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Omineca Miner Oct 3, 1914

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 c^.,o/��X-? j ���*;-&%
THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER IN NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. IV, NO. 5
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1914
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
k MURDER CASE ALLIES FORCING ENEMY BACK TO BORDER FUND GROWING
Bert Taylor the Victim���Suspected Indian Held
By Police
A horrible murder was disclosed on Tuesday morning, when
the body of Albert L. Taylor was
found on the railway track between Hazelton station and Sealy
gulch. The victim's throat had
been cut, and many knife wounds
showed the savage nature of the
deed.
The body was found by S. D
Murray, the dead man's partner,
who notified the police and coroner. C-jief Minty immediately
began an investigation, securing
evidence which led to the arrest
of John May, a young Indian.
Government Agent Hoskins, as
coroner, opened a inquest on
Tuesday evening, with a jury
composed of Wm. Grant (foreman), J. M. MacCormick, C'V.
Smith, A. D. McLeod, Chas.
Hicks Beach and George Berts.
To allow further investigation,
the inquest was adjourned until
last evening, when quite a number of witnesses appeared. All
the evidence was not in at a late
hour, and a further adjournment
was had. The inquest ia still in
progress, but will probably conclude today.
It has been shown that deceased
procured liquor in Hazelton on
Monday. About nine in the
evening, the ferry being tied up,
he and May asked Isaac Danes,
an Indian, to ferry them aero, s
the Bulkley, Danes refused, and
they crossed in George Beirnes'
boat. The police believe that
the Indian killed Taylor as the
result of a quarrel over a bottle
of whiskey.
Taylor, who had been in the
district for some months, was a
packer well known throughout
the country, and was regarded
as a good citizen. For some
weeks he had been acting as
guard at the bridge over Sealy
gulch.
KOMAGATA MARU
RIOTERS IN INDIA
THREE WEEKS' BATTLE STILL IN PROGRESS-
BRITISH FLEET LA YS MINES ON GERMAN COAST
London, Oct. 3:���After terrific fighting near Roye, on the
Allies' left, where the Germans have been strongly reinforced, the
enemy has been pressed back some miles further towards the
Belgian frontier. Violent German attacks, near Arras, were
repulsed. A number of attempts to bridge the Meuse near St.
Mihiel were made by the enemy, but the guns of the Allies'
destroyed the structures. In the Woevre district the French
continue to make progress. The extreme end of the Allies' left
wing is now within thirty miles of the Belgian border.
German papers are preparing the people for news of a
disaster to the German army in France.
The British government having at last decided to use mines
against the enemy, the admiralty has taken prompt action, and it
now announces that the fleet has planted many mines on the coast
of Germany, bottling up all enemy vessels.
Holland announces that the exportation of foodstuffs from that
country to Germany will be prevented.
more reverses and have been compelled to retreat.
Brussels is reported short of food, 700,000 people being in a
desperate condition. Efforts to obtain food from Antwerp have
failed, the Germans being in charge of Brussels.
The Germans are reported to have lost many thousands of men
in attempts to reduce the Antwerp forts.
Twenty steamers were required to transport the recently-
arrived East Indian troops to France.
A despatch from Nish says the Servian commander has ordered
the temporary abandonment of efforts to capture Sarajevo, capital
of Bosnia, as the Austrians occupy positions which can only be
taken by assault and great sacrifice.
Ottawa, Oct. 3:���The Canadian expeditionary force is believed
to have landed, but there is no report as to the time or place of
disembarkation. The convoy consisted of thirty transports, with
eleven warships.   The contingent numbers 31,300 troops,  with
A Petrograd despatch says the Kaiser is undoubtedly with tl e 8,000 horses.     The transporting of the force was the largest mili-
German troops in  East Prussia, where his forces have met with | tary movement ever effected on the Atlantic ocean.
THE MINER'S TELEGRAPHIC BULLETINS TELL STORY OF GREAT WAR DAY BY DAY
London, Sept. 28:���The Allies' left is making progress towards
the Meuse, and ground is being gained in the Woevre district;
otherwise the positions of the opposing forces in the north of
France is unchanged. On Saturday all the German forces were
hurled against the Allies, to be repulsed all along the line. There
was much bayonet fighting at several points. The fighting
continued yesterday, when the enemy was again beaten back with
Russians and Germans near Lyck, which has already lasted for
several days without decisive result.
Buda Pesth, Austria, Sept.30:���Cholera is epidemic among the
soldiers. Fifteen new cases are reported today in the hospital
here,
Tokyo, Japan,  Sept.  30:���Hard   fighting  between Japanese
severe loss,  after attacks of violence unprecedented since thfl |��?��P. ���d Germans is in progress in Kiau Chau.   The Japanese
beginning of the campaign.    Corps after corps of Germans was j have tne advantage so far\
unsuccessfully hurled against the flower of the British and French
Good Sum Already Raised in
Hazelton for the Big
Patriotic Fund
The people of Hazelton are
responding generously to the appeal for funds to provide for
those dependent on Canada's
soldiers at the front. On Monday the local committee began
its work, and during the week
obtained a large addition to the
fund. Over $500 has been given
by 94 subscribers, fifteen of
whom have agreed to make
monthly payments which will
amount to as much again. Following are the additional subscriptions:
Previously acknowledged $127.50
Calcutta, Oct. 2:-The Koma-
gata Maru passengers refused to
board the train for Punjab today, and opened fire with revolvers. Troqps were compelled to
fire on the Sikhs, to check their
rushes. One police official and a
constable were killed and a number wounded by the rioters, sixteen of whem were killed. It is
believed the trouble in Vancouver and here was inspired by
Germans, who wished to cause
trouble between England, Canada
and India.	
Mexico's Trouble*
Mexico City, Oct. 2:���Villa,
who has announced that he will
not be a candidate for the presidency, has asked President Carranza to resign in favor of Ferdinand Ocalderon. It is thought
likely the difficulty between Carranza and Villa will be settled at
a conference which is to be held
in a few days. Villa has declared
an   armistice  for the  national
armies.   It is predicted that the turning movement of the Allies
will soon succeed,
German airships on Saturday night dropped bombs on Alost.
Ghent, Dyuse, Minelbeke and Rollegliem. One man was killed at
Dyuse, where the hospital was damaged.
Yesterday bombs were dropped on Paris, in an attempt to
wreck the Eiffel tower wireless station. The enemy failed, but
killed a man and his daughter and damaged a number of houses.
The Kaiser is reported ill of inflammation of the lungs, the
result of falling in a trench.
The German bombardment of Malines was resumed yesterday.
There are unfounded reports that the Bavarians in the German
army are in a state of mutiny.
Jn the eastern theater of war, the Russian and German armies
are facing each other from Cracow to extreme Northeast Prussia,
each awaiting its opportunity to attack. The Germans are being
reinforced at Che rate of an army corps a day.
The Japanese are making progress in their attack on Tsing
Tau, which began on Saturday and continued yesterday. Their
casualties so far are three hundred. Those of the Germans are
unknown.    Chinese and Japanese troops are fraternizing.
An Anglo-French fleet is in the Adriatic, hoping to get in
touch with the Austrian fleet, which is in hiding.
The squadron of warships which is convoying the twenty-eight
troopships carrying the Canadian army corps is commanded by
Admiral Wemyss, in the flagship Charybdis.
Preparations are being made for the defence of Antwerp,
which expects an attack by the Germans, with siege guns.
Eighteen trainloads of wounded Germans from France passed
through Aix laChapelle in four hours on Friday.
The German steamer Ossa, with wheat and barley valued at
$81,000, was captured and towed in Falmouth yesterday. The
U. S. steamer Lorenzo and the Norwegian Thor were captured
while in the act of coaling the German cruiser Carlsruhe.
Major-General Anderson, a popular commander in the Boer
war, is likely to command the Canadian expeditionary force.
The King on Saturday reviewed 150,000 soldiers, part of
Kitchener's newly organized force.
Ollawa, Sept. 28: -The government has extended for six
months the order prohibiting the entrance into British Columbia of
all laborers and Chinese,
Paris, Sept. 30: Terrific fighting continues along the line of
battle. The Germans, offering desperate resistance, are being
gradually forced back to the north.
London, Sept. 30: -The speedy defeat of the German forces in
North-eastern France is predicted by military experts.
The war is costing Germany $5,000,000 a day, according to
Berlin advices.
Petrograd, Sept.   30:���The campaign in Prussia progresses,
although the first snowstorm of winter,  with cold, drenching rains
,l���U,mH   which are to be held! and sleet, greatly hampers the movement of troops in the field.
from Cct. 5 to Oct. 10. Advices  from the front tell of a tremendous battle between
London, Oct. 1:���Official advices say the turning movement by
the Allies, north of Somme, is developing rapidly. There is no
change in the position of the center or right wing. German attacks
have been repulsed with losses. The Allies have advanced ai
several points, notably east of St. Mihiel. A special from Nancy
states that the French troops have recaptured St. Mihiel, east of
Verdun, greatly relieving the pressure of the Germans in thai
quarter. In this engagement many prisoners were taken, includ
ing the Crown Prince of Bavaria. The Germans made a desperat<
attempt to retake the prisoners, but failed.
Yesterday, the nineteenth day of the Battle of Aisne, witnessed
a continuance of the stupendous and decisive struggle in the valley
of the Somme river.
Confirmation of the report that the right wing of the Gei-mar
forces was broken and in flight is lacking. Commentators are
sceptical, althought they expect the breaking of the enemy's rigln
as only the natural result of the Allies' great turning movemenl
The present status of the armies, as outlined in the official reports,
shows that the Allies have pushed the invaders back until tin
German right wing is virtually at right angles to the rest of tin
enemy's lines. The fact that German headquarters admits thai
the great efforts to throw back the pressure of the Allies proved
indecisive is regarded here as most significant.
The Germans bombarded Alost, setting the town on fire.
Fierce fighting continues at various points along the whole line of
contact.
In Northern Belgium the enemy, who are reported to have
been reinforced, are steadily drawing their lines about the
fortifications of Antwerp, and its investment is probable. Thus
far, 150,000 men are engaged in the Antwerp triangle.
An exchange of prisoners through the American ambassador
in London is planned by the belligerents.
Brussels has paid six of the forty millions indemnity demanded
by Germany.     The mayor remains in jail as hostage for payment.
The German cruiser Emden is reported to have captured five
more British merchantmen in the Indian Ocean.
The British cruisers Good Hope, Monmouth and Glasgow are
reported off Chile, on their way north.
Copenhagen, Oct. 1:���The heaviest gale within living memory
is sweeping over Denmark and the North Sea. Great damage has
been done all along the German coast.
The German air maneuvers in the vicinity of Kiel have been
abandoned.
Telegraphic communication is interrupted and details are
meager. A telephone message from the west coast of Jutland
says bodies of German sailors were washed ashore.
Rome, Oct. 1:���An Italian torpedo boat is reported sunk by a
mine between Venice and Comacchio, in the Adriatic Sea.
Meetings held here of various Italian parliamentary groups
discussed the war situation and passed resolutions substantially
endorsing the government's neutral attitude, on the ground that
conditions of neutrality entail sure protection of Italian interests.
As the result of the sinking of Italian fishing boats near
Ancona by Austrian floating mines, the Government has instructed
(Continued on Page Four)
St. Peter's Church.
25.00
Rev. John Field
20.00
G. G. Rock.    .
3.00
J. C. K. Sealy
15.00
W. Buttke      .
1.00
H. G. Wrinch
5.00
A. E. -Player .
15.00
M. G. Edgar .
5.00
H. F. Glassey
2.00
G. Berts ....
1.50
F. A. Brewer.
1.00
R. D'Egville .
5.00
Peter Nielson.       .      .
3.00
F. E. Willett .
5.00
H. A. DuHamel     .      ..
5.00
B. Markel.     .
5.00
Leslie Laing  .       ,      ,
5.00
Frank Lee     .       ,      ,
1.00
John Lee
1.00
VV. H. Sharpe
5.00
ri. N. Whitford     .
1.00
rl. Guest
5.00
George Crow .
1.00
A. C. Minty   .
5.00
R. C. Mills     .
2.50
H. Hamblin    .
5.00
Al. Cain .   *  .
2.5a
J. Mead ....
5.00
vV. W. Anderson    .
5.00
J. O'Shea
5.00
N. R. Gary    .
5.00
A. A. McDonald    .
5.00
J. M. MacCormick .
25.00
Paddy the Jap
1.00
t). Ogilvie      .       .       .
5.00
... G. Moseley
10.00
5. J. Martin   .
10.00
J. G. Steele    .
1.00
Emil Gallon    .       .
1.00
las. MacKay .
10.00
J. E. Dean     .
1.00
A. Griswold   .
2.00
vV. M. Williamson .
1.00
G. Gore  .
2.00
1'. Salomo
2.00
A. Leverett   .
5.00
.1. White.
5.00
("has. Reid
5.00
H. Welch
5.00
E. R. Cox
5.00
R, E. O'Brien.
5.00
C. B. Simpson
5.00
C. Fernua
5.00
H. H. Phillips.
4.00
Wm. Grant    .
5.00
W. W. Kerr   .
.      5.00
C. V. Wright .
5.00
H. M. Mathews
.      5.00
J. R. Fuller   .
.      5.00
Gilbert Burrington.
.      5.00
Mrs. Burrington
.      5.00
J. McDougall .
.      5.00
G. M. Beirnes.
.      5.00
S. W. N. Saunders.
5.00
T. Arikado
2.00
G. Hill    .
.50
J. P. Ilamm   .
.50
The following subscri
jers have
agreed  to make   mont
lily   pay-
ments of the amounts
specified :
S. 11. Hoskins
5.00
,1. Navlor
2.00
R. S. Sargent.
5.00
H. E. Holliday
3.00
R. J. Rock     .
2.00
L. D. Fulton .
3.00
W. J. Lvnch   .
1.50
J. C. Rock     .
1.00
R. H. Cusaek
2.50
Jas. Turnbull .
3.00
R. E. Allen    .
3.00
H. C. Kinghorn
3.00
Jas. Latham   .
3.00
G. R. Middleton    .
5.00
A. D. McLeod.
.       6.00 THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1914
The Omimiaca Mieer
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $2.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 2(1 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazette rates.
Vol. IV.
Saturday, October 3, 1914.
No. 5
An indication of the line on which Great Britain expects peace
to be arranged at the close of the war is given in an interview
obtained by Italian representatives with Hon. Winston Churchill,
who is officially reported as saying:
"We are very confident in Britain about winning the war. We
have made up our minds to win if it costs the last sovereign and
the last man in the British Empire. Time is on our side. I never
expected to see the campaign go so well in the first two or three
months. 1 have always been looking to the seventh, eighth or
ninth months of the war to produce the great decision.
"Of course, it is much too soon to speculate. We are not
building on accounts of battlefields. We are measuring the vital
forces of the nations engaged in the war. We are satisfied that
Germany lias done her worst and is fully expended. Russia has
only just begun. In less than six months' time we shall have one
million soldiers in line, all volunteers���not taken on compulsion.
The men will be equipped with everything that science can invent
or money can buy, drawn by our naval power from tlie whole
world.
"We want this war to settle the map of Europe on national
lines and according to the true wishes of the people who dwell in
the disputed areas. After all the blood that is being shed, we
want a natural and harmonious settlement which liberates races,
restores the integrity of nations, subjugates no one, and permits
genuine and lasting relief from the waste and tension of armaments, under which we have suifered so long. There will never be
real peace and comfort till then. As long as Austria has power
and spends thousands of Italian lives in quarrels of her ambition;
as long as she holds in her hand and bondage their provinces and
numerous populations which are Italian by heart and soul and
nature, there will always be armament and counter-armament,
fear, tension and intrigue, and always danger of this horrible
catastrophe returning. Let us make an end of it now; letus have
a fair and natural adjustment of European boundaries. Letus
war against the principle of one set of Europeans holding down by
force and conquest, against their wills, another section. Let us
reach a final and simple solution, and let us fortify and confirm the
settlement by a law of nations which even the most audacious will
have been taught to respect."
SUCCESSFUL IN
home.    Concurrent with the houi
MINING PROMOTION of this meeting other things were
  doing  in  Montana.     The mine
Recently there died in St. Louis had opened a huge vein of high
a man of whom few ever  heard,  grade silver and the news   was
He was of the Weyerhauser, ,|ashed lo gt Louis> Both mes_
type. He was worth $40,000,000, sageB crossed_ The fo,.mer was
according to the inventory de-1 recalled and the mine was devel-
posited with the assessor. This Lped t0 an extent that dazz|ed
fund had been accumulated in | the staid M p|odders ()f gt Lou.
the last 20 years through assid-: is and gave an impetus to that
uous cultivation of opportunities town. One bank which held a
and grasping details that others! block of the stock in escrow at
could not seize. This was James j 12_ cents a sha|.e had foreciosed
Campbell, who might rightfully on the 8ecurity and fi|ed the
be termed the father of mining certificates   away   in  its   vaults
investments in St. Louis.
He  v\as  not  a  miner,   but a
with  other worthless resources
and proceeded to forget all about
man gifted with far sight that jt This stock advanmj to one
pointed the way to success, but |do,|ar a sharei and then mounted
he had the faculty of picking upj the |adder steadi|y until it touch.
good things that others stepped jed   $18   wjth   reRU,ar  month|y
over.   He was  instrumental in dividend, of from 60 cents to $1
financing the famous Granite L shar- St Loui_ heg&n tQ
Mountain mine in Montana, (expand. The bank sold its
which brought to St.  Louis over| "worthle8s"  collateral for $15 a
speculation and investments,
bought run-down railroads which
he consolidated into trunk systems, acquired rickety old streetcar lines that could not begin to
pay interest on the cost, and by
spending money made these investments dividend payers.
Forty millions in the course of
20 years is a huge sum to gather
and care for, and it is a singular
fact that the death of a man
with such an accumulation would
not merit more than a passing
notice in the daily papers. Millionaires have grown so numerous that they are no longer deserving of more than cursory attention.
A Model Mine
Plans for the model mine at
the Panama Pacific exposition
are coming forward nicely. The
co-operation of a number of the
leading mining companies and
machinery manufacturers is going to make possible a really educational exhibit. The effort
will be to reproduce as closely as
space will permit actual stopes
from representative mines. The
list now assured includes the
Bunker Hill & Sullivan, Goldfi'eld
Consolidated, Homestake, Copper
Queen, a Jones & Laughlin iron
mine stope, and rooms showing
coal mining in both anthracite
and bitumiuous fields constructed
by several of the leading companies. Others are tentatively
promised. Bureau of Mines officials who are in charge of the
enterprise are meeting with
every encouragement, and we
believe the mine will be one of
the most instructive exhibits at
the Exposition. If it serves the
purpose of giving the general
public a real insight into mining,
a "perceptive center" around-
which to build an accurate concept of underground conditions,
it will be well worth the time
and labor expended.
Timber Sale X 231
SEALED TENDERS will be received
by the Minister of Lands not later than
noon on the 25th day of September,
1914, for the purchase of Licence X 231,
to cut 3.369,000 feet of timber, adjoining Lot 2390, and located south of Andimaul, Cassiar District.
Three years will be allowed for the
removal of the timber.
Further particulars of the Chief For-
seter. Victoria, B. C. 48-4
$35,000,000 in  the  days  before
the white metal  had become de-
share and ordered  the erection
of a  massive skyscraper.     The
monetized  and   was   quoted   at] stockholders drew down fat divi-
coinage value. dends and the news of the won-
The old steady going investors | derfu, profits inaugurated a boom
of the metropolis of Missouri |in the mjning stock8 that for a
were averse to speculation of the j time made St> Loui_ th_ mMng
mining class, but they were will-j fi|)ancja| c-nter of y,. West
ing to take a flyer and the first Thither every promoter wended
his way and the strong boxes of
the old town were opened and a
deluge of wealth lavished on
offerings from Arizona, New
Mexico,   Montana,   Utah,   Idaho
investment happened to be
Granite Mountain, which caused
the men behind the bankroll to
sweat blood for many years. Al
last the burden became too irksome and   they   held  a  meeting1 and Colorado.
f. fftt|t*Jt fj*?ttff* *ftT|tt|*-���
Ladies and Gentlemen's |
GARMENTS   !
j Cleaned, Pressed and i
Repaired
:H. ARIKADO
Omineca St., opp. Postoffice
HAZELTON, B. C.
ii+++++++M++++++++++++.|.+.|.i
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The Favorite    CAD f EKTP C
Shopping place  JAIVUJLlll O
We Lead���
Others Follow
MINERS' PROSPECTORS' and SETTLERS' SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY
Time to think of Warm Clothing
��� Cold Weather is on the way ���
Our Fall and Winter Stock, which is now
arriving from the manufacturers, includes a wide
range of seasonable goods
Ladies' and Men's Sweater Coats, Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves and Mitts
For Men we have received a large assortment of
Pants, for all walks of life
We aim to keep our stock complete and up to
date in every department of our stores
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J School   Supplies, Scribblers, Pens, Pencils, etc., etc.  ft
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General      D    C    CAPfTMT     Hazelton
Merchant      K.   O.   OAKULIl I R  P
B.C.
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Timber Sale X 233
SEALED TENDERS will be received
by the Minister of Lands not later than
noon on the 26th day of August, 1914;
for the purchase of Licence X 233, to cut
1,013,000 feet of timber situated in the
vicinity of the Kitseguecla Indian Reserve, Group 1, Cassiar District.
Three years will be allowed for the
removal of the timber.
Further particulars of the Chief Forester, Victoria, B. C. 48-52
f~-
The GALENA CLUB ""**
*-���-���--���������-----��������� Under New Management 	
vorit.
Retort
POOL AND AMERICAN BILLIARD TABLES
Finest Cigars, Cigarettes, and Tobaccos, Choice
Confectionery,   Fruits,   Ice Cream,   Soft Drinks
GRAHAM ROCK
PROPRIETOR
COAL NOTICES
Hazelton Land District.     District of
Cassiar
Takenotice that I, Arthur H. Smythe,
of Vancouver, B. C. broker, intend to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described land-
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Section 36, Township 57, thence east 80 chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains, north 80 chains,
to point of commencement, 640 acres;
claim No. 13.���a.h.s., n.w. cor.
Arthur H. Smythe.
June 5, 1914. D. O. Wing, Agent.
"Everything in Canvas"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
PrinceRupert. B.C.
HAZELTON HOSPITAL^
for nny jiuri.xl from one month upward at 31 per
monlh in wlvuncr. Thin rate lm.lud.!i office i-on-
uill ii ions nnil rni-dirlnos, an well un nil cobIh white
In U)�� hoipltal. Tickets obtainable In HrzcIUhi
nt the Port Office or the Drupr Store; In Ahlermeri-
from Mr. T. J. Thorp: In Tclkwu from l)r. Wullnco;
nr by mnil from the Medical .Snpurinindent at the
Pomlfal,
I !-P'MM"--++���_������*���+���*���!-*+*>l"*"*-*.M->M"PO
|| Skeena Laundry!
and declared they could not ro
any further with support. A
dispatch was sent to Phillipsburg,
Mont., instructing the superin-
t;ndent of the property to close
_own,   pay all   bills and   come
The falher of this movement
was James Campbell, and lo this
one man's business acumen Si.
Louis is indebted for some of its
best paying investments. From
mining he drifted  into railroad
Lee Jackman   Prop.
Our Work is Good and our RateH
Reasonable
Suits Cleaned and Pressed
Call and see us.        Next door to
Telegraph office.
I ItfcJutUfcthJHfclhifc Al^ifcAJtih liilnlj tfc_t^fc______ m
Hazelton Land District.     District of
Cassiar
Takenotice that I, Arthur H. Smythe,
of Vancouver, B. C, broker, intend to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over thc following described land-
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner ot Section 36, Township 57, thence west SOchains, south 80
chains, east 80 chains, north 80 chains,
to point of commenceme'it, 640 acres;
claim No. 14.���.a.h.s., n.e. cor.
Arthur H. Smythe.
June 5, 1914. D. O. Wing, Agent.
Hazelton Land District.    District of
Cassiar
Take notice that I, Frederick G. Colquhoun, of Vancouver, B. C, broker,
intend to apply for a license to proBpect for coal and petroleum over the
following described land���
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Section 36, Township 57, thence north 80 chains, east 80
chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, 640 acres;
claim No. 16.���F.O.C. S.W. cor.
Frederick G. Colquhoun.
.lune 5, 1914. D. Q. Wing, Agent.
Hazelton Land District.     Districtof
Cassiar
Take notice that I, Frederick G. Colquhoun, of Vancouver, B. C, broker,
intend to apply for a license to pros-
pi ct for coal and petioleum over the
following described land���
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Section 36, Township 57, thence west 80 chains, nortli 80
chains, east 80 chains, south 80 chains?
to point of commencement, 640 acres;
claim No. 16.���P.O.C.8.B, cor.
Frederick G. Colquhoun.
June 5, 1914. D. O. Wing, Agent.
Toronto
Montreal
Ottawa
THROUGH SERVICE TO EASTERN
CANADA AND UNITED STATES
Trains  leave Hazelton on Wednesdays and Saturdays
at 5.18 p.m.
Use the Grand Trunk Railway System for points east
of Chicago.
FARES:
One Way    Round Trip
$63.75      $92.00 St. Paul
73.55       105.00 Chicago
96.30 New York
70.35
On. W_y Round Trip
$47.75 $60.00
55.55 72.50
73.55 108.50
S. S. PRINCE JOHN leaves Prince Rupert for Vancouver at 9 p.m.
September 29th and every two weeks thereafter
on
For full particulars, tickets, etc., apply to local agent or to
A.   DAVIDSON,   *   GENERAL   AGENT,   -   PRINCE RUPERT,  B. C.
/COMMERCIAL PRINTING OF THE BEST
^    CLASS AT THE MINER PRINT SHOP
Bulkley Valley Farm
Lands For Sale
These Lands are close to the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, which is now running trains through the
Bulkley Valley, There is a ready local market for all produce. Land prices are reasonable. Terms are easy.
Write for full particulars to
NORTH COAST LAND COMPANY, Dd.
Suite 622 Metropolitan Building
p.u up c.piui $1,500,000. VANCOUVER, B. C.
Jt THE OMINECA .MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1914
THE
QUALITY STORE
Highest market prices paid for
Raw Furs
DRY GOODS
Men's Furnishings
Hardware Groceries
cTvTsmTth
GENERAL MERCHANT
HAZELTON
DENTISTRY
DR. BADGERO
Smithers, B.C.
Mines and Mining
Good Properties for sale ��� Cash or on
Bond.       Development and
Assessment Work.
Carr Brothers
Eight Years In This DiBtrict.
Haielton.   II.  C.
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HAZELTON
The Distributing Point
for the Great Northern
 Interior	
Prospectors, Miners,
Landseekers, Surveyors
and Sportsmen will find
the merchants of Hazelton prepared to meet
every requirement in
outfit and supplies. Having been engaged for
many years in outfitting
parties for the Northern
Interior, Hazelton business men are qualified
to give valuable advice
and assistance to newcomers.
Hazelton is situated at
the confluence of the
Bulkley and Skeena
rivers, a mile and a
quarter from South Hazelton station on the
Grand Trunk Pacific
railway. Enquiries
may be  addressed  to
Hazelton, B.C.
ftftft**Mftftftftftft*ft*ft*MftliMftftftM
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
Canadian women have raised
$283,000 for a hospital fund.
Monday   was   Field   Marshal
French's   sixty-second birthday.
Canadian bills are subject to
ten per cent discount in Seattle.
Over two million dollars have
been subscribed to the Canadian
Patriotie Fund.
Governor Glynn, of New York
has secured the Democratic nomination for re-election.
Mayor Baxter of Vancouver
proposes the closing of all bars
in that city at six o'clock.
Heavy purchases of wheat,
presumably for foreign account,
have been made in Washington
and Oregon.
Vancouver has been selected
as the meeting place of the
Dominion trades and labor congress in 1915.
Marine reports say British
ships are receiving charters from
American firms, as if the war
did not exist.
The U. S. revenue cutter Ta-
homa was stranded on one of the
Aleutian Islands and totally
wrecked.   The crew escaped.
A Montreal despatch says the
C P. R. has hired 6,000 extra
men as a means of relieving tha
distress brought about by the
war.
England, in two ships, to follow
different   routes
Polar regions.
to   the  South
The Russian government has
loaned Petrograd banks $500,000
for the relief of distress among
the families of soldiers who have
gone to the front.
Louis Botha, the Boer general,
now premier of South Africa,
is in supreme command of the
British forces operating against
German South Africa.
-It is probable that the peace
centenary celebration, which was
to take place next spring in many
cities in Canada and the United
States, will be abandoned.
o3iiiiiiiiiuii_iiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiico_iiiiiiiiiiiito_iiiiiiiiiiii[o_iiiiiifiiiii-_iiiiiiiiiiii.]|[iiiiiiiiii.o
= _
| Hudson's Bay Company |
GROCERIES   DRY GOODS
HARDWARE
Of Best Quality at Popular Prices
A full Assortment of
LIQUORS ^ "*&��
The Canadian government his
provided for tha taking over and
operation of telegraph and telephone lines in' the Dominion, if
such action proves desirable.
I     HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY     f
| HAZELTON. B. C. |
5-iiiiiiiiiiiir]iiiiiiiiMiiaiiiiiiiiiiiico]iiiiiiiiiiiico]iiiiiiiiiiiiro]iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiii[]iiiiiimiiico
The cutter Corwin, which weit
to relieve the Karluk survivors
and struck an uncharted rock off
Cape Douglass, has been refloated
by the Bear and broght to Nome.
���B"
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
J J\fFffY nnA ^ITA (IF^l We are prepared to supply private
LjIVLaMM Will kJISiULiO and public conveyances day and
night.     Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
Coal and Wood delivered promptly.
Consign your shipments in Our Riiflrlv fir MarlCav
Care for Storage or Delivery.     I\UUUy   Ot   lVlaCJV0.y
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
Address all communications to Hazelton.
Reuter's Simla correspondent
states���"On the occasion of the
Mahometan Festival the mosques
throughout India were thronged
with Mahometans praying for
British victory."
Sir Ernest Shackleton and his
exploring expedition   have  left
Disturbance of the fur trade
by war conditions will seriously
affect the Indians and Eskimos
of the north. The federal government has been asked to make
provision for the natives.
More Mines Resume
Salmo, B. ft, Sept. 26.���The
H. B., Zincton and Emerald
mines are about to resume operations after having been closed
down for the last six weeks on
account of the war having demoralized the metal markets.
Crews have been sent to these
properties and hauling commenced today.
It is reported that W. B. Burnham and partners interested in
the Golden Fawn group of claims
on Sheep Cteek will shortly commence a run of ore through the
Nugget mill. The ore will be
hauled around the mountain from
the Golden Fawn to the Nugget
mill as soon as the road can be
completed. There are six or
seven men at this property now.
W. B. De Witt, one of the lessees of the Porto Rico mine was
in town last week and reported
that a run of ore had been made
through the mill with very satisfactory results.
LAND NOTICES
While assessment work was
being done on the Molly Gibson
claim, Burnt Basin, a ledge is reported to have been struck seven
feet in width, assaying $31. in
gold across the lead. Samples of
the ore can be seen at the store
of McDonell and Costello.���Rossland Miner.
Peace River Land District.   District of
Omineca.
Take notice that D. D. McKinnon,
of Vancouver, restaurant keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 200
feet below the crossing at Old Hogem,
on the south bank of the Omineca river,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, to this
point.
Aug. 22, 1914. D. D. McKinnon.
CANADIAN  PACIFIC  RAILWAY
BRITISH COLUMBIA  COAST  STEAMSHIP SERVICE
^
S. S. "Princess Royal" leaves Prince Rupert every SUNDAY at 8 p. m.
S. S. "Princess  May" or "Princess Sophia" le v s Prince Rupert every
SATURDAY at noon
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
^r
Tickets to and from all parts of the world.
Steamship Tickets
J. G. McNab,   Cor. 3rd Ave. and 4th St.,
Atlantic and Pacific
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Jt
���nOn-
���HO*'���
-uO��-
Thorp & Hoops
Real Estate, Financial and Insurance Brokers
 ALDERMERE, B. C.	
Sole district agents for E. G. Prior & Co., Victoria, Agricultural Machinery and Implements, Wagons, Etc.
Fire,  Life,  Accident,  and Employer's Liability Insurance.
We represent the best companies.
Oil'
We Can Locate You On a Good Pre-Emption Near the G. T. P.
If you desire information about the Bulkley Valley write us.
���MM   i-i-HU----��MU_---HOII*-----��HII-��"-iIiOII HU MQll iiii nn IIH���
M.O
Oii-
Peaee River Land District.   District of
Omineca.
Tuke notice that  Walter Ramsay, of
Edmonton, merchant, intends to apply j
for permission to purchase  the following describtd lands:
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains easterly from the northwest
corner of L. L>. May's application to
purchase, thence south 80 chains, east
80 chains, north 80 chains, west 80
chains along the bank of Omineca river,
to point of commencement.
Aug. 22, 1914. Walter RamBay.
It is reported that the Star
mine, Sandon, will resume operations next week. Also that the
Surprise and other mines there,
which have "been running with
reduced force for the past three
weeks, will put on the full complement of men, and resume
sloping operations.
The Miner is twodollars a year
to any address in Canada; to
United States, three dollars.
Peace River Land District. District of
Omineca.
Take notice that May McKinnon, of
Vancouver, married woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains westerly from the northeast
Corner of I). D. McKinnon'sapplication
to purchase, thence south 80 chains,
west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80
chains along the bank of Omineca river,
to point of commencement.
Aug. 22, 1914. May McKinnon.
Peace River Land District. District of
Omineca.
Take notice that Frank Boston, of
Vancouver, watchman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains southerly from the northeast
cornerof D. D. McKinnon's northeast
corner, thence south 80 chains, west 80
chains, north 80 chains, east Ml chains.
Aug. 22, 1914. Frank Boston.
Peace River Land District. District of
Omineca.
Take notice that H. E. Fetherstonhaugh, of North Vancouner, married
woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchuse the following described
lunds:
Commencing at a post planted 15
miles from mouth of riveron eust bank
of Manson river, thence east 80 chains,
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south
80 chains along bunk of Manson river,
to point of commencement.
Aug. 10, 1914.    H. E. Fetherstonhaugh.
District of
���hQii-
-iiii������nO��-
-uQn-
-llO
^ Drugs and Toilet Articles.   Kodaks,
Kodak Supplies. Printing and Developing.   C| Gram-a-phones  and  Records.
Stationery
The "Up-To-Date" Drug Stores j
On-
Hazelton
���.nil������,iiOm-
L. D. Fulton, Mgr.
���nii_���iiOn���mi-
New Hazelton
-nil������nOn������ im������
!
Harold Pii-. J. R. Graham
PRICE & GRAHAM
B.C. Land Surveyor*
and Civil Engineers
HAZELTON   AND SMITHERS
London Building       ....        Vancouver
British Columbia
X TTTTTTTTTi^WTTi^T^T^H,l|h,M,)(
McRAE BROS., LTD.
STATIONERS &  PRINTERS
Architect.' and Eniiineer.' Suppliea
Kodak., Loose Leaf System.
R.minuton Typewriter*, Office Furniture
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion and British Columbia
Land Surveyors
Offices at Victo. ia, Nelson, Fort George
and New Hazelton.
B. C. Affleck, Mgr.  New Hazelton.
I"
Prince Rupert, B. C.
X -M- :-���>������I���S--I--C-.I-++.|. *.|.-!... ... ��������<��� ���.-. +���. + H
Assay Office and Mining Office
Arls and Cults Building, 578 Seymour Sired
���VANCOUVER, H.C	
J. O'SULLIVAN, F.C.S.
Provincial Assayer and Chemist
Assayer for 26 years with Vivian 4 Sons, Swansea
Charges Moderate    ::    Correspondence Solicited
LAND NOTICES
Peace Uiver Land Distrit t.   Distrit I of
Ominera.
Take notice that John A. Shaw, of
Edmonton, broker, intentls to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted j-to
chains easterly from thc northwesl
cornerof R. D. Fetherstonhaugh's tip
plication to purchase, on south bank of
Omineca river, thence south MO r hains.
east 80 chains, north 811 chnins, west
80 chains  along the bank of  Omineca j river lo point of commencement.
LAND NOTICES
Peace River Land District.    District of
Omineca.
Take notice that William MaeLaren,
of Calgary, broker, intends to apply
for permission to pun.base the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains down  from   H. E.  retheraton*
hangh's southwest corner of application
to purchaae, thence east 80 chains,
north SO ehalna, wesl 80 chnins. south
80  chains  along   thi  bank  of  Manson
river, to pointof commencement.
Aug. 22, 1914. John A. Shnw
Diatrict of
Peace River Lantl District
Omineca.
Take notice that L. W. May, of Ed- Peace River Land Dislrict
monton,   doctor,   intends  to apply for Omineca.
permission   to  purchuse   the following Take  notice that   R. D, Fetherston-
tlescribed lands: haugh, of Vancouver, mining engineer,
Commencing  at  a  post   planted  80 intends to apply  for permission to pur-
t hains  easterly   from  John A. Shaw's j chase the following described lantis:
northwest corner application to   pur-1 Commencing ata  post planted at the
chase, on the south bank of Omineca northeast corner of  D. D. McKinnon's
river, thence  south 80 chains, east 80 application to purchase, thence south Stl
chains, north 80 chains, west 80 chains chaina, east 80 chains, north 80 chains,
along the  bank of Oniineca river, to west 80 chains along the bieik of Omin-
point of commencement. eca river, tn pointof commencement.
Aug. 22, 1914.                      L. VV. May. Aug. 22, 1914.   R. D. Fetherstonhaugh.
Aug. 10, 11114.
William MaeLaren.
District of
Peace Kiver Land District.
Omineca.
Take notice that Henrietta Plumbe,
of North Vancouver, widow, intends to
appl.v for permission to purchase the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest coiner of Fetherstonhaugh's
application to purchase on Manson river, thence east 80 chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains, north 80 chains,
along the bank of Manson river, to
point of commencement.
Aug. 10, 1914. Henrietta Plumbe. THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1914
the ambassador at  Vienna to  make an  energetic  protest against
mines, which prevent the free and safe navigation of the Adriatic.
Vancouver,   Oct.   1
sailings to the north, leaving for Prince Rupert on Monday night.
LOCAL NEWS PARAGRAPHS
THE MINER'S WAR BULLETINS
(Continued  from  Page One)
Dr. H. N. Whitford returned to
Victoria on Tuesday.
T1|i. ;il(..imiii. |vim.(, ,. .������ i:i l()lvslimn|    A. E.Philips is up from Skeena
Crossing for a few days.
George A.   Kerr left for the
London,   Oct.   2:   A   midnight  despatch   from   Paris  says a coast on Tuesday's train,
violent engagement at  Roye,   north-east of  Peronne. turned  in j    C. V. Wright has gone to Vic-
favor of the  Allies  yesterday.    Progress  has  also been made at toria, on his annual vacation,
several points  in the  Argonne region.    Otherwise the situation is I    Howard Campbell returned on
unchanged, but satisfactory.
ANNUAL MEETING
OF FIRE ASSOCIATION
Advices from France say additional Indian troops landed there
on Friday last. There are indications that the recent successes of
the Allies are largely due to the reinforcement of the British
forces. Paris and London are equally confident of a great victory
over the Germans at an early day.
It is again rumored that Italy and Turkey will enter into the
war. In response to the Italian protest, Austria agrees to remove
the mines from the Adriatic and to indemnify the families of Italian
victims. Italy demands an indemnity of a $1,000,000 for the
destruction of ships by mines.
It is announced that within a week a new Russian army of a
million men will join the Tsar's present forces in Galicia and
Poland. After stubborn lighting, the Russians have captured the
German positions in Augustowo and Kopcfz, driving the enemy
hack. The German bombardment of Ossowjetz was unsuccessful.
The forts of the Russian Baltic seaport of Windau are reported to
have driven away a fleet of forty German warships.
German warships and aeroplanes yesterday attacked the
Japanese position near Tsing Tau. An artillery duel continues.
The Japanese siege guns sunk a German destroyer in the harbor.
A Japanese mine sweeper, off Kiau Chau, was blown up. Another
was damaged.
The Germans have bombarded and destroyed
city of Albert, near Amiens.
Wednesday from  Kitsumkalum.
Mr, and Mrs. ti. ti. Little are
visiting Prince Rupert's Exhibition.
Government Agent Hoskins
was a visitor iu Smithers on
Wednesday night.
Mr. and Mrs. Sealy and Miss
Sealy are taking in the fair at
Prince Rupert this week.
James Turnbull and H. C.
Kinghorn, of the forest branch,
lelt on Thursday for Prince Rupert fair.
At Hazelton Hospital, on Wednesday, a daughter was born to
Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Walker, of
Telkwa.
Miss Hogan, lady superindten-
dent at the Hospital, returned on
Wednesday from a vacation trip
to Prince Kupert.
The fire brigade was called out
yesterday   afternoon    to extin-
On Monday evening the annual
meeting of Hazelton Fire Association was held in St. Andrew's
Hall. Satisfactory reports were
presented by the officers. Fire
Chief Sarfeent reported that the
chemical engines and apparatus
were in good condition. The or-
ganiza on has a deficit of over
$100, and the provincial government has been asked for a grant.
Officers of the association for
next year were elected as follows: A. R. Macdonald, president; R. E. Allen, vice-president; Chas. Hick-Beach, secretary-treasurer. R. S. Sargent
was again chosen fire chief and
Messrs Moseley, Martin and
Naylor were appointed in charge
of the chemical engines.
passengers. Several of the injured are in a serious condition.
Boys loosened the brakes of the
freight car, which rushed down
the hill with terrific speed.
unfortified  Kuish a tire which started in Ben
! Peterson's cabin.    Little damage
A  despatch from  Callao,   Peru,   reports  the sinking of  the was done.
British steamer Banklields, off Peru, by the German cruiser
Leipzig.   The crew of the ship was saved.
Austrian troops, in addition to being short of food, are afflicted
with cholera. General von Auffenhurg, commanding the first
Austrian army, is officially reported ill. His ailment is said to be
cholera.
British refugees from Berlin, arriving here, are delighted to
find England still on the map. The Berlin war offices announces
t> the German people that Ireland is in rebellion; a revolt in progress in England, with the British fleet hiding in the Thames, while
the Germans invest Paris. When the German people learn the
truth they may take their revenge on the bureaucrats.
The war office has called for 1000 experienced railroad men, to
operate French railways. Practically all French officials are at the
front.
entv
THE
FREE WAR MAPS
EVERY READER OF THE OMINECA MINER
MAY HAVE A WAR MAP FREE
A map 3 1-3x2 1-2 feet, showing clearly every
boundary, every city, every town, village, hamlet and river in the whole European War area.
Each map in a neat folder of convenient size.
The Family Herald and Weekly
Star of Montreal has secured exclusive rights for the War Map
prepared by the celebrated map
firm of G. W. Bacon & Co.,
L.d.,  of London,  Eng.    It is
beyond question the most con -
prehensive map printed.
The Miner has completed arrangements by which our readers can secure a copy of this
excellent map  free of charge.
Here is our offer good for 30 days only
The price of The Family Herald
and Weekly Star Canada's
greatest newspaper is one dollar a year.
The price of The Miner is two
dollars a year.
We now offer both papers for
one year each, including a copy
of the Family Herald's War
Map, size 30 x 40 inches, in a
neat folder of convenient size,
for only $2 50.
This offer applies to all subscribers, new or renewal, who
pay for the two papers inside
the next SO days from this date.
To follow the war situation intelligently, The Family Herald
War Map is necessary. It should
be  in   every   Canadian   home.
ORDER AT ONCE
The Omineca Miner
Miss Adams, who recently graduated from the nurses' training
school at the Hospital, is leaving
in a few days to visit friends in
Vancouver, before taking up
private nursing.
Miss __vu Martin, of St. Johns,
Mid., has arrived to take training at the Hospital. Her sister,
miss Gertrude Martin, who graduated in 1912, has been engaged
us teacher at the Kispiox Indian
Mission,
W. H. Sharpe, who is an enthusiastic gardener, grew one
hundred pounds of "American
Wonder" potatoes this season,
from three pounds of seed furnished for experiment by the
government.
Ernest Lofquist, formerly of
Hazelton, returned tnis week
from Prince George, where he
has been for some months. Tlie
hockey fans would like to see
Ernie in the line-up again next
season, but he says he is bound
for California.
James A. Macdonald, manager
of Sargent's store at Smithers,
spent a couple of days here this
week, in consultation with the
head of the firm. He says conditions at the divisional town are
greatly improved, and the citizens are looking forward to
renewed growth.
Monday's big windstorm played
havoc with the government telegraph line in the Bulkley Valley.
For the first time since the open-
of the war, The Miner was
without bulletins for two days.
On Wednesday despatches were
obtained via the Alaska cable.
The line to the South was again
in commision on Wednesday evening.    	
W. A. Meeting
The sewing pgrty in aid of the
Patriotic Fund will meet at Mrs.
Hoskin's house at a quarter past
three in the afternoon on Thursday, Oct. 8th.
HAZELTON, B. C.
Ontario's New Premier
Toronto, Oct. 3:-Hon. W. H.
Hearst, a lawyer, minister of
mines and lands in the Ontario
cabinet, has been chosen to succeed the late Sir James Whitney
as premier of Ontario. He is
the youngest member of the
cabinet.
Liberals' Forlorn Hope
Ottawa, Oct. 2:���Joseph Martin, the "stormy petrel" of politics, has been appointed by Sir
Wil.rid Laurier to lead in the
new scheme for the reorganization of the Liberals of Western
Canada. Martin, it is understood, is to be a candidate in the
next election.
To Elect Fire Wardens
Government Agent Hoskins
gives notice that an election of
fire wardens for Hazelton will be
held on Monday next. Nominations will be received at the
courthouse between 10 and 11
a.m., and a poll, if required, will
be taken between 11 a. m. and 1
p.m. Three wardens are to be
elected.
Salmon For Allies
Vancouver, Oct. 2:���The first
cargo of salmon, part of British
Columbia's gift to the Allies,
will leave Vancouver on Oct. 10
and will be shipped from Montreal on Oct. 22.
Street Railway Fatality
Vancouver, Oct. 1:���A street
car used for freight, standing on
a sidetrack, broke away at noon
and crashed into a passenger
car, killing Charles Geall, the
motorman,   and   injuring  nine
Has Good Ore
Henry Bretzins, who returned
on Tuesday from the Babine
range, brought some splendid
ore samples from the Debenture
group, on which he has done
considerable work this season.
He is greatly pleased with his
showing. The Debenture is
about eight miles from the Cronin property, which has been developed considerably this season.
Just Arrived
FOR  FALL AND WINTER
WEAR
Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Sinclair
left on Tuesday for Los Angeles,
where they will reside for some
time. In appreciation of Mr.
Sinclair's valuable service on the
baseball and hockey teams, the
supporters of town athletics in
Hazelton presented him with a
substantial purse of gold, on the
eve of his departure.
A SPLENDID ASSORT-
*"* ment of the celebrated
JAEGER UNDERWEAR,
SOCKS, SWEATER COATS
VESTS, PAJAMAS, etc.
These goods require no recommendation. They are
the best manufactured in
England. ______
IF you have not inspected
our HOBBERLIN samples for Fall and WinterTail-
ored Clothing, you cannot
realize how nobby they are.
NOEL & ROCK
Hazelton, B. C.
��.     _��ll    ���_��_>    Ut-)-  ��fcH  *.��.|l   �����   **m\    ttm\    H *%    I
Phone 300 P.O. Box 1636
HARRISON W. ROGERS
ARCHITECT
Special Attention to Out of Town Clients
Suite One, Federal Block,
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
)*++>(i++*++++++*|.*i''l,++*++**'.-<'
STUART J. MARTIN
Provincial Assayer
HAZELTON       -       B. C.
ai|ii|,itii|ii|iiT**t*i|i*t'4*'t.*>**t*'T*-��'*T*-t*-T*****t**t**t**l**<'0
D. J. Comeau has received assays running from $7.40 to $35
on copper ore from the Comeau
group, on the west side of Rocher de Boule. He has driven 27
feet on a crosscut tunnel, which
Is expected to tap the lead at a
depth of 100 feet. The property
is situated near the Rocher de
Boule tramway.
EXPERT
Watch Repairing
WATCHES   -   JEWELRY
O. A. RAGSTAD,    Smithers
Orders may be left at Noel & Rock's, Hazelton
LAND NOTICE
Hazelton Land District. District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Alexander Austin,
of Prince Rupert, B. c, laborer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
500 feat northerly lrom quarter-way
cabin, five miles south from Fifth
Cabin, Yukon telegraph Una, thenc*
west 80 chains, north 80 chains, eaat 80
chains, south 80 chains, to point of
commencement, containing 640 acrea
more or lass, 4*12
Aug. 18, 1014, Alexander Austin,
The Miner is two dollars a year,
%^AXAAXJLAJ,J.Jt^4-XXXX4.^^XXXAXJLXX^<L-tXa-XJL-tXJL<t^
R. Cuniiingliarn & Son, Ltd.
PORT ESSINGTON Established 1870
HAZELTON
Our Winter Stock of Knit Goods
UNDERWEAR FOR CHILDREN
Knitted suits and dresses, jerseys, sweater coats, warm and comfortable as well
as smart and dressy. We have these in the famous Dr. Jaeger, Stanfield and
Pen-Angle, each make represenling fine value.
WOMEN'S KNIT GOODS
A full range of Jaeger's Underwear, Piece and Union Garments, in every
weight; knitted hats and caps, in the very latest styles. Ladies' sweaters and
sweater coats, golf sets, night robes, dressing gowns, and bedroom slippers.
Dr. Jaeger'i New Catalogues
These catalogues are being
mailed to every availahle address
direct from Montreal. If you do
not receive one,  ask at our store
for a copy. Any of these lines
which we do not stock we supply
at short notice. The prices are
the same all over Canada.
Walk-over Shoes
A shipment arrived this week and embraces some very fine lines for Fall wear
as well as some light weights. The low-heel shapes for ladies should be very
popular.    We have them in button and lace.
Shooting Season
TWO MONTHS MORE OF GROUSE SHOOTING
A good line of shooting coats at $3.50. 12, 16 and 20 gauge shells.
Smokeless Powder, 75c a box.    Rifles and Shotguns at all prices.
R. Cunningham & Son, Limited
*
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