
Cassiar
Take notice that Harold A. - ,,���  ���,���.,.,,.���   ,���,,.,..,,���-,,. ,.,,	
of Vancouver, B. C, intendB  to  apply , petroleum over the tollowing desci ibed
for a license to prosnect  for coal  and  randa.
petroleum over the following described ....
Robinson
to apply
.,,,.,,,. ._ point of commencement,
containing 640 acres, knownas claim 29.
March 10, 1914.     Harold A. Robinson.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Casaiar.
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B. C, intends to apply
for a license to prosiiect for coal and
lands. ,        ,    ,
Commencing at a poat plnnted ahout
6 mileB east and 2 miles south of the
southeaat corner of Lot 2194, Cassiar,
thence north 80 chains, east 80 chains,
south 80 chains, west 80 chains, to
point of  commencement,   640
knowii as claim 19.	
March 9, 1914.       HaroldA. Robinson.
Omineca Land District. Distriot of
C__Hflinr
Take notice that Haroltl A. Robinson,
Vancouver, B. C, intends to apply for
a license to prospect for coal tint
petroleum over the following described
landB: ,    .   ,    .
Commencing at a poat planted about
6 miles east and 2 miles sotith of the
Boutheast corner of Lot 2194, Caasiar,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, to point
of commeticement, 640 acres, known as
March 9, 1914.      Harold A. Robinson.
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles east and 4 miles aouth of the
southenst comer of Lot 2194, cassiar,
thence south eighty chains,
westeighty chains, north eighty chains,
cast eighty chains, to point of com-
640    acres,
Harold A. Robinson.
mencement,    containing
acres, j know., as c|aim 30.
March 10, 1914.
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
Canadian bonds
demand in London.
are in brisk
. Scores of forest fires are raging in Northern Ontario.
Hon. R. L. Borden is expected
to visit British Columbia in August.
King George to finish the season
alone, according to a source in
close touch with the court and
the government.
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= 3
| Hudson's Bay Company I
The Salvation Army is holding
a "Congress of Nations" in London.
A grand jury is investigating
the strike disorders in Southern
Colorado.
Suffragettes continue their
campaign against churches in
England.
Rioting strikers set fire to the
cathedral and two churches at
Senigalda, Italy.
Adlai E. Stevenson, former
vice-president of the United
States, is dead in Chicago.
Premier Asquith proposes to
place a time limit on speeches in
the British house of commons.
The bill to eliminate plural
voting passed its third reading
in the British house of commons.
It is reported that Premier
Whitney of Ontario will go to the
Senate after the present session.
The Ribot ministry was defeated in the French chamber of
deputies, after a life of two days.
Constable John N. Allen, of
Kamloops, was killed by tramps,
while searching for stolen goods.
The Grand Trunk Pacific and
Canadian Northern will expend
many millions for equipment this
summer.
Thirteen lives were lost in the
wrecking of fishing boats off the
New Brunswick coast in last
week's storm.
Colonel Roosevelt lectured before the Royal Geographical Society in London, on his recent
trip through Brazil.
Following threats on the part
of the I. VV. W., masked men set
fire to the buildings of a hop
ranch at Wheatland, Cal.
Prince George and Fort George
citizens, at a public meeting, decided to apply for the incorporation of the district as a city.
Three balloons, out of four
which started in a race from
Portland, were wrecked by a
storm.   The aeronauts escaped.
Omineca Land Diatrict.  District of
Cassiar
Take notice that Harold A. RobinBon,
of Vancouver, B. C, intends to apply
for a iicense to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following deacribed
lands:
Commencing at a post plnnted about
8 miles east and four miles south of the
Boutheast corner of Lot 2194, Cassiar,
thence south 80 chains, east 80 chains,
north 80chains, weit 80chains to point
! of commencement, and containing 640
acres, known as claim 31.
1 March 10, 1914.     Harold A. Robinson.
An Italian steerage passenger
on the White Star steamer Can-
opic suddenly went mad and
stabbed twenty fellow passenger.
The Dominion government
steamer Montmagny, with a
crew of 24, is reported missing.
It is feared she was wrecked in
the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
Disputes between labor unions
and the I. W. W. caused a series
of riots in Butte, seceders from
the federation attacking the
union parade and raiding the
union hall.
A Birmingham manufacturer
announces that he has invented
a train which will travel 500
miles an hour. It is of the monorail type, and will fly after attaining a certain speed.
SEALED TENDERS addressed to the
undersigned, and endorsed "Tender for Public Building, Prince Rupert,
B. C," will be received at this office
until 4.00 P.M., on Monday, July 6,1914,
for the construction of the Public Building above mentioned.
Plans, specification and form of contract can be seen and forms of tender
obtained at the offices of Mr. G. B. Hull,
District Engineer, Prince Rupert, B.C.;
Mr. William Henderson, Resident Architect, Victoria, B.C.; and at this Department.
Persons tendering are notified that
tenders will not be considered unless
made on the printed forms supplied,
and signed with their actual signatures,
stating their occupations and placeB of
residence. In the case of Arms the actual signature, the nature of the occupation, and place of residence of each
member of tne Arm must be given.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted cheque on a chartered
bank, payable to the order of the Honourable the Minister of Public Works,
equal to ten per cent (10 p.c.J of the
amount of the tender, which will be
forfeited lf the person tendering decline to enter Into a contract when called upon to do so, or fail to complete
the work contracted for. If the tender
be not accepted the cheque will be re
turned.
The Department does not bind  itself
to accept the lowest or any tender.
By order,
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works.
Ottawa, June 5, i914.
Newspapers will not be paid for this
advertisement if they insert it without
authority from the Department. -62588
English challengers for the
international polo cup defeated
the American team in the first
match of the series, by 8. goals
to 3. 	
PresidentWilson will personally
command the fleet ef American
warships which will attend the
formal opening of the Panama
Canal next March.
In Athens it is considered that
a renewal of the war between
Greece and Turkey is inevitable,
owing to the continued persecution of Greeks in Turkey.
Queen Mary has decided in case
of further suffragette demonstrations in the vicinity of royalty to
quit London abruptly and leave
SHALED TENDERS addressed to the
undersigned and endorsed "Tender
for Third Class Detention Building,
Prince Rupert, B.C.," will be received
. t this office until 4 p.m., on Wednesday, July 9, 1914, for the construction
of a Third Class Detention Building,
Prince Rupert, B.C.
Plans, specification and form of contract can been seen and forms of tender
obtained at the office of Mr. William
Henderson, resident architect, Victoria,
B.C., and at this Department.
I'ersiuiH tendering are notified that
tenders will not be considered unless
inn.le on the printed forms supplied,
anil signed with their actual signatures,
stating their occupations and places of
residence. In the case of firms, the
actual signature, the nature of the occupation and place of residence of each
member of the firm must be given.
Each tender must be accompanied by
an accepted cheque on a chartered
bunk, payable to the order of the Honourable the Minister of Public Works,
equal to ten per cent. (10 p. c.) of the
amount of the tender, which will be
forfeited if the person tendering decline to enter into a contract when
called upon to do so, or fail to complete
the work contracted for. If the tender
be not accepted the cheque will be
returned.
The Department does not bind itself
to accept the lowest or any tender.
By order,
R. C. DESROCHERS,
Secretary.
Department of Public Works,
Ottawa, June 6, 1914.
Newspapers will not be paid for thiB
advertisement if they insert it without
authority from the Department.- 62676.
s
GROCERIES   DRY GOODS
HARDWARE
Of Best Quality at Popular Prices
|   A full Assort-
_.   ment of
LIQUORSa,M,s ke8p^��� |
S     HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY     j
HAZELTON. B. C. |
b"-iiiiiiiiiiiic:iiiiiiiiiiiiaiuiiiiiiiiico_iiiiiiiiiiiiro_iiiiiiiiiiiico-iiiiiiiimiaiiiiiiiiiiii[_iiiiiiiiiiiico
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
/ [VFRY _vn_7  ^TAf^F^ We are prepared  tn supply private
LiiTimtXl   UnU Ol/tUMmO  and   public  conveyances   day  and i
night.     Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
Coal and Wood delivered promptly.
Consign  your shipments in  Our     Pnrlr]v  &���   M __ C IC a V
Care  for Storage or  Delivery.     IVUUUy   Ot   ITldCrVcty
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
Address all communications to Hazelton.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
BRITISH COLUMBIA   COAST  STEAMSHIP SERVICE
Steamer "PRINCESS  BEATRICE"
Leaves Prince Rupert for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle every
SUNDAY AT 8  P. M.
Summer Excursions to Eastern Points at Low Rates. Effective June 1st
Tickets to and from all parts of the world.     Atlantic and Pacific
Steamship Tickets
vv   J. G. McNab,   Cor. 3rd Ave. and 6th St.,   Prince Rupert, B. C.
COMMERCIAL PRINTING OF THE BEST
CLASS AT THE MINER PRINT SHOP
-non������mi"
"iiO'i-
-iiOii-
Thorp & Hoops
Real Estate, Financial and Insurance Brokers
ALDERMERE. B. C.
-NO
\
Sole district agents for E. G. Prior & Co., Victoria, Agricultural Machinery and Implements, Wagons, Etc.
Fire,  Life,  Accident,  and Employer's Liability Insurance.
We represent the best companies.
We Can Locate You On a Good Pre-Emption Near the G. T. P.
If you desire information about the Bulkley Valley write us.
i ii mi   nOn      nn      "Q-  On ��������������� ���
( H       ���'
���nO
01i���mi���-_0��       11       ��ii-���m**�����0"-
-illi������iiii���-HOii"
-nO
Omineca Land District.   DiBtrict of
(*'i i,si '\v
Take notice that Haroltl A. Robinson,
of Vancouvor, B. (_., intends to apply
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following tlescribed
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
9 miles east and G miles south of the
southeast corner of Lot 2194, Cassiar,
tnence soulh 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, to point
of commencement, 640 acres, claim 36.
March 10, 1914,      Harold A. Robinson.
CJ Drugs and Toilet Articles.   Kodaks,
Kodak Supplies. Printing and Developing.   f_ Gram-a-phones and  Records.
Stationery
The "Up-To-Date" Drug Stores
Hazelton
L. D. Fulton, Mgr.
New Hazelton
��Q_   i ��� mi       nt���-nn������nO_       iih-
-nO�����"li���
-��0
COAL NOTICES
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B. C, intends to apply
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following describetl
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
9 miles east and 6 miles south of thc
southeast corner of Lot 2194, Cassiar,
thence south 80 chains, east 80 chains,
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, 640 acres, claim 86.
March 10, 1914.      Harold A. Robinson.
COM. NOTICES
Omineca Land District.    Districtof
Cassiar.
Take notice that Haroltl A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B. C,   intends to apply
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Harold A. Robinson,
of Vancouver, B. C, intends to apply
for a license   to prospect for  eoal anil
fletroleum over the following describetl
ands:
Commencing at a post planted about
9 miles east and 7 mileB south of the
southeast corner of Lot 2194, Cassiar,
thence south 80 chains, east 80 chains,
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, to point
of commencement, 640 acres, claim 37.
March 10, 1914.     Harold A. Robinson.
for a license to prospect for coal and
petroleum over tne lollowing described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
9 niiles east ami 7 miles south of the
southeast corner of Lot 2194, Cassiar,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north   80  chains,    east  80   chains,   to
point of commencement, and containing
64(1 acres, claim 88.
March 1(1, 1914.      Harold A. Robinson.
Omineca Land District.   Diatrict of
Cassiar
Take notice that HaroldA. Kobinson,
of Vancouver, B. ('., intends to apply
for ii Hcenae to proapect l'or coal and
petroleum over tne following tlescribed
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
8 miles east and 7 miles south of the
southeast corner of Lot 2194, Cassiar,
thence soutli 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, topoint
of commencement, 64(1 acres, known
as claim 39.
March 10, 1914.      Haroltl A. Robinson. TBE 0M1NT.CA MINER, SATURDAY, JUNE 20, 1914
DENTISTRY
Dr. BADGERO
Of Smithers
Will  be in  Hazelton   from
June Hi until further notice.
Dental work of every description,   Careful attention
guaranteed.
Smithers Notes
(From Thursday'*. Review)
George Thomson arrived from
Hazelton on Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. E. J.
visitors in Smithers.
E. Richardson  came up  from
Rupert last evening.
present moment I wish again to
draw attention to facts   which
busy  people have little thought
of and for which the immorality
of society is chiefly responsible.
I It is the preventable blindness of
infants.     Medical men are fully
Doreen are cognizant that many cases of in-
I fantile   blindness    are    caused
I through  the   ignorance   of   the
i
I'lion.' 300 P.O. Box n;:i.r)
HARRISON VV. ROGERS
ARCHITECT
Special Attention to Out ofTown Clients
BUJTK
B. C.
W.   A.   Williscroft   went
I'rince Rupert on Sunday.
to
Jack
Babines
Aldous is over from the
for a few days.
: (INK. RKDBRAL Block.
PRINCE RUPERT,
T. Lucai E. A. Lucas
LUCAS & LUCAS
Barristers and  Solicitors
District Forester Allen was in
town on Saturday evening.
E. B.  Nash, of Calgary,  is
visitor in Smithers this week.
Telephnn
RoB-ra Bui
Cor.
iSeymuur Mi-
ill, nml Pender
Vancouver, 11. C.
Mines  and  Mining
Good Properties for sale -  Cash or on '<
Bond.      Development and
Assessment Work.
Carr Brothers
Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Armishaw
arrived from Chilco last evening.
; mothers . and   nurses;   many   a
I child  is  condemned to  life-long
blindness through the sins of the
father or the unpardonable delicacy  of  the   family  doctor.    A
very large proportion of those
; blind from infancy is due to the
; wickedness of the parents.    This
is more the subject for a scientific journal than a newspaper and
therefore must be left to the consideration  of thoughtful minds.
1 That  the  fact exists  is the important point.     If the govern-
' ment  appointed a committee  to
j enquire into the matter, ample
^evidence could be collected which
would   show   the  wisdom   of a
young country like Canada, and
especially  British  Columbia,   in
SEALED TENDERS, addressed to
j the Postmaster General, will be re-
, ceived at Ottawa until Noon, on Friday,
j the 24th day of July, 1914, for the conveyance of His Majesty's Mails, on a
j proposed Contract for four years, once
per week each way, between Hazelton
land Kispiox, from the lst day ofOcto*
I bar next.
Printed notices containinK further
information as to the conditions of the
proposed Contract may be seen and blank
forms of Tender may be obtained at the
Post Offices of Huzelton, Kispiox and
New Hazelton, and at the ollice of the
undersigned,
Post Ollice Inspector's Office, Victoria, B. C, 15th May, 11114.
E. H. Fletcher,
40-2-4 Post Office Inspector.
James Latham, forest rangei
returned  to Hazelton this morn-! setting aside a small percentage
ing.
Eight Years In This District.
HlU.-l.on,   II.   C.
J. A. LeRoy J. Nation
Hotel Winters
Cor.   Abbott and Water Streets
��� Vancouver
European Plan $1.00 to $2.50
Rooms with Baths.    11 <.t ami ('old
Water.     Steam Heated.
Motor Bus Meets   All Bouts und
Trains.
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Paschal, of
New Hazelton, arrived on lasl
evening's train.
o���
Highest market prices paid for
Raw Furs
DRY GOODS
Men's Furnishings
Hardware Groceries
C. V. SMITH
GENERAL MERCHANT
HAZELTON
of the receipts for the sale, rents,
and  royalties of the public es-
Mrs. Swaggert left on Tuesday j tate, for assisting and aiding the
for a two-months' visit to  Port-1 blind.     What   greater   blessing
land, Oregon. i cou'd a statesman like Sir Rich
ard McBride and  the Attorney-
general  confer   upon   posterity
than  the inauguration of an institution *whose special  duty  it
would  be to assist the medical
practitioners to cope  with  this
evil and save thousands of children from being totally blind, notwithstanding that at birth they
are suffering from disease.   This
would provide for the education
jand  training of the  blind.      1
I would   ask   all   serious   minded
! men and women to make some enquiry before they dismiss this
matter from consideration.
Frank Richards, J.P.
Vancouver, B. C.
! I The railway company has been
j ! placing gravel on the local freight
j I sidings this week.
I
���o
Mr. and Mrs. Lem Broughton
left this morning for a prolonged
visit to California.
Angus   Stewart,    Hugh   Me
Leod and L. J. Conkey  were
town on Saturday.
in
J. McNeil and Lem Broughton
j returned  last evening   from   a'
business trip to Prince Rupert.
11. P. Gorman, Frank McKinnon and Jack Williams were up
with the New Hazelton ball team.
.���>���-..-- ...
Clothes That
Hold Their
Shape
���a
i
1).   A.   McPhee,
and  C.   King,   of
among   the   week's
Smithers,
L.   II.   Campbell,
son and E. B. Thomas
Van-
i
|
j  couver, are among the guests at
j the Hotel Bui
Notice
The following horses, left at J.
H. Snodgrass's ranch, Francois
Lake, by M. Stich, will be sold
by public auction, at Hazelton,
on July fi, 1914, under the provisions of Chap. 29, R. S. B. ft,
for wintering charges and expenses, unless same are paid before that date:
One roan mare, branded H U
on left shoulder; docked tail.
One  three-year-old  roan filly,
i unbranded.
L Stephen-1 m41-4 W. VV. KERR,
of
F.   L.  South
Victoria,   are
visitors   in
ley.
Hobberlin Clothes are always tailored right. They
always hold their shape.
No part is stinted. We can
please the most particular
dresser with Hobberlin garments. Drop in and have a
look at the . new spring
samples.
NOEL & ROCK
Huzelton,  B.' C.
Road Superintendent Carr returned to Hazelton yesterday,
after a trip of inspection through
this part of his district.
SKEENA DISTRICT
The theater management gave
a dance on Monday evening, in
honor of the visiting ballplayers.
Gray's orchestra furnished the
music in its usual excellent style.
IN  accord!
B. C. 1!U
It. S.
Gov-
I.ANI) NOTICE.
District.
District of
Hazelton   Land
('oust, Range 5,
Take notice that Klla H. Humble, of
Prince Rupert, occupntion murried
womun, intends lo apply l'or permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
5(10 yards in u N.K. direction from the
two mile post on thc Copper river trail,
being on an Island, thence westerly
following the north bunk of the slougii
4(1 chuins moreor less, thence northerly
and easterly following the south bunk
of the Copper river _u chains more or
less, to point of commencement, containing Id ucres more or less.
Kiln II. Humble.
.1    11. Wells, Agent.
Datetl 5th Mnrch, 1914, m__-_2
District of
A special train from the east
this morning brought H. S. Clements, M. P. for the district, and
several others. They went
through to Rupert on the passenger train.
Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Tyner arrived from Regina on Saturday
evening, to make their home
here. They have taken the house
formerly occupied by Mrs. Swaggert. Mr. Tyner is district manager for Peterson & Pels.
CORRESPONDENCE
Slate Aid for the Blind
Editor   Miner:      We   furnish
money   for education and set a-
side, out of  public domain (held
Omineca I.and District.
Const., Range..
Tuke notice that Charles Hicks Beach,
of Hazelton, B. C, occupation general I u���  ,i,    ,, .   ,.
agent, intentls  to apply for permission ! -V   the   Crown   in   trust  for the
to purchase the following described1pe0p]e) ample^means for the sus-
lands: |
Commencing at a post plnnted at the tenance of a university  for the
northwest  corner of Lot 849, Range 6, i ... . ,
(Joust District, and being the northeast people, We provide, toa certain
corner  of   the lantl applied for, thence        .      , .  .        , ,
west 20 chains, south & chnins, east 20 (;xl^t. provision for the aged,
chains,   north  40  cliains,   to point of  Dut   we   _Q
commencement, and containing 80 acres :
more or less. .     _    .    sickness and death of the bone
Charles Hicks Beach.
April 24 1914 Iancl muscle of the ?tate.   At the
for the
not provide for the
Ferry, Babine Lake
lance with chapter K.r
j * B. C. 1911, " Ferries Act," thc
ernment of British Columbia invite applications   for  a charter for a ferry to
ply on the Babine Lake.
Applications, endorsed   "Tender  for
Ferry, Babine Lake," will be received
by the Honourable Minister of Public
Works, up to 12 o'clock noon of Tuesday, the 2:jrd June, 1914,
The limits of the ferry shall extend
for u distance of tWO miles above and
tWO miles below said point.
The charter will cover a period expiring on Mist March, IBIS.
Applicants shall give un outline of the
schedule on which they propose to operate this ferry.
Applicant! shall give u description of
the vessel it is proposed to use and the
method of operation.     The vessel must
conform in ull respects to the requirements of the "Ciiniulu Shipping Act"
und amending Act.
All children who are travelling t.ianil
from school shall be carried free of
charge.
Applicants shall state the tolls they
propose to ask for���
Knot passengers (udults), each.
Foot passengers, children under thirteen years.
Automoblle8 With driver and passengers.
Passenger with saddle-horse,
Passenger with horse and buggy.
Driver   with   two horses and wngon,
loaded or unlonded.
Driver with   ft ur  horses und wngon,
loaded or unloaded,
Automobile, loaded,
Automobile, unloaded.
Cuttle nnd horses, per bend.
Sheep,  per head.
Hogs, per head,
Calves and colts  under one year old,
per head,
Freight, perishable, per KM) lb.
Freight, imperishable, per 100 lb.
Bach applicant shall state the amount
of grunt he requires for Uie operation
of this ferry.
The Government of British Columbia
ia not neoessatlly bound to accept the
lowest or any application submitted.
J. E. GRIFFITH,
m40-l-2 Deputy Minister and
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B. C, 27th May, 1914.
NOTICE
In the Supreme Court of British
Columbia.
In the matter of the Administration
Act, and in the matter of the Estate of Fred Zoellner, deceased, intestate,
TAKE NOTICE that by nn order of
His Honour Judge Young,, dated 8th
June, 1914, I was appointed Administrator of the estate of the said Fred
Zoellner.
ALL parties having claims against
the said estate are hereby requested to
forward the same, properly verified, to
me, before the 27th day of June, 1914,
and all parties indebted to the said estate are required to pay the amount
of their indebtedness to me forthwith.
Dated 11 th day of June, 1914.
Stephen H. Hoskins,
m41-2 Ollitial Administrator
Hazelton, B.C
^&m-
Department of Agriculture
Live_Stock Branch
Live Stock, Field Crops and general   Agricultural   Information.
Write or Call
H. E. WALKER, B. S.A.
Provincial Agriculturist       Telkwa, B.C.
WANTED���One or two energetic, reliable agents for Hazelton and surrounding territory.
Only live wires need apply. Merchants' Casualty Company of
Canada, 218 Central Building,
Victoria, B. C.
STYLE
J W" matter not generally
7mJL, known or fully appreciated with regard to commercial printing is the fat. that
Style, display (by which is
meant typographical arrangement) and type-faces are subject to change, as in the case
of clothing and other fashions.
^ Modern printing shows a
marked tendency towards the
neat and plain in display with a
liberal use of margin, as opposed to the old-_tyle methods of
coarse, overcrowded and over-
ornamental composition. Not
every printer can give you the
better class of work. It is,
therefore, to your interest to see
that your printing is done at
the mos. fully equipped commercial printing plant in the
Northern Interior, carrying a
large and high-grade slock of
slationery, and employing workmen of experience and ability.
The Quality Mark Printshop is
e
meir
f>
R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd.
PORT ESSINGTON
Established 1870
HAZELTON
"All the time"
The newest and latest in every department.
This week brings some very fine pieces in
Dress goods, in Tartans, in Crepe, in Cretonnes, Pongee Silks, Japan and China
Silks, Butcher Linen, Prints, Sateens, Ladies'
Light Summer Vests. A sorting up on
Ribbons. A very fine assortment of Comforters ranging from $2.25 to $1 5. Worn-
ens and Children's Lisle Hose, White,
Tan, Red, and Black Colors. fl This hot
weather a Morris or Arm Rocker Chair,
a Swing Chair or Rattan Rocker for lounging around will add to your comfort. We
have them on hand. fl Tennis players
will find everything they require for the
pastime from our stock���Shoes, Racquets,
Balls, Shirts, fl Fresh Fruits���Strawberries. Cherries, Grape-Fruit, Cantaloupes,
Peaches, Plums, and all seasonable Fruits
every train.
#%������������++^+^^^+++++++++��;^^+++^^'H��+++^^

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