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Omineca Miner Nov 4, 1911

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 VOL. I, NO. 10
HAZELTON, B. C. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1911
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
I FOOD FOR
SIXTEEN DAYS
Railroad Explorers Have
Strenuous Experience In
the   Naas River   Country
TALE OF GREAT HARDSHIP
Hoard's Party Of Four Reaches Hazelton After Trying Journey��� Were Re-
connoitering For Canadian Northeastern, Sir Donald Mann's  New Railway.
To travel for sixteen days
through an unmapped and untrodden wilderness, without food
other than the country afforded,
was the experience of a party of
surveyors who reached Hazelton
on Thursday.
Clarence Hoard, the engineer
in charge of the party, left Stewart on Sept. 22, accompanied by
W. A. Boultbee, G. W. Morris
and A. E. Tutt, with the object
of making a reconnaissance survey of the country between Portland Canal and the head waters of
the Naas and Skeena rivers. The
information the travelers were
able to obtain on the coast led
them to believe the journey could
be made in ten days, and only
provisions for that time were
taken, as back-packing was the
only means of transportation.
The first part of the trip was
negotiated without difficulty, but
it was found that the distance
had been greatly underestimated,
and before the party were half
way to the telegraph line, where
horses and supplies for the return
were in waiting, their food had
given out, and for the last sixteen days of the trip they were
compelled to live on berries, save
when they succeeded in killing
two porcupines and six grouse.
Weakened though they were by
hunger and fatigue, the surveyors
doggedly followed their course,
which they knew must in time
bring them to the telegraph trail,
and after three final days of privation, when they had to travel
through snow, which deprived
them of the chance to pick berries, the almost exhausted men
reached Sixth Cabin, on the telegraph line, where they were
anxiously expected.
The party displayed remarkable
powers of endurance, Mr. Hoard
especially showing plenty of
stamina. About the time the provisions failed, he was unfortunate
enough to dislocate his ankle,
making walking extremely painful, but he made shift to continue
the trip, without allowing his
mishap to delay the party.
At Sixth Cabin, where W. J.
Sweeney and an Indian awaited
the party, with horses and supplies, Operator Mooney, the explorers say, did wonders for their
comfort. In fact, they state, it
would be impossible for better
treatment to be accorded anyone
than the men along the line gave
them on their trip to Hazelton.
The journey to this town was
made in twelve days, which must
be considered quick time when
the lateness of the season is
taken into account. Owing to
the lack of feed on the trail and
the extremely bad travelling,
seven horses, out of eleven which
left Hazelton, died before the
party reached here.
Mr. Hoard and his companions
are reticent as to the object and
results of their reconnaissance,
but advices from Victoria indicate that they were exploring
for Sir Donald Mann's Canadian
[Continued on page eight.]
Witt Close Bridge
The Suspension Bridge over
the Bulkley, on the main wagon
road, will be closed to traffic from
Monday to Saturday, both days
inclusive. It is being widened
two feet.
Stewart Says Steel
Has Crossed Rockies
(Sppclnl  to The Miner)
Vancouver. Nov. 3 : ��� Contractor Stewart, of the firm of
Foley, Welch & Stewart, has arrived here, after a tour of inspection of the Grand Trunk Pacific.
He says the rails are already laid
across the summit of the Rockies,
through the Yellowhead Pass.
Tracklaying is now in progress
on the western slope, and it is
expected the steel will have
reached a point twenty miles east
of Tete Jaune Cache before the
middle of November. Equally
rapid progress, Mr. Stewart says,
is expected to be made in the
work on the 415 mile gap between
Aldermere and the Cache. From
Tete Jaune Cache the right-of-
way has already been cleared to
a point fifty miles nearer Fort
George, while on the western
end right-of-way work is completed for a distance of sixty
miles east of Aldermere, in the
direction of Fraser lake. When
the construction crews from west
and east meet, Foley, Welch &
Stewart will have built a line of
railway 1400 miles long, from
Saskatoon to Prince Rupert.
BRITISH nun TO
BETTER TERMS FROM
Provincial Ministers Will Confer with Dominion Cabinet On Many Questions Affecting Interests of the Province���Favorable
Legislation  Expected  At  Next  Session
Turks Hold Their Own
Tripoli: Skirmishing continues
between the lines of the Turkish
and Italian armies, without change
in the situation. Since the occupation of the city Italy has gained
no advantage.
STOLEN GOLD DISCOVERED
Part of Money Stolen from the Bank of
Montreal Found Under Sidewalk In
New Westminster
New Westminster, Nov. 2: ���
City workmen engaged in repairing the streets today found $25,-
000 of the $280,000 stolen from
the New Westminster branch of
the Bank of Montreal several
weeks ago. The money was discovered under a sidewalk, where
it had evidently been hidden by
the robbers on finding that they
had too much to carry. Further
developments are promised within a day or two.
Mann Under Surgeon's Knife
Toronto, Nov. 3:- Sir Donald
Mann, who has been seriously ill,
has successfully undergone an
operation for the removal of gall
stones and is recovering.
A Nonogenarian Convict
(Special tn Tho Miner)
Vancouver, Nov. 2:���John Taylor, aged ninety-two, the oldest
prisoner ever sentenced in a Canadian court, was given two years
for manslaughter in killing a companion in a drunken row in the
suburbs of Vancouver.
(Special to Tho Minor)
Victoria, Nov. 1:���Premier Mc
Bride and Attorney-general Bowser left today for Ottawa, going
by way of Seattle and Chicago.
At the Dominion capital they
will meet Hon. W. R. Ross for a
conference with Prime Minister
Borden and his colleagues. The
question of better terms, upon
which Mr. Borden has already
expressed himself favorably, will
be thoroughly discussed, as well
as other matters affecting the interests of British Columbia. It
is expected that legislation favorable to this province will be introduced at the earliest possible
moment. With regard to the
question of better terms, the ap-
pointmen t of a board of arbitrators as the first step is probable.
Other matters which will be
dealt with at the conference are
the provincial control of fisheries,
Indian reserves, wharves, river
and harbor improvements and
the regulation of Asiatic immigration, upon all of which the
former Dominion government refused to meet the wishes of the
province.
To Name Permanent
Tariff Commission
VERT GRAVE
Appalling Condition Reported In China, Where Imperial Troops Burn  Hankow
Halifax, Nov. 3:   The banquet
tendered Hon. R. L. Borden last
night by the Conservatives of his
There is a probability  of the; home city was the greatest event
province taking over the  admin- j of the kind ever held here.    The
istration of lands in the Canadian ' Prime Minister was in fine form,
and gave  an  optimistic  address
which    was   received   with  the
CONSTITUTION ACCEPTED
Throne Agrees To Restriction Of Emperor's Power, While Revolutionists
Continue To Gain Ground Shanghai
Taken by Rebels Without Resistance.
Pekin, Nov. 3:   While the revolutionists   seize Shanghai and
PUBLICITY CAMPAIGN
Hazelton will   be Widely Advertised in
Connection with Nev. G.
T. P. Townsite
Italian Cruelty Alleged
Rome, Nov. 3: The Italian
minister of war has issued a
denial of reports charging Italian
troops with brutality towards
women, children, the aged, infirm and non-combatants.
Clark Again Champing
Fredricton, Nov. 2:��� "Nine-
tenths of the people of the
United States favor the annexation of Canada," said Champ
Clark, speaker of the American
house of representatives in an interview here today. "I don't
care who hears me say it," he
continued, "I am willing to make
this proposition: Let me run for
president on a platform calling
for the annexation of Canada in
so far as the United States can
accomplish it, and let Taft run
against me opposing annexation,
and I will carry every state in
the Union,,"
Advices from the Natural Resources Security Co. to Aldous &
Murray, received yesterday, are
to the effect that the company is
perfecting plans for a campaign
of publicity which will result in
making Hazelton and its resources
known throughout the entire continent. The company is going to
concentrate its advertising on
Hazelton, as this town is so well
known, the new townsite across
the Bulkley being treated as a
part of Hazelton, which, in effect
it is. The people of the town are
assured that no time will be lost
in developing South Hazelton,
and important announcements
may be looked for in the immediate future.
Pacific railway belt in British Co-
lumbia.   It is also proposed that t ^   ,.���������,,,.,���.     ���,. ;il,   ^^  ,,_     ^   ^^
the provincial government repur-1 nounced the proposed establish- J the throne gignifieg its acceptance
chase the 3,500,000 acres in the | ment 0f a permanent tariff 10f the pian for anew constitution
Peace river district conveyed to commission for the purpose of prepared by the national assem-
"'"��"���� '   .".���"v.-rnm.-nl   as   :,   ,,,ril|.��� m���   ,,���,   l;(,iir ,���    ,-.-:^lbly.    The proposed  constitution
provides for the perpetuity of the
Manchu dynasty, but the power
of the Emperor is restricted.
The constitution is subject to
amendment by parliament.
The    situation    generally    is
growing worse, from  a government point of view.     No resistance was offered the  revolutionists at Shanghai, and they  have
service| occupied  the native portion of
the city and taken possession of
the arsenal.     The situation  at
Hankow is appalling.   A  conflagration swept over the city while
continuous lighting was in progress   between    the   rebels   in
possession and  the government
! forces.     Stray  bullets   dropped
Bombs Dropped  in Turkish  Camp���j into the British  concession,   but
Bombardment   of   City Continued By   djd    ,H>   harm.       The   rebels   are
Besieging Ottoman Army usmg ,onjf rjmge g.ung
Nankin and other cities are ex-
Tripoli, Nov. 2   For the  first pected to yield to the rebels  to-
time in the history of warfare; morrow,
dirigible air machines have  been,
successfully used   in the Italian-! c NR- To Pacific ,n I91?
Turkish war. The invading1 Winnipeg, Nov. 3:���The Cana-
forces succeeded in dropping four dian Northern has completed
bombs into the encampment of plans for the erection of a mag-
the Turkish army which is be-;nificent hotel in this city. The
sieging the city.    The casualties structure   will   cost   $2,000,000.
regulating  the  tariff upon  rea-
I subsidy for the construction of j sonable business principles.   The
J the Canadian  Pacific.     Nothing commission will"investigate con-
was done by the Laurier govern- ditions throughout Canada as afro ent to advance the settlement fected by the tariff, and will be
of this block  of land,   although I gjven time to  prepare a  j.eport
jthe provincial government was gi^ng its.conclusions before the
| ready and anxious to forward its government will take any  action
development. in tariff matters.
Speaking of the installation of j    M|.     B(),.den    aiso annnunced
the Duke of Connaught as Gov- that the g0vernment intended to
ernor-general,   Mr. McBride said extend Ule policy of civi-
the coming to Canada as Viceroy roform initiate(] whjle the Con.
of a member of the Royal family servatives   were   in  opposition
is a great move in Imperial affairs The premler   did   not ,.efer to
and cannot fail to have a good navai affairs
effect.
Upon the conclusion of the
conference the ministers will return directly to Victoria to make
p'reparations-for the opening of
the session of the provincial
legislature early in January.
AIRSHIPS USED IN TRIPOLI
EIGHT WERE KILLED
Girls
Employed   In    Powder   Factory
Meet Death In Explosion of
Giant Powder
Chehalis,   Wash..   Nov.   1:-
Eight girls were killed today in
an explosion which destroyed the i
powder factory of the Imperial j resulting from the explosion of I Officials of the company say the
Powder company here. All the the missiles are not known. i main line will be completed to the
victims were working in the The Italian lines have been' Pacific coast by the autumn of
packing room of the plant fold-1 drawn in until  they extend  but; 1913.	
ing giant powder in sticks when
tons of loose powder were by
some unknown means exploded,
destroying the entire plant. Not
one of the girls employed in the
packing room escaped death. The
plant, which was erected a year
ago, cost $250,000.
little beyond the city itself. The
Turks continue their bombardment of the city and defences in
an effort to recapture the place.
Little fighting is reported from
other points.
WILL START TUNNEL
Number   Two   Vein   on   American  Boy
Group to be Developed    Good
Ore in Eagle Shaft
Hallowe'en Party
In the Presbyterian club rooms
on Tuesday evening  Rev. D. R.
B. C. Ore Stolen
London, Eng., Nov. 3: Last
night a thief broke the window
of the Canadian Pacific railway
office in Trafalgar square and
stole valuable minerals from the
British Columbia exhibit. He
was not caught.
A Costly Blaze
London, Ont., Nov. 3:��� This
city had an $800,000 fire today.
Nearly a dozen stores were destroyed, including Chapman's
and Kingsmill's, (drygoods) and
Purdon's hardware store. The
conflagration, which is the largest in twenty years, throws five
hundred people out of employment.
Excellent   progress  is   being
made in the development of the
American Boy group, which was
Ontario'. Liberal. Will Fight on Tuesday evening Rev. D. R.  visited   by the  Miner man  the
Toronto, Nov. 3: Newton W. McLean and Mrs. McLean, with other day. Two shifts are work-
Rowell, K. C, the new leader of the assistance of the ladies of the \nf, jn tjle shaft on No. 3 or
the provincial Liberal party, is Presbyterian church, gave a Eagle vein, and a depth of 55
engaged in preparing a new plat- highly enjoyable Hallowe'en (Vet has been reached. The vein,
form for use in-the election cam- party, which was attended by a which had flattened somewhat
paign. The Liberals, it is an- good crowd. Both young and old has again taken ils normal pitch
nounced, will contest every seat appreciated to the full the excel- of about sixtv degrees and the
in Ontario. The election will be lent entertainment, which in- bottom of the shaft shows thirty
held next month. eluded  the  serving of   refresh- inches of fine  galena ore,   with
ments by the ladies. The affair not a little gray copper. ' It is
was only the first of a series of not to be expected that the re-
social evenings which it is in- cord 0f two feet a day> made so
tended to hold in the club rooms far> can be maintained at greater
Four Years for Manslaughter
(Special in Tho Miner)
Vancouver, Nov. 2: Ishibashi,
a Japanese, was found guilty of
the killing of a fellow countryman at the Naas Harbor cannery.
The jury having brought in  a
during the season.
Morice River Coal
The coal claims of the  Prince
recommendation to mercy with Rupert Coalfields,   Ltd.,  on  the
their verdict  ol   manslaughter
Dance Next  Friday
The next dance of the Assembly club will be held in the auditorium on Friday next. Good
music is promised and a large
attendance is looked for.
Justice Murphy sentenced the
prisoner to four years in the
penitentiary.
A Japanese Trick
London, Nov. 3: A large
quantity of inferior Japanese
salmon has been coming to this
depth, but with the installation
of a horse whim, which is contemplated, depth will be gained
rapidly.
Surveys for the tunnel  which
is to tap the big ore shoot on No.
Morice river, have been  survey-
ed. It is the intention of the I �� v'ei^lmve'been^oni^eted" an"d
management to finish the work preijmlnary work is now under
of prospecting next season, says way u h ex,)ei.ted thal Kround
P. M. Dockr.ll, the managing wl]1 be broken ear]y next week
director. Drilling will be resum- The tunmi, wi��� be ,.un neaHv m
ed in the spring, and the com-; feet ,)efo,.e st,.ikhlR the point
pany will begin development almed ior> when a aepth of no
work as soon m the construction; feet on the vein wi��� be had    An
average assay on the surface of
the vein, which is one of the
strongest in the camp, gives
values of $1)2 to $117.    Like No.
market recently under labels call
ing it Fraser River salmon.   The j of the G.   T.  P.   affords trans
High  Commissioner for British portation  facilities.      The   coal
Columbia    took    action   today, j measures   on     the    company's
causing the labels to be removed j ground will, it is said,  produce
from    a   consignment  of  1000 ] large quantities of steam coal of i~'{neVein TsTn excellent  nnsi
cases, ' good grade. i tion for development by tunnels, THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1011.
mnimeca
A Wonderful District
In an  interview published  in
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the the Vancouver Province, C. B.
Clarke, who recently bonded the
Dominion group from Carr Bros.,
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
Macdonald & Rauk, Publishers and Proprietors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $1.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 16 cents per line for tirst insertion, 10 cents per line for each subsequent
insertion.       Legal notices inserted at B. C. Gazette rates.
Vol. I.
Saturday, November 4, 1911.
No. 10.
To Prevent Wildcatting
Omineca district has so far been most fortunate in its freedom
from wild-cat mining flotations. With the opening up of our
great mineral resources, which cannot be much longer delayed,
there may be another tale to tell, unless some means are adopted
to nip in the bud any discreditable mining enterprises. We have
a great many prospects which, under careful and competent
management, are likely to develop into mines, and there will be no
difficulty in obtaining the necessary capital if the district is kept as
free of irresponsible promoters as it is at present.
Apropos of this subject, it is to be noted that at the last meeting of the western branch of the Canadian Mining Institute the
question of wild-catting was one of the leading topics of discussion.
said:
"There are greater evidences
of mineralization in the Hazelton
district than any other region I
ever visited. It will be a wonderful mining center as soon as
railway facilities are provided.
I searched the coast of Alaska
from end to end in a fruitless
quest for a good proposition, but
1 had to go to Northern British
Columbia before I secured what
I wanted. I can assure you that
I saw a better and more varied
assortment of ores on exhibition
in Hazelton than could be secured
in all the cabinet collections in
the towns of Alaska."
No Merchant Marine
The shipping interests of   the
The president, in an address to the association, expressed the opin-' United States look to the Panama I
ion that doubtful mining promotions could be prevented by adopt- j Canal as a means of restoring to|
ing   proper   precautions. In the first place, he maintained, the seas the Stars and Stripes. I
there must be reasonable grounds for believing that ore exists in! j he fact that the United States
payable quantities in the prospect. Secondly, the distribution of I has nomerchantmarine in foreign
capitalization between promoters'and treasury stock should be onUrade js unpalatable to Atlantic
a basis to provide for the development of the property. Thirdly, j and pacif}c coast people, but they
the management of the property should be placed in competent
hands. Fourthly, no promoters' stock should be placed on the
market until the claims are developed beyond the prospect stage.
It is our opinion that the solution of the problem lies in the
enforcement of laws covering the last three points touched upon.
It would prove almost, if not quite, impossible  to arrive at any
basis for judging the merits of an unproven property. The; and Stripes have now practically
opinion of a qualified and unprejudiced mining engineer that a! disappeared from the seas. The
property was worthy of development should be sufficient justifi- United States has only nine
cation for incorporation. The setting aside of suflicient shares; steamers in overseas foreign
for treasury purposes is a matter which may well come within the i trade. Not many people realize
jurisdiction of the provincial government. The most important' this fact, but it is so. TheAmeri-
point, and one upon which too much stress cannot be laid, is the j cai) \\.dg js rarely seen in the ports
character of the management of any  mining company  seeking to|0f other countries, while Great
do not seem to be able to arouse |
any interest in shipping matters
among the residents of the interior states. Not so many years
ago the United States had a strong
merchant marine,  but the Stars
mation on these 'points for the
guidance of congress.
The commission is insistent
that the revenue of the canal
shall go to pay not only the operating expenses, but to repay the
capital invested. Every legitimate means for raising revenue
should be adopted, says the report.
The commission has given much
thought to the disposition of land
in the canal zone, important because of its bearing upon the future administration of the zone
and the operation of the canal.
Of the 436 square miles of land in
the zone the government owns
363, of which 96 miles are occupied by the canal. A large part
of the government land will be
required for military, naval, and
other official purposes. It is
deemed essential that the Spanish
law shall continue to prevail to
prevent friction with the neighboring Panamanians in the cities
of Panama and Colon.
The commission wishes to get
rid of the great body of foreign
laborers who were imported to
dig the canal as soon as the work
is completed. They^now populate the established townsites,
and the commission declares that
they should be repatriated after
work no longer can be given
them.
As to the form of government
for the zone, the commission directs special attention to the military necessities, the canal being
deemed a military asset.
Provincial
Free Circulating
Library
AT ADAMS' DRUG
STORE
Call and Examine
V:
J. Mason Adams
DRUGGIST
Hazelton
J
Royal
Soft Drinks
are  made  here ��� "None  better
made anywhere"
obtain capital from the investing public. Great profits have been
made in mining, and those who use discrimination and judgment
in making investments in mining ventures have as good a chance
of success as in any other line of business, while the profits in successful mining enterprises are, as a rule, much greater than in
ordinary commercial business. The only safe rule for the investor who is not personally equipped to judge of the merits of a
property, is to be certain that the management of the company to
which he proposes to entrust his money is capable and honest.
Men of character, standing and experience in the mining business may be trusted, first, to see that the property they propose to
develop is of such a character as to give reasonable promise of
success; second, to conduct the operations of their company in an
efficient and economical manner, and finally, to see that every
shareholder gets a square deal.
An alluring field for investors is being opened up in Omineca
district, and it is certain there will be many gains and few losses
Britain has 11,563 ships in foreign j
trade, to say nothing of the home
trade boats; Germany has 2178, j
Norway 2149,  France 1517 and]
Japan 870, and these figures show
that the  United  States  is absolutely dependent on other countries for the carrying of her commerce.
For A Library Policy
An association has been formed to encourage the organization
and development of public libraries in this province. Its first
and immediate aim is to secure
Road Work Finished
With the exception of a little
work on the sleighroad from
Pleasant Valley to Francois lake,
the season's program of road improvement in this district has
been completed. On Monday
Road Superintendent Williscroft
returned from South Bulkley,
having inspected the sleighroad
from that point to Old Woman's
lake. This road, which will be
useful to settlers in that vicinity,
is on the line of the main trunk
road, and will, when converted
into a wagon road, form part of
the Pacific Highway.
,   . ,       I the passage of a modern public
if the peop e who put their money into mining enterprises here ,., .     c    , ,        ,,
A.      ,     ��� mi ,. ii- libraries act.    Such an act would
follow the rule given.      the government can, by making necessary
regulations, discourage the practices of irresponsible promoters;
but the best safeguard for the small shareholder is in the good
character and capability of the men to whom he entrusts the spending of his money. ^^^^____
An Important Discovery
In view of the considerable proportion of zinc in the ores of
this district, the announcement which comes from Nelson that a
practicable method of handling complex zinc ores has been discovered is of much importance to the mining men of Omineca. It
is stated that A. Gordon French, a metallurgist who has a small
plant in the Kootenay city, has succeeded in recovering the zinc
values in silver-lead ores without sacrificing the other contents.
The process, which is as yet secret, is said to consist in first
roasting the ore, then dissolving the zinc by the aid of a chemical
reagent, after which the zinc is recovered in metallic form by
electrolysis and the residue smelted for the silver and lead. The
miners of this district will wish the discoverer every success in his
efforts to perfect his process. If it proves practicable it will
greatly increase the value of ninety per cent of the mining properties in Omineca. _^_^__^__
The Chinese Situation
provide for the establishment of
library boards in any part of the
province, whether organized
municipalities or unorganized
districts, besides giving authority
to municipalities to levy a rate
for library purposes and would
make provision for a provincial
grant in proportion to the amount
raised locally, and provide for the
organization, inspection and assistance of public libraries in the I
province by an officer or officers ;
appointed by the government.
Anyone interested may obtain
full information from the B. C.
Library Association in Victoria.
The Panama Canal
Foreshadowing the early completion and opening of the Panama Canal, the Isthmian Canal
Commission, in its annual report,
just made public, recommends
congressional legislation governing canal tolls, organization for
the operation of the canal and for
Parcel Mail Refuted
It is reported that postoffices
throughout the country refuse to
accept fourth-class matter for
Hazelton, though the mail contract provides for sufficient
weight to include at least a part
of the parcel mail.
Try our Ginger Ale
Lemon Soda
Cream Soda
On Sale Everywhere
Royal Bottling Works
Hazelton, B. C.
..^..^..^..~ffi
JOIN ONE OF OUR
SUIT CLUBS
You may get a $20 Suit
for $2 or $3
Drawing Takes   Place  Every
Saturday Night
Noel & Rock
Hazelton, B. C.
Fifty-one Bunks of
Solid Comfort
Clean Beds, Clean Bunks,
Tobaccos, Cigars, Candies,
Nuts, Soft Drinks, Fruits in
Season, etc., etc.   ::   ::   ::
The Grand
Oppoiite  Hazelton  Hotel
Ferguson & Steele
Proprietor!
""Coffee
House
*JJ Where everything is well
cooked and appetizing.
Our Pies, Cakes, Cookies,
Doughnuts, Bread and Buns, are
the best.
Try a pound can of our Special
Blend Coffee. There is none better anywhere.
Hazelton Bakery
Opposite Hazelton Hotel
:
.��.-^-..-^..{g)
A. Chisholm
General  Hardware
Builders'   Material
Miners'  Supplies
Hazelton, B. C.
J
Why Buy a Ready-Made Mackinaw Suit when you can buy a
Tailor-Made
Mackinaw
Suit at<Dl C 50
The best Mackinaw
manufactured
.at$15:
Anger the Tailor
Opposite Police Station
lln/.llon,   II.   C.
The Manchu rule has resulted in the most complete and absolute conquest and thorough subjugation of the Chinese people, and
for two hundred and fifty years and more they have been the object
of cruel and unjust laws, no privileges whatsoever being granted to | government of the canal zone,!
them  and  the study of literature  the only field open  for their j utilization of canal revenue to pay
energies.     Official   positions were only given to Manchus, whose operating expenses and to repay
lives have been made easy for them, wealth being settled upon the capital invested.   Expedition
them at birth, so that no such thing as a poor Manchu has ever j is urged  in  order tc advise the
existed.    But this method, although giving them great power, has: commercial world  of  the use it
as surely resulted in decay.     Without incentive to work, their lives may  make of the great water-
have naturally been idle and given up to reckless and lavish expendi-! way, of the cost of sending ships
ture of the country's revenues.     Their  licentious habits have through it and just when it will1
turned the palace into a frightful house of misrule, with the natural, be opened,
consequence that the people of the country have been fleeced and j    The commission wishes to give
misgoverned to an  extent hardly paralleled in  the world.     The at least eighteen months' notice
result of this Iniquitous system has been the gradual awakening of of the rates, to permit the world's
the Chinese themselves to the manifold wrongs inflicted upon them,  maritime interests time to read-
wrongs which already, about one hundred years ago, led up to the!just their routes, to  build new;
demand that they should be qualified to hold official appointments,  ships and organize new   trans-
both military and civil.'   The granting of these privileges among i portation companies.   It is also
other causes has given rise to the hope which actuates the reformers deemed desirable to put the canal
in their effort to cast off the yoke of the alien rulers against whom to use as early as possible, not
they have rebelled.     One of the results of the defeat of China by only to   secure financial returns
the Japanese has been the creation of a feeling of patriotism J on the enormous capital invested,
hitherto unknown in the ancient kingdom, and in the very probable; but to make possible the passage
event of success attending the revolution, the solidarity which is j of the world's fleets without con-
becoming evident in Chinese national life will make the Flowery I fusion or delay.   The commission
Kingdom a power to be reckoned with. I is already preparing much infor-1
Quality Right
ARGENT
Prices Right
The Favorites
In Footwear
SHOE PACS
Long-wearing
Comfortable
Nine inch top, Soled and Nailed, regular $7 now $6.00
Twelve inch top, Soled and Nailed, regular $8.50 now $7.50
UNDERWEAR
A complete assortment
of the best garments
in medium and
heavy weights
for
Fall and Winter Wear
Better call and select
what you require before sizes are
broken
RUBBERS
A complete line of new
and reliable goods
All Styles
All Sizes
for Men and Women
You'll find good service
and complete satisfaction in these
rubbers
Hazelton
���ARGENT
GENERAL MERCHANT
Telkwa THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4, mi.
aw
The Hub of* the Hazelton District of British Columbia
On the Main line of the Grand Trunk Pacific
REGISTERED TOWNSITE
The Prosperity of Every Great City is Due to its Geographical Location
NEW HAZELTON
The most important Townsite!    The most talked of Townsite on the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway
THE SPOKANE OF CANADA THE SPOKANE OF CANADA
New Hazelton Townsite
Section 1
Now being offered for sale is not a
Grand Trunk Pacific Promotion
Townsite. NEW HAZELTON Town-
site was selected by the experts of
a syndicate of successful men as the
geographical location for a big city.
They bought the land, realizing the
wonderful resources of the Hazelton
District, the Mines, the Distributing Centre for hundreds of miles,
and many other reasons.
We ask you to investigate in your
own way all of the statements in this
advertisement. Should you join us
by buying lots you will know that
your investment is guarded by every
means known to human foresight,
and the judgment of a body of successful men known to you all.
Your profits should eclipse the story
of Edmonton, Calgary, Regina, Moose
Jaw or Prince Rupert.
Don't be classed among the failures WHO WILL SAY, "I WISH   I   HAD
known." don't stand idly by and
see your neighbors reap the profits
on Real Estate while you reap
nothing but your salary. put your
savings to work in that sure coming
City-NEW HAZELTON.
NEW HAZELTON is out of the
damp belt, aud many people who
spend the whole year in the district
say the winters are not severe���plenty
of sunshine and dry air.
Taken from Official Bulletin, B.C.
No. xxii, Page xxiii:���
"On the Upper Skeena, about a
distance of 50 miles, there are large
tracts of land on both sides of the
river, which, as far as soil and climatic conditions are concerned, I
would consider ideal for successful
growing of fruit as well as for other
branches of agriculture. Potatoes,
and all garden produce, grow to per
fection."
HAVE YOU CONFIDENCE OF
MERCHANTS ON THE GROUND?
Many Lots already purchased
by the keenest business men of
Hazelton (Old Town). You can
safely   follow  the  judgment of
SUCH MEN.
NEW HAZELTON should be the
centre of a busy population of thousands within a year. Why not? During the past year there was an average of over two new towns created
in the Canadian West every week.
We are all here to share in this
most wonderful prosperity. We offer
you an opportunity to participate in
the progress of the best town for
investment on the line of the Grand
Trunk Pacific.
NEW HAZELTON Railroads Open
New Country.
Railroads have been the great feature
in the growth of Western Canada.
NEW HAZELTON, located on the
Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad is attracting the attention of the whole world, as
all important towns do on the main line
of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad.
Stores are going up. Newspaper
plant about to move on the Townsite.
Two or three General Merchandise
Stores, Drug Store, Bank, Restaurants, and in fact many lines of trade
are now arranging to open in NEW
HAZELTON, Section One. Activity
is in that part of the Townsite known
as Section One.
INVESTMENTS
Made in towns with the
Right Kind of Country
Right Kind of Resources
Right Kind of People
Will surely be big paying investments.   This is the kind
of town you find at
NEW HAZELTON, B.C.
The story of NEW HAZELTON is
well known to the public. It is a
Townsite being offered to the public
by successful business men. There is
positively no Railroad Company or
Townsite Promoter financially interested in THE land. The owners
have undertaken to make NEW HAZELTON a city of importance in British
Columbia. NEW HAZELTON promises to be the most profitable city to
the Grand Trunk Pacific along its main
lines.
Offices Removed
The offices of Foley, Welch & Stewart
are now located in NEW HAZELTON.
Union Bank of Canada will open a
branch in NEW HAZELTON. Sectional
building and supplies en route for new
branch.
NEW HAZELTON, the hub of the
Hazelton District, will be the natural
headquarters for what promises to  be
the    MOST    ACTIVE    AND    SENSATIONAL
NEW city in the fastest growing part
of the world today on account of the
wonderful Lead and Zinc Mines, the
Groundhog Mountain Coal Fields, the
vast agricultural country tributary to
the coming principal city in British
Columbia on the Grand Trunk Pacific
Railroad.
The Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad is
now running regular trains over 100
miles out of Prince Rupert. The G. T.
P. Officials, and also the G. T. P. Contractors, say that the railroad should be
running to Mile 164 this winter, and
will reach NEW HAZELTON
next summer. Grading is now under way as far along the line as
30 miles east of NEW HAZELTON.
The grading is about finished from
Prince Rupert to NEW HAZELTON.
Many mines are getting ready to ship
ore. Some of the mines being developed
are: Silver Cup, American Boy, Silver
Standard, Sunrise and Sunset, Lead
King, Erie, Babine. Most of the ore
in NEW HAZELTON mines is high
grade Silver-Lead, similar to ore in the
Slocan District in East Kootenay,
B.C., and similar to some ores found at
Leadville, Colo.
Buy Lots
Terms Are Easy
Look them over again,  and think of
this money-making investment.
Prices:
Business Lots
$350 to $500
33 x 100 (according to location) Per Lot
Terms: One-third cash, balance 1 and 2 years at 6 per cent
Residence Lots  -   $100 to $300
Terms: $10 cash, $10 per month; No Interest; or One-
third  cash ;   balance 1 and 2 years at 6 per cent.
Make Cheques, Drafts, Money and Express Orders payable to NORTHERN INTERIOR LAND CO., LTD.
Out of City Investors
Can reserve one or more Lots by
wire or letter. State price of Lots and
number required, and we will make the
best available reservation for you.
Remember NEW HAZELTON is
not a gift Townsite, and when you
buy a lot in it you are investing
your money on the business judgment of the most successful men in
British Columbia.
NEW HAZELTON Townsite had
over a QUARTER OF A MILLION
DOLLARS INVESTED by a few business men before the Lots were offered for sale. NEW HAZELTON is a
Business Man's Townsite. All the G.
T. P. and local history was carefully
considered. The Engineers' Reports as
to grades, opportunities for Side Tracks
necessary to handle the thousands of
freight cars were examined. Then
they invested in NEW HAZELTON.
They paid in Cash for NEW HAZELTON and nearby lands over TWO
HUNDRED AND FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS.
That is a wonderful sonnet written by
John J. Ingallson the subject of Opportunity, but the real fact is Opportunity
does not knock once on each man's
door. Opportunity plays a continual
anvil on every man's portals- but of
course, if he is knocking at tho time he
will not hear Opportunity when she
knocks.
New Hazelton
Where the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad has Sixty Acres of right-of-way
and track grounds.
NEW HAZELTON is reported by
Engineers to be the only available spot
in the Skeena or Bulkley Valleys for
many miles each way where it would
be possible to have Railroad Yards large
enough to handle the Hazelton District's
business.
NEW HAZELTON affords a long,
nearly level, stretch of land suitable for
Immense Yards, which will be required
to handle the thousands of cars of ore
and coal that will be shipped from the
mines in the Hazelton District.
The G. T. P.
CAPITAL of Grand Trunk Railway
and the Grand Trunk Railway Systems,
$447;898,932.
Over 50,000 Stockholders, G. T. and
G. T. P. Millions of people boost for
Grand Trunk Pacific Townsites.
Maximum grade of G. T. P. is 21 feet
to the mile, one-fifth of any other Transcontinental Railroad in Canada or the
United States.
NEW HAZELTON is the Town that
everybody is talking about, and there
are no two opinions as to its opportunities for investments.
NEW HAZELTON la situated near
the junction of the Skeena and Bulkley
Valleys.
THE NORTHERN INTERIOR LAND
CO., LTD., PAID CASH FOR AND
OWN (SECTIONONE) NEW HAZELTON TOWNSITE AND GUARANTEE
jTO DELIVER TO PURCHASERS OF
LOTS AN INDEFEASIBLE TITLE
UPON RECEIPT OF FINAL PAYMENT.
ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO
Northern Interior Land Co., Ltd.
Prince Rupert, B.C.
P. O. Box 1515
Prince Rupert Agent for Sale of Lots
Jeremiah H. Kugler, Ltd.
Second Avenue between Fifth and Sixth Sts.
Hazelton Agent for Sale of Lots
W. Kennedy THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1911.
It is important
for you to
i 1^ that I have stock and
; IVllvJW   appliances to turn out
I all kinds of CARRIAGE WORK,
I special     Sleighs,     Wagon     and
j Sleigh   Brakes,   Etc.
|   C. F.WILLIS
l      General Blacksmith
:   Repairing
Job Work
Horseshoeing a Specialty
HAZELTON, B. C.
TOTEMS AND THEIR ORIGIN
An Authority Tells What the British
Columbia Indians Mean When They
Carve Their Picturesque Emblems.
Mines  and  Mining
Good Properties for sale     ("ash or on
Bond.       Development and
Assessment   Work.
Carr Brothers
Six Years In This District.
Hazelton, B. C.
I  For Fine  Cigars,   Cigarettes  ���
i and Tobaccos go to j
I      G.T.P.      j
I Cigar Store and \
\    Pool Room    \
I .      i
l    Soft Drinks, Confectionery,    |
j Books and Magazines )
1 l
) Baths In Connection I
I J. B. Brun,    - -    Proprietor )
Public Telephone
Hazelton
Two-Mile
Taylorville
Sealey
HAZELTON OFFICE:
SLINGER & AYERDE
CIGAR STORE
Draying J
All orders promptly and carefully I
executed [
Leave your orders at C. F. Willis' (
Blacksmith Shop
E. C. Stephens
A. Price Augustine, C.E.
British Columbia   Land  Surveyor
Will return to Hazelton about Nov. 1,
1911. Orders for land, timber or mineral claim surveys will be received at
the office of Aldous, Robertson &
Murray, Hazelton.
ISSUES
riCKKTS
HAZELTON HOSPITAL
for nny period from on. month upwftrd at $1 par
month In mvmico.  Thisnit. Includes offlcs con"
nilltlitinllH Itlll!  RIBdlClnM, fcl WI'll !IH llll I'llHtH Wllill1
in tho hni.|iiiiii. Tickets obt.ln.bla in Htsolton
from B, 0. Stephenson Mid Prod Heidi In a|i|��t-
niiTi1. from Rav. K. L. Stephenson, or at tin- Bat*
jiitnl frnni the Miiiii'nl Superintendent.
"Anthropology is the science
of man embracing' woman, according to a lady of fame," said
Professor Hill-Tout in a lecture
on "Totemism" before the Arts,
Historical and Scientific Associ-
tion in Vancouver, but what anthropologists or ethnologists
were, he did not explain. In
treating with his subject he stated
that the lady who had given the
above definition had really been
quite correct. In the study of
savages, the women had to be
considered as well as the men.
"Totemism," he explained,
was another word for religion,
and did not signify only the
poles people were in the habit of
seeing up the coast, but the whole
basis on which the social and
religious rites of the Indians were
founded.
Taking the religious side first,
\ the totem of an Indian or a clan
stood for the spiritual being he
or they worshipped. They did
not bow the knee, so to speak, to
the piece of wood, but to the God
or spirit represented by the figure
carved upon it.
When a youth came to the age
i of puberty he was sent out to the
wilderness to find his totem. To
do this he went away by himself
and fasted, took violent exercise
in the way of swimming and running, and so reduced himself to a
receptive condition, and then in
his sleep he would dream, and
the animal or object of which he
dreamed would be his totem.
The reason that birds, fish, animals, canoes, etc., were so often
chosen by them was because they
were so intimately connected
with them; using them, chasing
them and thinking of them, as
the case might be, almost every
hour of the day, these things
would naturally come to them in
their dreams.
When   an   Indian   was   lucky
enough to dream of an animal of
the chase, he would,  in future,
according to his idea, be better
able   to   capture    it   than   his
brethren, for he himself is  part
: of that animal, and   his   totem,
being the spirit of that animal,
would assist him to bring it  to
him.   At the same time he, in
i his turn, had to treat the animal
i with proper respect.    He had to
; kill it in a certain way, gather
| its hair and skin and the offal
together, and put it into a stream,
where it was supposed to be able
to come to life again and return
to its herd.
One of the peculiarities of the
American Indian was that he
looked at everything dually, giving it a spiritual as well as a
bodily existence. They also looked on objects and ideas as either
hostile or friendly, from which
sprang their superstition; they
were always fostering the friendly things, and trying to get on
the right side of the hostile, or
again making the friendly overcome the hostile.
The medicine men or doctors
were men who had special communion with the good spirits.
From the social point of view,
the  totem   played  an important
part. It might be of interest to
those who held with Evolution
to know that the science was
traceable amongst the Indians.
Following out the idea that the
present race of mankind was
evolved from a lower species, the
savages of both America and
Australia had their matriarchal
and patriarchal periods. In the
first, the father was not considered one of the family; the mother
and her offspring constituted
' what was called the family. The
father was practically non-existent. With the patriarchal
system, the second grade, the
father was supreme, and the
mother a mere chattel; the next
was the combination, where father
and mother made up the family.
Another peculiarity noticeable
was that one tribe, the bears,
for instance, could not marry
into the bears; they would have
to chose from the beavers or
some other clan. This was an
excellent system, and though the
origin of it had puzzled the heads
of ethnologists, he thought it was
started either as a protective
measure against immorality, or
with a view to becoming more
friendly with another clan.
When the matriarchal system
was in vogue, the totem was
carved with the mother's or her
brother's emblem.
There were three kinds of
totems : The commemorative,
which was raised in honor of a
man like a statue. The mortuary
pole, which was a kind of personal totem of a deceased man,
and would show where he came
from and where he had relations.
The clan totem represented the
father's totem; in the chief's
place, if it were patriarchal, or
the mother's emblem, if it were
matriarchal.
When a man decided to build
a house, either for his family or
for a whole clan, as was often
done in the early days, he immediately called the carver, and
set him to work to carve the
front of the house with his totem.
Some of these houses were from
60 to 90 feet broad and from 100
to 300 feet long. One was
known to be 900 feet long and 60
feet wide. In these a whole clan
would live.
Sash and Door Factory
Hazelton's New Industry
Full stock of all kinds and sizes of Window
Sash, Doors, Office Fixtures, Interior Finishings
on hand or Made to Order.
Large stock of Lumber and Building Materials, Tinsmithing, Plumbing and Steamfitting.
Job and Shop Work a Specialty.
Plans and Specifications.
Stephenson & Crum
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS
Hazelton
Britain's New Battleship
Great Britain's largest and best
armored battleship King George
V, has been launched successfully. The King George V has
been on the stocks two weeks
less than the average Dread-
naught, having been laid down
on January 16 last. The vessel
has a displacement of 23,000 and
her principal dimensions are:
Length 555 feet, beam 89, draft
27 1-2. The armament consists
of 13.5 inch guns and twenty-
four 4-inch guns. Engines of
31,000 horsepower are expected
to furnish a speed of 21 knots an
hour.
British Columbia Gold
From the gold-producing standpoint, the present year promises
to show a marked increase for all
parts of the province. Although
the annual clean-ups have yet
to be made for 1911, fully one
million dollars' worth of fine gold
have been received at the Dominion assay office at Vancouver to
date. Of this amount the Koote-
nay district has contributed $200,-
000; Cariboo, $300,000; Atlin,
$300,000; Yukon, $100,000, and
probably another $100,000 from
Alberta, the Skeena and Vancouver Island. The big returns for
the year will not be available for
some weeks.
plorer, who accompanied Rasmus-
sen, obtained from Cook's Esquimaux assistant, Etukishuk, the
box which Cook alleged contained
the instruments and papers which
would prove his polar discovery
claims.
The box contains only a broken
sextant and other instruments,
but no papers. According to
Fruehen, Etukishuk said that
Cook's story of the trip to the
Pole was absolutely untrue.
CANCELLATION OP RESERVE.
NOTICE Is hereby irlvon thai tho raservo oxlst-
tng nn viu'iuii Crown land, in Rango 5, Coast i)i��t-
riot, notloa of which, bearing date ot May 25th,
Mini, wn�� published In tho British Columbia Qasstte
<>f Mhv 20th, 1BI0, in uncoiled In so fur ns tha samo
relates i" tlw lands surveyed no Lots Ix7��, 1K7H.
1879, 1800, 1808, 1894, 1896, i896, 1897, 1898, HMH).
2507, amiH, 2509, 2510. ail I nml 2512, Ranga 0. Coast
District. ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands,
Department of Lands.
Victoria, n. ('.. Ainc. 16, 1011. n-:io
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
Notice is hereby given that thi-' reserves established over vacant Crown lands in ittintrcs 4 and
6, Coast District, by notices bearing dates respectively of December 17th, 1IKIK, May 5th, 1010,
and May 2~>, 1910, which were published in the
British Columbia Gazette in the issues of December 17th, 11X18, May 12th, 1910, and May 26th, 1910,
are cancelled in so far as the same relates to the
lands surveyed as Lots 387, 388, 532, 538, 534, 635,
530, 537, 538, 589, 540, 541, 1111,1112, 1113, 1114, 1115,
1110, 1117, 1118, 1119, 1120, 1121, and 1122 all in
range 4, Coast District; and lots 41128, 4029, 4030,
4031, 3022a, 3030, 3031a, 8048, 3044, 3591. 1933, and
4934, all In range 5, Coast Distric t.
Lands Department. R. A. lien wick,
Victoria, B. C. Deputy Minister of Lands.
October 11, 1911.
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that; the reserve existing on vacant lands of the Crown, notice of which
was published in the British Columbia Gazette in the
issue of May 5th, 1910, and bearing dale of
May 5th, 1910, is cancelled in bo far as the
same relates to the lands surveyed as Lots 2317,
2318, 2319, 2320, 2321, 2322, 2828, 2824, 2325, 23211,
2327, 2329, 2330. 2331, 2332, 2331, 2335, 2330, 2:137,
2:139, 2311, 2342, 2313, 2347, 2348, 23I8A, 2310. 2850,
2358. 2309, 24118, 3113, 3114, 3116, 311(1, 3117, 3118, 3119,
312(1. 3121, 3122, 3123, 3121, 3125, 3120, 3127, 3128, 3129,
3130, 3131, 3132, 3133, 3134, 3135, 3136 3137, 3138, 3139,
3140, 3141, 3142, 8142A, 3143, 3144, 3145, 3140, 3147.
3148, 3148A, 3149, 315(1, 31351, 3152, 3153, 3154, 3155.
3150, 3157, 3158, 3159, 8160, 3161. 3102, 3103, 3164, 8165,
8166, 3167, 3168, 3169, 3170, 3171, 3172, 3173, 3174, 3175,
3176, 3177, 3178, 3179, 3184, 2187,3187 and 3188, Range
6, Coast District.        ROBERT A. RENWICK,
Deputy Minister of Lands.
Department of I .amis,
Victoria, B. C, Aug. 10, 1911. n-30
CANCELLATION OF RESERVE.
NOTICE is hereby given that the reserves existing over vacant Crown lands in Ranges 4 and 5,
Coast District, notices of which, bearing dates of
May 5th, 191(1 and May 25th, 1910, respoctivly, were
published ill the issues of the British Columbia
Gazette of May 5th and May 26th, 1910, are cancelled in so fares the same relates to lands surveyed
as Lots 785, 786, 787, 788. 789, 7011, 791, 791a, 792, 793,
79-1, 795. 850, 857, 956, 959. 860, Ml. B82, 893, 851. 885,
866, 8(17, BBS, 809, 87(1, 871. 872. 873, 1158, 1159, 1160,
1164, 1105, 1100, 111!!, 1168, 1109. 107, 408, 817, 1174,
1176, 1182, 1189, 1191, 1192, 12II1A, 1188, 1187, 119(1,
782, 788, 784, 781, 780, 313, 777A, 7(1 and 1180, all in
Range 4, Coast District; and Lots 2188A. 1020, 1023
3814 and 3820, all in Range 5, Coast District.
ROBERT A. RENWICK.
Deputy Minister of Lands,
Department of Lands.
Victoria, Ii. ft. Aug. 10. 1911. n-30
Latest Jewelry Novelties in  Gold
and Silver.   High grade watches.
Watch Repairing.
O. A. RAGSTAD,    Hazelton
"Everything in Canavs"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
Prince Ilium I. B.C.
Arctic Explorers Lost
A message received at Copenhagen from Greenland says that
Knud Rasmussen, the Danish explorer, failed to discover any
traces of Captain Elmar Mikkel-
sen and his companions, who
after having been rescued on the
coast of East Greenland last year,
left their party to search for
traces of the lost explorer, Erich-
sen. Rasmussen expresses the
fear that Mikkelsen and his party
have perished.
Freuhen, another Danish ex-
Phillips & Lindquist
Builders and Contractors
Plans  and  Specifications.     Store  and
Office Fixtures a Specialty.
P. O. box 812 Hazelton
Stephenson & Crum
Undertakers and
Funeral Directors
Special attention to Shipping Cases
Hazelton, B. C.
Hotel Premier
Prince Rupert
It is the best place to
stay. European and
American plan. Electric
lights, hot and cold running water on every
floor. No extra charge
for bath.     ::   ::    ::   ::
(     Rates:   $1 to $3 per day    (
I
Fred W. Henning, manager
I DRY LUMBER
Ready for Building in the
New Town
^
Get prices from us before you build in New Hazelton.       We
are ready with the goods
fnterioTTumber Company
Hazelton
I
Omineca Hotel
Hazelto
^ This hotel is headquarters for all mining and commercial men
visiting Omineca district.
Good Sample Rooms
Baths and Barber Shop
Hot and Cold Water
People desiring to visit Bulkley Valley and point" south may
travel by the Bulkley Valley Stage, which leaves this hotel for Aider-
mere and Telkwa every Tuesday and Friday.
J. C. K. Sealy, Prop.
(T
4
MEN'S WEAR
that gives Satisfaction,
and Reliable
Boots and Shoes
^
^
are Specialties at
LARKWORTHY'S
STORES
Hazelton and Sealey
J
& EXPRESS CO.
HAZELTON, B. G.
fl
Stage leaves every Friday and every Tuesday morning
at 8 o'clock for Aldermere and Telkwa. Returning,
leaves Aldermere and Telkwa Tuesday and Friday
arriving  here   Wednesday   and   Saturday   at   noon.
Horses for hire for private parties.
Horses, Oats, Wheat and Bran for sale.
E. E. Charleson, Manager
(f~-
^
Fairbanks-Morse
Gasoline Donkey
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Vancouver, B. C.
V
e
inner $2 a year THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1911.
Provincial Elections Act
Skeena Electoral District
TAKE NOTICE that I have received objection in writing to the retention of the following names on the Register of Voters for the
Skeena Electoral District, on the grounds
Btated below:
AND TAKE NOTICE that at a Court of
Revision to beheld at the Court House, Prince
Rupert, B.C., on the 6th day of November,
1911, at ten o'clock in the forenoon, I shall
hear and determine said objections, and unless
such named persons or some other Provincial
Voter on their behalf satisfies me that such
objections are not well founded, I shall strike
such names oir the said Register.
J. H. McMULUN,
Registrar of Voters
Dated this 11th day of October, 1911
The following persons are reported absent
from the District:
NO.
NAME
PLACE
NO.
NAME
PLACE
17 Alexander, James Prince Rupert
18 Alexander, John     " "
34 Ancell, Hubert M    "
40Anderson, James     " "
46 Anderson, Orville .. .-Georgetown
53 Applegreen, Frank Port Simpson
64Arbo, Robert Bateman's Landing
55 Archer, Fred  Prince Rupert
56 Armstrong, A     " "
59 Armstrong, John B     " "
70Augustine, A. P._     "
71Auld, Peter      " "
80 Bailey, Charles Edward .   "
81 Bailey, John     "
84 Baillie, George M.     "
88Bain, Hugh...     "
90 Ball, George Alexander .   -'
96 Banville, Louis     " "
115 Basker, John Daniel    " "
117 Bateman, -Herbert V     " "
121 Baxter, David     "
123 Bay lay, Francis Port Essington
129 Beaulieus, Louis Prince Rupert
131 Beamish, John     " "
161Bergin, D. J...     "
163Bermingham, M. Cornelius.. _
'  Klun Kowi Bay
166 Berteaux, Henry S. Prince Rupert
168 Bianco, Victor     " "
170Birch, Hugh Bernard....    *'
171 Birnie, Thomas Carfrae .   " "
177 Black, William David...    "
178 Blackburn, Samuel Port Essington
186 Blanchfield, W. J ...Prince Rupert
189Blenkinsop, Alfred W...Port Essington
191 Blue, Alexander Prince Rupert
198 Bond, Richard James Port Simpson
200 Booth, Patrick D Prince Rupert
207 Boucher, Eugene Ernest-   " "
210 Bourdon, Eli    "
211 Bourgon, Joe     "
224 Bragg, William Thomas-    "
225[Branscombe, Frank Port Essington
228jBrawn, Wilfrid Percival.Prince Rupert
232 Bremner, John     "
233]Brendon, Ernest Aldermere
24l|Brewster, Gilbert   Carlyle
249lBrin, Arthur R_. .Prince Rupert
250! Brin, Harry K      "
251 Brindle, Arthur St. C Hazelton
252 Briscoe, Thomas Prince Rupert
255|Brody, Philip      "
26l'Brown, Arthur     "
263'Brown, Edward. ...Port Simpson
239!Brown, Harold Prince Rupert
270J Brown, Henry Hughes Surf Inlet
278;Brown, Robert  Hazelton
280! Brown. Samuel A  Prince Rupert
28l|Brown, Victor      "
283 Brown, William  Irving
284jBrown, William Prince Rupert
287Brownbridge, William...
288 Browne, Beverley W	
289'Brownley, John J	
298^Buchan, Frank Smith....
299]Buchan, James 	
300Buckley, Fred	
306'Burbidge, Henry	
316: Burwash, Peter. _  Surf Inlet
320;Butchart, J. C.  Port Simpson
3221 Butler, Charles. Prince Rupert
325JButtimer, George Allan Carlisle
32l!Caib, Joseph  Prince Rupert
332'Cain, Norman V.    ������
335!Callaghan, Patrick    ������
343 Cameron, James     "
345 Cameron, John      "
347 Cameron, Lawrie W ...Maple Bay
355]Campbell, Alex. Dugald.Prince Rupert
36rCampbell, John Alexander "
363!Campbell, John Allison..   "
365!Campbell, John Joseph..   "
366jCampbell, Murdoch.    "
369 Caprechotie, Luigi    "
397 Carter, Alfred St. Leger    ������
398 Carter, Alfred Thomas Hazelton
405 Casey, George B Prince Rupert
415Chapman, John    "
419'Charlds, George    "
428 Chretien, Frank    ������
435 Christie, William    "
443]Clarke, Fred      "
449 Clarke, Fred Leon        "
458|Clazue, Herbert Nadun..   "
473 Cody, Patrick Port Simpson
481'Coles, Thomas    Prince Rupert
487 Collins, John Port Essington
488Collins, W. J ..Prince Rupert
497]Conway, John     "
602Cooler, Simeon      "
504'Coons, Harry     "
SOTCopley, Charles Stanley.   "
682Coulombo, Ernest   .. Hole in the Wall
523|Court, Frank Irving
524 Coutu, Guatave A. Aberdeen
533|Cowell, James Dene .Hazelton
542 Craig, Thomas Prince Rupert
544
545
653
Cramb, Henry
Cratts, Charles Wadhams
Cross, James William .Queen Charlotte
657 Cruickshank, Alexander .Prince Rupert
560Cullen, James Edwin    "
563Cullon, Hartley ....Kispiox
686Dann, Alfred John Prince Rupert
590Dault, William    "
591 Daus, Ian Gordon Claxton
594!David, Clement .Prince Rupert
695 Davidson, James H. G...   "
598'Davies, Evan Lewis G...   "
606 Davis, John __ .Claxton
607]Davis, Wilfrid Wolfe ..Prince Rupert
621 Deavlllei George William.Naas Harbour
623JDeletang, Roland ... ...PrinceRupert
628pemerest, Robert Bertram	
  Hole in the Wall
63llDeMille, Willard Prince Rupert
633iDemray, David    "
642'Desautels, Albert E    "
643 Deslongschamps, Charles   "
649,DeWolr, Paul AlexanderPortEssington
654]Dilworth, W. McG PortSimpson
655]Dimsdale, Henry George.Prince Rupert
666Dineen, Lionel S. C PortSimpson
658Dinsmore, Isaac A  Stewart
660Dleney, Joseph Port Essington
663 Dobing, John G Prince Rupert
667jDohaney, George Ernest.   " "
669 Doherty, James   Hazelton
670Dolan, Thomas Prince Rupert
672 Don, John   Refuge Bay
674 Donald, James Port Simpson
678 Donahue, James Prince Rupert
680 Donovan, Dennis.
682Dorward, Davie.
688 Dow, H	
689 Dow, Jack	
692Doyle, James ...
693 Doyle, John	
703 Drew, Ernest J.
707 Dryden, JamesEdward. .Hole in the Wall
711 Dunomel, George Aldermere
712 Duke, Charles Francis...Prince Rupert
713|Dumas, William
717
719
720
722
733
743
Duncan, George Crichton   "
Dunlevy, Martin Garvis Hazelton
Dunlevy, Stanley P..  Hazelton
Dunn, Christopher Prince Rupert
Durran, John     ������
Earle, Norman S    "
744|Eastcott, Henry.         ������
766 Elliott, William John...    "
7C8| Ellison, Charles    ������
772;Elsworth, Loren    "
778|Engle, August William.-   "
784 Erickson, Alex  Port Simpson
787Erickson, Frederick Prince Rupert
788;Erickson, John Port Simpson
789Ervin, Richard Calvin .--Prince Rupert
794!Eetches,Harold Charles..   ������
802'Evindson, Olaf....    ������
803|Evitt, Charles Vernon...   ������
812 Fanell, John ._    -
813|Farand, Hector    "
815Farquharson,WmFranklin "
824] Ferguson, Fred C -   ������
825 Ferguson, Ivor..    "
826|Ferguson, John W    "
827Ferguson, R    ������
830!Ferris, Herbert William Surf Inlet
833jFillmore, Albert Prince Rupert
835Findlay, Duncan B Surf Inlet
842 Fitzgerald, Godfrey Prince Rupert
844 Fitzsimmons, John    "
845 Flanagan, Frank John...    "
846 Flanagan, Frank -    "
854!Flint, William     "
856i Flynn, James     "
860|Foran, James    "
861 Forbes, Alexander    "
862 Forbes, Alex. Duff    "
868 Forster, Joseph    "
879 France, Benjamin..     "
883 Franuk, Harry.. __   ������
893 Fraser, William    ������
896Freeman, Barnabas C.PortEssington
898|Freeman, Jake  Port Simpson
899JFreeman, RansonO Telegraph Point
900Freeney, Frank R  Stewart
902]Fritchett, R  Prince Rupert
903|Frith, F. W...     "
906;Fritchett, Emilus     "
918Gagne, Bernard....     "
922]Galbraith, James     " "
924]Gall, James     *'
926 Galloway, Everett    ,'
927jGalorne, Peter     "
931'Gammie, John     "
932 Gardener, Robert S. M..   "
935 Gaudette, Robert G. --.-    "
936Gaudreau, Joseph     " "
938Geardner, John __     "
943 George, James Surf Inlet
963
955
956
959
963
967
973
Gibson, William  Hazelton
Gifford, Thomas. Prince Rupert
Gilfillan, Alexander     " '
Gillespie, Michael     "
Gillis, Angus    "
Gillis, Jones     " "
Gilmore, William  Dawes   " "
975]Gingras; Fred.
979
986
991
992
993
994
999
1008
1012
1014
1019
1020
1023
1030
1031
1035
Godreau, Louis      " "
Gold, John...     "
Gosling, Joseph Port Essington
Gough, Ernest Hampton.Prince Rupert
Gould, Archie R    "
Goulet, Joseph Eugene..   "
Graham, Fred William...Port Simpson
Grant, Albert Edward...Prince Rupert
Grant, Hugh   Hazelton
Grant, Robert Alexander. .Port Simpson
Grasset, Gordon F Telegraph Point
Graves, William Prince Rupert
Gray, John.      " "
Greenwood, P     " "
Greenwood, Peter     " "
Griffin, Fred     "
1040]Griffith, Joseph Allan ...     '
1045 Guest, Howard     "
1046JGuilbault, Ormond     "
1047jGunning, James     "
1065iHaley, Bernard Stewart.    "
1068 Hall, Thomas      "
1079|Hamilton, William     "
1080 Hamilton, William     "
1106 Harrap, Ralph E.     "
1112Harris, Harry      "
1120jHarrison, Fred Richard..    "
1123 Harston, John Brunton...Little Canyon
1124!Harstone, Ralph -Copper River
1125'Harstwood, William A...Prince Rupert
1132Hastie, David.. _.__    "
1133[Hastie, David..._     "
1135iHathaway, George     " "
1137JHawkesford, William....    "
1153jHelgeson, Hans Port Essington
116l|Herne, Thomas Webster Hazelton
1169jHerstick, John Prince Rupert
1173 Hewitt, BasilO     "
1176 Heyward,GeorgeSergeant  " "
1182Higgins, William...     "
1183JHiggs, Richard..     "
1184 Hildebrand, Russel S....    "
1190|Hirst,William Henry ....    "
1211Holt, Frank E.. Port Simpson
1221 Houseberger, Carson E. ..Prince Rupert
1223lHovland, John    "
1228]Howell, Joseph R..     "
1230'Howson, Harry Telkwa
1233 Hughes, Andrew Prince Rupert
1236 Hughes.Thomas J  Hazelton
1249Hunter, Peter Prince Rupert
1254!Hynds, William BiBhop..    " "
1256 Ingram, William     " ������
1257 Inns, Wesley Ernest     " "
l258Innes, William E     "
1260|Inrig, Donald....     "
1266 Ivey, Fred      "
1267Irw*in, T. G     "
1275Jacobs, George.     " "
1282;Jacques, Arthur Wm Hazelton
1286[Jenkins, Alex ..Prince Rupert
1289'jenns, Percival R     "
13021 Johnson, John _.    "
1303'Johnson, John Alexander   " "
1311 Johnston, A. Edward PortSimpson
1312 Johnston, Charles Henry . " "
1316ljohnston, Harry L Prince Rupert
1320 Johnston, Peter     " "
1333 Jones, Richard R Hazelton
1350 Keillor, William T Gribble Island
1361 Kendall, Daniel Port Simpson
1371 Keough, Thomas Prince Rupert
1395 Kimball, Lester..     "
1399 King, Joseph M     "
1412 Knight, Robert      "
1417Kroman, Edward  Hazelton
1420 Kyle, Arthur  Prince Rupert
1428 Laidlaw, Jas. Turnbull...Port Simpson
1429 Laing, John Charles Prince Rupert
1434 Lamb, Walter J  Hazelton
1436 Landry, Leo Prince Rupert
1443 Langifle, Alex. Douglas.    " "
1475 Lawry, Robert Roy     " "
1477 Lawson, George     " "
1490 Lekvold, Peder P .Porcher Island
1495 Leonard, Harry M Prince Rupert
1507 Levesque, Alphonse     " "
1509 Levy, Julius      "
1511 Lewis, John William ....    " "
1612Limin, William Hazelton
1613 Lincoln, William r..T.... Prince Rupert
NO.
NAME
PLACE
1514 Lincoln, William Prince Rupert
1523 Little, Sam     "
1525 Littlejohn, William H.__.    '���
1526 Livingstone, D     "
1534 Logan, William N ....Surf Inlet
1535 Loiselle, Wilfrid Prince Rupert
1538 Long, Bert     "
1540 Longhurst, Thos. Leslie.   " "
1550 Lubbock, Merlin Gordon.    " "
1570 MacDonald, Allan Orr...    "
1594 Mack, John      "
1598 Mackay, James Alexander   " "
1599 Mackay, James Beattie..    " "
1601 Mackay, Robert Findlayson" "
1602Mackay, William John. Port Essington
1605 MacKenzie, Angus    ....Prince Rupert
1611 MacKenzie, Hector     " "
1614|MacKenzie, Norman   ...    " "
1618 MacKie, James  Irving
1625 MacLean, Donald Prince Rupert
1633 MacLeod, Murdoch      ���
1646 Macpherson, John ,, "
1637 Macpherson, Joseph     ,,
1640 Madden,John H Port Simpson
1643 Madigan, Charles L ..Prince Rupert
1644 Madsen, Nicholas     " "
1645 Magar, George Port Simpson
1649 Mairs, Charles W... Prince Rupert
1650 Mairs, James H     "
1655 Maloney, William     " "
1663 Mansell, Thomas A......    "
166!; Marin, Antoine     " "
1672 Marsh, Rueben      " "
1680 Martin, John     "
1682 Martin, Stewart J     "
1085 Mason, John    "
1696 Matheson, Hugh     " "
1701 Matheson, Roderick     "
i707 Matthews, Edward M...    " "
1709 Matthews, Morton     " "
1712 Maxwell, Alex. P Port Essington
1717 Meade, James  ..Port Simpson
1724 Mcekin, William.. Prince Rupert
1740 Miles, George C ....
1744 Miller, Frank John	
1749 Miller, Levi Alfred	
1755 Mills, Henry Andrew	
1761 Mitchell, David P.	
1765Moffatt, R. B	
1768 Molloy, Joseph James-..
1781 Moore, John Smith	
1787Moran, William	
1789Moreau, Octave	
1792 Morgan, George Winter.
1800 Morkeberg, Helger	
1802 Morrill, James M.	
1805 Morris, John M  Lowe Inlet
1811 Morrison, Daniel  Surf Inlet
1814 Morrison, George Prince Rupert
1815 Morrison, George J     " "
1818 Morrison, John  David...    "
1819 Morrison, John      "
1816 Morrison, Richard     " "
1818 Morrow, George W     " "
1837|Mowatt, James     " "
1838 Mowt, John  ...Port Simpson
1836[Mullen, Dan  .Prince Rupert
184l]Mullin, Arthur    "
1844Munday, Thomas    " "
1848!Munro, Duncan. ..Kitsumkalum
1859!Murdoch, Henry William Prince Rupert
1860Murdoch, Hugh Port Simpson
1863 Murphy, Edward  Aldermere
1865'Murphy, John Herbert-.Port Essington
1866 Murphy, Joseph W. R Aldermere
1868 Murphy, Michael Prince Rupert
1871 Murphy, William    "
1872 Murphy, Arthur     "
1887 McAuley, Alexander __-    "
1890 McBeth, Edward V    "
1897 McCallum, D     "
1901McCate, Peter Willis...Port Essington
1902 McCauliffe, Patrick Prince Rupert
1913McCourt, John      "
1915 McCreary, James Wallace   " "
1924McDavid, Daniel..     "
1926'McDonald,   Alphonse....    " "
1927iMcDonald, Arthur     "
1930McDonald, Daniel    "
1931;McDonaltl, Daniel     " "
1934|McDonald, Francis Lee..    " "
1942]McDonald, John A    "
1943{McDonald, John Dan Rivers Inlet
1949'McDonald, John Simon..Prince Rupert
1950 McDonald, John W. Alex   "
1956 McDonald Robert R    "
1959 McDonald, Donald     "
1961 McDonell, Alexander  Hazelton
1962 McDonnell, Alexander Roy	
  Prince Rupert
1965 McDougall, John H     ������
1973|McEwan, Edward A     ������
1977|McFeat, Walter     ������
1981[McGillis, Daniel James..    "
1982 McGillivray, Angus D     "
1988
1989
1998
2004
2035
McGowen, John
McGrath, John  Port Simpson
Mclnnes, George Leslie.-Prince Rupert
Mclnnes, Daniel D     "
McKay, John
2040 McKechnie, James Jedway
2041 McKee, William John....Port Simpson
2042McKeen, A. W Port Essington
2045 McKenzie, Alexander Prince Rupert
2051 McKenzie, George Rod Rivers Inlet
2052 McKenzie, John Prince Rupert
2055 McKenzie, Macleod     ���'
2056iMcKeown, David     "
2057!McKinley, Andrew B..._    ������
2096,McKinnon, Geo. W Hazelton
2071]McLaughlin, George Edward	
   Prince Rupert
2072iMcLaughlin, Hubert P ..   "
2074 McLaws, David Douglas
2079!McLean, George ...     "
2081JMcLean, John . Port Essington
2082'McLean, William Prince Rupert
2093]McLeod, Alex A     "
2094'McLeod, Angus     "
2100 McLeod, Donald     "
2104 McLeod, Henry J     ������
2120 McLeod, Roderick      ������
2123 McLeod, Walter     ������
2131 McMillan, Alexander     "
2137 McMillan, George B     "
2138 McMillan, John T          "
2147 McNaughton, Aimer .        Port Simpsou
2149 McNaughton, Donald C.. Hazelton
2153 McNeil, James Alfred     Prince Rupert
2154 McNeil, John      "
2174 McPherson, Daniel     "
2176 McPherson, Donald     "
2178 McPherson, John ...     "
2179 McPherson, William S ..    ������
2191 MeRae, William     "
2194 McTavish, Duncan     "
2202 Neal, Sydney     \
2219 Nesbitt, John C...     "
2225 Newell, James     "
2226Newell, Robert. Port Simpson
2232 Nicholas, John    Prince Rupert
22,13 Nichols, John Daniel   ...    "
2236 Nicholson, Donald Port Essington
2237 Nicholson, Roderick A...Prince Rupert
2240 Nicol, James      "
2241 Nicol, John          "
2243 Nightingale, Robert     "
2255 Norris, Charles Henry    .Bulkley Valley
2268O'Flynn, James Thomas.Prince Rupert
2270O'Hanley, Stephen ..Surf Inlet
2273Oliver, James Herbert ..Prince Rupert
2284 O'Myrrho, Peter     "
22880'Regan, John  Grayeyard Point
2294 Oster, Edward     Refuge Hay
2297,Oulette, Josenh S. C Prince Rupert
2308 Palmer, LeamlerAlphonse   '���
2310Paradis, Alfred     "
2312 Parigeau, Henry D     "
2321 Parrott, Hobart     "
2322: Parsons, Edward C . ���Porcher Island
2326 Paterson, Lewis Prince Rupert
2327 Pascoe, Thomas. Surf Inlet
2330 Patterson.GeorgePatrickPrince Rupert
2331 Patterson, John    "
NO.
NAME
PLACE
2334'Pattullo,Thomas DufferinPrince Rupert
2341|Peitrson, Alfred     ������
2351Perrault, George     "
2852 Perrault, George     "
2356Perry, Roger F     "
2361 Peterson, Horatio Nelson    ������
2372 Philpott, George William    "
2373 Picaut, John.     "
2377 Pinson, Louis      ������
2382 Poirier. Harry     "
2383 Pollard, John Henry Port Essington
2390 Potts, Douglas  Hazelton
2391 Powell, James. _..Prince Rupert
2392 Power, James.     ������
2303 Pretty, Arthur Walter.... Lakelse
2412 Pruneau. Adelard   .. Prince Rupert
2413Pulvis, Albert      "
2419Quinn, Hugh     ������
2420Qulnn, Joseoh   Hazelton
2480Raisbeck, Thomas Prince Rupert
2435 Rapkins, Thomas  Oceanic
2436 Rathler, Emil     PrinceRupert
2488 Ravelhal, Henry    ������
2446 Reedy, Joseph J     ....    "
2454 Rhodes, Clarence        "
2460 Richardson,  Harry     "
2461 Richardson, Henry       ������
2463 Richer, Alphonse..        "
2461 Richer, Henry Ovide  ...    "
2469Riffon, Fred    	
2470Riley, Charles     ....    ������
2471 Riley, Harry     Jedway
2472 Riordan, Michael PrinceRupert
2474 Rivet, Louts Honore    "
2476Roberge, A.    "
2477 Roberge, Amedee.         "
2484Robertson,JamesBremner  ������
2486 Robertson, HoraceBuchanan'
2491.Robichaud, Louis    ������
2392 Robins, William John ...    "
2497]Robinson, Robert        "
2510 Rose, Robert R._     "
2612 Ross, Albert     '���
2515'Ross, Edwin Cameron...    "
2518 Ross, William Edward Kitamaat
2519[Rosseau, Jos. Prince Rupert
2523!Rowat, Joseph      "
2528 Roy, Abraham     "
2540 Russell, William.. ._    "
2544 Ryan, John       "
2547 St. Davis, Albert     ������
2548Salmon, Alfred J Graham City
2554 Sanders, George. ...Prince Rupert
2567 Scadden, Fred      "
2570 Schofield, Beverly Agreen  "
2571 Schreiber, Charles Brymer "
2575Scott, Clement Charles..    ������
2576 Scott, George.. Swanson Bay
2581 Scott, John Prince Rupert
2587 Scripture,Thomas Nelson.Port Simpson
2593 Sexton, Joseph        Prince Rupert
2594 Shade, George Adam . -Port Essington
2598 Shades, Charles John ... ..Hazelton
2603Sharpe, Thomas Dalby ..Prince Rupert
2614 Shore, Harry Watts ....    ���'
2618 Shuhon, Owen      "
2625 Silverlhorn, James B ..Bulkley Valley
2628 Simms, John  . Surf Inlet
2634 Sinclair, John Prince Rupert
2635 Sinclair, Robert C      "
2648 Slavin, Jack     ���'
2650 Sloan, William P... ....Kitamaat
2667Smith, James  PrinceRupert
2668 Smith, John Princess Royal Island
2671 Smith, John Forshaw ..Prince Rupert
2674 Smith, J. M     "
2676 Smith, Joseph    ������
2677 Smith, Kenneth M     "
2684 Smith, Walter J Port Simpson
2685 Smith, William. ...Prince Rupert
2686 Smith, William...     "
2687 Smith, William      "
2689 Snatsinger, Edward Claxton
2691 Snider, Edwin Percival T . Prince Rupert
2692 Snowdon, Watson Porcher Island
2693Sobey, William. Prince Rupert
2698 Soule, Cornelius N     "
2699 Sourkes, Harry L     "
2702Sparrow, Robert     "
2708 Spenser, George     ���'
27] 1 Sprague, Harry WilmotPort Essington
2716Stacey, Peter    ..Prince Rupert
2717Staino, John     .Copper River
2718Stainsby, Harry     PrinceRupert
2724 Statham, Charles S     "
2725 Statham, Roland J     ".
2726 Startup, Benjamin     "
2727 Steele, Alfred     ������
2728 Steele, James L Kitamaat
2731 Stephens, Arthur John.. Prince Rupert
2733 Stephens, Jack     ������
2736 Stephenson, Edward     "
2744 Stephenson, James     "
2750 Stewart, Duncan     "
2756Stewart, John Clarence..    ������
2758 Stewart,  Robert  Totem Pole
2760 Stewart, Robert Mushet    Stewart
2762 Stewart, William. Prince Rupert
2763Stiles, H      "
2765Stooke, Samuel G     "
2767 Storing, John     "
2771 Strain, Thomas Bernard.    "
2777 Strathy, Everett Kent...   "
2780 Striethorsl, Harry  Port Essington
2788Studdy, John C ..Prince Rupert
2791 Sullivan, Jerry      "
2809 Swanson, John T ..Port Essington
2832 Taylor, James .Prince Rupert
2834 Taylor, J. W     "
2826 Tessier, George      "
2837 Tessler, Herman     "
2843 Thomas, Harry     "
2844 Thomas, Henry John     "
2846 Thomas, Walter	
2847 Thompson, A If red William Port Essington
2851 Thompson, George Foster Prince Rupert
2858 Thompson. John      "
2873Tichette, Stanislas...   .   "
2874Tiege, William John
2880Tinsley, BernasdL    "
2883Todd, Donald   PortSimpson
2884 Tolan, William II. Prince Rupert
2881!Tomlinson, Robert.. Meanskinisht
2887 Tomlinson, Robert, Sr       Meanskinisht
2888 Tomlinson, Robert, Jr Meanskinisht
2894 Toynlice. Albert Victor Prince Rupert
2895Toynbee, Charles A    ������
2891) Triicey, Dole Hazelton
2900 Tremblay, Hector Prince Rupert
2902 Tremblay, James         Port Essington
2905 Trevett,'Herbert   .Surl'Inlet
2908Tronif, Angel  Prince Rupert
2915 Turnbull, Alex       "
2916 Turnbull, John .Port Essington
2917 Turnbull, Robert Prince Rupert
2924 Twaddle, James D     Masset
2928 Tweedle, Fred M        Surf Inlet
2927 Urquhart, WilliamWatsonPrince Rupert
2932 Valleau, Fred W Hazelton
2936 Vandall, Frank  PortSimpson
2943 Vent, Edward ..Surf Inlet
2944 Verdan, J. M     PrinceRupert
2952 Vincent.GonrgoArmstrong ������
2953 Viziiia, Fred   ...     "
2964 Vukicivich, Louis  "
2955 Wade, Samuel    "
2967 Wakefield, George ... Ootsa Lake
2962 Wall, Oorgc      Prince Rupert
2967 Wallace,James AndrewG    "
2968 Wallace, Joseph ...  Hazelton
2987 Ward, LawrenceP. D Prince Rupert
3000 Watson, Harry. PortSimpson
3011 Watts, CharlesW .... PrinceRupert
3016 Watts, William Frederick    ������
8018 Wawrecker, Conrad
3020 Webber, John   .    Port Essington
3027 Wells, Alfred A Prince Rupert
3034 Wessels, Arthur W     "
3040 Whehell, Creswie'"        "
3046 White, Robert      "
3062 Williams, Benjamin        ..PortSimpson
3063 Williams.GwillinTrehernePrince Rupert
3065 Williams, Hugh       .    ..    "
3070jWilliamB, Robert Pearce    "
NO.
NAME
PLACE
3073:Williams, William .PrinceRupert
3076.Williscroft, William E....Port Simpson
3082 Wilson, Hugh S Balmoral
3083,Wilson, James      PrinceRupert
3084Wilson, James Yule .-Hazelton
3085 Wilson, James Yule PortSimpson
3088 Wilson, Thomas  PrinceRupert
3091;Wilson, William Henry..    ������
3094! Winter, Albert 0 Kitselas
3095'Winter, Albert Oldham         "
3100 Wood, Jerrold J..       Prince Rupert
3101 Wood, Joseph     ���'
3102 Wood, Leonard     "
3103 Wood, Leonard T        ������
3105 Wood, Waller W          ������
3107Woodnouse, Geoffrey ...   "
3114 Woollam, John     "
3115 Worsley, Arthur     " "
3118 Wright, Ali'ord E _    "
3121 Wuckicivich, R
3125 Wyatt, George Henry     Port Essington
3133 Young, Clement   .....      PrinceRupert
3138 Young, Herbert .. Port Simpson
3141 Young, Leslie Bruce       .PrinceRupert
3145 Young, William.           "
The following persons are reported duplicated on the List:
NO. NAME PLACE
23 A llan, John     Prince Rupert
102 Barger, Emory.  Aldermere
104 Barger, Robert. Aldermere
491 Colligan. Peter.  Stewart
530Covert, W. E Bulkley Valley
739 Dassault, Lucine PrinceRupert
786 Erickson, David Kitselas
1104 Manner, Alfred E Prince Rupert
1158 Henderson, Alec Lome Creek
1206 Holma, William John..  Bulkley Valley
1247 Hunter, Charles..   PrinceRupert
1252 Hyatt, Mark    ._    "
1489 Legge, Louis L _.    " "
1492Lenl'esty, William D...Q. C. Townsite
1532 Lockwood, Frank Bateman's Landing
1542 Little, Henry Hyslop ..PrinceRupert
1568 Macdonald, Alexander Rod   Aldermere
1576 MacDonald, J. B. L PrinceRupert
1582 MacDonald, John F     "
1595 MacKay, G Reid         "
1608 MacKenzie, Donald     "
1647 Maidmont, Harry Bulkley Valley
1659 Mann, John Klunkowi Bay
1087 Mason, Leonard A ... Hazelton
1767Molloy, Joseph James. ..PrinceRupert
1846Munnis, JamesMcN   ...   " "
I860 Murphy, Joseph W R . Aldermere
1870 Murphy, Robert H . .PrinceRupert
1873 .Murray, John Alexander    "
1892 McBeth, Murdock  Kitamaat
1940McDonald, James ..PrinceRupert
1943 McDonald, John Dan Rivers Inlet
1985 Mclnnes, Angus D       ...PrinceRupert
2141 McMordie.RobertA    "
2145 McNab, John G     "
2151 McNeil, Daniel .........    "
2169McPhee, William      Lakelse Lake
2171 McPherson, Alexander D Prince Rupert
2602 Sharpe, Henry W Hazelton
2798 Sutherland, Douglas Prince Rupert
2823 Tallander, S Alexander. Porcher Island
2892 Tompkins, Victor John .  Prince Rupert
2998 Watson, David     "
3051 Whitlow, Frank M   Kitselas
3144 Young, R. Bord    .          ...Stewart
The following persons are reported deceased:
NO. NAME PLACE
74 Aloxson, Adam Irving
127 Beacher, Lionel Fane    Klun Kowi Bay
140 Beaudoin, Joseph       .... Prince Rupert
487 Colin, Frank        " "
509 Corimer, John L D     "
787 Erickson, Frederick    ..."
839 Fisher, Harry Cheevers     Masset
857 Flynn, Thomas Aldermere
1017Grant, William..    PrinceRupert
1007Graman, John Hazelton
1003 Haines, Charles E  Naas River
1241 Humphrey, William H...  ..Aberdeen
1397 King, James Little Canyon
1862 Murphy, Edward  ..   PrinceRupert
1880 McAdam, Logan Edward Skidegate
188s McAvoy, Wm Aldermere
1946 McDonald, John George   PrinceRupert
2102 McLeod, George...     " "
2207 Nellson, Neil Peder  Jedway
2254 Norris, John A Bulkley Valley
2311 Parent,Joseph ......  ...PrinceRupert
2375 Pierce, William Henry Kispiox
2404 Present, Joseph    PrinceRupert
2414 Purdy, Wallace A . ...Masset
2178 Roberts, Thomas Joseph Hazelton
2533 Rudland, William      PrinceRupert
2545 St. Aubin, Joseph     Kitselas
25S0 Scott, John Herbert ....       Metlakatla
2082 Smith, Thomas Nash   .    PrinceRupert
2688 Smith, William Rudolph.. Stewart
2795 Sutherland, Daniel W    .Lome Creek
2809 Sutherland, William G     PrinceRupert
2867 Thornhill, Thomas J   .    Kitselas
2876Tilley, Seth       ...BellaCoola
2984Valpy, Henry George ..Port Essington
The following persons are reported Indians and not entitled to be on the
list:
NO.
NAME
PLACE
750 Edenshaw, Henry
751 Cdgar, George	
752 Edgar, Louis    	
75:i Edgar, Magnet
754 Edgar, Mark George
Masset
China Hat
Port Simpson
I he following persons are reported not
British subjects:
NO.
NAME
PLACE
681 Dorsey, John Bulkley Valley
1505 Levennagen Henry A       PrinceRupert
1706 Matrcsse, Joseph .. Glentanna
2498 Robinson. Sheldon George       Hazelton
F. W. HART & CO.
Furniture
and House Furnishings  Complete
Funeral Directors, Embalmers
Special attention to orders from out of
town.
Prince Rupert THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1911
rSHBBB
MB ! ,'J"..-1^
Sale of Lands for Unpaid Delinquent Taxes in the Omineca Assessment
Distrid, Province of British Columbia
I HEREBY (IIVIO NOTICE, that on Thursday the 16th day of November, A.D. 1911, at the hour of two o'clock in the afternoon, at the Court House, in the Town of Hazelton, 1 shall sell at public auction, the lands of the persons in the list hereinafter set out, for the delinquent taxes remaining unpaid on the 31st day of December, A.D. 1910, and for interests,
costs ami expenses, including the cost of advertising said sale, if the total amount due is not sooner paid.
List Above Mentioned.
Name of Person Assessed
Short. Description of Property
Statu
Inter
tory
m
est to
Costs
date of
and
sale
Expenses
Spencer,  V    ._  Lot 177, R. V Coast District
   "   178, R. V
Silverthorn, J. B  	
Jarvis, Jr.,  Arthur M..  W 1-2
Thompson, Robt _ 1-5
Ellis, Claude P  2-5
' 2125, R.
' 2126, R.
' 2127, R.
' 2128, R.
' 2130, R.
1 2131, R.
' 2132, R.
1-2  S E 1-4 Sec.
Dist	
Lot   337, R.
799, R,
V
V
V
V
V
V
V
8.00
10.00
10.00
32.00
10.00
8.00
16.00
16.00
16.00
���tawM
jjWfc'JJJUJ.JjeWU'!!!!
Name of Person Assessed,
Short Description of Property,
Taxes
McCroskie,
$ 0.38
.76
.76
1.52
.76
.38
.76
.76
.76
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
2.00
$ 10.38
18.76
18.76
35.52
18.76
10.38
18.76
18.76
18.76
35, Tp. 5, R. V, Coast
Fraser, David E	
Burns,  E. J 	
Holmes, G.  G	
Stewart, Jennie C	
Brown, Julius	
Kane. F. B	
"     828, R,
"     828, R.
.1-5        "     828, R.
.1-5        "     828, R.
"    1139, R.
"   2098, R.
.S 1-2     Sec. 25, Tp. 5, R. V Coast District
N1-2SE1-4 Sec. 26, Tp. 5, R. V Coast Dist.
S1-2NE1-4       " "       R, V
Campbell, Robt. F  ... ��*�� f�� g Tft ����� I{- V Coa8t ��[^
Sard, C.  W   Sec. 15,'Tp'. 8,'R. V Coast District. 	
Kealy, A.  E       "22,    "   8,     "
Diplock, A. B... |J;2 ���� I TP;,9. B.V Coast District...
McCroskie, E  .1-2 Lot 42, Cassiar District..	
Williams, D. H. & Hoare, J. H 1-4       " " "       	
Ainstie, B   3-4 Lots 294 and 297, Cassiar District     24.00
Williams, G. E. ��� Lot 397, Cassiar District    123.60
Stevenson,
Kirkland,
James .
Elizabeth
425,
503,
8.00
.38
2.00
10.38
3.60
.15
2.00
5.75
16.00
.76
2.00
18.76
.80
.03
2.00
2.83
1.60
.06
2.00
3.66
.80
.03
2.00
2.83
.80
.03
2.00
2.83
64.00
3.04
2.00
69.04
8.00
.38
2.00
10.38
32.00
1.52
2.00
35.52
16.00
.76
2.00
18.76
4.80
.22
2.00
7.02
64.00
3.04
2.00
69.04
59.20
2.80
2.00
64.00
64.00
3.04
2.00
69.04
4.80
.22
2.00
7.02
12.00
1.80
2.00
15.80
24.00
1.14
2.00
27.14
23.60
8.76
2.00
134.36
32.00
1.52
2.00
35.52
16.00
.76
2.00
18.76
Edward-
Sub-division   of   Dist.   Lot   103,   CasBiar
District.     Plan No. 805.
Lots 21 to 25, Block 2, Lots   3 to 12, Bk 3
23 to 27,
20 to 24,
8 to 12,
9, 10 & 13,
1 to  5,
3,
4,
7,
8,
12,
22 to 24,
14 to 18,
17 to 24,
"   14,    "
"   16,    "
and 28 to 48,
33 to 37,
2 to   6,
18 to 22,
19,
7 to 11,
1 to 12,
7 to 11,
Block 18..
3
6
7
8
14
15
18
1 and 2, 18 to 27, Block 19	
5 to   9, Block  20,   Lot  8,   Block
1    to    4,     20    to    34,     Block
40 to 44, Block 24, Lot 42 to 48, Bk 26
1 to 8, 13 to 22, Block 27
9    to   13,     19    to    23,     Block    28
15 to 19, Block 30, Lot 1 to 5, Bk 31
21 to 24, Bk 31, Lot 1, 17 to 21, Bk 32
13 to 17, lllock 34, Lots 14 to 18 and
Lot 24, Block 35
3 and 4, 20 to 22, Block 36, Lots 11 to
15, Block 38
30 to 39, Lot 48, Block 38, 21 to 24
Block 39
29, 35 to 39, Block 39, Lots 15 to 18
Block 43
42 to 44, Block 43, Lots 1 and 2, Bk 44
8 to 12 and 28 to 32, Block 44
7 to 11, Block 45, Lots 2g to 37, Bk 45
Lots 43 to 46, Bk 45, Lots 1, 17 to 21,
1 to   5,
22 & 28,
25 to 28,
22 to 26,
6&10,  '
49,
51,
52,
53,
56,
3 to 12,
1     1 to   4,
7 to 10,
16 to 19&23,
21 to 30,
Bk47
" 51
" 62
53
55
56
36 to 40 and 46, Block 56
1 to   4, Bk 57, Lots 45 and 46, Bk 57
11 to 13,
7 to 11,
12 to 21,
19 to 23,
1 to
4 to
3 to
1 to  4,
10 to 11,
58,
60,
63,
66,
68,
70,
71,
72,
' 74,
19 to 23,
20 to 28,
18 to 22,
10 to 14,
16 to 20,
19 to 22,
22,
8 to 12,
58
62
64
67
1 68
70
71
73
Beattie Alice  M.
Lots
5 to   9, Bk   4, Lots 45 to 48, Bk
1 "      6     "     11 to 15    "
13 to 17   "    19     "    48
1 to
1 to
2 to
Telkwa   Townsite.     Sub.   of   S.   W.   1-4
Sec.  35,   Tp. 6, R. V, Coast   District
(Ma]> No. 817)
Stewart, G  -Lot 14, Block 15   $
Aldermere   Townsite.      Sub. of N. 1-2 of
N. E. 1-4 Sec. 26, Tp. 6, Range V, Coast
District
Lot 3, Block 2 	
.    "13,    "    16	
" 15,    "    16 	
Lots 9 and 10, Block 18, Lot 20,  Block 25
McCroskie, Alice
Smith, G.  W...
Rood, Kenneth ...
Hemsworth, J. H.
.45
1.20
.90
1.20
1.20
.60
$ 1.00   $   1.45
Flewin, Helen  _  Lot 7, Block 24.
Bums, R. M  ...Lots 11 and 12, Block 24... 1.35
Frizzell, Sarah.       Lot 10, Block 25  90
Phelan, Oli. E _ Lots 4 and 5, Block 26         14.40
Sub-division of Lot 38, Cassiar District
 ..Lots 27 and 28, Block 24
1.50
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.20
1.90
2.20
2.20
1.60
2.35
1.90
16.90
Charleson, A. J.
$   1.35    $   .05   $ 1.00   $   2.40
Charrist. A. W..._ Block
Dickey, A. F     "
Cannon, J      "
Hewiston, Mrs. G. L..     "
Labiossie, A...    "
Sub-division of D. L. 102, Cassiar District
Plan No. 812
3 $
7 -. 	
8 _ _	
9 _...
32. _ 	
Williams, D. G..._	
Sub-division   of   Dist.    Lot  103,    Cassiar
District.    Plan No. 805.
Lots 6 to 10, Block 2, 23 and 24,  Block 7
'    "23 and 24, Block 15, 1 to 3, Block 16
8 to 12, Block 19, 7 to 11,
32 to 36, Block 26, 2o to 24,
Block 26
Block 30
5 to 9,  Block  36,   1   to  4, Block  43
24 to 28, Block 48, 11 to 14, Block 52
16 to 20, Block 56, 35 to 39,
5 to 9, Block 67, 14 to 18,
Block 62
Block 70
Hammersley, A. St. G.
Lots 11 to 15,
.    " 35 to 39,
"     6 to 10,
" 45 to 48,
.    " 33 to 37,
" 15 to 19,
" 24,
.    " 18 to 24
" 16 to 20
"     3 to   7,
.    " 12 to 1(1,
" 11 to 15,
"     land 2,
.    " 12 to 14,
" 40 to 44,
" II to 15,
"     1 to   3,
Block 2,
" 4,
" 12,
" 16,
" 19,
" 24,
" 28,
" 34,
" 38,
" 44,
" 47,
" 49,
" 51,
" 59,
" 62,
" 68,
" 70,
Lots 15 to 19, Bk 4
13 to 17,
2 to  6,
1,
5 to   9,
27 to 31,
1 to 4,
1 to 3,
11 to 15,
13 to 17,
4 to   8,
26 to 28,
30 to 39,
5 and 6,
8 to 12,
21 to 22, '
5 to   9, '
7
' 14
' 18
' 24
' 26
' 30
35
' 39
41
48
49
57
60
64
68
74
.60
2.40
.60
2.4o
2.4o
$ 7.2o
12.oo
I0.80
12.oo
9.oo
7.7o
7.7o
8.4o
8.I0
4.5o
$ 1.00
1.00
l.oo
l.oo
l.oo
$ l.oo
l.oo
l.oo
l.oo
1.60
3.40
I.60
3.4o
3.4o
$ 8.2o
13.oo
II.80
13.oo
G. W. London, F. Kirkland
C. Aslbertson & W. P. Ogilvie.
Hoare, J. H..._
" 20 to 24
.    "     3 to  6
" 10 to 14
" 16 to 20
" 14
"    " 27&2.S
.    " 11
Lots 28  to 112,   1
1   to    4,
" 40  to  44.
" 11  to  18.
" 17  tu 21.
" 19  lo 88,
20
39
47
57
69
72
12
28
47
56
2 to 6
4 to 8
13 to 17
to 19
4
12
19
32
40
51
58
67
11
5
21
15 to 19
& 12
& 6
to 22
Lota   43   to
"    34.
"    11!  to
20
43
49
72
Block  3
4
14.80
32.4o
22.6o
21.oo
19.4o
21.8o
I8.00
19.8o
18.80
12.4o
23.4o
14.8o
6.60
13.4o
17.4o
12.4o
6.60
3.oo
44,
211 to 22,
2 to 0,
22 to 88,
r> to u,
3 to 7,
19 to 23,
1 to 5,
Lots
Bennett, Elizabeth-
Mason, Henry	
Mason, William	
Coraveau, G.-_	
Lindseth, Clara E..
Jackman, W. T..._
Barber, H. J _.
1.00       lo.oo
1.00
.22       l.oo
.22
l.oo
1.00
1.00
8.7o
8.92
9.4o
9.32
,60
88 to :i7.
22 and 88,
18  lo 21.
17 to 21,
211 to 22.
llluml 11,
1 and  2,
12,
40  to 48,
13 to 17.
1  to    4.
23 and 24.
17 to 21,
23 and 21.
1 to I.
28  to 32.
1,
11.
2ll and 21.
23 Mid 24,
31  to 33,
III    I,
8.
14,
III,
111.
211.
20,
20,
311,
34,
85,
38,
III.
41.
46,
Til.
53,
65,
57,
Block 69,
" CO,
"    02.
10 to   II.
18 to   22.
34 to   38,
38 to   42.
1 and 2,
8 to
G to
9 to
15 to
411 lo
29 to
12 to
38 to
15 to
9 nnd 10,
31 to 35.
17   to   19,
11
15
16
19
22
20
27
31
35
30
39
43
45
45
52
55
60
57
12.00
I ..its
11,  Block
14,
04,
07,
08,
71.
72.
74
19.
58,    -
08, -
8.     -
19. -
4,    -
38, -
24,
20  to   24,
23 and 24.
88 nnd 24.
13  to   IS.
10,
00
07
70
71
73
Barber, H. J. & Ogilvie, W. P..
Hatney, P. T. & Ogilvie W. P..
to    3.
48,
62,
I.olH     14,      Block
Lotn   13 and 14, Block 20.  Lota
7  to    9.
30,
15  to  19,
11.
25  to 27,
43,
40,
02.
49,
18, ���
15   to
12   to
10, 17.
4   to
8,
lllock 28
"     60
"     31
"     08
"     00
5.80
.45
1.00
1.20
.CO
.SO
3.G0
1.60
1.80
Brown, E. N..
Gabie, W. G..
Oxley, Thomas
Sub-division of E. 1-2 of Lot 104, Cassiar
District.    Plan No. 797.
Bauer, W.A., Roberts.J.P., & Findloy,J.niockn 1, 2, 3, 1. 5, 0, 8, 9, 10, 11. 16, 10 and 17 * 04.23
Sub-division  of  Lot 507,  Cassiar District
D. A. McPhatter niurk 5 $
Hutton, George    "    11	
Emerson, E Lou 1 to 8, Block45	
     "    10 to 12,        "45 , -   -
Ward, Mrs.  C    "  18, "46	
Emerson, E    "14, "45	
Interest
to Date
of Sale
Statu-
ory
.CoBts
and
Expenses
.33
.00
l.oo
l.oo
l.oo
1.00
11.00
Hazelton, B. C, October 14, 1911
Total
$21.00    $   .33   $ l.oo    $22.33
l.oo      15.8o
1.4o      l.oo      34.8o
.78      l.oo      24.38
.63      l.oo      22.63
l.oo      2o.4o
.33      l.oo      23.13
.33      l.oo      19.33
.33      l.oo      21.13
2o.l3
l.oo      13.4o
.63      l.oo      25.o3
l.oo      15.8o
7.6o
l.oo      14.4o
l.oo      18.40
l.oo      13.4o
7.6o
4.oo
17.00
19.00
1.00
7.05
1.00
1.45
1.00
8.00
1.00
2.20
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.(0
1.00
1.90
1.00
7.45
1.00
2.50
1.00
2.80
174.98
t 1.00
S   1.46
1.00
1.45
1.00
1.78
1.00
1.87
1.00
1.30
1.00
1.25
C. W. HOMER,
Assessor and Collector,  Omineca Assessment District.
^fo&r/frj&ig^SSB^ig^
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M THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1911.
News Notes of General Interest
"Progressive" Republicans
have launched a well-organized
boom for the nomination of Senator La Pollette for the presidency.
Dr. Sproule, who has been
chosen speaker of the new House
of Commons, is regarded as the
best posted man on parliamentary
procedure in the House.
Independent observers of affairs in the United States predict
a Democratic landslide at the
election next year, with the high
cost of living as the reason.
California has a new law that
sends a man to jail when he fails
to support his family. He is then
put to work in the streets, and
$1.50 a day is paid to his family.
Victoria city council has agreed
to exempt the new G. T. P. hotel
from taxation for ten years on
condition that it is equal in point
of size and elegance to the Empress.
New Zealand places her prisoner in camps on the hills and
plains, where they work on the
afforestation projects of the
country. The plan is said to
work admirably.
In New Westminster a good
roads convention is in session.
The completion of the Pacific
Highway to Hazelton and beyond
is one of the principal subjects
under discussion.
The provincial election campaign in Ontario is well, under
way, the candidates of both
parties being now in the field.
The return to power of Premier
Whitney is expected.
The first international egg-laying contest ever held on this
continent has just opened in
Vancouver. Two hundred hens
from many parts of the world
are entered in the competition,
which will last one full year.
The new parliament will be
called for the despatch of business on November 15. The session will not be unduly prolonged,
and after a brief adjournment at
Christmas, prorogation will be
sought by the end of January or
the first week in February.
The provincial department of
works proposes to construct a
number of ferries at different
points on the Skeena, to afford
settlers on the south side of the
river means of reaching the railway. The points suggested are
Little Canyon, Kitsumkalum and
Breckenridge Landing.
A Winnipeg paper has made a
bitter attack on Dr. John Jones,
the American consul-general located there. It charges that he
took a part in the interest of the
reciprocity candidates in the recent election, and protests against
the representative of a foreign
government interfering in domestic politics.
There is some talk of appointing Mr. C. A. Magrath lieutenant-
governor of Alberta when the
present occupant, Hon. Mr. Bul-
yea, steps out. Mr. Magrath was
defeated in the constituency of
Medicine Hat at the recent elections, and would undoubtedly have
found a seat in the cabinet had
be been successful.
A Hankow dispatch says the
revolutionary determination to
end the regime of official graft
was clearly shown by the execution of an officer who had been
appointed to collect funds for the
rebel cause. He was caught in
an attempt to divert some of the
money to his own pocket and
promptly beheaded.
Earl Grey and party were given
a royal welcome on their arrival
at Liverpool. His excellency
said: "It is impossible to be too
sanguine as to the future development of Canada. It is a splendid
country and it is going ahead as
fast as anyone could wish. I am
glad to be back in England after
seven happy years in the land of
open sunshine,"
The office of lieutenant-governor of New Brunswick will become vacant on March .1 next,
and it is now certain that the appointment will go either to Dr.
Daniel or Senator Wood. Dr.
Daniel steps aside to provide Hon.
J. D. Hazen a seat in St. John,
and in the event of Senator Wood
accepting the position Dr. Daniel
will go to the Red Chamber.
The negotiations between China
and the four groups of bankers
who arranged the currency reform loan of $70,000,000, have
been suspended. The international bankers concerned recently refused China's request
for a temporary loan of $3,000,-
000 for its war fund, preferring
to maintain a neutral attitude as
between the government and the
revolutionists.
The Bahamas are anxious to
enter into closer relations with
the Dominion, the islands having
been on several occasions hard
hit by changes in the United
States tariff. An organic connection seems to be contemplated
by the islanders. Two courses
seem to be open, to transfer the
administering power from London to Ottawa, making the colony
in a sense a province of Canada,
or to be content with commercial
union.
A statement of Canadian public
accounts for the last fiscal year,
issued by the finance department,
shows receipts of $117,880,409.78
and expenditureof $87,774,198.32,
leaving an apparent surplus of
$30,006,211.46 on the consolidated
account. An additional outlay
of $30,852,913.38 is shown on the
capital account, including $23,-
487,986.19 on the Transcontinental railway, and $1,597,663.48
on bounties. The debt increase
is $3,772,505.
A revival of activity in the
Slocan silver-lead district is indicated by the consolidation of
the properties controlled by
Byron M. White and John M.
Harris. The deal was concluded
a few days ago, when it was announced that the noted Slocan
Star, which has been closed
down since 1905, would resume
work next week. The amalgamation of the White-Harris properties does away with the litigation which has hampered work
in the past.
Serious differences have arisen
between the British government
and the Irish Nationalists over
the financial provisions of the
Home Rule Bill. On all other
points there is practical agreement. The Irish parliament is to
consist of two elected chambers,
and the Irish representation,
largely reduced, is to be maintained at Westminster. The Irish
government is to have control of
police administration on which
the Nationalists propose saving
$2,500,000 annually.
Zinc Experiments
Apart from the work in Scandinavia, says a metallurgical expert, as to the commercial success of which no information is
available, the electric smelting of
zinc ore is, in spite of all claims
to the contrary, not only still in
the experimental stage, but is in
the infancy of the experimental
stage. Even if the metallurgical
difficulties can be overcome,
which is possible, I am of the
opinion that no one, except perhaps the Scandinavians, is yet in
a position to make any reliable
estimate of commercial advantage
or commercial results in any way.
It is, however, well worth while
to determine the possibilities and
publish the result for the general
benefit, unveiling so far as possible the secrecy that is likely to
be maintained as to the investigations in this field by private
interests, having always in mind,
of course, the hope that our work
may develop a process that will
be commercially applicable to the
treatment of the zinc ores of
Canada.
Forestry in Saxony
The aggregate area of the state
forest of Saxony is less than 450,-
000 acres. The yield of the state
forests in the year 1908 was 226
million feet board measure. In
this total are comprised 83 per
cent of wood ancl timber fit for
technical use and 17 per cent, of
firewood. The age of final maturity beyond which trees are not
allowed to remain is, for spruce,
80 years; for pine, 80 years; for
all hardwoods, 120 years. The
diameter of the trees measured at
four and a half feet above the
ground at these ages depends entirely on the quality of the soil.
It varies for spruce between 8
and 10 inches; for pine, between
6 and 10 inches. The entire
gross expense for forestry in
1908 was a million and a half dollars; 40 per cent for salaries; 40
per cent for logging and forest
experiments, and 20 per cent for
planting and road building. The
entire gross revenue from forestry in 1908 was $3,900,000. The
net revenue was, as a consequence, $2,400,000, equal to $5.32
net per acre.
The Lead Bounty
The following figures, obtained
by Mr. E. Jacobs, for submission
to the meeting of the Western
Branch of the Canadian Mining
Institute, held lately, show the
amounts paid during several
periods to July 1, 1911, and the
balance unexpended at that date,
of the $2,500,000 originally voted
by the Dominion house of Commons for the payment of the
bounty on lead mined in Canada:
Total expenditure (under
first Lead Bounty Act),
during period ended June
30, 1908   $700,390.04
Paid during fiscal year ended March 31, 1909     274,447.50
Paid during fiscal year ended March 31, 1910     343,099.08
Paid during fiscal year ended March 31, 1911     249,370.38
Paid during three months
ended June 30, 1911        49,713.32
Total amonnt paid as bounty
on lead $1,617,020.31
Add amount appropriated
for zinc ore reduction experiments       50,000.00
$1,607,020.32
Balance still available as at
July 1,1911     834,079.68
Total amount voted ...$2,500,000.00
Traveling Library
The traveling library sent up
by the provincial government,
and now ready for circulation at
Adams' drug store, comprises
many interesting and instructive
books, making a welcome addition to the town's supply of
reading matter.
Lost
On Wednesday, Nov. 1st, between Hazelton and Sealey, Silver
Hunting - case Watch. Finder
please return to Mr. O. A. Rag-
stad, jeweller, Hazelton, B.C.,
and get reward.
Strayed
A three-year-old Bay Stallion,
weight about 1300, strayed from
John Mclnnes's pasture at Two-
mile on Saturday, Oct. 21. A
suitable reward will be paid for
return or for information. Wm.
James Eakin, care Miner.
LAND NOTICES
Omineca Land District.   District of
Coast, Range 4.
Take notice that Lucy Maltman,
of Vancouver, nurse, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
5 miles up the Nadina River from the
head of Francois Lake on the north
bank and marked L. M. Ne. corner,
thence south 40 chains, west 80 chains,
north 40 chains, east 80 chains to point
of commencement containing 320 acres
more or less. Lucy Maltman.
September 10, 1911.
Omineca Land District.    District of
Coast,   Range 4.
Take notice that Robert Valentine
Dolbey of Vancouver, doctor, intends lo
apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
5 miles up the Nadina river from the
head of Francois lake on the north bank
and marked R.V.D. Nw. corner, thence
south 80 chains, east 80 chains, north
80 chains, west 80 chains to point of
commencement containing 040 acres
more or less.
Robert Valentine Dolbey.
September 10, 1911.
Omineca Land District -District of
Coast, Range V.
Take notice that Hugh McKay, of
Hazelton, B. C., contractor intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-west corner of Lot 913, Coast
Range V, thence north 80 chains, thence
east 40 chains, thence south 80 chains,
thence west 40 chains to point of commencement and containing 320 acres
more or less. Hugh McKay.
August 21, 1911.
Omineca Land District.      District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Thomas Hurley, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
n.-e. corner of lot 811, Cassiar, thence
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 040 acres.
Sept. 7, 1911. Thomas Hurley.
13
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar
Take notice that Angus J. Chisholm,
of Aldermere, farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
s.-e. corner of lot 811, Cassiar, thence
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Sept. 7, 1911. Angus J. Chisholm.
13
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Alexander Chisholm,
of Aldermere, farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
s.-e. corner of lot 813, Cassiar, thence
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains to point of commencement, containing 640 acres.
Sept. 7, 1911. Alexander Chisholm.
13
COAL NOTICES
Omineca Lund District.   District of Cassiar.
Take notice thai Fred Allan and Joseph
Sleath Hicks of Hazelton. miners, intend to apply
for permission to purchase the following de-
scrihed lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the Rear river
trail, 2'S miles from the month of Hear river and
���1 miles from Bahinc trail, thence north Mi chains,
west SO chains, south 80 chains, east 80 chains to
point of commencement, containing old acres
acres more or less. Fred Allan
Sept. 25, 1911. Joseph Sleath Hicks.
LIQUOR   LICENCE   APPLICATION
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the
fifteenth day of November next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for a renewal
of the hotel licence to sell liquor by retail in the hotel known as the Omineca
Hotel, situate at Hazelton, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 7th day of October, 1911.
10 JOHN C. K. SEALY.
The Churches
LIQUOR ACT, 1910
(Section 42)
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the
fifteenth day of November next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for a renewal
of the hotel licence to sell liquor by retail in the hotel known as the New
Telkwa Hotel, situate at Telkwa, in the
province of Uritish Columbia,
Dated this 7th dav of October. 1911.
GEORGE HENRY McDONELL,
III Applicant.
CHURCH OK KNC1.AND
ST. PBTHB'B,  HA/.EI.TON
Sunday Services: Mornlngal 11 o'clock; Sunday
School  at 2,80  p.m.:   Native  service, B.80 p.m.:
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Rev. J. Field.
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
HAMILTON
Services  held   every Sunday evening In   the
Church Koom at 7.3U o'clock.
RBV. D. It. McLkan.
CHURCH OE ENGLAND
SEALEY
Services held every Sunday afternoon at :l o'clock
In the church building on IVterson's road.
NEW HAZELTON
Services held every   Sunday   evening  at   7:30
o'clock in the Church Tent.
L. C. LUOKRAfT.
Omineca Land District.    District of
Coast Range V.
Take notice that I, Frank White, of
Kitselas, farmer, intend to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
north-east corner of the Kitselas Indian reserve, thence north 20 chains,
east 20 chains, south 20 chains, west 20
chains to point of commencement, containing 40 acres more or less.
Oct. 13, 1911. Frank White.
18
LIQUOR    LICENCE   APPLICATION
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the
fifteenth day of November next, application will lie made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police for a renewal
of the hotel licence to sell liquor by retail in the hotel known as the Ingineca
Hotel, situate, at Hazelton, in the Province of British Columbia.
Dated this 7th day of October, 1911.
10 McDONELL & McAFEE.
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.
NOTICE is hereby given that the
partnership lately .subsisting between
us the undersigned, Allan Cameron
Aldous, Struan George Robertson and
William Pitt Murray, carrying on business at Hazelton, British Columbia, has
been dissolved as from 31st August by
mutual consent, so far as regards the
said Struan George Robertson, who retires from the linn.
All debts due to or owing by the late
(inn will be received and will be paid by
the said Allan Cameron Aldous and
William Pitt Murray, who will continue
the said business under the present style
of Aldous & Murray.
As witness our hands this 1st day of
October, 1911.
Allan Camkron Aldous.
Struan George Robertson.
William Pitt Murray.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted one-
quarter mile east of the east bank of
Moss river and one-quarter mile north
of the Skeena river, at the south-east
corner of Lot 2195, Cassiar district;
thence 80 chains north, 80 chains east,
80 chains south, 80 chains west to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less, known as Fred Hasler's
coal claim No. 1. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 1(1, 1911.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast corner ot lot 2196, Cassiar
district, thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west to point of commencement, containing 040 acres more or less, known as
Fred Hasler's coal claim No. 2.
Sept. 16, 1911. Fred Hasler.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Van-:
couver, miner, intends to apply  for a
license to prospect for coal  and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southeast  corner of  Lot  996,  Cassiar
district,   thence   80   chains   north,   80 ���
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains |
west to point of commencement, containing 640 cres more or less, known as
Fred Hasler's coal ciaim No. 3.
Sept. 16, 1911. Fred Hasler.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-east corner ol Lot 2179, Cassiar
district, thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less, known
as Fred Hosier's coal claim No. 4.
Sept. 16, 1911. Fred Hasler.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 2195, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, 80 chains east to point of commencement, containing 610 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 5. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, 1911.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 2196, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, 80 chains east to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 6. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, 1911.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 996, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, 80 chains east to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 7. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, 1911.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 2179, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains west, 80 chains
south, 80 chains east to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 8. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, 1911.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply lor a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the l'ollowingdcscrihcdlands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east ol' the southeast corner of
Lot ZI95, Cassia?- district, thence 80
chains north, 811 chains east, 80 chains
south, so chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 9. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, 1911.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler. of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 2196, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, so chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hosier's coal
claim No. 10. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18. 1911.
Omineca Land District,   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intend to apply  for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 996, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. II. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, I9II.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 2179, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 040 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 12. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 18, 1911.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east and one mile south of the
south-east corner of Lot 2195, Cassiar
district, thence 80 chains north, 80 chains
east, 80 chains south, 80 chains west to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres more or less, known as Fred
Hasler's coal claim No. 13.
Sept. 19, 1911. Fred Hasler.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 2195, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
soulh, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 14. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, 1911.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 2196, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres, more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 15. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, 1911.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted three
miles east of the southeast corner of
Lot 996, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 10. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, 1911.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intend to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east and one mile south of the
south-east corner of lot 2195, Cassiar
district, thence 80 chains north, 80
chains east, 80 chains south, 80 chains
west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more or less, known
as Fred Hasler's coal claim No. 17.
Sept. 19, 1911. Fred Hasler.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 2195, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, 80 chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 18. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, 1911.
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 2196, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, SO chains east, 80 chains
south, 80 chains west to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 19. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, 1911.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Fred Hasler, of Vancouver, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal anil petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted four
miles east of the south-east corner of
Lot 9911, Cassiar district, thence 80
chains north, SO chains east, 80 chains
south, so chains west to point of commencement, containing 610 acres more
oi' less, known as Fred Hasler's coal
claim No. 20. Fred Hasler.
Sept. 19, 1911.
LIQUOR   LICENCE   APPLICATION
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the
fifteenth day of November next, application will be made lo the Superintendent of Provincial Police for a renewal
of the licence for the sale of liquors by
wholesale in and upon the premises
known as the Hudson's Bay Company's
store, situate at Hazelton, B. C, upon
the lands described as lots 6 and 7,
Hazelton townsite.
Dated this 7th day of October, 1911.
10 .1. C. BOYD, Applicant
LIQUOR ACT, 1910
(Section 49)
NOTICE is hereby given that, on the
fifteenth day of November next, application will be made to the Superintendent of Provincial Police lor the transfer
of the licence for the sale of liquor  by
retail in and upon the premises  known
as the New Telkwa   Hotel,   situate   at
Telkwa, British Columbia, from W. S.
McDonell to George   Henry   McDonell,
of British Columbia.
Dated this 7th dav of October, 1911.
W. S. McDONELL, (Deceased)
Holder of Licence.
R. J. McDONELL, Executor.
GEORGE HENRY McDONELL,
10 Applicant for Transfer, THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 15)11
ANNUAL RIFLE MATCHES
Heavy Tweed Overcoats
A look over our stock will win your appreciation and agreement that
We Have Them All Beaten
Our Overcoats arc large and roomy, heavy and warm, neat and dressy.
Our Coats have the famous Adjustable Auto Storm
Collar which alone commends
Quality, Value, Style
R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd.
Hazelton
tetam&tm-m&ismuE&WKm&m*?,
fr
=^
Huelton'l Favorilr Resort
A
GALENA CLUB ^%s
BOX BALL * '
POOL AND BILLIARDS
Soda Fountain Equipped tj serve Finest lec Cream  Sodas,
Sundaes, etc., etc.
Our specially is the Lest Confectionery,   including   unrivalled
Imported Chocolates.
Choicest Egyptian and other Imported Cigarettes    Fine Cigars.
Books, Magazines and Periodicals
^
D. J. McDougall
E. J. Tate
Jf
Ingineca Hotel
McDonell & McAfee, Props.
The only family hotel in the district.       Private   dining   rooms.
Night and day restaurant.      Modern conveniences.
Reasonable rates.    Good Stable in connection.
Hazelton
Choicest of  Wines, Liquors and Cigars
always on hand.
Hazelton   Marksmen   Wind  Up   Season
At the Targets On Thanksgiving Day���
Prize Winners Receive Their Rewards
Plans of the Rifle Association
At the annual matches of the
Hazelton Rifle association, held
at the ranges on Monday, there
was a good attendance of com
petitors and spectators, and the
day's program was carried out
success fully.
In the first class Arthur Skel
home won   a closely contested
match at 200, 500 ancl 600 yards,
II. II.   Little,  who  was second,
and Major Leslie, winnerof third
prize, being only one point be
hind in the total score.   Dr. Mae
lean proved the high scorer in the
second class, with J. H. Hether
ington   second   and   Dr.  H.  C
I Wrinch third.
A special prize for the highest
score of the day at any range was
carried off by Arthur Skelhorne,
\ who also won the grand aggregate handicap.
Ln the first class the range
prizes wore won by Major Leslie
and Arthur Skelhorne.
Range prizes for the second
. class were awarded to Dr. Maclean, J. H. Hetherington and J.
W. Campbell.
The prizes were presented to
the winners at a general meeting
of the association,  held  in  the
Presbyterian club room on Wed
nesday evening.    The executive
committee announced   that   the
sum  of seventy dollars was re
quired to pay liabilities incurred
in making improvements on the
ranges.    At the next meeting of
' the association arrangements will
j be made to pay off the indebted
i ness.   It is proposed to hold one
j or two smoking concerts during
| the winter.
Following are the contributors
| to the prize fund: R. Cunningham & Son, Hudson's Bay Co.,
R. S. Sargent, Rosenthal, Harris
& DeVoin, Herald, Miner, B. C.
Brokerage Co., Aldous & Murray,
Noel & Rock.
JOHN BLUME DEAD
Wellknown   Prospector   Goes   To   His
Last Rest, Regretted By
Many Friends
J. F. Macdonald     Furniture Dealer j
Hazelton, B.C.
As our s"tock is insufficient to carry us through the
winter, we have decided to offer our goods at
Reduced Prices
while they last. We have a large assortment lo select from, and would
advise you to select your winter's House Furnishings while procurable.
Come and inspett our goods, we guarantee our customers satisfaction
J. F. Macdonald      Furniture Dealer
r
HARRIS MINES, Ltd.
Non-Personal Liability
'Hjhe management of Harris Mines, Ltd.
propose to open up the I 00 foot level
on No. 2 and 3 veins this winter. This
will open up large bodies of high grade
ore for shipment when rails are laid.
This property will make a mine and a
big one. You will make no mistake in
buying the treasury shares. The shaft
on No. 3 vein is now down over 40 feet.
Go out with us and have a look for
yourself.
Rosenthal, Harris & DeVoin
Selling Agents for the Company
HAZELTON, B. C
J
General regret is felt at the
untimely death of John Blume,
who succumbed on Sunday morning to a lingering illness, which
culminated in brain trouble. The
circumstances of his seizure at
Groundhog and the gallant behavior of Bob McDonald, his
partner, in bringing him to Hazel
ton despite almost insurmountable difficulties, are fresh in the
minds of our readers.
.John Blume was one of the
best-known prospectors in the
district, his energetic and cheery
I disposition making him a general
: favorite. He had been in Omineca for six years, and had ac-
; quired interests which would in a
short time have made him wealthy
' had not his career been cut short.
Tuesday afternoon the funeral
I took place, interment being in
the Hazelton cemetery. Omineca
Aerie, P, 0. E., of which deceased
was a member, attended in a
body, while many friends attended the service in St. Peter's
church and joined the funeral
cortege.
Local and Personal
Jack Ward was in from Twenty-
mile on Thanksgiving day.
J. K. Ashman came in from
Twenty-mile on Wednesday.
L. L. DeVoin has gone up to
his Bulkley valley ranch for a few
days.
Dan Horrigan, well known in
Prince Rupert, arrived in Hazelton on Thursday.
A general meeting of the Conservative association was held on
Thursday evening.
The erection of a number of
new buildings was begun in New
Hazelton during the week.
George Hazelton has gone to
Vancouver for the winter, being
a passenger in Tuesday's mail
canoe.
J. H. Snodgrass returned t n
Wednesday from Aldermere,
where he has spent the last
month.
J. Hart, of Vancouver, who was
formerly engaged in the lumber
business here, is a business visitor
in town.
Angus Matheson returned on
Thursday from a prospecting
trip to Naas river and the Kit-
wankool country.
John Ashman, who was confined to the house by a severe
attack of rheumatism, is recovering his usual health.
A number of skating enthusiasts, who went up to Charleson
lake during the week had good
sport, the ice being in excellent
condition.
Wolves are not at all plentiful
in this vicinity. The first skin
brought in for some time was
sold the other day by a Babine
Indian.
The 400 Burns cattle which
were at Morricetown flats have
been converted into beef, and
are now in cold storage for the
winter market.
C. H. Munro, accompanied by
the three McKay brothers, Pete,
Bob and Dan, left on Thursday
for Buck river, where the party
will spend a few weeks.
Bob McDonald and T. E. Han-
kin, who returned from Second
Cabin on learning of the death
of John Blume, are again on
their way to Groundhog.
Dan Carroll is in from Hudson's Bay mountain, where he
has finished his season's work on
the mineral claims he has located
in that part of the district.
Those interested in the Hazelton Rifle association will endeavor
to obtain a government appropriation for the construction and
equipment of permanent ranges.
W. R. Eggleston, the Telkwa
builder, was a business visitor in
town during the week. He reports business brisk in the valley
with every prospect of exceptionally good times in the future.
A Hallowe'en entertainment,
under the auspices of the Y. M.
C. A., afforded the railroad and
bridge workers at Skeena crossing an opportunity to spend an
enjoyable evening on Tuesday.
W. H. Morrison, in charge of
the Y. M. C. A. work at Skeena
crossing, was in town for a
couple of days during the week.
He reports that the railroad
workers are taking great interest
in the activities of the association.
A canoe went to the railhead
on Thursday to bring up a quantity of express for Aldous & Murray. A number of men employed at Burns' cold storage plant,
whose work is finished for the
season, were passengers for the
coast.
A letter has been received from
the public works department intimating that the government
will make provision for the construction of a wagon road to the
Rocher de Boule mines in the
spring, provided the result of development work during the winter justifies the expenditure.
The estimated cost will be $10,000.
Charles Reid, formerly manager of the Pender street branch
of the Bank of Vancouver in its
home city, has arrived to take
charge of the local branch, relieving H. Neville Wright. The
retiring manager will leave tomorrow for England, where he
expects to interest capital in
several promising prospects in
this vicinity. He has acquired
options on several properties.
Somebody with a grievance
appears to have been complaining
about the mail service between
the Coast and Hazelton. The
people here will be at a loss to
imagine any just cause of com
plaint against the mail contractors, who have invariably brought
the mails up river with greater
regularity���notwithstanding the
difficulties of transportion in the
winter season -than the steamers
are able to achieve during the
season of navigation.
It is estimated that the amount
of farm machinery, wagons, etc.,
brought to Hazelton during the
season of navigation this year exceeds $30,000 in value. This is a
good indication of the progress
being made by the agriculturists
of the district, and speaks well
for the settlers in the Bulkley
valley, who purchased most of
the machinery and appliances
brought in for agricultural purposes.
That the Assembly club will
continue to hold its place among
the successful institutions of
Hazelton is to be judged from the
attendance at the opening dance
of the season, which was held in
the auditorium on the evening of
Thanksgiving Day. The recently
elected executive committee is
taking hold with a will, and has
already secured a sufficient number of members to guarantee the
success of the club in the coming
season.
While coming up the river on
her last trip, the launch Kit-Ex-
Chen was disabled by the bending of her tail shaft, necessitating
a tie-up at Meanskinisht. The
cargo was transferred to canoes.
Messrs O'Neill & Larocque came
to Hazelton on Wednesday for
tools and appliances, leaving
yesterday to make the necessary
repairs and bring the boat up the
the river. The launch will
remain here until February,
when she will be taken to Telkwa,
for use on the Bulkley between
that point and up-river construction camps.
Superintendent Betts, of the
Grand Trunk Pacific Coal company, is down from Telkwa. His
concern has discontinued work
on its coal claims for the season.
A Bohunk Lawbreaker
For some time Peter Pavich has
been giving the police trouble; but
it was not until Monday that they
succeeded in getting an air-tight
case against him. Pavich, who
has been conducting a "hotel"
for foreigners, appears to have
been in the habit of supplying
Indians with liquor. On Monday
the constables succeeded in obtaining evidence so strong that
when the culprit appeared before
Mr. Loring he was given the limit
for the offence, being fined $300
and sent to New Westminster for
six months. He paid his fine, to
escape another half year behind
the bars. Lue Perpich, another
foreigner, tried to pass a bottle
of whiskey to an Indian within
sight of a constable. The attempt cost him a $100 fine.
NO FOOD FOR 10 DAYS
[Continued from page one]
Northeastern railway, formerly
known as the Portland Canal
short line, which will probably
be the next road to be constructed in Northern British Columbia,
and which is seeking for assistance from the provincial government.
In a day or two Mr. Hoard will
leave for the coast to present his
report. G. W. Morris, who was
one of the pioneers of the Steamboat country, is greatly taken
with the showings of this camp,
and will remain here, while W.
A. Boultbee also declares his intention of casting in his lot with
the prospectors of Omineca district.
Horse Blankets
Heavy Jute Blankets, well lined,
Double Breasted with Web Leg
Straps.    -:-   Extra Large Sizes.
$4.00 to $7.50 per pair.
Aldous & Murray
Hazelton
Acreage for Sale
Adjoining every import Ant station on the Grand Trunk Pacific from
Prince Rupert to Fort George
FARM LANDS IN
Bulkley, Kispiox, Kitwangar, Nechaco Valleys, Francois Lake,
Ootsa Lake, Fraser Lake, Trembleur Lake and Lakelse Lake
BRITISH COLUMBIA BROKERAGE COMPANY
Box 20, Hazelton, B. C.
SEASONABLE UNDERWEAR
FOR MEN
Wolsey Underwear 6.00 per suit
Stansfield's Blue Label 4.00 per suit
Stansfield's Red Label 3.50 per suit
Penangle No. 95 3.00 per suit
We also carry some cheaper
grades from $1 per garment
tm>
Hudson's Bay Company

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