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Omineca Miner Oct 24, 1914

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THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER IN NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. IV, NO. 8
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1914
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
A DREDGING SYNDICATE
Coast People to Work Extensive
Area in Omineca River
Goldfields
A notable addition to the concerns operating in the Omineca
river placer fields is the Omineca
syndicate, headed by Messrs Roe
and Abernethy, of Port Moody,
with H. B. Perks as mining engineer. Accompanied by F. W.
Valleau, formerly gold commissioner for this district, Mr. Perks
spent some weeks in the district,
with which he is well acquainted,
acquiring six five-mile dredging
leases on the Omineca, between
New Hogem and Germansen.
Returning a few days ago, Mr.
Perks told The Miner that, judging from his experiences last
season, he thought the dredging
area of the Omineca would prove
greater than that of California,
comprising at least 32,000 acres.
The surface showings are very
good. In his opinion, while the
value of the ground is not yet
demonstrated, the profits will
exceed those of the California
dredging enterprises. He has
every confidence in the future of
Omineca district.
POPOVICH TO HANG
ON JANUARY EIGHTH
A Clinton despatch says Justice Clement sentenced Nick
Popovich to be hanged on January 8 for the murder of Mike
Turklja near Endako. The trial
lasted two days, many witnesses
being examined. Constable
Brown, who worked with Chief
Minty in preparing the evidence,
assisted in the prosecution. The
judge commented favorably on
the care with which the case had
been handled by the police.
Patriotic Concert
The ladies of the Women's
Auxiliary announce a concert
and dramatic entertainment, in
aid of the Patriotic Fund, on
Thursday evening next, in Assembly Hall. In addition to an
excellent concert program, Hazelton Dramatic Society will present the farce, "The Wrong
Flat." A large crowd should
enjoy the entertainment. Tickets may be procured at all stores.
FIGHTING IN BELGIUM NEAR CHANNEL COAST
BRITISH FLEET BRINGS ITS LONG-RANGE
ARTILLERY TO BEAR ON ENEMTS POSITIONS
London, Oct. 24:���An official bulletin, issued in Paris at
midnight, states that on the western front the battle continues with
great violence, particularly around Arras, La Bassee and Armen-
tiere. The Allies yesterday lost some ground at La Bassee, but
gained at Armentiere. North of Aisne the Anglo-French artillery
destroyed three German batteries.
French warships have joined the British vessels which are
throwing shells into the German positions between Ostend and
Nieuport. The fight has developed into a terrific artillery duel, in
which the advantage is with the Allies-, owing to the longer range
of the naval guns.
A war office report says the Allies have made progress on the
Somme river and in the Verdun district. Between the North Sea
and the Oise river, the enemy appears to be undertaking a new
effort, making use of organizations composed of men recently
drilled, some being very young and others of middle age, with
staffs drawn from various parts of the German army.
Petrograd officially reports that in the eastern theater of war
the enemy is still retreating. Much war material was taken below
Ivangorod, where the Germans, hastily abandoning their positions,
left guns, ammunition and provisions. The Russians have crossed
the Vistula without resistance. The Austrians are still fighting
stubbornly on the San river and south of Przemysl.
A Copenhagen despatch says Germans are talking of an
expeditionary force, via Antwerp, to effect a landing on the British
coast. Two shipyards at Kiel are building thirty armored lighters,
each capable of carrying 500 men, for use in transporting troops
across the channtl, should the Germans find conditions favorable.
Antwerp is almost deserted. Only a few German troops
remain in the city.
Reports from Amsterdam say von Moltke is dying in Berlin
from an illness for which he was undergoing treatment when the
war began.
The German cruiser Karlsruhe is reported to have sunk thirteen British merchantmen engaged in the South American trade.
Lille is reported to be in ruins and ashes.
General von Tirpitz has been killed. Prince Maximilian of
Hesse, the Kaiser's nephew, was killed in action.
Bad weather is delaying transport of the enemy's big guns in
Belgium, while the British naval guns are doing wonderful work.
A late despatch from Amsterdam states that the Allies have
taken seventy thousand prisoners. There is no official confirmation
and the report is disbelieved.
Ottawa, Oct. 24:���Hon. Sam Hughes has been promoted to the
rank of major-general. Colonel Gwatkin, of the Canadian general
staff, has been given the same rank.
THE MINER'S TELEGRAPHIC BULLETINS TELL STORY OF GREAT WAR DAY BY DAY
Were Not Spies
It has developed that the Germans arrested at Union Bay, on
suspicion of espionage, are members of the Kohse family. Miss
Kohse was formerly a resident of
Hazelton, and one of her
brothers, Ed., is now in this
district. Their friends here say
the Kohses were on a launch trip
up the coast, and take no stock
in the spy story.
Alleged Bomb Menace
Montreal, Oct. 23:���A letter to
the mayor tells of a gang of Germans and Austrians in Montreal,
furnished with bombs and ready
to do great damage to the city at
a moment's notice.
New Postmaster-General
Ottawa, Oct. 21:-Hon. T. C.
Casgrain has been sworn in as
postmaster-general in succession
to Hon. L. P. Pelletier. Deputy
Speaker Blondin is the new minister of inland revenue.
London, Oct. 19:���The latest official despatch from the battle
front states that the British and French left wing has driven the
enemy back more than thirty miles in the last few days and has
occupied Givenchy and Fromelles and retaken Armentieres, on the
Belgian border.
An official despatch from Paris at midnight states that two
violent attacks by the Germans, at St. Die, near the German border
southeast of Nancy, were repulsed with serious loss to the enemy.
It is reported that General von Kluck was relieved of his
command two weeks ago.
The situation on the Vistula, in the eastern theater of war, is
little changed. The Austrian attempts to cross the River San have
failed. Fighting continues south of Przemysl. The Russian forces
made bayonet attacks at several places, driving the enemy back
and capturing a thousand Austrians.
An official despatch from General French gives the total British losses in killed, wounded and missing from Sept. 12 to Oct. 8
as 561 officers and 12,980 men. The British casualty list of Oct. 14
reports the death of General Ian Hamilton, of Boer war fame.
Ten other officers were killed and 25 wounded.
The new British light cruiser Undaunted, just commissioned,
was placed in command of Captain Cecil H. Fox, who commanded
the Amphion when that cruiser was sunk by a mine early in the
war. On Saturday the Undaunted, which was accompanied by four
destroyers, encountered four of the enemy's torpedo boat
destroyers off the coast of Holland. The enemy's vessels were
sunk, with a loss of 360. The British had five wounded. Thirty
Germans were rescued.
Since the seizure of a mysterious "factory" in London and the
arrest of the Germans who conducted it, feeling against the
Germans and the spy menace has run high, culminating yesterday
in serious disturbances in Deptford, a suburb of London, where
several shops kept by Germans were wrecked and one set on fire.
The police restored order.
The Germans have imposed a fine of one million dollars on
Ostend, through which 40,000 infantry and 400 guns passed on
Saturday.   This is taken to indicate a movement against Dunkirk.
Pekin advices say Germany is ready to negotiate for the surrender of Tsing Tau, on terms.
Russia is sowing mines to protect the Gulfs of Riga and Finland.
The Holland-American liner Noordam was damaged by striking
a mine in the North Sea on Saturday.   No casualties.
Colonel Grey, brother of Sir Edward Grey, was taken prisoner,
with his aviator, when their aeroplane was brought down by
Germans near Peronne.
Ottawa, Oct. 19:���It is officially stated that British Columhia
business houses and manufacturers will supply blankets, underwear, etc., for the British Columbia portion of the second contingent. 	
Ottawa, Oct. 20:���The Dominion government has ordered the
immediate recruiting of fifteen thousand infantrymen, ten thousand
of whom will be sent to England in December. By spring Canada
will have one hundred thousand men in training and at the front, at
an estimated cost of $250,000 a day.
Belgian army is still active, and, with the assistance of British
marines, repulsed attacks by the Germans between Nieuport and
Dixmude. Progress is being made between Arras and Roye, the
enemy being forced steadily back. Gains have also been made on
the right bank of the Meuse, near St. Mihiel.
An unofficial report says the Allies have retaken Ostend. Lille
has been evacuated by the Germans, whose line is seriously
threatened.
A French force, captured in a fog by Germans, turned the
tables by taking their captors prisoners. Algerians, by a bayonet
charge, annihilated eight hundred Germans.
A despatch from Petrograd says parts of the San and Vistula
rivers are choked with dead Germans. The Russian advance continues.
Two captured Russians had their tongues cut out by the
Germans.
A French cruiser sank an Austrian submarine in the Adriatic.
Turkey has declined to accede to Britain's request for the discharge of the German crews of the cruisers Goeben and Breslau,
purchased from Germany by Turkey.
A German mine-layer, disguised as a hospital ship, was captured by the British cruiser Undaunted.
A small Japanese cruiser was sunk by a German mine in Kiau
Chau Bay, with a loss of 271.
The Canadian expeditionary force, encamped on Salisbury
Plain, had it first field day on Saturday. The troops acquitted
themselves well.
One hundred Canadian nurses are now in London, to undertake Red Cross work at the front.
Two new battleships, the Queen Elizabeth and Warspite, will
be completed this week. They will be the first to carry the new
15-inch guns, the deadliest weapon of the world's navies.
Montreal, Oct. 20:���Israel Schafer is on trial here for high
treason, the charge being that he assisted Austrians to leave
Canada for the front. They called themselves Bulgarians. The
penalty for the offense is death, but may be modified by the
clemency of the crown.
Vancouver, Oct. 20:-Thirteen Austrians, en route to the
United States, presumably on their way to the front, were arrested
near New Westminster by a troop of B. C. Horse.
BATTLE WITH BANDITS
Washington Bank Robbers Kill
Canadian Official���Two
Accounted For
Vancouver, Oct. 23:���On Saturday night last a gang of five
bandits, supposed by some to be
he connected with the men who
robbed the Union Bank at New
Hazelton, held up the_Wixson
National Bank at. Sedro-Wpoley,
Wash., securing$20,000. A gun-
fight followed the robbery.
Melvin Wilson, a ten-year-old
hoy, was killed by a stray shot.
Pursued by several posses, the
robbers made their escape, but
were located yesterday in the
woods near Blaine, but on the
Canadian side of the line. Canadian customs and immigration
officers endeavored to capture
them. The bandits gave battle,
killing Clifford Adams, a customs
officer. One of the fugitives
was killed, and another, badly
wounded, killed himself rather
than surrender. The remaining
ihree robbers are believed to be
surrounded in the woods. Part
of the booty secured from the
bank was found on the two dead
men.
Several officers sustained
wounds.
London, Oct. 21:���The Paris official bulletin states that attacks
by the Germans along the entire battle front yesterday  were
everywhere repulsed.    The reports indicate that the attacks were
intended to break the Anglo-French wedge which threatens severe
damage to the enemy's line in Northern France,  the Allies  being
twenty miles over the Belgian border.    Von Kluck's army  is said
to be in the greatest danger it has experienced since the war
started.
In East Prussia and along the Vistula the situation is unchanged.
The battle south of Przemysl continues, the advantage being with
the Russians so far. In this engagement an entire battalion of
Austrians, with all officers and machine guns, surrendered to the
Russians.
An indication of the severity of the battle  for the Channel
ANOTHER MURDER
BY VANCOUVER HINDU
Vancouver, Oct. 21:���Inspector
W. C. Hopkinson, the best-known
Canadian Hindu interpreter, was
shot and killed in Vancouver
courthouse, by Mewa Singh, a
Hindu. The murdered official
was about to give evidence for
the Crown in the trial of a Hindu, the case arising out of the
Hindu temple shooting and the
Komagata Maru incident. This
is the twenty-third death arising
out of the attempt to land the
Komagata Maru's passengers.
The assassin was captured, a revolver in each hand, by the janitor
of the courthouse, who narrowly
escaped shooting.
Give Up Coal Lands
The Groundhog coal lands held
by Alvo von Alvensleben, for
German capitalists, have been
relinquished, reverting to the
original owners, R. K. Lindsay
of Vancouver and Hunter Corner
and A. E. Falconer, of Hazelton.
Another For Active Service
Harry E. Holliday, manager of
the Hudson's Bay Co. store here,
has resigned his position to go
to the front. He left on Thursday for Englajid, to rejoin his
old corps. Mr. Holliday is the
sixth Hazelton man to leave for
the war, and the fourth member
nf Hazelton rifle association, of
which he was secretary.
towns is given by the fact that seventeen trains, of forty cars each,
A purchasing agent of the British government is now in Can-1 loaded with wounded Germans, passed through Bruges,  Belgium,
ada, for the purpose of buying in the Dominion all possible provis-j towards Germany.
German marines who are serving with the enemy's army in
Belgium are said to have been ordered to rejoin their ships, which
ions and supplies for British troops.
London, Oct. 20:���The seventy-eighth day of the war sees the
position more hopeful than ever, from the Allies' standpoint.
More gains have been made on the western front in France.     The
Big Loan For P. G. E.
Victoria, Oct. 24:���While Attorney General Bowser has no
definite news, he believes that
Premier McBride, while in Ottawa, secured from the federal
government a loan of $6,000,000
for the construction ofthe Pacific
Great Eastern. The premier is
now in New York.
are about to leave Kiel.
An unofficial report from Bucharest says a big l.usso-Turki.h
(Continued on Page Four)
Vancouver, Oct. 24:���The
Dominion Trust Co. has gone into voluntary liquidation. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1914
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Tliree Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $2.!i0 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 20 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazette rates.
Vol. IV.
Saturday, October 24, 1914.
No. 8
Whatever may have been the general opinion at the beginning
of the great war, it is apparent that Earl Kitchener and General
French cherished no illusions concerning the strength of the
Germans, and their expressed opinions that the struggle would be
prolonged and sanguinary have been amply borne out. That the
British leaders have proved themselves perfectly able to cope with
the situation cannot be questioned. In the beginning, Great
Britain had an army of something less than sixty thousand ready
for the field, but that its forces have again shown themselves to be
ideal soldiers is abundantly evident. Fighting against victorious
forces, overwhelming in numbers, the little British army in the
first month of the war again and again proved its superiority, and
when reinforcements enabled the Allies to turn back the German
invasion, the Britons were foremost in the advance, as they had
been the last to retreat.
The first phase of the war is now over, and while it is difficult
to judge from the meager despatches the exact positions of the
contending forces, th ire can be no doubt that the Germans who
advanced so confidently towards Paris have been forced back to
the frontier and that their main forces are engaged in a desperate
effort to prevent the advancing Allies from penetrating their line
and destroying their communications. As this is written, reports
indicate that the enemy's efforts to force a way south along the
coast, and thus outflank the Allies' left wing, have utterly failed,
and as an army of such magnitude as that invading Belgium cannot stand still for long, we may expect to hear of a retrograde
movement which will end, after a stubborn defence of the German
frontier, in the invasion of the Kaiser's empire by British, French
and Belgian troops.
Germans are talking loudly of the "surprise" they have in
preparation for Britain, and some apparently expect a combined
naval and aerial attack on England, but we hazard a guess that the
next great movement of the war will be a German retreat.
The war may be prolonged, but one thing is certain���it will
will not end until the Allies dictate terms of peace in Berlin.
MINING REVIVAL
DUE, SAYS EXPERT
"Mining is looking up gradually in the east, and the indications are that before long there
will be one of the most splendid
revivals ever experienced in the
history of the country." This is
the gist of a statement made
recently bv S. M. Levy, general
manager of the Ely Consolidated
Copper company, a well-known
consulting engineer, after having
spent six months in New York
and Boston, where he succeeded
in enlisting capital in some mining enterprises, says the Salt
Lake Herald-Republican.
"The eastern people are beginning to look upon mining with
a great deal more faith than formerly," he continued. "In times
past they looked askance at mention of mines. Now that they
have had many losses in industrials, they have turned toward
mining with much more favor
than for years. They now know
from experience that there are
worse things than putting their
money in mines. Yet right now
I would not advise western mining men to go east for capital;
a little while and it will be plentiful." 	
Tungsten deposits have been
discovered in Korea, and mines
are being developed.
^������������������MHaUHHaMMBBHaaB������������������������������������������������
NOW IS THE TIME
TO INVEST IN MINES
"Many people seem to have
the idea that because such big
mines as the Anaconda, the Utah
Copper and other large coppers
have right now reduced to half
capacity that it would be foolish
to venture into the mining industry until after the advent of
normal times," said John B. Taylor, one of the best known
practical miners and consulting
engineers of Utah. "Yet if they
will stop long enough to think
they will see the fallacy of such
a stand.
"The present depression is as
sure to be followed by a great
mining boom as day is to follow
night. It has taken place in
every instance of the world's
war history. This has been the
experience in the United States
following the rebellion and every
large European war since. History will repeat itself again
following the present crisis in
Europe.
"The man with a little money
for investment* in mining now
figures that he will be ready to
get in just as soon as the war is
over. But right now, not then,
is the time, and I'll show you why.
"With the firing of the last
shot in the decisive battle at once
there will be an unprecedented
demand for all kinds of metal.
Every pound of metal Uncle Sam
can afford to part with will have
a ready market. Prices will b.
high from the start. Our metals
will be required in the rebuilding
of their leveled cities. Every
great building requires tons of
steel, copper, lead and zinc; the
electrified railroads ripped upand
demolished mustal I be replaced. It
will take millions of tons of metals  to feed the great industr. 1
The Miner is two dollars a year
to any address in Canada; to
United States, three dollars.
appetite of Europe. Our ships
and the world's ships will be
taxed to their capacities carting
these great tonnages to every
nation on the continent.
"Now, the only mines which
will be in shape to furnish this
metal are the developed ones,
such as those mentioned above.
They are in a position to spring
at once to their capacity and
reap the benefit of the sudden
demand for their products.
They only will reap the harvest
of high prices. Take Utah Copper, for instance, in a week's
time it could probably be handling 40,000 tons of ore a day.
"Now, the men who wait
until the war is over will get left.
The men who get in now, pick
up some good bargains lying
around and bring them to a producing state while the depression
Is still on, are the boys who will
be in at the killing. The man
who waits must pay double or
treble present prices. Even
with the best of properties it requires six months to a year or so
to place them in producing condition. Witn feverish activity
the late buyer is rushing development work in hopes of getting
some of the cream. Rush work
is always expensive work, too.
And about the time he gets his
good little property up to normal
capacity the richest cream has
been skimmed from tbe industrial milk pan of the world. The
more far-seeing investor has
taken the price, and the tardy
one must content himself with
the skim milk." -Nevada State
Journal.
An extensive deposit of coal
has been eiscovered in Bolivia at
an altitude of 13,000 ft.
GOOD MORNING!
We   Are Introducing
American Silk
American Cashmere
American Cotton-Lisle
HOSIERY
They have stood the test. Give
real foot comfort. No seams to
rip. Never become loose or baggy. The shape is knit in���not
pressed in.
GUARANTEED for fineness,
style, superiority of material and
workmanship. Absolutely stainless. Will wear 6 months without
holes, or new ones free.
OUR SPECIAL OFFER
to every one sending us $1.00 in
currency or postal note, to cover
advertising and shippingjeharges,
we will send post-paid, with
written guarantee, backed by a
five million dollar company, either
3 Pairs ol our 75c value
American Silk Hosiery,
or      4 Pairs of our 50c value
American Cashmere Hosiery
or      4 Pairs of our 50c value
American Cotton-Lisle Hosiery,
or      6 Pairs of Children's Hosiery
Give the color, size, and wether Ladies' or Gent's hosiery is
desired.
DON'T DELAY-OfTer expires
when a dealer in your locality is
selected.
THE INTERNATIONAL HOSIERY CO.
P.O. Box 244
DAYTON, OHIO, U.S.A.
NOTICE.
In the Siipremk Court ok British
Columbia.
In the  matter nf the  Administration
Act and in the matter of the  Estate
of John Solar, deceased, intestate.
TAKE NOTICE that bv an order of
His   Honour    Judge    Young,   dateil
the  19th  day  of October, 1914, I waH
appointed Administrator of the Estate
of the said John Solar,   deceased, and
ALL persons having   claims against
the said  estate arc hereby required to
forward the same, properly verified, lo
me, on or before the 14th day of November, 1914, and all persons indebted to
the said estate are required to pay the
amounts of their   indebtedness to me
forthwith.
Stephen H. Hoskins,
Official Administrator.
Hazelton, B.C.
Dated 2'ird day of October, 1914.      8-9
The Favorite    C A DfTN'PQ
Shopping place  MMUjE-iH O
We Lead���
Others Follow
MINERS' PROSPECTORS' and SETTLERS' SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY
Time to think of Warm Clothing
��� Cold Weather is on the way ���
Our Fall and Winter Stock, which is now
arriving from the manufacturers, includes a wide
range of seasonable goods
Ladies' and Men's Sweater Coats, Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves and Mitts
For Men we have received a large assortment of
Pants, for all walks of life
We aim to keep our stock complete and up to
date in every department of our stores
School   Supplies, Scribblers, Pens, Pencils, etc., etc.
General      D    C    CADfTNT    Hazelton
Merchant
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Liquor Act���Section 41
Notice is hereby given that, on the
first day of December next, application
will be made to the Superintendent of
Provincial Police for renewal of the
hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Omineca Hotel,
situated at Hazelton, in the Province
of British Columbia. 11
Dated this 15th day of October, 1914.
JOHN C. K. SEALY, Applicant.
Liquor Act���Section 41
Notice is hereby given that, on the.
first day of December next, application
will be made to the Superintendent of
Provincial Police for renewal of the
hotel license to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Hazelton Hotel,
situate at Hazelton, in the Province of
British Columbia. 11
Dated this 15th day of October, 1914.
ROYSTON G. MOSELEY, Applicant.
Liquor Act���Section 41
Notice is hereby given that, on the
firjt day of December next, application
will be made to the Superintendent of
Provincial Police for renewal of the
hotel licenBe to sell liquor by retail in
the hotel known as the Hotel Bulkley,
situated at SmitherB, in th*- Province of
British Columbia. 11
Dated this 15th day of October, 1914.
JOHN N. CARR, Applicant.
"Everything in Canvas"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
Prince Rupert. BC
The Miner is two dollars a year. SimpiE-*
Liquor Act, 1910
Notice is hereby given that, on the
fir t day of December next, Bpplicati in
will be made to the Superintendent of
Provincial Police for the grant of a '
license for the sale of liquor by let ail
in anil upon the premises known as the
Burn Lake Hotel, situated at Bums
Lake, upon the land described as Lot
1K76.
Dated  this  nineteenth day of Orto-1
ber, 1914.
The Burns Lake Trading and
12 Lumber Co., Applicant
Per H. M. Laidlaw, Manager, j
HAZELTON HOSPITALt=
r r any period from one month upward at 11 per
month In advance. Thli rat�� Include* office ron*
iul.��t Imhh and medlclnee, aa welt aa all routs while
In the hospital. Ticket* obtainable In Haielton
at the Pott Office or the Drug Store; In Aldermere
from Mr. T J. Thorp; In Telkwa from Dr. Wallace;
or br mall from IM Medical Superintendent at th*
STEJf
Accuracy
and
Penetration
dial in i;u ish
our
"High Power"
Repeating
Rifle No.425
I.Ul Price $20.00
.0    "U.30    ..'-n_,3S
calibers
V%e KrmtntftuA Auto-Lndmf
QjtltmBm
A Big Game Rifle that
Makes Good.
Sure Fire N'olinlks No Jams
Of..* 1-k*. .our Out...
Hi-nd fur H.rt-Mimrlr lliiftlrilrd
Kill, l-UI-j Sn. II
Y i. Stevens Arms �� Tool Co.,
Chicop*. Fill, Mas.
The GALENA CLUB
H_s��lt__'i
Fnorila
R.*ort
> Under New Management i
POOL AND AMERICAN BILLIARD TABLES
Finest Cigars, Cigarettes, and Tobaccos, Choice
Confectionery,   Fruits,   Ice Cream,   Soft Drinks
GRAHAM ROCK-
-PROPRIETOR
V:
TRUNK
TO THE EAST
Passenger Trains leave Hazelton at 5:18 p. m., Wednesdays and Saturdays, for Prince George, Edmonton,
Winnipeg,  etc.,  making connection at Winnipeg for
principal eastern centers.
Uie tha Grand Trunk Railway System east of Chicago
TO THE SOUTH
s.s.
'PRINCE GEORGE" leaves Prince Rupert every Friday at 9 a.m. for
VANCOUVER, VICTORIA and SEATTLE
For through tickets, apply to local agent or to"
DAVIDSON,   *   GENERAL   AGENT,   *   PRINCE  RUPERT,  B. C.
/COMMERCIAL PRINTING OF THE BEST
^    CLASS AT THE MINER PRINT SHOP
tr
Bulkley Valley Farm
Lands For Sale
These Lands are close to the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, which is now running trains through the
Bulkley Valley. There is a ready local market for aH produce. Land prices are reasonable. Terms are easy.
Write for full particulars to
NORTH COAST LAND COMPANY, Ltd.
Suite 622 Metropolitan Building
r.u ��f.pi,_i ii.soo.ooo. VANCOUVER, B. C. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1914
THE
QUALITY STORE
Highest market prices paid for
Raw Furs
DRY GOODS
Men's Furnishings
Hardware Groceries
C. V. SMITH
GENERAL MERCHANT
HAZELTON
DENTISTRY
DR. BADGERO
Smithers, B.C.
i
Mines and Mining
Good Properties for sale ��� Cash or on
Bond.      Development and
Assessment Work.
Carr Brothers
Eight Years In This District
Haielton.   II.  O,
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HAZELTON
The Distributing Point
for the Great Northern
 Interior	
Prospectors, Miners,
Landseekers, Surveyors
and Sportsmen will find
the merchants of Hazelton prepared to meet
every requirement in
outfit and supplies. Having been engaged for
many years in outfitting
parties for the Northern
Interior, Hazelton business men are qualified
to give valuable advice
and assistance to newcomers.
Hazelton is situated at
the confluence of the
Bulkley and Skeena
rivers, a mile and a
quarter from South Hazelton station on the
Grand Trunk Pacific
railway. Enquiries
may be addressed  to
,e
Hazelton, B. C.
ftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftftft*!
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
Coal  mines at Princeton are
reported to be on fire.
The last steamer of the season
with supplies for Nome left
Seattle on Sunday.
Nearly three hundred of
Maritz's rebels have been captured in South Africa.
Canada has made arrangements
with the Bank of England to secure funds for war purposes.
The British steamer Orange
River is loading lumber at Eureka, Cal., for Port Sudan, Egypt.
Twenty earthquake shocks near
Thebes, Greece, did great damage, rendering many homeless.
John Hyland, a well known
merchant of Northern British
Columbia, is dead at Telegraph
Creek.
A Japanese line is putting on
steamers which will run from
Bombay to Vancouver, via China
and Japan.
Major McGraw, Indian agent
at Vernon, says the Indians of
British Columbia are increasing
in number.
ashore near the mouth of the
Skeena, is being repaired at
North Vancouver.
Traffic through the Panama
Canal, blocked by a landslide in
Culebra Cut, will be resumed
within a few days.
Alvo von Alvensleben, Ltd.,
the much discussed German land
and coal operators of Vancouver,
have gone into liquidation.
Sir George Paish, financial expert to the British Government,
is to visit Washington and confer
with the United States authorities
regarding  international credits.
Mike Adams was given seven
years imprisonment for a bomb
outrage during the Nanaimo
trouble. William Jackson, his
accomplice, was sentenced to six
years.
Canada's foreign trade in August totalled $100,374,000 as
compared with $97,832,000 for
August 1913.
President Wilson has Bigned
the bill designed to open up the
coal lands of Alaska, under a
leasing system.
The  Prince  Albert,   recently
Hazelton Public School
Income and expenditure account for the year ending June
30, 1914:
Income��� Subscriptions, $152.90;
cash receipts from entertainments, Feb. and May, $220.75;
cash on hand, July 1, $74.07.
Total, $447.72.
Expenditure ��� Telegrams and
stamps, $9.95; cordwood, $33.50;
janitor's wages, $40.00; supplies
and furniture, $142.23; building
extras, $173.13; freight and express, $7.94; cash at bank, July
1, 1914, $40.97.    Total,  $447.72
I have examined the books and
accounts of the Hazelton Public
School, and certify that the
above statement is correct.
(Sgd.) A. E. Player, Auditor.
The steamer Daldorch, with
wheat from the Pacific coast,
was the first British ship to pass
through the Panama Canal She
reached Dublin in fifty days, the
Canal saving thirty days on the
trip.
The Mexican government has
taken possession of the lines of
the Mexican Tramways Co., a
Toronto company. The Mexican
employees of the railway went
on strike, after giving the company four hours to meet all
demands, and traffic became suspended. The government is
operating the lines.
S_iiiiiuniiiaiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiico_iiiiiiiiMii[o_iiiiiiiiiiiico.iiiiiiMiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiimg
= =
! Hudson's Bay Company I
GROCERIES   DRY GOODS
HARDWARE
���
r*i
o
1       Of Best Quality at Popular Prices
��-   A full Assort-
_   ment of
LIQUORS alway8ke8pt..k |
Commercial Printing at  The
Miner Print Shop.
LAND NOTICES
Peace Kiver Land District   District of
Omineca.
Take notice that D. D. McKinnon,
of Vancouver, restaurant keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 200
feet below the crossing at Old Hogem,
on the south bank of the Omineca river,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, to this
point.
Aug. 22, 1914. D. D. McKinnon.
Peace River Land District. District of
Omineca.
Take notice that Walter Ramsay, of
Edmonton, merchant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains easterly from the northwest
corner of L. I). May's application to
Purchase, thence south 80 chains, east
0  chains,   north  80  chains,  west 80
chains along the bank of Omineca river,
to point of commencement.
Aug. 22, 1914. Walter Ramsay.
Abolish Stock Exchanges
Probably business suffers more
from the ignorant and often
malicious valuations placed upon
stocks, which are only subdivisions of properties and assets,
than from any other one thing.
Stock exchanges, theoretically
markets where traders meet and
arrive at true values by barter
and higgling, are in reality but
the gilded haunts of gamblers
who either do not know values
or who are wholly indifferent to
them.
Brokers are so much concerned, and no more, with the intrinsic values of the things they
deal, in as poker players are concerned with the intrinsic values
of the cards they play with. A
poker player decides that the
five cards he holds are "worth"
so much and he bets that much
on his hand. A stock broker decides that certain shares are
"worth" so much���that is, he
can sell them for an advance���
and he buys them. The two
"games" are twin brothers.
���Exchange.
Peace River Land District.   District of
Omineca.
Take notice that May McKinnon, of
Vancouver, married woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
fullowing described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains westerly from the northeast
corner of D. D. McKinnon'sapplication
to purchase, thence south 80 chains,
west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80
chains along the bank of Omineca river,
to pointof commencement.
Aug. 22, 1914. May McKinnon.
Peace River Land District. District of
Omineca.
Take notice that Prank Boston, of
Vancouver, watchman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains southerly from the northeast
cornerof D. D. McKinnon's northeast
corner, thence south 80 chains, west 80
chains, north 80 chains, east 80 chains.
Aug. 22, 1914. Frank Boston.
HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY     f
1 HAZELTON, B. C. |
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Peace River Land District.   District of
Omineca.
Take notice that H. E. Fetherstonhaugh, of North Vancouner, married
woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted 16
miles from mouth Of river on east bank
of Manson river, thence east 80 chains,
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south
80 chains along bank of Manson river,
to point of commencement.
Aug. 10, 1914.   H. ES. Fetherstonhaugh.
Peace River Land District.   District of
Omineca.
Take notice that L. W. May, of Edmonton, doctor, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described Innds:
Commenoing at a post planted 80
chains eiisterly from John A. Shaw's
northwest corner application to purchase, on thc south bank of Omineca
river, thenre south 80 chains, east 80
chains, north 80 chains, west 80 chains
along the bank of Omineca river, to
point of commencement.
Aug. 22, 1814. L. W. May.
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
J IVFUY nnA  ^kTAflF^i  w<' ���"'<' prepared tr. supply private I
I__r*_.J_i    Will  _.1__UL_J   and   public   conveyances   day  and
night.     Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
Coal and Wood delivered promptly.
Consign  your shipments in  Our     Rm-lr_V   fir   W/i�� rlCSIV
Care for Storage or  Delivery.     IxUCiay   OC   IVlttCIVay
Addre*,*. all communications to Hazelton. HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
. "IJllPL.
CANADIAN  PACIFIC RAILWAY     ^
BRITISH COLUMBIA  COAST  STEAMSHIP SERVICE
S. S. "Princ.ii Royal" leaves Prince Rupert every SUNDAY at 8 p. m.
S. S. "PrinceM May" or "Princeis Sophia" le vet Prince Rupert every
SATURDAY at noon
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
Tickets to and from all parts of the world.     Atlantic and Pacific
Steamship Tickets
vv  J. G. McNab,   Cor. 8rdAve. and 4th St.,   Prince Rupert, B. C.    ��
iiOh-
-IIOII-
-HO'l-
- Ull���III
Thorp & Hoops
Real Estate, Financial and Insurance Brokers
 ALDERMERE, B. C,	
���Sole district agents for E. G. Prior & Co., Victoria, Agricultural Machinery and Implements, Wagons, Etc.
Fire,  Life,  Accident,  and Employer's Liability Insurance.
We represent the best companies.
We Can Locate You On a Good Pre-Emption Near the G. T. P.
If you desire information about the Bulkley Valley write us.
Ill���-HU������Ull������ llll������ IIO"���llll������llOll������ llll��������� llOll������ llll������llll������ llll������
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Now is the time to buy a Hot Water Bottle
The War will double the price of all rubber goods. Buy
before the advance in price. We have a three-quart, red
rubber Hot Water Bottle, guaranteed for two years, selling at
$3.00
Combination Attachment, $1.00
The "Up-To-Date" Drug Stores
Hazelton
L. D. Fulton, Mgr.
New Hazelton
-iiOh-
-hOii-
-uOii���liii-
H-rold Price ���>��� ���*��� Graham
PRICE & GRAHAM
B.C. Land Surveyors
and Civil Engineer!
HAZELTON  AND  SMITHERS
London Building      ....       Vancouver
Brili.h Columbia
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion and Uritish Columhia
Land Surveyors
Offices at Victo.ia, Nelson, Fort Geo. gland New Hazelton.
B. C. Affleck, Mgr.   New Hazelton.
fC->-*n-H"i"H-.���-i*-it*f*t*-h*t*rt*-tt*t-i|M��iii'*|.i��i-t*:,
j   McRAE BROS., LTD.
t     STATIONERS & PRINTERS
ii Architect*' nnd Engineer*' Supplier
f. Kodak*. Loote Leaf Sjritema
{Remington Typewriter*. Office Furniture
Prince Rupert, B. C.
X ���!���+*++++���...+..**+.���++'(..��..���.++*.*i.i
Assay Office and Mining: Office
Arts and Crafts Building, 578 Seymour Street
 VANCOUVER, B.C	
J. O.SULLIVAN, F.C.S.
Provincial Assayer and Chemist
Assayer for 26 years with Vivian & Sons, Swansea
Charges Moderate     ::    Correspondence Solicited
LAND NOTICES
Peace River Land Distrirt.   District of
Omineca.
Take notice that John A. Shnw, of
Edmonton, broker, intends to apply for
permission to purthi^se the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted B0
chains easterly from the northwest
cornerof R. D. Fetherstonhaugh's application to purchase, on south bnnk of
Omineca river, thence south K0 chains,
east 80 chains, north 80 chuins, west
80 chains along the bank of Ominecn
river, to point of commencement.
Aug. 22, 1914. John A. Shaw.
Peace River Land District.   Lnslric. of
Omineca.
Take  notice that  R. D. Fetherstonhaugh, of Vancouver, mining engineer,
intends to apply for permission to purchaae the following described lands:
Commencing ata  post planted at the
northeaat corner of D. D. McKinnon's
application to purchase, thenee south 80
chainB, east 80 chains, north 80 chains,
wast 80 chains along the ba>ikof Omineca river, to point of commencement.
Aug. 22, 1914.   R. D. Fetherstonhaugh.
LAND NOTICES
Peace River Lnnd District.   District of
Omineca.
Take notice that William MaeLaren,
of Calgary, broker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following descrilied lands:
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains down from H. E. Fetherstonhaugh's southwest, orner of application
to purchase, tlience east 80 chains,
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, smith
80 chains ulong the bank of Manson
river to point of commencement.
Aug. 10, 1914. William MaeLaren.
Peace Kiver Land Distript.   District of
Omineca.
Take notice that Henrietta Plumbe,
of North Vancouver, widow, intends to
apply for permission  to purchase the
followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of Fetherstonhaugh's
application to purchase on Manson river,   thence  east    80  chains,  south  80
chains, west 80 chains, north 80 chains,
along the bank  of Manson  river,   to
point of commencement.
Aug. 10, 1914. Henrietta Plumbs. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1914
THE MINER'S WAR BULLETINS
(Continued from Page One)
naval battle has taken place in the Black Sea.     Exceedingly heavy
firing, lasting for a considerable time, is reported.
The French forces are now firmly established in Alsace.   . .
Over a million and a half Belgians, fleeing from the ruin and
desolation wrought by the Germans, have taken refuge in Holland
and England.
An official statement from Tokyo tells of the occupation by the
Japanese of important German islands in the Ladrone, Marshall,
and Caroline groups, in the South Pacific.
It is reported in Paris that General von Moltke, the Kaiser's
chief of staff, is dead at a hospital at Secamp. near Havre. His
absence from the front gave rise to the previous rumor that he had
been superseded.
The Russian government, which has a monopoly of the liquor
traffic of lhe empire, will abandon the manufacture and sale of
vodka, owing to the good results of the temporary wartime prohibition,
Victoria, Oct. 21:���Colonel Roy, commanding British Columbia
military district, has retired. Major Ogilvie, of Victoria, is in
charge temporarily.	
London, Oct. 22.���The official statement issued in Paris last
night says the enemy continued to make vigorous assaults but were
again beaten back, with considerable loss, the Allies holding their
positions all along the line. The Belgian army, which is now cooperating directly with the French and British, especially distinguished itgelf.
All the day's reports of fighting in Belgium, where the Germans have been attempting to gain ground on the coast, agree that
the enemy sustained a reverse and are in retreat. British warships
shelled villages near the coast which were in the hands of Germans. The fleet did effective work in co-operation with land
forces. Sixteen hundred Germans, engaged in digging trenches
by night, were killed by shells from the ships.
Two German airships were brought down on the Belgian coast.
Intercepted German reports state that during the advance
towards Dunkirk their forces were attacked by a large and unexpected body of troops and were shelled by warships, being compelled to fall back on Ostend. All available German troops are
being hurried from various points in Belgium to Nieuport.
A late report states that the Germans were defeated in an engagement six miles from Ostend.
Reports from German sources say Zeppelin sheds are being
built at Tonderin, in Schleswig, and at Bostock, on the Warno,
near the Baltic.
An English correspondent at the front says the Germans advancing towards the Channel have met with the greatest surprise
of the war and have retreated to Ostend. That the latter city has
been retaken by the Allies is denied.
A despatch from Ghent says the result of the fighting near the
Belgian coast has caused great anxiety among German officers, one
of whom, a general, committed suicide yesterday. Festivities announced in celebration of German successes have been suddenly
cancelled.
A midnight despatch from Petrograd says it is officially announced that a large German force marching on Warsaw has been
defeated by the Russians and is in full flight, leaving many wounded on the field. A large number of prisoners was taken. The
Russians are in pursuit. In Galicia the situation remains favorable
to the Russian army.
In their defeat north of the river Pilitza, in Russia, the
Germans abandoned positions they had fortified in their advance.
The Russians are assuming the offensive in the region south of
Przemysl.
A Copenhagen report says an engagement was fought between
a Russian or British submarine and German torpedo craft, in the
Baltic.    No result is known.
Typhoid is reported epidemic among the German troops in
Belgium and France.
The King and Lord Kitchener will review the Canadian troops
at an early date. Colonel Hughes had a conference with Lord
Kitchener yesterday.
Vancouver, Oct.. 22:���British Columbia's share in the second
contingent is limited to 2,000 men. This is disappointing to
Vancouver, but the Ottawa authorities say that a larger number will
be accepted from this province when Lord Kitchener's wishes are
known. 	
London. Oct. 23:��� From the Belgian coast to La Bassee, near
Lille, the Germans resumed their violent attacks yesterday. All
were repulsed with loss to the enemy, says the official statement.
In Argonne and to the north of Verdun the Allies have gained
additional ground.
One of lhe Allies' commanders on the Belgian border says the
Anglo-French troops will probably be in Brussels in a fortnight,
and certainly in a month,
An official Petrograd despatch says the Russians have again
defeated the German forces near Warsaw, taking 2,000 prisoners.
Great Britain has completed twenty-two new warships, ranging
in size from submarines to dreadnaughts, since the opening of the
war.
Two trainloads of wounded from the recent severe engagement
at. Nieuport and Dixmnde have arrived in London. On Tuesday
the Germans attacked these towns with great force, gaining the
advantage at first, but being finally completely routed. In their
retreat they left many dead and wounded. The loss on both sides
was heavy.
Official reports show that in the severe fighting near Ostend on
Wednesday and Thursday the Belgian army, now part of the Allies'
battle line, finally repulsed the German offensive movement on
Dixmude and Nieuport.
Eleven British warships again shelled the German forces on
Wednesday, killing General von Tripp and his staff, who were at
Middlekerke.
The bombardment between Ostend and Nieuport still continues
with the Germans firing from Middlekerke, the French from Nieuport, and the British from warships. British aviators are directing the artillery fire of the Allies. The naval marksmanship is
said to be remarkable.
The military expert of the Times says the realization of failure
is spreading among the German officers. It is not to be expected,
however, that the enemy will give way without strenuous efforts,
and there are fiercer struggles ahead than any fought so far.
An official despatch from Tokio says part of the Japanese fleet
is off Hawaii, seeking the German Pacific fleet. The general staff
announces that the attack on Tsing Tau began on Thursday. The
Japanese are using heavy marine artillery, and part of the fleet is
co-operating with the a-my.
Reports of the Kaiser's illness are rife in Paris. It is also
reported that the German fleet is off Falsetro, Sweden.
LOCAL NEWSPARAGRAPHS
Harry Marment, of Francois
lake, is in town for a few days.
Tom Carr came down from
Smithers on Tuesday, for a business visit.
J. H. Sproule, of Dawson, was
among the week's arrivals in
Hazelton.
F. W. Valleau returned on
Monday from the Omineca river
district.
F. M. Bard and E. C. Beardon,
of Skeena Crossing, were here
on Wednesday.
J. E. Oppenheimer and D. J.
Williams, of the Rocher de Boule,
were up from Skeena Crossing
on Thursday.
Only Ten Days More For
THE
FREE WAR MAPS
The new ferry across the
Skeena at Hazelton is proving
a great convenience to ranchers
and townspeople.
EVERY READER OF THE OMINECA MINER
MAY HAVE A WAR MAP FREE
A map 3 1-3x21-2 feet, showing clearly every
boundary, every city, every town, village, hamlet and river in the whole European War area.
Each map in a neat folder of convenient size.
Just Arrived
FOR FALL AND WINTER
Prospectors in this district
have now left the hills for the
season. As usual, many will
winter in Hazelton.
Many townspeople are replacing with brick chimneys the
metal flues formerly used, greatly
reducing the fire risk.
Game Warden Burrington has
succeeded in stopping the sale of
grouse, formerly a regular practice with the Indians.
Dr. Stone returned on Wednesday from Clinton, where he
was a witness in the trial of Nick
Popovich for murder.
Manager MacCormick has men
and teams engaged in excavating
for a larger cellar under R.
Cunningham & Son', big store.
T. W. Brewer, forest ranger
in the Upper Bulkley and Lakes
district, returned to town on
Thursday. He reports great improvements in the Francois and
Ootsa districts.
Road Superintendent Carr returned from the Bulkley Valley
on Tuesday. Recent rains, he
says, have made the roads very
muddy. They have been in excellent condition for the greater
part of the season.
COMMITTED FOR TRIAL
ON MURDER CHARGE
The preliminary trial of John
May, the Indian charged with
the murder of Albert Taplor on
Sept. 28, was held on Wednesday
before Magistrate Hoskins.
Chief Minty, who had conducted
the investigation with his accustomed thoroughness, presented
considerable evidence inculpating
the prisoner, who was committed
for trial at the next Prince Rupert assizes. Twenty witnesses
were examined.
May will be taken to New Westminster to await trial. The date
of the assizes has not yet been
fixed.
No Election Thii Year
Toronto, Oct. 22:���Hon.
Robert Rogers declared in an interview here that there would be
no general election for the Dominion house before next year.
Liquor License Application
Notice
Notice is hereby given that, on the
first day of December next, application
will be made to the Superintendent of
Provincial Police for a renewal of the
license for the sale of liquors by whole
sale in and upon the premises known as
the Hudson's Bay Company's store,
i*ituate at Hazelton, It. C, upon thc
lands described aB lots 6 and 7, Hazelton townsite. 11
Dated this 16th day of October, 1914.
THE HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY,
Applicant.
The Family Herald and Weekly
Star of Montreal has secured exclusive rights for the War Map
prepared by the celebrated map
firm of G. W. Bacon & Co.,
Ltd., of London,  Eng.    It is
beyond question the most comprehensive map printed.
The Miner has completed arrangements by which our readers can secure a copy of this
excellent map free of charge.
Here is our offer good for 30 days only
A SPLENDID ASSORT-
���"*��� ment of the celebrated
JAEGER UNDERWEAR,
SOCKS, SWEATER COATS
VESTS, PAJAMAS, etc.
These goods require no recommendation. They are
the best manufactured in
England. 	
IF you have not inspected
our HOBBERLIN samples for Fall and WinterTail-
ored Clothing, you cannot
ealize how nobby they are.
NOEL & ROCK
Hazelton, B. C.
Phone SOO P.O. Box 1685
HARRISON W. ROGERS
ARCHITECT
Special Attention to Out of Town Clients
Suite One, Federal Block,
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
STUART J. MARTIN      j
Provincial Assayer      I
HAZELTON
0*|**ft*t**l*4.4*.jii|i*|i,|*i|i*t**t**t**i*.
B. C.       I
._.._��� .����� I*, ilnli ,|i illlll __
'tymtnpte^ || ������! ||| ||| |||     |   ^-p
The price of The Family Herald
and Weekly Star ��� Canada's
greatest newspaper���is one dollar a year.
The price of The Miner is two
dollars a year.
We now offer both papers for
one year each, including a copy
of the Family Herald's War
Map, size 30 x 40 inches, in a
neat folder of convenient size,
for only $2.50.
This offer applies to all subscribers, new or renewal, who
pay for the two papers inside
the next 30 days from this date.
To follow the war situation intelligently, The Family Herald
War Map is necessary. It should
be in  every  Canadian   home.
EXPERT
Watch Repairing
WATCHES   -   JEWELRY
O. A. RAGSTAD,    Smithers
Orders may be left at Noel & Rock's, Hazelton
LAND NOTICE
���ORDER AT ONCE
The Omineca Miner
HAZELTON, B. C.
Hazelton Land District. District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Alexander Austin,
of Prince Rupert, B. C, laborer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the lollowing described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
500 feet northerly from guarter-way
cabin, Ave miles south from Fifth
Cabin, Yukon telegraph line, thence
west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80
chainB, south 80 chains, to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less. 4-12
Aug, 18, 1914, Alexander Austin.
The Miner is two dollars a year.
VXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX*
    rr"
R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd.
PORT ESSINGTON
Established 1870 HAZELTON
IAEGE].
A SHIPMENT OF
CHILDREN'S WEAR
Received this week contains some
very neat Jersey Costumes, in sizes
20, 22, 24.       Saxe Fawn and
Rose Colors
Girls' Golfer Suits complete, in scarlet and tan colors
Boys' and Girls' Sweater Coats, all colors.
Another shipment of Children's Underwear is due to
arrive this week.
STOVES AND HEATERS
A timely suggestion now that winter is near us,
is to look after your requirements before the
cold weather sets in.     :      We can fit you up.
Our Winter Stocks in every department are pretty well in now,
and we can take care of your every want
R. Cunningham & Son, Limited
^{^^^^^.pjr-p^^:^:

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