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Omineca Miner Sep 9, 1911

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 VOL. I, NO. 2.
HAZELTON, B. C. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1911.
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR.
1-
IP
iff
V'5
Enthusiasm Aroused In Vancouver by Bowser's Arraignment   of  Reciprocity
BORDEN AND SIR WILFRID
Federal Leaders Continue Busy In Eastern Constituencies ��� Dominion Is
Awaking tc Importance of the Issue���
Campaign in British Columbia
Vancouver, Sept. 8:���(Special
to the Miner) The feature of the
week in the coast campaign was
the address delivered by Hon.
W. J. Bowser at the first Conservative rally in Vancouver on
Thursday. In a vigorous address, amid a riot of laughter and
cheers, the Attorney-general
quoted Laurier's anti-reciprocity
speeches in the House, as reported in Hansard and his public
speeches on the same subject,
concluding with the Prime Minister's reference to reciprocity at
the banquet given by the Canadian Club of Ottawa to Ambassador Bryce in April, 1907, on which
occasion Sir Wilfrid said Canada
would have no more reciprocity
proposals and no more pilgrimages to Washington, but was
looking to the motherland. The
Liberals, said Mr. Bowser, take
joy in recalling the early reciprocity speeches of Sir John A. Mac-
donald, but we don't have to go
so far back to get Laurier's views
the other way.
Reciprocity, the speaker averred, would do incalculable injury
to the growing industries of British Columbia. Under it the Panama canal would be of little
benefit to the ports of this
Province. That the adoption of
the pact would lead to annexation was the view of American
statesmen and leading journals.
Referring to his prosecution of
Canadian Northern contractors
in Victoria for violation of the
alien labor law In bringing men
from Seattle he justified the fining
of the contractors and condemned the Ottawa authorities who,
he said, under a secret order-in-
council, sought to void the Act
by letting down the immigration
barriers.
Are Pleased With
Northern Interior
Laurier in Ontario
Collingwood, Sept. 8:-Sir Wilfrid Laurier has returned to Ontario, and spoke here last night.
He declared there would be no
change in the tariff on manufactured goods until ample opportunity was allowed for examination of the question. He claimed he had rejected American proposals for reciprocity in manufactures.
Among the visitors to the
Miner office during the week
were two coast newspaper men,
W. E. Playfair and Frank Ward,
representing the Vancouver
News-Advertiser and the Victoria
Colonist. They have just completed a horseback journey, undertaken in the interests of their
papers, from Ashcroft to Hazelton, and express surprise and
pleasure at the remarkable evidences of coming prosperity they
saw on their trip. They were
only in town a short time, leaving
for the Coast to prepare descriptive articles on the country
covered by their itinerary.
Southern Salmon Pack
Vancouver, Sept. 8:���(Special
to the Miner) The Fraser River
salmon pack is estimated up to
date at two hundred and fifteen
thousand cases of all kinds, of
which sixty thousand cases were
sockeyes. The Puget Sound pack
was seven hundred thousand
cases, of which one hundred and
ten thousand cases were sockeyes,
ROSS HAS GOOD MEETING
Liberal Candidate Receives a Hearing
from Members of Both Parties and
Proves Himself an Adroit Campaigner.
Says Nothing about Lumber Industry.
IATTVE S1LVE
HUDSON BAY MOUNTAIN
Sensation Caused By Display of Rich Specimens from New Discovery���Confirmation of
Reports Likely to Cauoe Stampede���Assays
Run Well Up In the Thousands
A fairly large crowd last night
listened to Duncan Ross and other advocates of reciprocity in the
first public meeting of the local
campaign. The Liberal candidate did not arrive until nine in
the evening, which made the
meeting a late one. The proceedings were opened by George
Swan, as chairman, and C. W.
Peck gave the first address, his
remarks being confined to generalities. Mr. Ross, in his lengthy
speech, gave his attention mainly to the disloyalty cry, which he
chose to set up as the only argument against reciprocity advanced by the Conservatives. Needless to say, his adroitness of argument did not fail him, and he
succeeded to his own satisfaction i
in vanquishing his man of straw. |
The question of British Columbia's lumber industry under reciprocity was not discussed by the
candidate, but was taken up by
the last speaker of the evening,
John Dorsey, of local fame, who
undertook to show that reciprocity would benefit those who owned timber lands, as eighty per
cent of them were Americans.
His argument was not, however,
a very lucid one. The crowd,
while not enthusiastic, gave the
speakers a good hearing, and
there was frequent applause.
Premier Sots Time Limit
Sudbury, Sept. 8: -In a speech
here Sir Wilfrid Laurier predicted
that the tariff barriers between
Canada and the United States
would be down within three
months. He denied that Canada
was at' 'the parting of the ways."
A Turncl Fatality
Gus Wickham, a Swede, working in one of Duncan Ross's tunnels, was killed on Sunday after
noon. Deputy-coroner Stephenson held an inquest on Tuesday.
The evidence showed that the
unfortunate man picked into a
missed hole, and a verdict in accordance with the facts was
returned, no blame being attached to anyone.
A Convenient Institution
The new free reading and
writing room, over Adams' drug
store, has been successfully inaugurated, and is being used by
many who find it most convenient. It is open to the public
every day except Sunday. The
room is maintained by the Presbyterian church, and no charge is
made for any of the facilities it
offers to the people. The
room is large, well lighted and
ventilated. Files of the local and
metropolitan newspapers are
kept, as well as many magazines
of the better class, subscriptions
to which have been donated by
friends of the movement. Still
other desirable magazines should
be on the list, and the committee
hopes to secure donations of the
amounts necessary to secure
them,
While it has been demonstrated
beyond doubt that this district
is remarkable for the excellence
of its mineral showings, and
while all capable mining men
unite in declaring that its future
as a big producer is assured, the
development of our various camps
has been so gradual and consistent that, although many rich
showings of ore are ready for the
inspection of visitors, and high
assays are quite the usual thing,
there has heretofore been no
excitement such as is caused by
the discovery of rich placers or
native minerals. This state of
affairs obtains no longer. Since
news of a strike of native silver
on Hudson Bay Mountain reached
town a few days ago, and samples of the rich mineral were displayed in the window of a local
firm, little else has been talked
about, even the election taking
second place in the public estimation.
The find was made by Fred
Allan and Phil Hankin, on
ground adjoining the Lakeview
group, eight miles from the railway, on the northeast slope of
the mountain. They staked four
claims, and claim to have the
vein exposed on three. The
discoverers say the ore, which is
a beautiful bornite, carrying a
remarkable amount of native
silver, in leaves and small flakes,
occurs on the footwall side of a
dike of porphyry in a limonite formation. The vein is stated to
have a width of from 22 to 26
inches.
In Harvey and McKinnon's
office, where the ore is displayed
there is a constant stream of
visitors, all of whom wish to
handle the specimens. It has
been found advisable to tie a
string on the largest piece of the
native metal, lest fome absent-
minded visitor shruld collect it,
while some of the best specimens
have not been publicly displayed.
An assay of the bornite gave returns of 5640 ounces of silver to
the ton, equal to a value of
$2932.80. There is also a high
percentage of copper in the ore.
Rod MeCrimmon resigned the
position of superintendent of the
Silver Standard. He left for the
Coast on the Hazelton. George
McBean, the original owner of
the group, is again in charge of
the property for the company.
Among the specimens of high
grade ore brought in during the
week were some fine pieces from
Silver Island, Babine Lake. This
ore, which was obtained by Ben
Siverson, shows a great deal of
wire silver and is undoubtedly of
very high grade.
In Harvey & McKinnon's office
are displayed a large number of
striking specimens of the ores
uncovered on the Rocher de Boule
group, hitherto worked by Trimble & Pemberton and recently
bonded to W. J. Cowan . The
showing on the property is declared by recent visitors to be
truly remarkable.
R. G. Steele, a mining engineer
of wide repute, who last year
bonded two groups of claims on
Hudson Bay Mountain, has returned to the district and expects
to proceed with development
work at once on the High Ore
group, bonded from Angus McLean and Angus Matheson, and
the group acquired from L. M.
Woods and partner. Mr. Steele
is now on the ground, examining
the claims.
Contractor Tells of
Railroad Progress
ijiij
J. W. Stewart, of Foley, Welch
& Stewart was in town for a
couple of hours today, leaving
for the lower end of the line on
the Conveyor. To the Miner,
Mr. Stewart said his firm expected to make good progress
during the coming winter. All
the camps between Hazelton and
Telkwa have been established |
and construction work will soon
be under way on every part of
that section. The contract for
clearing right of way for fifty
miles south east of Aldermere
has been let, and further contracts will be awarded shortly.
It is expected that steel will be
laid to Skeena crossing in time to
allow of the hauling of supplies
to the Bulkley valley camps from
that point during the winter.
Sufficient supplies have been accumulated. Mr. Stewart said, for
the camps as far as Aldermere
and beyond, and it is likely that
camps will be established and
outfitted as far as Bulkley summit, sixty miles from Aldermere,
during the winter.
uuuuuiurUL
FIFRR
ILLLy
Labor Day Sports Attract
Large Crowd, Which Thoroughly   Enjoyed   the  Day
H. B. C. POSTS ARE EM
Hudson's Bay Company Ships Unusually
Large Amount of Supplies to the
Eastern Part of Omineca District,
where Prospectors and Surveyors arc
Busy.
Stewart Telegraph Line Open
The announcement is made by
W. W. Wrathall that the telegraph line from Kitsumkalum to
Stewart, on Portland Canal, is
completed and open for the transmission of messages. The rate
from Hazelton to the northern
camp is $1.25 for ten words.
Mineral Float
There is two feet of high grade
galena in the face of the number
two tunnel on the Silver Cup.
Large specimens of fine coal
from the Copper river measures
are on exibition in Aldous,  Rob- j
ertson and Murray's window.
Good progress is reported from
the Nine-mile road, which is expected to be of use to the miners
as a sleighroad during the coming
winter.
In the Silver Standard shaft,
at a depth of 62 feet, there is now
showing two feet of beautiful
galena, assaying from $160 to
$240 dollars a ton, Specimens of
this ore are on exhibition.
J. S. Cline, owner of the Silver
Pick, reports that the vein,
which was struck last week in
the prospect tunnel now in progress, proves to be thirty inches
in width at that point, with aline
showing of ore,
Likes Northern Country
Vancouver, Sept., 7:-G. T. P.
colonization agent Lett who has
just returned from a trip to the
north, is enthusiastic regarding
the possibilities presented for the
development of the fruit lands of
Lakelse, Kitsumkalum and
Copper River. The railway line
runs through rich fruit producing
country. The Provincial Government set out one thousand
apple trees in these valleys this
spring.
Incendiarism at Nelson
Nelson, Sept., 7: Following
the destruction by fire of the
Hall smelter, and other buildings,
with a loss of nearly a million, an
investigation was held, with the
result that the fire was found to
have been of incendiary "origin.
Several attempts have been made
to set fire to stores and houses in
the last few days, and armed
men are guarding nearly every
house in the vicinity. The chief
of police fears some of his men
may be shot by firebugs, The
Attorney-general's department is
at work on the case.
On Thursday Charleson's pack-
train left for Babine post with
fifty packs of supplies for that
and other interior posts of the
H. B. Co. Mr. Boyd reports that
already three times as much
freight has been sent to the interior posts as in any previous
year, while the Babine warehouse is still full. This speaks
volumes for the activity of prospectors and surveyors in that
part of that district. Charleson's
train has made four trips and
Cataline has taken three cargoes,
while Indians have handled 300
horse loads. Cataline will make
another trio to Babine, with 11,-
000 pounds, and will then take
the same quantity to Fort Fraser.
HAZELTON 10���G. T. P. 5
Borden in New Brunswick
St. John, Sept. 8:   Speaking to
a large audience at Sussex, Mr.
i Borden said reciprocity would
j loosen the bonds of Empire. He
j repeated his pledges of assistance
; in the construction of permanent
highways and in the spread oi
j agricultural knowledge among
i the farming classes. The oppos-
: ition leader will next tour Prince
Edward Island. His reception
j throughout New  Brunswick has
been enthusiastic.
Aeronauts Killed
Mulhausen, Germany, Sept.8:
Lieutenant Neumann, a military
aviator,   was   flying a machine
j with one   passenger when the
(gasoline   tank  exploded.     Both
men were killed.
Chinese River Overflows
Hankow, China, Sept. 8:���
Floods occasioned by the Yang-
tse river overflowing its banks
have done immense damage.
Hundreds have been drowned
and thousands rendered homeless.
Canada Risks its Soul
Montreal, Sept. 8: Rudyard
Kipling, in a cable letter to a
daily paper here, warns Canadians to beware of reciprocity,
declaring that the nation would
be risking its very soul in making such an agreement with the
United States. The commercial,
financial, legal, social and ethical
standards of the American people
will be imposed upon Canada if
the pact becomes law. She would
be throwing away her inherit-
I ance. The adoption of recipro-
j city would mean for Canada a
I very long repentance.
Local Team Wins Good Baseball Game���
Hetherington Wi:-s Race Many Interesting Events Decided Splendid Dance
In Evening Closes Enjoyable Day.
Hazelton's Labor Day celebration was successful and enjoyable
from start to finish. Exigencies
of space prevent anything like an
adequate description of the day's
events being given; it must suffice to say that citizens and visitors alike were highly pleased.
Under the direction of a capable committee the sports came
off in accordance with the program and without a hitch. As
was expected J. H. Hetherington
won the championship of Northern B. C. in the 100 yards in impressive style, with Carson second. He also won with ease the
quarter mile race, Moore being
the contender. Muckleston and
Tibbie were first and second in
the shot put; Mrs. Stickney won
the egg and spoon race, with Miss
M agner a close second; the juvenile races were productive of
much amusement.
The running high jump was a
closely contested and a splendid
exhibiton. W. Picketts won at
5 feet 2 inches, Graham Rock,
who was second, jumped 5 feet
1 inch.
Hazelton lost the tug of war,
the al'-comers team winning first
and third pulls.
The concluding game .of the
season in the "Peavine" league
was the feature of the afternoon
when the Grand Trunk engineers
met the local nine in what proved
to be a classy exhibition of baseball. The score was ten to live
in favor of Hazelton, but the visitors were by no mea.is outclassed. In fact, had they had the
same opportunities for practice,
they would make the local team
work hard to win. Graham Rock,
the new local pitcher, proved to
be a star of first magnitude, hav-
ingthreesti ikes called on twenty
men. Lou Reed, the opposition
slab artist, was no mean antagonist and the Hazelton men were
lucky to get hits enough to win.
The dance in the evening was
the best social event of the summer season, there being a large
attendance, a good floor, and ex-
celli.nL music, the latter furnished
by Mrs. Harvey and Mr. Smith.
To the excellent work of the
various committees is due the
great success of the celebration
and the fact that the Hazelton
Athletic Association, under whose
auspices the sports and dance
were held, emerges from the
affair with money in the bank.
Cnnadic.r. Northern Progress
Winnipeg. Sept. 8:��� Sir Donald Mann, in a newspaper interview here, stated that the
Canadian Northern would be
completed from coast to coast
within three years. He was
greatly pleased with the progress
of the Company's work in British
Columbia. Ninety miles of the
road between Vancouver and
Hope were already graded, and
track laying would proceed rapidly. The first forty miles of grade
on Vancouver Island would be
completed befpre December, THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1911.
The Omieeca Mioeir
Publish��� every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
Macdonald & Rauk, Publishers and Proprietors.
Voters Disfranchised
There is no prospect that the
government will be forgiven for
depriving the west of some 25
representatives in the next parliament. The act is so deliberate,
so unnecessary, and so unjust, so
contrary to the spirit of the con-
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:   Canada and Hritish Possessions, Two Dollars a '��� gtitution   and SO sweening in its
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year. I j.  ..        , ��� ,.   j.v_j.
' I disfranchisement   that   govern-
ADVERTISING   RATES:     Display,  $1.60 per inch  per month;   Reading . .    .,
XT .,      ,,      ,        ,.    ,.    ,.   , .   '  ,?'    ,���   f.        ,,    .        .',, 4 ment supporters in the provinces
Notices, 15 cents per line for first insertion, in cents per line for each subsequent     ���        ,r*  .. ,.,   *
pi
insertion.       Legal notices inserted at I!. C. Gazette rates.
Vol.
Saturday, September 9, 1911.
No. 2.
There are
party is waning
tion.
Liberals Face Defeat
unmistakable
affected refuse to offer any ex
cuse, says an exchange. What
excuse can there be for dissolving parliament in the third year
of the term, when in that very
year the census is taken which
signs that the power of the Liberal! must nearly double the represent-
The party is, in fact, in process of disintegra-; atlonsJ,of ^ur provinces ?   With-
veteran   leader   faces  defeat  fighting to the last, but \ln a few months this  readjust-
without hope of victory.       In the very heart of his Quebec strong-: ment couu d, be, ���     f"d .that
,,,,, .i    /. , i-.i.ii      c    2   i. j   larger   ha f   of   the   Dominion
hold   Bourassa, the tierv malcontent, is the leader of a fast-spread-,   , . ,  . ,       ,,    ,,  .
. . ,,  .    ���      ., ,,    . ��� �� .,     which is concerned could obtain
ing insurgent campaign.       Ontario witnesses the influence of the., ,        ... ,.     ,.
..      .       ���,    ,.       it ���   a i i t ���*. _i   its proper and constitutional m-
anti-reciprocity Canadian League, organized by prominent Liberals;fl    v   *
and gaining many recruits from that party.       In the northwest i    ��� ...',  ~ ,     ,. .   ..
.,     ,   . , ���     .   .,   .      ��� .., .,, v        British Columbia, probably en-
provinces the electors are awaking to the true issue, and there will be  ....  ,,   .    , ,
j .,      , ,     i ,.j   ii d ���*��� i. n i _u- ���    tx. j titled to twelve members or more,
no Liberal landslide there.       British Columbia remains the avowed .     ���       ,     . ,,,       '
,.,,,��� ,��� ,    ���,,    , ,-j/-��� *.-      is allowed only seven.     Alberta,
enemy  of  the  Laurier  policy and will return a solid Conservative      ....   ,,       ' ,     ,.        '
, , ... n ., ���   ,   .      ,,      .,       .   ,. ,        entitled by government estimates
delegation,        I o crown all the premier s troubles, there is bicker- .       ,   ,   "V",     , ,
,        .   .    .. ,,       uf   . ..   ,. j    ..{. j. ..       to at least twelve members, is
ing and recrimination m the cabinet itself and with few exceptions i  ,    ,     .,       , ���   ,'
,. .   .      . j i. .      j    .  .   .v..     ji i also kept down to seven.    Saskat-
his  most trusted  lieutenants are  not ardent in their adherence.    ,        *      , . .   .     ~ . ���
c, ,1     ���     ,.,     ,      i-       ,. u      nva    i aw*        ���.     4.u    i �� chewan,  which is officially esti-
Followmg the desertion of Hon. ( lifford Sitton comes the loss of i     .   ..  , . ,.       ,,.
..      t    ���   r> ��� ��� 4      e       ���        jC.   ��� j d-   ai     mated to have a population calling
Hon. Loins Brodeur, minister ol marine and fisheries, and Sir Alan  .      . ,, r�� ,
.   ,                    . . .        .. ,    ,���         .4,              4.,         ,,              .    i for eighteen members, may have
Aylesworth,   minister ol Justice, with many others of lesser note.      .    *         ���    .. ,         ...   ..
���,;             .,           ,           .,     , .,      1        .               1         j.   ���       ,   ;only   ten.    Manitoba,   with  the
These gentlemen   honor  the  Liberal  party more  by  refusing to   . f. ,     . .                       .   .
.,               .       .4     .,      ,    , ,,      ,,.   ,1   e 11       1 1,   ���      ..,       right to sixteen or more, is kept
indorse   reciprocity   than had they blindly followed their mistaken | ^��  nf n.^ nf ^���m     v���[ ���
leader in his desperate   effort  to  force the unwelcome pact upon
the country.
The Election Issue
Since the proponents of reciprocity practically rest their case
upon the argument that the adoption of the pact would open
new markets to Canadian products, it will profit the voter who
wishes to form a correct opinion on this important question to examine the evidence presented for and against. The inquirer will
at once be struck   with the paucity of
out of six of them. Four prov
inces with a population represented to be about the same as that
of Quebec, are left with thirty-
five members, while Quebec has
sixty-five.
The Economic Aspect
A careful examination of the
trade returns of recent years
information presented I shows that, while there may
by the Laurier government, as contrasted with the voluminous I be individual districts in which
and comprehensive reports prepared by the United States gov-j the Canadian farmer will be able
eminent, by which it was proved to the satisfaction of American J to export his produce in larger
producers that the agreement would be of great benefit to them, i quantities to a section of Ameri-
In great hurry to adopt the pact, the Liberals seek to content the can territory which does not pro-
electors with the assertion that reciprocity will open to Canada a duce the same class of goods, the
market of ninety millions. Let the inquirer consider, however, net result of the "wider market"
that these ninety millions, in addition to supplying their own needs,: will be to widen it on the Cana-
export every year an excess production of over $400,000,000, in- 'dian sideof the line forthe bene-
cluding the very commodities which Canada might expect, under: fit of the American farmer. This
reciprocity, to sell to them. What advantage, then, is Canada to is not a mere speculative opinion;
gain by throwing its comparatively small excess production upon a it is a certainty, based upon as-
market already over supplied? Is it not a certainty that, with ' certained facts. The Canadian
our tariff wall removed, much of that four hundred million surplus j trade returns show that between
would flow into Canada, to demoralize our markets? As Siftonjl9o9 and 1911 Canadian exports
has pointed out, the United States is a much older, vastly more po- of cattle to the United States in-
pulous, immensely richer commonwealth that Canada, and its bus-1 creased by only $48,36o; but Am-
iness life is organized and systematized to a degree of perfection j erican exports of cattle to Cana-
unknown,    perhaps,   in  any   other  country. With unrestrict- da increased in the same period
ed entry to our markets, in natural products, permitted by this a-
greement, the great American organization of capital would simply
take hold of our products and manipulate prices to suit themselves.
Nor would there be any relief from such domination except in an
annulment of the agreement, which might prove a matter of difficulty once the moneyed interests of the United States had secured
a hold upon the coveted  Canadian markets. We believe  the
people of Canada will consider the risk too great to assume.
This is not the time to adopt a new and uncertain tariff policy.
Not only is Canada already prosperous, but she has every assurance ed States in 1911 that in I9o9,
of long continued and annually increasing prosperity by the steady land Canada imported $2,527,846
development of her own great natural wealth. We know now'more of fruit from the United
that as a people we are on the safe road to success. Why then'States in 1911 than in 1909.
should we leave it for another road of which we have no certain Where is the   "Wider Market?"
over.half a million dollars. In
the same period our exportation
of breadstuff's to the United
States decreased by $175,3o),
and American exports of bread-
stuffs to Canada increased by
over three millions and a quarter
of dollars. Canada exported
$182,677 less of fruit to the Unit-
What will happen in the next two
years, if the pact goes into force?
The American mechanic and fac-
knowledge and which will lead us we know not where?
There is a sentimental side to the question, and this also must
be considered. Sentiment has always played a great part in
shaping the world's policies, and will again in this instance, tory operative is not working full
There is no doubt that in adopting the reciprocity agreement Canada j time. Unemployment has cur-
would lose prestige as a nation. By placing our commercial in-! tailed his expenditure; and the
terests in the control of the Americans we should be radically re-: American farmer is suffering in
versing the policy which has consistently been pursued by Canada | consequence. Under Reciprocity
during the past forty years; and we should be deliberately and res-1 the Canadian market will become
olutely turning our backs on Great Britain, on whose aid we leaned i as his very own. Our "protect-
when all other aid was lost, and by whose assistance we secured ed" operatives, with steady em-
the prosperity we at present enjoy. There is a sentimental as-' ployrnent and high wages, will
pect to the question, as may thus be perceived, but it is so intimate- j look good to the the American
ly blended with many years of progress and success that it can not farmer and the food trusts. And
be dissociated from our material welfare. the Canadian Agriculturist will
"If it is true," says a prominent Liberal who refuses to accept have to grin and bear their un-
Laurier's reciprocity dictum, "that it is essential in the interests of '��� scrupulous competition. The
this Dominion of Canada that we should conserve our resources and Canadian operative will send his
work out carefully, painfully and perhaps slowly, the best method
of making them available in order that we may have a strong, virile and well nourished population, it must be clear that this is not'his labour.   The Canadian farm
the time to take down the bars and turn these resources over to.er���the   operative's   best   cus
money to a country that bars out
our manufactures, [the product of
tomer���will have less money to
buy goods with,  and the opera-
the United States,
"If we enter upon trade relations of an extensive character
with the United States, and if all the favorable anticipations which five's will suffer along with the
can be entertained turned out to be well founded, and our friends farmer. "Cheap" food, under
south of the line use us well and give us nearly everything we ask,! such conditions, is "dear"
what is the inevitable conclusion? Must not our trade and bus-1 f����d- ~Ex.
iness and very life become m'xed with theirs, so that we shall become increasingly dependent upon them, with the ultimate end of
political union?
"And if these favorable anticipations are   not realized
Foster on the Pact
In a forceful article on reci-
and procity, the veteran statesman,
they will not treat us well, and want to grab and quibble, on the in- j George E. Foster, deals with the
terpretation of any reciprocity treaty, what will that mean? It question in its three-fold applica-
will mean that ten or fifteen years from now, we shall have to be- tion, its application to Canadian
gin all over again; just where we are now, and start once again to , industry, Canadian transport and
put ourselves right." | Canadian nationality.   He begins
his consideration of the first aspect by asking "Is it better to
have the factory and the industry in Canada or outside of it?"
and he advances a number of
practically unanswerable arguments to show that not only under reciprocity would we lose all
the industrial enterprise- which it
has taken so many years to build
up, and place the Canadian consumer at the mercy of the immense trusts of the United
States, but that with the reciprocity-furnished United States
products we should still have to
submit to a protective duty, and
that this duty would be one of 42
per cent, compared to the present
Canadian one of 27 per cent.
That is, under reciprocity, we
should simply substitute the
United States manufacturer for
the Canadian and increase the
protection 15 per cent.
' 'Is the high protection system
with its effects in the United
States abolished?" asks Mr. Foster, "when a new state of 7,000,-
000 inhabitants is added ? Would
it be lessened or abolished when
the Canadian market of 7,000,-
000 was added to the domain of
the United States manufacturer?
If there is reciprocity in manufactured products between Canada and the United States, there
must be uniformity of tariff in
both countries as against outside
countries. Which would be likely to prevail, the tariff of Canada or that of the United States?"
He shows that not only would
the United States manufacturers
discontinue establishing branch
industries in this country, but
that the Canadian manufacturer
could not hope to push his wares
in the ninety-million market of
the United States and would have
to succumb to competitive pressure.
"To expose our national industrial system to the assaults of
that of the United States," Mr.
Foster says, "seems very much
like a repudiation of the policy of
30 years, a destruction of the vital forces we have been at so
much pains and expense to
create, and an abnegation of our
present and future national
ideas."  	
The President's View
Canadians may find food for
thought in these statements made
by President Taft, speaking on
reciprocity:
"Canada will have 30,000,000
people some day, and it would be
a shortsighted policy that would
fail to provide means to capture
this trade."
"Canada does not and cannot
raise more than one-sixth of one
per cent of the crop of the United States. The United States
exports in Canada fifteen times
as much meat and dairy products
as Canada imports into the United States."
"The world price of whoat,
barley, rye and oats is fixed
abroad, where the surplus o,? the
producing countries is disposed
of, and is little affected by the I
place from which the supply is
derived."
The application of these authoritative statements to the issue as it effects Canada is fairly
obvious. Taft, whose knowledge
of the subject is profound, does
not believe reciprocity will help
the Canadian producer.
A Breach of Faith
Laurier's insistence on the immediate adoption of the reciprocity agreement he attemped to
justify on the ground that he
should keep faith with the United States government. This excuse for attempting to foist upon
the country without allowing consideration an unnecessary policy,
of extremely dubious advantage,
will hardly be accepted by the
electors who have fresh in their
minds his unexplained failure to
keep faith with them. Before
the present agreement was negotiated he solemnly declared there
would be no change in the fiscal
policy without the appointment
of a commission to go into the
matter. It requires some obliquity of vision to see honesty in
the Premier's actions.
_ go to ���I
Adams' Drug Store
The   Choicest  Stationery,
Chocolates and Imported
Cigars.
J. Mason Adams
DRUGGIST
Hazelton
V
Royal
Soft Drinks
��
are  made   here ��� "None   better
made anywhere"
Try our Ginger Ale
Lemon Soda
Cream Soda
On Sale Everywhere
Royal Bottling Works
Hazelton, B. C.
The Last Election
In the election of 1908 the Liberals elected 134 members and
the Conservative 87. According
to the statement of the Clerk of
the Crown in Chancery the popular vote stood:
Liberal 596,533
Conservative    -    -   579,571
Majority -  -   -   16,962
If the parties   had been represented according to the  vote the
membership would have been:
Liberals 112
Conservative -   -   -   -  109
^Coffee
House
t| Where everything is well
cooked and appetizing.
Our Pies, Cakes, Cookies,
Doughnuts, Bread and Buns, are
the best.
Try a pound can of our Special
Blend Coffee. There is none better anywhere.
Hazelton Bakery
Opposite Hazelton Hotel
Quality Right
Prices Right
R. S. SARGENT
GENERAL MERCHANT
/jL, well assorted and complete
stock of General Merchandise
including every requirement of
prospector, miner and rancher.
Buying in carload lots, we can
sell the best goods at ordinary
prices. Years of experience in
this district enables us to anticipate the needs of all classes, and
we can supply everything you
need.
Care is taken in filling mail
and telegraphic orders and in
packing goods for shipment by
river, road or trail.
R. S. SARGENT
Hazelton
Telkwa
fu
\
Vi >
THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1911
H
u
w
Philips & Lindquist
Builders and Contractors
Plans and  Specifications.     Store and
Office Fixtures a  Specialty.
P. 0. box 812 Hazelton
( For Sale
Cordwood
Sawed in Stove Lengths if so
desired
Enquire of
H. COPPOCK, Hazelton
CHURCH OP ENGLAND
ST. PETEK'S, HAZELTON
Sunday Services: Morning at 11 o'clock; Sunday
School  at  2.30  p.m.;   Native  service, 8.30 p.m.;
Evening Service. 7 p.m.
Rev. J. Fihi.ii.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HAZELTON
Services   held   every Sunday evening in   the
Church Room at 7.30 o'clock.
Rev. D. R. McLean.
CHURCH OF ENGLAND
sealey
Services held every Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock
in the church building on Peterson's road.
11. C LUCKRAFT.
���+
The Fast Launch
'Kit-Ex-Chen"
Sealey-Hazelton
Route
Leaves Hazelton at 9 and 11 a. m., and
3:30 and 6:30 p. m.
Leaves Sealey 9:30 a. m., and 1, 4 and
7 p. m. Express Service.
O'Neill & Larocque, Props.
+.~..
Hotel Premier
Prince Rupert
It is the best place to
stay. European and
American plan. Electric
lights, hot and cold running water on every
floor. No extra charge
for bath.     ::   ::   ::   ::
Rates:   $1 to $3 per day
Fred W. Henning, manager
Local and Personal
The Operator arrived on Thursday afternoon and remained overnight.
G. M. Swan has returned from
an extended business visit to the
coast cities.
Martin O'Rielly, a Prince Rupert merchant, was among the
visitors of the week.
R. J. McDonell is spending the
week in the Bulkley, looking after his varied interests.
Angus Stewart arrived on
Wednesday. He has been in
Prince Rupert on business.
The Hazelton arrived from the
end of steel on Monday evening
and tied up until Wednesday
morning.
Mrs. J. W. Austin, who has
spent ���some weeks in Hazelton,
returned to Prince Rupert on
Wednesday.
The Conveyor arrived and departed early on Tuesday morning. She brought a number of
passengers.
A. C. Aldous and F. B. Chet-
tleburgh spent a couple of days
prospecting down the river, returning on Thursday.
Mrs. Starrett, of Babine, has
returned from a visit to the
coast, accompanied by her daughter.   They are spending a few
days at the home of C. V. Smith,
brother of Mrs. Starrett. Miss
Smith returned with them.
T. Dunlop, superintendent of
right-of-way work, started yesterday on a vacation trip to Winnipeg and other outside points.
Contractor J. E. Bostrom, accompanied by Mrs. Bostrom
and their two children, spent
part of the week in town, returning yesterday to their down-river camp.
Hugh McKay ("Sourdough")
is back from a prospecting trip
which took him to the Bear lake
country. The district in which
he prospected is at present difficult of access, but he thinks highly of its future prospects.
in too late to allow of their names
being placed on the list. Since
the expiry of the time for receiving applications, over two hundred local men have applied for
registration. These names will
go on the list at the revision of
November first.
Can Hardly Reach Hazelton
According to advices just received, P. E. Sands, a Seattle
motor car man, left that City the
end of last month with the intention of driving a car to Hazelton. The adventurous motorist
will have a notable trip, but it is
hardly likely he will reach
Hazelton this season. It would
take a remarkable automobile to
negotiate the pack trail which is
the only highway for fifty miles
or more of his proposed route.
Drug Store For Telkwa
The first drug store in the
Bulkley valley will be opened at
Telkwa on October 1st, by J.
Mason Adams, the local pharmacist. The building for the new
store is now in course of erection,
while the stock of drugs and
sundries is here awaiting shipment. A competent chemist will
be in charge of the new establishment.
HARDWARE
The Hudson's Bay Company
Have  just received a large shipment of
hard
araware comprising:
....���<��    $
ft
Hammers, all sizes	
Wedges,    "     "	
Cast Iron Bean Pots, 8 lb to 22 Hi
Saws, 4 ft. to 6 ft. long    -    -    -    -
Rifles, .22 repeaters, [20 shols]-    -
Planes, Stanley's Universal, No. 55 -
Heaters, Airtight I
Stoves, [cook stoves with good ovens
Stove Boards, fancy designs - - -
Axes, from 1 3-4 tli to 5 ft   -   -   -
Also all that is required in the House or Kitchen in Gran
ite, Tin, Sheet Iron, and Galvanized ware. I
���M^���������       mm        ii      ���^W^���^
20 per
.15 "    "
.11   "    "
.90 "  foot
9.50      each
20.00
4.00 upwards
"     17.00     "
$1.75 to $2.75 each
1.00 "   2.25   "
rom
Presbyterian Church  Moves
Beginning tomorrow, theserv-[
ices of the Presbyterian church
will be held each Sunday in the
new church rooms, over Adams'
drug store, instead of the large
hall.      The   new   premises  are'
commodious and easy of access,,
and will be much more comfortable in cold weather than the hall.
SWEEPING REDUCTION IN
HOUSE FURNISHINGS
J. F. Macdonald, Furniture Dealer,   Hazelton
Offers a 25 per cent Reduction in the Price of
Furniture for One Month Only
Now is the time to purchase your Furniture for the winter, We
have a large and varied stock to select from, and we are confident that
our prices will appeal to you. Give us a call or write for quotations.
We guarantee prompt service, satisfaction and attention.
Conservative Association Meeting
Hazelton Conservative Association held a well-attended open
meeting on Thursday evening in
the committee rooms which have
been opened opposite the police
station. R. DeB. Hovell opened
the meeting with a forcible address, in which he presented the
evidence against the Laurier
policy in a most convincing manner, making good his contention
that the Liberal leader and his
cabinet were not to be safely
trusted with the administration of
Canada's affairs. J. F. Macdonald, dealing with the economic aspects of the reciprocity issue,
made a very suggestive speech
against the pact. The meeting
was most enthusiastic, and was
a good indication of the strength
of the anti-reciprocity sentiment
in Hazelton.
Blind Pig Keepers Fined
Although the insufficiency of
the provincial police force in this
district makes it difficult to check
the illegal sale of liquor by unlicensed vendors, an effort is
being made to discourage the
traffic In July there were five
convictions before Magistrate
Allison, while in August one of
the Sealey dealers was convicted
and fined $300, a large stock of
liquor being also confiscated and
destroyed. On Wednesday Thomas Craddock and George Bury
were charged with illegal selling
of liquor at Two-mile, and being
found guilty were fined $150 and
costs,
Omi
ineca
Haztlto
Hotel
CJ This hotel is headquarters for all milling and commercial men
visiting Omineca district.
Good Sample Rooms
Baths and Barkr Shop
Hot and Cdd Water
People desiring to visit Bulkley Valley and points south may
travel by the Bulkley Valley Stage, which leaves this hotel for Aider-
mere and Telkwa every Tuesday and Friday.
J. C. K. Sealy, Prop.
Route Your Freight via the
Steamer "Inlander"
Flat Rate $40 per ton
Prince Rupert to Hazelton
H,
Voters Lists Arrive
The listof voters in the Skeena
district has been printed, and
copies were received during the
week. As the list is the result
of the May revision, there are
many Hazelton men whose applications for registration were sent
Quality Right
Prices Right
TELKWA ST
Having two freight outfits bringing freight to our Telkwa Store, we are enabled to carry a full stock
^msmmmmwmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
fjL* well assorted and complete
stock of General Merchandise
including every requirement of
prospector, miner and rancher.
Buying in carload lots, we can
sell the best goods at ordinary
prices. Years of experience in
this district enables us to anticipate the needs of all classes, and
we can supply everything you
need.
Care is taken in filling mail
and telegraphic orders and in
packing goods for shipment by
river, road or trail.
To Become a Benedict
Richard S. Sargent, a pioneer
of Hazelton, and one of our most
progressive and prosperous merchants, is to enter the wedded
state. Before leaving for Prince
Rupert on Wednesday Dick admitted that he expected to return a married man. He was
given a hearty send-off by a
large gathering on his departure. The lady who is to become
Mrs. Sargent is Miss Emily A.
Barbeau. daughter of Joseph Bar-
beau of Prince Rupert, in which
city the wedding will take place
on Monday. After a brief trip to
Alaska, the bride and groom will
come to Hazelton, where Mr.
Savgent has had a neat cottage
placed in readiness. The people
of the district will unite in wishing Mr. and Mrs. Sargent all
happiness.
A number   of   new   Moore   gasoline
lights for sale at   McDougall & Tate's.   ^=
Fast Freight and Passenger Service
B. Rochester
Manager
R. Cunningham & Son
Hazelton Agents
MEN'S WEAR
that gives Satisfaction,
and Reliable
Boots and Shoes
=^
are Specialties at
LARKWORTHY'S
STORES
Hazelton and Sealey
J
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS
ARGENT
Telkwa
Hazelton
Province of British Columbia
NOTICE is hereby given that all Public Highways in unorganized Districts,
and ail Main Trunk Roads ill organized
Districts arc sixty-foot wide, and have
a width of thirty-three feet on each
side of the mean straight centre line of
the traveled road.
THOMAS TAYLOR,
Minister of Public Works.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., .Inly 7th, 1911.
NOTICE to Creditors, Devisees, Legatees, Next-of-Kin, and Others Having
Claims Against the Estate of Frederick Koeger.
Notice is hereby given that all creditors, devisees, legatees, next-of-kin, and
others having claims against the estate
of Frederick Koeger, deceased, late of
Edson, in the Province of Alberta, who
died at Edmonton, in the province of
Alberta, on the twenty-third day of
August, 11111, are required before the
expiration of two months from this advertisement, to send by post, pre-paid,
or to deliver to the National Trust
Company, Limited, Edmonton, Alberta,
Public Administrator, their names, addresses and descriptions, and a full
statement of particulars of their claims
and the nature of the security (if any)
held by them, duly vended by Statutory
Declaration, and that after the last
mentioned date, the administrator will
proceed to distribute the assets of the
said estate amongst the parties entitled
thereto, having regard only to the
claims of which they shall then have
notice.
Dated at Edmonton, this 26th day of
August, A. D. 1911.
National Trust Company, Limited,
Public Administrator,
Edmonton, Alberta.
Griesbuch, O'Connor & Co.,
Solicitors for Administrator.
Ingineca Hotel
McDonell & McAfee, Props.
<][ The only family hotel in the district. <]] Private dining
rooms. <J Night and day restaurant. <J Good Stable in
connection.      tfl Reasonable rates.      <J Modern conveniences.
nir
Hazelt
on
Choicest of  Wines, Liquors and Cigars
always on hand.
-[3
Hudson's Bay Company's Steamers
"Port Simpson" and "Hazelton'
Flat Freight Rate $25 per ton, plus Railroad Charges
Passenger Fares:   Hazelton to Newtown $11, including berth
Newtown to Hazelton $12.50, including berth
The Str. Port SimpBon meets the Wednesday train and the Str. Hazelton nvnts
the Saturday train.       Passengers will lind accommodation on board stealers. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1911.
Sale of Lands for Unpaid Delinquent Taxes in the Omineca Assessment
District, Province of British Columbia.
Name of Person Assessed.
Short Description of Property.
Taxes
Interest
to Date
of Sale
Statu-
ory
Costs
and
Expenses
I HEREBY (JIVE NOTICE, that on Thursday the 12th day of October, A.D. 1911, at the hour of two o'clock in the afternoon, at the Court House, in the Town of Hazelton, 1 shall sell at public auction, the lands of the persons in the list hereinafter set out, for the delinquent taxes remainining unpaid on the 31st day of December, A.D. 1911, and for interests,
costs and expenses, including the cost of advertising said sale, if the total amount due is not sooner paid.
List Above Mentioned.
Name of Person Assessed
Short Description of Property
Taxes
Statu
Inter
tory
est to
Costs
date of
and
sale
Ex
penses
Spencer, V _  Lot 177, R.
.-..   "   178, It.
V ('oast District  $
V
Heal, Fred. G..
Silverthorn, J.  )
Stuart, Geo. M.
" 2125, R.
" 2121), R.
- " 2127. R.
. " 2128, R.
. " 2130, R.
. "2131, R.
. " 2132, R.
.S 1-2 S E 1-4 Sec.
Dist
Lot
35, Tp. 5. R.  V, Coast
E 1-2
W 1-2
.N 1-2
Jarvis, Jr.,   Arthur M   .Wl-2  "
Thompson, Robt.    1-5        "
Ellis, Claude P   2-5
Fraser, David E      1-5
Burns, E. J   1-5
Holmes, G. G	
Grand Trunk Pac. Dev. Co	
Stewart, Jeanie C  ---
Brown, Julius ...  S 1-2    Si
NW 1-4
- FrSWl-4
252, R.
337, R.
729, R.
728. R.
730, R.
731, R.
799, R.
828, R,
828, R.
828, R.
828, R.
1139,
1143,
2098,
;���. 25,
V Coast
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
District
8.00
10.00
16.00
32.00
16.00
8.00
16.00
16.00
16-00
8.00
6.00
3.60
0.38
.76
.76
1.52
.76
.38
.76
.76
.76
.38
.28
.15
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
Tolal
10.00
18.76
18.76
35.52
18.76
10.38
18.76
18.76
18.76
10.38
8.28
5.75
58.60       2.78      2.00      63.38
R. V Coast District
Heal, Jr., F. G.
25,
36,
Kane, F. B.
N1-2SE1-4 Sec. 26, Tp. 5, R. V Coast Dist,
-"--S1-2NE1-4
~       .   ���   o ..  r, SW1-4 Sec. 30, Tp. 6, R.
Campbell, Robt. F - NW1-4 Sec. 19,   "'
R. V
V Coast District
16.00
30.40
16.00
.80
1.60
.80
.80
64.00
3.60
8.00
32.00
17.90
16.00
4.80
.76
1.40
.76
.03
.06
.03
.03
3.04
.15
.38
1.52
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
18.76
33.80
18.76
2.83
3.66
2.83
2.83
69.04
5.75
10.38
35.52
.85      2.00      20.75
.76      2.00       18.76 Beattie, Alice M.
McCroskie, Edward.
.22      2.00
Sarel, C. W..
Kealy, A. E..
.Sec. 15, Tp. 8, R.
.    " 22,    "   8,
V Coast District     64.00
-    59.20
3.04
2.80
2.00
2.00
7.02 j
69.04;
64.00
ni ,   ,     .    r, Sl-2 Sec. 7, Tp. 9, R. V Coast District.
Diplock, A. B._ Sl-2 Sec. s!     "        "
64.00       3.04      2.00      69.04
McCroskie, E .1-2 Lot 42, Cassiar District  4.80
Williams, D. H. & Hoare, J. H .1-4      "         "         "        12.00
Ainstie, B 3-4 Lots 294 and 297, Cassiar District  24.00
Williams, G. E Lot 397, Cassiar District  123.60
Stevenson, James...
Kirkland,  Elizabeth.
     "425,       " "     	
     "503,       " "     	
Telkwa   Townsite.     Sub.   of   S.   W.   1-4
Sec.  35,  Tp. 5, R. V, Coast  District
(Map No. 817)
Stewart, G Lot 14, Block 15 $
Aldermere   Townsite.      Sub. of N. 1-2 of
N. E. 1-4 Sec. 26, Tp. 5, Range V, Coast
District
, Lots 1 and 2, Block 2	
Spencer, V.,   Broughton, L��� Ouelet J.    ������    4 to 20      "     2, 3 to 20, Block 3
A. & Pink, H     "    1 to 10     "    4, Lot 13, Block 4...
"   15 to 20      "     4, Lot 6 to 15, Blk. 6a
     "     lto20      "     7, Lot 1 to 20. Block 8
"     1 to 20      "     9,	
32.00
16.00
.45
.22
1.80
1.14
8.76
1.52
.76
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
7.02
15.80
27.14
134.36
35.52
18.76
G. W. London, F. Kirkland....
C. Aslbertson & W. P. Ogilvie.
$ 1.00    $    1.45
$   7.00    if   .27   $ 1.00   $   8.27
11.40
" 4 to 13     "   11, Lot 15, Block 11...
" 18, Block 11, Lots 1 to 18,   Block 14      9 55
" 1 to 20, Block 15, Lots 5 and 6, Bk 16
" 8, 11, 12, 14, 16 to 20, Block 16	
" 1 to 8, 11 to 20, Block 17...	
" 1 to 8, 11 to 20, Block 18	
.    " 1 to 20,  Block 19, Lots 1 to 20 Bk 20
" 1 to 20, Block 21. Lots 1 to 20 Bk 22
" 1 to 20, Block 23, Lots 1 to 5 Bk 24
" 13 to 20,   Block 24, Lots 3 to 6 Bk 25
Lot 9, Block  25, Lots 11  to 19, Block 25      a 05
Lots 1 and 2, Lots 6 to 20, Block 26	
Blocks 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33,and 34	
21.15
.49       1.00       12.89
1.00       10.4
.94       1.00      23.09
.29      1.00
9.34
Hoare, J, H._
McCroskie, Alice .Lot 3, Block 2 	
Smith, G. W     "13,    "    16	
Rood, Kenneth      "15,    "    16 	
Hemsworth, J. H  ...Lots 9 and 10, Block 18, Lot 20, Block 25
Flewin, Helen Lot 7, Block 24	
Burns, R. M._   Lots 11 and 12, Block 24	
Frizzell, Sarah.... Lot 10, Block 25	
Phelan, Oli. E._ Lots 4 and 5, Block 26.	
Hazelton Townsite
Mcintosh, Angus  Lot 55, part of Lot 62 $
Sub-division of Lot 38, Cassiar District
Charleson, A. J. .Lots 27 and 28, Block 24 $
Sub-division of D. L. 102, Cassiar District
Plan No. 812
 Block
Charrist. A. W	
Dickey, A. P.""	
Cannon, J.. -	
Hewiston, Mrs. G. L 	
Hall, CM.
Adleberg, Philip & Martin, Morris
Labiossie, A  -	
Williams, D. G	
Hammersley, A. St. G.
3 3
7	
.    "       8	
.    "      9	
.    "     12   	
.    "     21	
.    "     32    	
Sub-division   of   Dist.   Lot 103,   Cassiar
District.    Plan No. 805.
Lots 6 to 10,  Block 2, 23 and 24,  Block 7
-    "23 and 24, Block 15, 1 to 3, Block 16
"   8 to 12, Block 19, 7 to 11, Block 26
"    "32 to 36, Block 26, 2o to 24, Block 30
.    "   5 to 9,  Block   36,   1   to  4, Block  43
"    "   24 to 28, Block 48, 11 to 14, Block 52
"   16 to 20, Block 56, 35 to 39, Block 62
"    "   5 to 9, Block 67, 14 to 18,  Block 70
Lots 11 to 15, Block 2, Lots 15 to 19, Bk 4
13 to 17, " 7
2 to   6, " 14
1.20
.90
1.20
1.20
.60
1.35
.90
14.40
6.00
1.35
.60
2.40
.60
2.4o
1.20
1.2o
2.4o
1.00
2.20
1.00
1.90
1.00
2.20
1.00
2.20
1.00
1.60
1.00
2.35
1.00
1.90
1.00
16.90
Bennett, Elizabeth
Mason. Henry    	
Mason,  William	
Coraveau, G.	
Lindseth, Clara E..
Jackman, W. T....
Barber, H. J.	
1.50
$   .43   $ 1.00   $   7.43
$   .05   $ 1.00   $   2.40
Barber, H. J. & Ogilvie, W. P.
Hatney, P. T. & Ogilvie W. P..
Brown, E. N	
Sub-division   of   Dist.   Lot   103,   Cassiar
District.    Plan No. 805.
Lots 21 to 25, Block 2, Lots  3 to 12, Bk 3
.    "   23 to 27,     "     3,    "    33 to 37, "   3
"   20 to 24,     "     4,    "      2 to   6, "   6
8 to 12,
9, 10 & 13,
1 to   5,
7,
8,
12,
18 to 22,
19,
7 to 11,
22 to 24, " 14, " 1 to 12,
14 to 18, " 16, " 7 to 11,
17 to 24, and 28 to 48, Block 18.
1 and 2, 18 to 27, Block 19	
5 to   9, Block   20,   Lot  8,   Block
1    to   4,    20    to    34,    Block
"   40 to 41. Block 24, Lot 42 to 48, Bk 26
.    "    1     to    3,     13    to    22,     Block    27
"   9    to   13,     19    to    23,     Block    28
"    15 to 19, Block 30, Lot 1 to 5, Bk 31
"   21 to 24, Bk 31, Lot 1, 17 to 21, Bk 32
"    "   13 to 17, Block 34, Lots 14 to 18 and
Lot 24, Block 35
"   3 and 4, 20 to 22, Block 80, Lots 11 to
15, Block 38
"   30  to 39, Lot 48, Block 38, 21 to 24
Block 39
" 29, 35 to 39, Block 39, Lots 15 to 18
Block 43
"   42 to 44, Block 43, Lots 1 and 2, Bk 44
.    "   8   to  12   and   28   to   32,   Block   44
"   7 to 11, Block 46, Lots 2g to 37, Bk 45
Lots 43 to 46, Bk 15, Lots 1, 17 to 21, Bk 47
" 1 to 5, " 49, " 3 to 12, " 51
"   22&28,  "   51,    "     1 to   4,       " 52
25 to 28,
22 to 26,
0&10,
52,
53,
56,
7 to 10,
16 to 19&23,
21 to 30,
53
55
56
36 to 40 and 46, Block 56
1 to   4, Bk 57, Lots 45 and 46, Bk 67
11 to 13,    " 58,    "    19 to 23,     " 58
7 to 11,
12 to 21,
19 to 23,
1 to   5,
4 to   8,
3 to   6,
60,
63,
66,
63,
70,
71,
20 to 28,
18 to 22,
10 to 14,
16 to 20,
19 to 22,
22,
62
64
67
68
70
71
1 to  4,   " 72,
10 to 11,   " 74,
8 to 12,     " 73
Lots   5 to   9, Bk   4, Lots 45 to 48, Bk   4
.    "     1 "      6     "     11 to 15    " 12
"   13 to 17  "    19    "    48 " 19
1 to  4
1 to 5
2 to  6
20
39
47
2 to 6 " 32
4 to 8 " 40
13 to 17   " 51
20 to 24 " 57
3 to 6 " 59
10 to 14   "    72
24
15 to 19
' 58
1 67
16 to 20
14
27&28
11
12
28
47
66
11 & 12 " 20
5  &   6 "43
21 to 22 " 49
16 to 19 " 72
LotB  28  to  32,   Block  3,   Loll  43  to   48,   Block   3
1   to    4,       "      4,       "    84, 4
"     40  to  44,       "      4.       "    12  to   16, 0
14 to 18.
17 lu 21,
15 U. 28.
44.
211 to 22,
to 26,
to 9.
to    7,
1!)   lo
1   to
33 to 37.
22 mill 8ft
IS  to  21,
17   to 21,
2il to 22,
111 mill II.
14,
16,
16,
211,
26,
86,
38,
46,
44,
45,
61,
10 10 14.
18 to 22,
84 10 38,
38 to 42,
1 unil 2,
12 to 16,
8 to 12,
6 to 10.
9 to 13,
15 to 19,
40 to 43,
29 to 36,
12 to 19,
38 to 42.
16 to 24,
u and 10.
31 to 36,
17 to 19,
Lots   1 and 2, niock 59,
"     12. "    60,
"    46  to 48.       "    62,
13  to   17.
1   to    4,
23 ami 2-1.
17 to 21,
23 anil 24,
1   1.1    4,
28  to  32,
1,
11,
20 ami 21,
23 and 24,
31  to 88,
6   to    8,
1   to    3,
10,
64,
67,
71,
72,
74
19,
68,
63, -
8.
49,
I,
38, ���
24,
20  to   21.
88 and 24,
23 ami 24,
13  to   18,
10.
30,
15  to  19,
40,
62,
16. 17, 20,
4  to    7,
$21.00
14.80
32.4o
22.6o
21.oo
19.4o
21.8o
I8.00
19.8o
18.80
12.4o
23.4o
14.8o
6.60
13.4o
17.40
12.4o
6.60
3.oo
16.00
11
16
16
19
22
20
39
43
45
46
62
65
56
67
IrfjtH 7 lo 11, lllock 59
" 2 to 14, " 62
"      1, "    63
66
67
70
71
73
Lota     14,      lllock      40
Lots   18 ami 14, Block 2i:,  Lots   15   to   18,    Block 28
7   to    9       "    43,       "    12  to   14,       "     66
6.80
.45
1.00
1.20
.60
.90
.90
1.90
3.60
81
66
$
1.00
1.00
Loo
l.oo
1.00
l.oo
1.00
$
1.60
3.40
I.60
3.4o
2.20
2.2o
3.4o
35 to 39,
6 to 10,
45 to 48,
33 to 37,
15 to 19,
24,
18 to 24
16 to 20
3 to   7,
12 to 16,
11 to 16,
1 and 2,
12 to 14,
40 to 44,
11 to 15,
1 to   3,
4,
12,
16,
19,
24,
28,
34,
38,
44,
47,
49,
51,
59,
62,
68,
70,
1, " 18
5 to   9, " 24
27 to 31, " 26
1 to  4, " 30
1 to   3, " 35
11 to 15, " 39
13 to 17,
4 to   8,
26 to 28,
30 to 39,
5 and 6,
8 to 12,
21 to 22,
6 to  9,
44
48
49
67
60
64
68
74
$ 7.2o
12.00
I0.80
12.oo
9.oo
7.7o
7.7o
8.4o
8.I0
4.5o
$ l.oo   $   8.2o
l.oo 13.00
l.oo II.80
l.oo 13.oo
l.oo lo.oo
l.oo 8.7o
.22      l.oo 8.92
l.oo 9.4o
.22      l.oo 9.32
l.oo 5.6o
.33
.33
.33
.33
.63
Gabie,  W.  G    "    25,               "   49,     "    8.               "    nil 1.50
Oxley, Thomas  H..   "   25 to 27,     "18,  i.bo
Sub-division of E. 1-2 of Lot 104, Cassiar
District.     Plan No. 797.
Bauer, W.A., Roberts,J.P., & Pindloy,J.BIoeki 1, 2, 3, 4. 6. 6. 7, 8, 11. 10, 11, 15, 16 and 17*64.23 $9.76
Sub-division of  Lot 507, Cassiar District
D. A. McPhntter... Block 6 8 .46
llutton, George   "11  .45
Emerson, E. Lots 1 to ft Block 46  .72
    "  10 to 12.     "46  .27
Ward, Mrs.  C.    "  13,             "46  .30
Emerson,  E    "   14,             "  46  .25
Hazelton, B. C, August 29, 1911
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
I l.m
I 1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
Total
$   .33   $ l.oo $22.33
l.oo 15.8o
1.4o      l.oo 34.8o
.78      l.oo 24,38
.63      l.oo 21.63
l.oo 2o.4o
l.oo 23.13
iToo 19.33
l-.oo 21.13
l.oo 2o.l3
l.oo 13.4o
l.oo 25.o3
l.oo 15.8o
l.oo 7.6o
l.oo 14.4o
l.oo 18.4o
l.oo 13.4o
7.6o
4.oo
17.00
22.38
14.0T,
19.00
18.62
22.87
13.00
17.73
1.00
7.06
1.00
1.46
1.00
2.00
1.00
2.20
1.00
1.09
1.00
1.90
1.00
1.90
2.60
2.80
I 1.46
1.46
1.71
1.87
1.80
1.86
C.   W.   HOMER,
Assessor and Collector,  Omineca Assessment District.
II ���!���   I      ���
Tib�� Omioeca Miner
Commercial Printing
in the latest approved style
L
1
JM
rj.l
mm*
a   n ijjBijii-�����- >mmmmmmm<tmtmtm THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1911
ri
It is important \
for you to j
K.               that I have stock and i
1VI1UW appliances to turn out :
all kinds of CARRIAGE WORK, t
special     Sleighs,    Wagon     and j
Sleigh  Brakes,  Etc. j
C. F.WILLIS |
General Blacksmith [
Repairing                      Job Work j
Horseshoeing a Specialty       ' I
HAZELTON, B. C. j
Mines and Mining
Good Properties for sale -  Cash or on
Bond.       Development and
Assessment Work.
Carr Brothers
Six Years In This District.
Hazelton, B. C.
JOIN ONE OF OUR
SUIT CLUBS
You may get a $20 Suit
for $2 or $3
Drawing Takes   Place  Every
Saturday Night
Noel & Rock
Hazelton, B. C.
F. W. HART & CO.
Furniture
and House Furnishings  Complete
Funeral Directors, Embalmers
Special attention to orders from out of
town.
Prince Rupert
Not a Necessity
Uncle Sam knows perfectly
well that his storehouse of raw
material is today pretty well
within confined limits. He
knows perfectly well to keep up
the trade of his industrial centers
and the power and influence of
his cliques and combines, he must
for economic reasons, secure new
warehouses and stores chock full
of raw material. He turns to
the Dominion of Canada with its
unlimited resources. Uncle Sam
is always on the lookout for No.l.
I say today, if one examines this
question from the standpoint of
some of the leading authorities of
the United States and if he takes
their views of the economic situation seriously he is bound to
come to the conclusion that they
are within easy reach of the end
of their natural resources. There
is absolutely no question that
within the next few years,
whether they like it or not, if
they propose to keep their factories busy and railroads turning
over dividends they must come to
Canada for the raw material and
that being the case there is absolutely no necessity why we should
take down our tariffs. On the
contrary, there is every reason
why, if possible, we should build
them higher than ever. If you
look at this from a business view
or from any angle you must come
to the conclusion that in respect
of the argument in dollars and
cents we have nothing to gain
and every thing to lose.���Hon. R.
McBride.
Mr. Borden's Position
In a speech at Woodstock, Hon.
R. L. Borden, dealing with Sir
Wilfrid Laurier's argument that
all the Canadian statesmen in
years gone by wanted reciprocity, said:
"We did want reciprocity but
that was before we found ourselves, before we found the British market, before we realized
what inter-provincial trade and
intercourse meant.   We did want
it then, but is that any reason
why we should want it now."
Cries of "No" answered this
enquiry, and Mr. Borden pointed
out that since the time when
reciprocity had seemed desirable
Canada had grown .and prospered.
"Would you expect a healthy
young man ready for a substantial meal to be satisfied with the
nursing bottle?" asked Mr. Borden, and the audience laughed.
"I say the effect of this agreement will be to create a greater
surplus in the United States for
export."
"Because we do not doubt the
loyalty of the Canadian people
we have forced the government
to bring on this election," continued Mr. Borden. He said that
Sir Wilfrid Laurier now proposed
a policy which would make Canada merely a commercial appanage of the United States.
"We hope," he said in conclusion, "that the people will on
September 21 send a message to
president Taft and the King that
although the ruler of a foreign
country has declared the tie
between the Empire and the
mother country to be light and
almost imperceptible yet that
tie is stronger than ever
before, and shall never be
broken."
Local and Personal
W. S. Harris returned on Monday from Prince Rupert.
Mrs. and Miss Driver left for
the coast on Wednesday morning.
Miss Germain, of Toronto, has
joined the hospital staff as nurse-
in-training.
Dr. Wallace, superintendent of
the Telkwa Hospital, was among
the Labor Day visitors.
Mrs. and Miss Sharpe returned
on the Hazelton from their holiday visit to the coast cities.
Mrs. Hirst, a daughter of Mr. and
Mrs.  Sharpe,  came with them
from the coast, and will spend a
short time here.
Frank L. Charleson and Mrs.
Charleson returned to Telkwa on
Tuesday.
Wm. Paterson, of Twenty-
mile, came in on Tuesday to arrange for supplies.
Miss Soale, the Mission School
teacher1, is back from her vacation trip to the outside world.
George Smith, a Francois lake
settler, is in town and confirms
the optimistic reports from that
district.
The first life insurance man to
begin business in Hazelton, R. C.
Bean, left on Tuesday for Prince
Rupert.
W. J. Lynch, a passenger on
the Hazelton, comes from Seattle
to take the position of accountant at Sargent's.
C. D. Clarke, who recently
bonded the Dominion group from
Carr. Bros, has returned for a
time to Montana.
Deputy Returning Officer Parker says the location of the polling place for the election has not
yet been decided.
Miss DuVernet, of Prince Rupert, daughter of the Anglican
bishop of this diocese, is a guest
of Mrs.  (Rev.) John Field.
The Cullin ranch at Kispiox is
one of the numerous properties
acquired by H. Coppock, who returned on Tuesday from a visit to
that place.
On Tuesday J, C. K. Sealy returned to the Bulkley valley,
where the supervision of ranch
work and improvements demands
a good deal of his attention. H.
B. Rochester, manager of the
Inlander, accompanied Mr. Sealy
to spend a few days at the ranch.
Thos. W. Heme, formerly assessor here, has been gazetted
acting government agent for the
Fort George division of Cariboo,
and acting deputy commissioner
of lands for the Fort George division of Cariboo and the Peace
River division of Cariboo-Cassiar.
& EXPRESS CO.
HAZELTON, B. C.
9
Stage leaves every Friday and every Tuesday morning
at 8 o'clock for Aldermere and Telkwa. Returning,
leaves Aldermere and Telkwa Tuesday and Friday
arriving  here  Wednesday   and   Saturday   at   noon.
Horses for hire for private parties.
Horses, Oats, Wheat and Bran for sale.
E. E. Charleson, Manager
tr
=\
Fairbanks-Morse
Gasoline Donkey
The lightest, most compact
hoisting apparatus
obtainable
'^p|'H- \    N�� Licensed Operator Required
H Tw p. lip W' Used by the Dominion and Pro
lK~" VrV'C'^V^'V^^Sw^V*'^"4';***'.:--.! vinria      I invprnmpnts
Can  be also   used   to pump water, saw wood or
clear land
Largest stock of Gasoline Engines and Machinery west of
Montreal
For particulars write
The Canadian Fairbanks-Morse Co., Ltd.
101-107 Water St.
Vancouver, B. C.
v
*r  $2 a year
'^^^^^^^S^MMMMMMMf^M^M^MMM^^Mi^MM^^^M^^M-^^^^^^^MMiMMMm
aata SB
w
It takes only $25 cash and $25 monthly papents to purchase
===== five lots in five
mxx'ji
Eua*
Real Estate
Mines
One shrewd and successful investor
has just purchased from me fifty
lots in these towns
Insurance
Loans
Bfcfel
For full information, maps, circulars, etc., call or write to
E. H. Hicks Beach
Agent for Grand Trunk Townsiies
Hazelton, B. C. Notary Public
Investments
ggglEgg^W^JgBftlfig^^ THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1911
Why Buy a Ready-Made Mackinaw Suit when you can buy a
Tailor-Made
Mackinaw
Suit at
The belt Mackinaw
manufactured
An Aerial Record
Boston, Sept. 7: Graham
White, the British aviator, at the
Boston-Harvard aeroplane meet,
flew thirty-three miles, with a
passenger, in the remarkable
time of twenty-eight minutes.
A. Chisholm
General   Hardware
Builders'   Material
Miners'   Supplies
Hazelton, B. C.
I
Pope Nearing His End
Rome, Sept. 8: Owing to the
advanced age and illhealth of the
Pope, it is apparent that the
election of a new head of the
Catholic church will soon be
necessary. It is believed the
choice will fall on Cardinal Rani-
polla.
Insurrection in China
Peking, Sept. 7: Disorder in
the province ofj Sze-Chun is becoming serious and missionaries
have been ordered by the Viceroy
to concentrate in the larger
towns. Eighty Canadian missionaries are in the affected districts, and some fears are entertained for their safety.
Local and Personal
Fifty-one Bunks of
Solid Comfort
Clean Beds, Clean Bunks,
Tobaccos, Cigars, Candies,
Nuts, Soft Drinks, Fruits in
Season, etc., etc.    ::    ::    ::
Grouse Season Opens
The toothsome  willow grouse
may now be hunted legally, the
season   having   opened   on  the
first.    In the immediate vicinity
of Hazelton the close hunting of
past seasons has made the birds
rather scarce and  shy,   and the
\ hunters who have been out dur-
I ing the week have not met with
I much success.    Much larger bags
I will be obtained by those who go
further afield, as the game is reported  quite plentiful  in many
parts of the district.
The Grand
Oppoiite  Hazelton Hotel
Ferguson & Steele
Proprietor*
For Sale
Ten Acres Cleared
Land, two miles from
Hazelton.      Apply to
H. Coppock.
/r
=\
Hazelton's Favorite Resort
GALENA CLUB
BOX BALL
POOL AND BILLIARDS
Soda Fountain Equipped to serve Finest Ice Cream  Sodas,
Sundaes, etc., etc.
Our specialty is the best Confectionery,   including   unrivalled
Imported Chocolates.
Choicest Egyptian and other. Imported Cigarettes    Fine Cigars.
Books, Magazines and Periodicals
\
D. J. McDougall
E. J. Tate
J
^ Within a short time navigation on the
Skeena will close.
Are you prepared for this?
Order that Sleigh Now
^ Have you secured your bob sleds, your
cutter or that light sleigh you wanted?
If not better do it at once.
If Telegraph your order at our expense.
Aldous, Robertson
& Murray
Hazelton.     -   -   B. C.
A large party of young people
is picnicking today at Kispiox.
Mrs. (Rev.) John Field and
Mrs. E. E. Charleson left today
for a week-end visit to Telkwa.
Harry Jones has returned from
the coast, and is now on his way
to Glentanna, after spending a
few busy days in Hazelton.
C. W. Peck, of Prince Rupert,
accompanied Duncan Ross on his
trip up the river, and remains
over in Hazelton for a day or
two.
Efforts are being made to secure the laying of a sidewalk on
West Omineca street for the convenience of many residents on
the reserve.
The Port Simpson arrived from
the end of the steel at four this
afternoon,   with   a   number of
| passengers and a large amount
of freight. Owing to the low
stage of water she was compelled to tie up at the upper landing.
After spending ten days at
Telkwa, R. S. Sargent returned
to town on Tuesday. His new
store at the up-river town is already doing a rushing business,
he reports. J. A. Macdonald,
who is in charge, is a merchant
of experience and ability.
W. H. Morrison, the Y. M. C.
A. representative on this section
of the G. T. P., is in town today.
1 He states that the organization is
about to open club rooms at Skee-
j na crossing, for the benefit of the
large number of men employed on
railroad work in that vicinity.
A telegram from Prince Rupert announces that H. S. Clements, the popular Conservative
candidate for this constituency,
accompanied   by   Wm. Manson,
. M. L. A., is on his way up the
river, and expects to be here on
Tuesday. He will address the
electors at a public  meeting in
I the auditorium.
The launch Rambler, brought
from the coast for work on Francois lake, will be overhauled at
once, and the owner, R. H. Ger-
\ ow, expects to send it in to the
lake as soon there is sleighing on
the new road from Pleasant
Valley. Francois is a splendid
lake for boating and the Ranbler
should prove profitable.
Advices from Vancouver indicate that the exposition authorities failed to give the ore exhibit
the prominence it deserves and
which it was promised. Visitors
to the fair state that the exhibit,
which is of great variety and interest, is relegated to a corner
of the building in which patent
wash boilers and other miscellaneous matter is shown.
W. J. Carr, who again had
charge of the Bulkley valley road
work, has completed the season's
improvements and brought the
road equipment to headquarters
early in the week. The appropriation was sufficient to cover
work on the road as far as Spring
Hill, to which point there is now,
according to those who use it, an
excellent highway.
Morgan O'Brien, the well
known Bulkley valley rancher,
came in o n Wednesday, and
leaves today for the coast, which
he has not visited for six years.
He will visit his eastern home, and
does not expect to return until
spring. Mr. O'Brien, who knows
the Bulkley valley well, is extremely optimistic about that
section of the country, going so
far as to predict that the center of
industry and population in the
Omineca district will be found
there after the completion of the
railroad.
The Last House of Commons
Following  is the standing of
the House by Provinces:
Liberal. Con.
Ontario   -  -   -   - 36 50
Quebec   -   -   -   - 54 11
New Brunswick -  11 2
P. E. Island - -   -  3 1
Manitoba -   -   -   -  2 8
British Columbia -  2 5
Saskatchewan -   -  9 1
Alberta   -  -  -   -  4 3
Yukon 1 0
^wagg&i^i^^ |
$
I
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Real Estate
and Mines
Hazelton, B. C.
%&8^^@��v&$^m^
m
FOR SALE - Stable and
contents.    Easy terms.
H. Coppock, Hazelton
J. W. AUSTIN
Provincial Assayer
Prompt and reliable work
Hazelton, B. C
Beautiful Designs in Engagement
and Wedding Rings. High grade
Watches. - - Watch Repairing.
0. A. RAGSTAD,    Hazelton
Ready for Building in the
V New Town
Get prices from us before you build in New Hazelton.        We
are ready with the goods
^
**=
Interior Lumber Company
Hazelton
k-jtSz^mmss&^KMmzj^ tsi^aassiZK**-���~sus.^nm.i.:nssi
ISSUES
TICKETS
HAZELTON HOSPITAL
for any period from one month upward at SI per
month in advances This rate Includes office consultations and medicines, as well as all costs while
in the hospital. Tickets obtainable in Hazelton
frum E. C. Stephenson and Fred Field; In Aider-
mere, from Rev. F. L. Stephenson, or at the Hospital from the Medical (Superintendent
Stephenson & Crum
Undertakers and
Funeral Directors
Special attention to Shipping Casus
Hazelton, B. c.
@.^.n��fc.ir
Draying
have just what you are
looking for in
Children's Hats
and Caps
Neat  and  Attractive
R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd.
Hazelton
MLi*iSaBstft��'.a5NBWi^^
All orders promptly and carefully '
executed j
E. C. Stephens (
Leave your orders at C. F. Willis' J
Blacksmith Shop |
������m^r-~^-,rr.-���-^J��~-,..^. ���,��� ..j)   -_.. v ������  T|LJ..,
lash and
mi i acrary
Hazelton's New Industry
For Fine  Cigars,  Cigarettes
and Tobaccos go to
G.T.P.
Cigar Store and
Pool Room
I       .	
|    Soft Drinks, Confectionery,    j
| Books and Magazines
Baths In Connection
j J. B. Bran,
Proprietor j
Full stock of all kinds and sizes of Window
Sash, Doors, Office Fixtures, Interior Finishings
on hand or Made to Order.
Large stock of Lumber and Building Materials, Tinsmithing, Plumbing and Steamfitting.
Job and Shop Work a Specialty.
Plans and Specifications.
Stephenson & Crum
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS
Hazelton
nr
i ii
<sj
r

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