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Omineca Miner Dec 4, 1915

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 THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
ioer
VOL. V, NO. 14
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1915
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
GERMANS BEGIN TO
RECOGNIZE THE TRUTH
London, Nov. 29;���-Maximilian
Harden, editor of the Die Zuk-
unft, of Berlin,in the latest issue
of his newspaper received here,
tells his countrymen that they
must expect a war of exhaustion.
He ridicules the German talk
about Swedish intervention, and
the idea that Russia will conclude
a separate peace. He says he
considers it no sign of strength
that the German government
steadily refuses to disclose "its
war aims," and believes the government is making too much
noise about food regulations.
Herr Harden says the soil of
Germany is free, and her armies
are everywhere in enemy territory, but that none of her enemies
have been disarmed, that none
of them seem near collapse, and
that the mightiest of them,Great
Britain, can not honestly be said
to be even seriously wounded.
All of them, he says, believe
piously and sincerely they will be
victorious, and they are absolutely determined to secure victory
by all possible means.
Herr Harden points out that
Russia is "farther than ever from
that decline, which we, in our
madness, so eagerly believed,"
and says it is folly to suppose
that any of the Entente Allies
are ready to conclude peace.
ANOTHER CAIN FOR RUSSIANS
SERVIA WILL FIGHT TO THE BITTER END-
RUSSIAN ARMY REPORTED IN BULGARIA
Kitchener's Plain Words
"There is no room," Lord
Kitchener said to a labor conference the other day, "for any
pessimism. Give me the men
and the war munitions I want,
and I will guarantee my personal
reputation that we have the war
in the hollow of our hands."
"I know," Lord Kitchener added, "how many many men I
want, and how many I want for
munitions. I have their names
and the numbers on their doors,
and if they do not come I will
fetch them."
OFFERS TEN BEDS
FOR KHAKI INVALIDS
Numbers of invalided soldiers
are now returning from the
front, and many who are convalescing will be cared for at
Esquimalt. Believing that the
climate here will prove more
favorable for some cases than
that of the coast, Dr. Wrinch,
medical superintendent of Hazelton Hospital, has offered the
military authorities ten beds in
thehospital for the accommodation
of that number of wounded. This
patriotic offer will probaby find
acceptance.
London: The Russians have
taken twelve miles of trenches,
700 prisoners, and a large quantity of munitions and food on the
Tukum road, west of Riga, according to a despatch from Geneva to the Exchange Telegraph
Co. Riga was one of the main
objectives of the Germans. Von
Hindenburg. however, has never
been able to penetrate the Russian lines on this sector and the
capture above reported would
indicate that the Ressians again
are on the offensive, after comparative quiet for some days.
Rom��: The Giornale D'ltalia
today prints an interview with
M. Ristitch, Servian minister to
Italy, concerning the rumor that
Servia might capitulate. The
minister is quoted as follows: "I
absolutely deny that there will
he any capitulation, this word
being unknown in Servia. There
the people either win or die.
The Servian people and  govern
ment will fight to the bitter end,
next to the Allies. Servia will
be loyal to the last man. In a
short time Servia will have a
fresh army of 200,000 men, full
of enthusiasm, to throw on the
flank of the enemy. She only
needs supplies of arms and ammunition."
London: Reports that Russian
troops have entered Bulgaria are
persistent, but details of the invasion are witheld.
Additional Rritish troops landed in Saloniki yesterday.
On the Strumnitza front the
British artillery has silenced the
Bulgarian guns.
Paris: The Athens correspondent of the Havas agency sends
the following: "It is reported
from Fiorina (Greece) that the
Servians have sent a number of
battalions to occupy the village
Bno, two hours from the Greek
frontier, in order to thwart the
Bulgarian maneuver having for
its purpose the occupation of the
railroad station at Xanall and the
cutting of the Servian retreat toward the Greek border."
Paris : A despatch to the
Havas agency from Athens,dated
Thursday, says: "Monastir was
occupied at 3 o'clock this afternoon."
Paris: The Allied powers,
finding that Greece had not withdrawn her forces from Saloniki
and that her answer to the Entente demands was too long delayed, have decided to again
1 apply the economic pressure so
effective a fortnight ago. Public
opinion in Athens is beginning
to turn towards full acceptance
of the demands.
London: A large German submarine was sunk yesterday by
the shore batteries at Gibraltar.
The British steamers Middleton
and Clan McLeod have been
sunk by submarines in the Mediterranean.
LOCAL AND DISTRICT
NEWS PARAGRAPHS
R.S.Sargent has been gazetted
a notary public.
D.L.Stewart, of Cedarvale,was
in town on Tuesday.
H.J. Hughes arrived from South
Fort George on Wednesday.
Martin Saunders, of Smithers,
is a visitor in Hazelton today.
the heavy artillery for active lis a part of the Mediterranean
service. The good wishes of his expedition. He writes the Miner
many friends will go with him.   that he is  alive and  well after
' twelve months' service. His
brother Alan, of Massett, was
killed in action last April
J.I.Peters is now general agent
for the C.P.R. at Prince Rupert,
succeeding the popular J. G. Mc-
J. A. Sampare, of Gitwangak,
spent a couple of days in  town.
G. A. Rosenthal, of Smithers,
spent a few days here this week.
George Fowler, of Hope, was
among Monday's arrivals i n
Hazelton.
Hazelton contributed to the
great success of the war loan by
subscribing $10,400.
Mrs. Cox is raffling a handsome
Christmas cake, in aid of the
W.A. Red Cross fund.
Walter Simpson, of the telegraph service, came down from
Eigth Cabin on Tuesday.
H.C. Kinghorn, Forester Allen's
chief of staff, leaves on Monday
for Montreal, where he will join
About twenty New Hazelton
people came over last night, to
attend the Red Cross concert.
Harry Smith has  secured  the
contract for the two-room school
which is to be built at Smithers. ,
Nab,  who has  been   appointed
John  Newick,  of the   Up-to- i district traffic agent for steam-
Date   drugstore,    returned   o n ] ers at Vancouver.
Wednesday from a visit to Smithers.
Agricultural Meeting
Those who are interested in
Indian Agent Loring returned J Kardening) as wel| as the farmers
on Thursday from a visit to Vic-jinthis vicinitv>  should bear in
toria, where he was engaged on [mind the agricultural meeting in
official business.  I the sch00lhouse on Tuesday eve-
C. H. Hawley, an old-timer on | ning at 8. Illustrated addresses
the telegraph line, who has been ; will be delivered by A;H.Tomlin.
in the east for a couple of years, | son provincial horticulturist, and
is here this week.
R.E.Allen, H.C.Kinghorn and
H. M. Mathews, returning from
Prince Rupert, were among Monday's incoming passengers.
F. R. Jessup, well-known here
as a member of the G. T. P.
engineering staff, now a lieutenant in the 1st Border Regiment,
sends his regards to all his
friends in this district. His corps
H. E. Walker, provincial agriculturist.
Card of Thanks
On behalf of the W. A., Mrs.
Field, the president, has requested The Miner to convey the
thanks of the organization to
Mrs. Reid and the ladies and
gentlemen whose efforts made
last nights concert so successful
| and added a considerable sum tp
the Red Cross fund.
BIG CROWD ATTENDS
RED CROSS CONCERT
Unqualified success rewarded
the ladies and gentlemen who
organized last night's Red Cross
concert. Assembly Hall was
crowded to the doors, and the
program proved to be of a most
entertaining character. The
numbers were as follows:
Overtures Orchestra
Song, The Best Old Flag on Earth,
Mr. Scott.
Part Song, Braid the Raven Hair,
Ladies' Choir.
Recitation Mr. Mclnnes
Farce
DOCUMENTARY EVIDENCE
Mrs. Thos. Melville .   Mrs. Reid
Mr. Thos. Melville .  Mr. Philips
Selection, Orchestra.
Song, The Sunshine of Your
Smile, Miss Goddard.
Farce, HANS von SMASH
Mr. Batch .... Mr. Scott
Miss Susie Batch . . Mrs. Sealy
Miss Mary Batch . . Miss Smith
Katie,Irish Servant Mrs. Hamblin
Mr. Prettyman . . Mr. Fuller
Mr. Dasher. . . Mr. Donahae
Hans van Smash, a Green Dutchman .... Mr. Philips
Selection, Orchestra.
Song,        Selected   Miss Smith.
Selection, Orchestra.
Lack of space prevents an extended notice, but mention must
be made of the excellent performance of Mrs. Reid and Mr.
Phillips, to whose efforts much
of the success of tke occasion
was due.
After the concert, dancing and
refreshments occupied the attention of a large part of the crowd.
Thenetproceedswerenearly$140.
SEATON COAL MAY
BE HIGHLY IMPORTANT
That the coal deposits near
Twenty-mile are to be developed
in the near future is the news
brought by Arthur Skelhorne,
who is spending a few days in
the district. A report on the
property, by James Ashworth. a
noted engineer, has just been
received. Of the eleven seams
occurring, only one is recommended for development, but that is
evidently of considerable importance. M r. Ashworth reports
that No.2 seam contains 5ft.4ins.
of bituminous coal, coking 71 per
cent on a nine - ton test. He
estimates that the seam contains
14,000,000 tons, and as the point
for working is only 300 feet from
the siding at Seaton, the proposition looks extremely favorable.
This coal can be landed at
Prince Rupert to compete on the
most favorable terms with the
Vancouver Island product.
Mr. Skelhorne is forming a
development syndicate to open
up the property, which is owned
bv the Seaton Coal Co. THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1915
e
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year: Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $2.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 20 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazette rates.
Vol. V.
Saturday, December 4, 1915.
No. 14
GERMANS BEGIN TO FEEL THE STRAIN
The theory that the end of the war will come through a
general collapse of the Teutonic allies is beginning to find general
acceptance. There are abundant signs that Germany and Austria
are approaching the point of exhaustion in men, munitions and
food. This does not mean that their people are facing actual
famine, or that they cannot still place millions of men in the field;
but the best evidence goes to show that the reserves of troops upon
which they must depend to maintain their long fighting lines are
nearing extinction, while the economic condition of the two nations
may be judged by the voices of their newspapers. Despite a rigid
censorship, such statements as the following appear in late isssues
of German dailies:
"Let us frankly admit that the German people are in distress."
-DieZukunft.
Unless the people are protected from high food prices, the
Nueste Nachrichten says, "the pollution of the soil of Germany by
the hordes of our foreign enemies is a question of time only."
"The situation is a serious one."��� Tagliche Rundschau. Berlin.
"The reality is growing daily farther from the intoxicating
vision of victory, in the sight of enormous and increasing losses in
the field, starving women at home fighting for food, and no alternative but ruin, whether victorious or defeated, at the end."���
Vorwarts.
"The discontent that is brewing is alarming." -Magdeburg
Zeitung.
"People are beginning to interpret the miserable existing
conditions as the defeat of the Empire."���Frankfurter Zeitung.
"The position of the families of mobilized men is rapidly
becoming one of despair."���Berlin Tageszeitung.
������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������
Parcels For Soldiers
The post-office department announces that, owing to the postal
convention with France, which
has not been amended, parcels
addressed to soldiers at the front
must carry the regular postage,
which is 32 cents for one pound
and eight cents for each additional pound up to eleven, which is
the limit. The rate to Great
Britain is 12 cents a pound.
In all cases parcels for tha
troops must be addressed to the
Army Post Office, London; but
this rule does not affect the rate
of postage, whbh depends upon
the final destination of the parcel.
Hospital Affairs
At the meeting of the advisory
board of Hazelton Hospital, it
was decided to prepare a statement of the year's work and the
financial condition of the institution, which will be published
before the annual meeting. Additional funds will be required
and there is no doubt the people
of the district, which is seldom
called upon to asssist this worthy
institution, will respond liberally
as in the past.
Hospital Sunday collections at
St Peter's Church totalled $50.
Chinese residents also voluntarily
contributed $10.25 to the Hospital.
Seed Growing
The eleventh annual report of
the Canadian Seed Growers' Association, which is ready for distribution, contains addresses and
papers of special interest to those
concerned in matters pertaining
to crop raising. In addition to
reports and papers presented at
provincial conventions on the
progress which is being made in
the production of registered seed
in the different provinces, a number of excellent papers from
leadine agricultural authorities
are included.
This report is being mailed to
members of the association only,
and to others who apply for it to
the Publications Branch, Department of Agriculture, Ottawa.
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The Favorite    0 A D C Vf&V ^     We Lead~
Shopping place  wilUmi * & Others Follow
MINERS' PROSPECTORS' and SETTLERS' SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY
COLD WEATHER
Should remind you of
WARM CLOTHING
Such as Underwear, Sox, Gloves, Toques, Etc.
Woollen Goods have advanced at the factories,
but we still sell at our former prices while the
stock lasts.
Underwear, Woollen Gloves, Woollen Socks,
Leather Mitts and Gloves (lined and unlined).
RUBBER FOOTWEAR
Just a Reminder
About Your
BEDDING
Spring Mattresses
Pillows, Sheets.
STOVES, HEATERS, PIPES,
STOVEBOARDS, ETC.
Flour, Oats, Hay,  Bran and Shorts at new
Prices.
��32. R. S. SARGENT, LTD. Hri!on
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horticulturist and poultryman.
The bulletin is available on application to the Publications Branch,
Department of Agriculture, Ottawa, Ontario.
/f=
The Miner is two dollars a year.
Seasonable Hints
"The real test of the farmer
is, perhaps, in his ability to make
the most profitable use of the
various products of his farm and
his foresight in getting ready in
every way practicable between
harvest and seed time for the
productive operations of the next
season," states J. H. Grisdale,
director of Dominion experimental farms, in presenting Seasonable Hints, No. 3, for November,
December, January and February,
to the farming public of Canada.
A careful perusal of its sixteen
pages will amply reward the
stockman, the agriculturist,  the
Addressing Soldiers' Mail
In order to facilitate the handling of mail at the front and to
ensure prompt delivery, it is requested that all mail be addressed as follows:
(a) Regimental Number.
(b) Rank.
(c) Name.
(d) Squadron. Battery or Company.
(e) Battalion, Regiment (or
other unit), Staff appointment or Department.
(f) Canadian Contingent.
(g) British Expeditionary
Force.
(h) Army Post Office, London
England.
Unnecessary mention of higher
formations, such as brigades,
divisions, is strictly forbidden,
and causes delay.
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Lowest rates Prince Rupert to all Eastern Points via steamer
to Vancouver and Canadian Pacific Railway.
Meals and berth included on steamer
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   anZ^ATTLE
S.S. "Princeu May" leave. Prince Rupert every SUNDAY, at 6 p.m.
S.S. "Princeu Sophia" leaves Prince Rupert Nov. 19th; Dec. 3rd   17th-
Jan. 2nd, 14th & 28th.
Tk
^:
J. G. McNab,   Cor. SrdAve. and 4th St.,   Prince Rupert, B. C.
The Omineca Miner is two dollars a year anywhere in Canada.
Prohibition carried in Newfoundland by 2500 to 5000. It
will become effective January 1,
1917.    	
The English language is spoken
by ten per cent of the world's
inhabitants.
Bulkley Valley Farm
Lands For Sale
These Lands are close to the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, which is now running trains through the
Bulkley Valley. There is a ready local market for all produce. Land prices are reasonable. Terms are easy.
Write for full particulars to
NORTH COAST LAND COMPANY, Ltd.
Suite 622 Metropolitan Building
Paid up Capital * 1.600,000.
V,
VANCOUVER, B. C.
J THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1915
i ������������
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
Navigation is still open on the
great lakes.;
China is preparing to build 4,000
miles of railroad.
Scutari,  Albania,
capital of Servia.
is now
the
There is an epidemic of burglary in Vancouver.
Ten per cent of Canada's population is of foreign birth.
Okanaganapplescaptured many
prizes at Spokane apple fair.
The sale of liquor on railway
trains is now forbidden inOntario.
The C. N. R. is now running
three transcontinental trains a
week.
Five steamers have been chartered to carry wheat for Belgian
relief.
A tornado swept Little Rock,
Ark., killing thirteen and injuring
twenty.
Mrs. W. R. Ross, wife of the
minister of lands, is dead at
Victoria.
A colliery explosion at Boomer,
W, Va., on Tuesday entombed
200 miners.
A Canadian, broke in Arizona,
tramped to Vancouver to join the
overseas forces.
A special corps of Canadian
miners is being formed for service at the front.
Kipling's only son is reported
missing, and is believed to have
been killed in action.
screw top metal boxes, from
which the recipients may make
hand grenades.
to approach owing to the tremendous sea running inshore.
Later despatches say five of
the crew were rescued after almost superhuman efforts by the
men of the Clayuquot lifeboat.
SlllllllllllllCllllllllllllUllllllllllllltOllllllllllllltOlllllllllllllCOllllllllllllltllllllllllllltllllllllllllltO
I Hudson's Bay Company |
France's new loan is proving
highly successful. Paris alone
subscribed for five billion dollars.
Reports say German and Austrian officers are being employed
in the Chinese army and arsenals.
Seventeen hundred munition
workers have gone from Canada
to England. Nearly all are at
work.
Over 70 per cent of the 1340
prisoners paroled in the state of
Washington since 1909 have reformed.
An anti - prohibition petition
which was presented to the provincial government contained 33,-
947 names.
A train on the Mexican Central
was blown up by Villista soldiers.
Sixty were killed, including several Americans.
G.M.Dawson, surveyor-general
of B. C, has been appointed
western member of the Canadian
munitions board.
The Canadian ice - breaking
steamerMinto has been purchased
by the Russian government for
use at Archangel.
Sir Charles Davidson's report
on the submarine enquiry shows
that Liberal charges of graft were
utterly unfounded.
At the request of the exposition j a
authorities, the famous Canadian |
exhibit will be transferred from||
San Francisco to the San Diego 8
exposition.
Experimenting with   a  para
chute.   Colonel  Maitland, of the ��
British  air  fleet, dropped safely ��
to earth from an aeroplane 10,000' ��
feet in the air. ��.
  o
  ^j
Major Winchell, appointed head \ |
of the Salvation  Army's  relief ��
work  in   Belgium,   has been refused  admission to that country
by the Germans.
An attempt to set fire to 40,000
barrels of gasoline at Tacoma
was foiled on Sunday.
Four thousand lobsters, brought
from the Atlantic, have been
planted in Puget Sound.
A fire at Drummond colliery,
Westville, N.S., has thrown 800
men out of employment.
Britain has taken over
great steamer Statendam,
completed at Belfast for
Holland-America line.
the
just
the
The German cruiser Frauenloeb j
was sunk  in   the   Baltic   by   a
British submarine, a week  after!
her sister ship, the Undine, and |i
at the same place.
The Dominion  government is1
said to have asked the opposition
to agree  to an extension of the
life of parliament for a year after
the end of the war.
In London the hours during^
which liquor* may be sold are
now restricted to five and a half.
No drinks may be sold on credit,
and the no-treating rule is enforced.
Order your Liquors for Xmas NOW.
Brandy: XXX Hennessy
XXX Marion
Champagne: Mumm's Extra Dry, pts.
Claret: Chateau Breillan
Navy
Gin: Finsbury, Sloe, Gordon Dry
"   DuKuyper
Port: Old Duke
"     H. B. C.
Sherry:  Bodega
Whiskies: Scotch, per bot.  $1.75, 1.50, 1.25, & 1.00       E
Rye        "     " $1.25, 1.10, &  .75       |
Rum: H. B. C, Negrita per bot.      1.50       g
The War Tax on Champagne is 25 cents and on Claret,    =
Port and Sherry, 5 cents per bottle. ��
Please remember we cannot sell in quantities of less than 6    ��
a bottles (qts.), but we can assort them for you. n
��    On  the  1 st  December we commence giving coupons for    ��
��    the nice dinner service with every dollar you spend with us.    ��
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ier bot.
$ 2.10
44          It
.75
4 4           t 4
2.00
"           "
.60
"           '*
���50
44           (4
.85
"           "
2.00
44             .4
1.00
4 1             it
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4 4           4 4
.75
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
LIVERY and STAGES
night.
We are prepared to supply private
and  public conveyances   day  and
Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
BEST DRY BIRCH, $5.50 A CORD
I Consign  your shipments in   Our
| Care  for  Storage  or  Delivery.
Address all communications to Haxelton.
Ruddy & MacKay
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
Inland revenue reports show
that the consumption of spirits,
wine and beer in Canada has
fallen to a lower rate per capita
than in any period in the last
five years.
3 TRAINS WEEKLY
MONDAYS. THURSDAYS. SATURDAYS at 6:08p.m.
To Edmonton, Saskatoon, Regina, Winnipeg,
St. Paul, Chicago, Eastern Canada, Maritime
Provinces and United States.
.ndard and Tourist Sleeping Cars and Parlor-Observation Car
Service.
2  BOATS WEEKLY  from  Prince Rupert.     S.S. Prince Rupert
every Tuesday at 9a.m. S.S.Prince George every Saturday at 9 a.m.
UNEXCELLED EQUIPMENT ... CHARACTER SERVICE
Ninety persons were killed in a
hurricane which swept the Portugese coast on Monday.
The number of officers and
men who have left Canada for
overseas service is 110,000.
A "Bantam" regiment, of men
too short for regular battalions,
has been authorized for B.C.
A moving picture progtam is
to be a feature of Sunday evening
services in a Tacoma church.
The Standard mine at Silverton
has so far paid $1,800,000, equal
to 90 per cent of its capitalization.
Presbyterians in the maritime
provinces voted in favor of church
union by more than two to one.
A resolution advocating a six-
hour day was introduced in the
American Federation of Labor.
The Bank of Montreal has established a new high record,
with total assets of $303,000,000.
An organized gang, financed
by German moneyed interests,
was responsible for the burning
of Pier 14 at Seattle and for attempts to destroy steamships and
Legislation deisgned to improve I other property
the living and working condition j 	
of women is to be enacted by     Alex.   Lucas,   M. L .A .,   was
Vancouver city council. [awarded $200 damages in his libel Synopsis of Coal Mining Regu-
1 suit against Moses Cotsworth and                        lations.
the  Ministe-ial   Union for state- 	
ments    made  in    their  political jC0AL miningrights of the Dominion,
,,���,,      _  .  .    .     r,     ,       v-'   in   Manitoba,   Saskatchewan   and
pamphlet,      lhe Crisis in B. C.      Alberta,   the   Yukon    Territory,   the
Northwest Territories and in a portion
It is announced that the British '. of th��   Province of   British   Columbia,
. , . ���  , ... ] .,,       , may be leased for a term ot twenty-one
A number of Bulgarian otnceis, government will  take measures years at an annual rental of $i an
who are serving in the Russian [to prevent further mischievous a"e-    Not more than 2,560 acres will
For full particulars, reservations on boat cr train,
apply to Local Auent or to
ALBERT DAVIDSON, GENERAL AGENT, PRINCE RUPERT, B. C
Agency All Atlantic and Trans-Pacific Lines.
German newspapers are devoting much space to the growing
scarcity of food. Many chemical
substitutes are  being exploited.
Victor Carlstrom, the Canadian
aviator, has just flown from
Toronto to New York, 600 miles.
A patriotic confectioner in Victoria advertises that his candy
for soldiers's giffe is put up in
army have been branded as  deserters by the Bulgar authorities.
Up to June 30, the losses of the
first Canadian division in killed,
wounded and missing approximated 50 per cent of its strength.
Authoiities at Cleveland, Ohio,
are investigating the confession
of Dr. E.W.Ritter, implicated in I
plots to destroy munition plants.
Large numbers of undesirable
aliens are being deported from
London, and all persons arriving
in Great Britain must have passports.
In a revolver battle with holdup men at San Francisco, Police
Corporal Cook was shot dead.
One bandit was killed and three
escaped.
A great war council to arrange
the organization of an international staff for the Allies is to be
held in Paris, says the London
Chronicle.
The Chilean bark Carelmapu
was lost off the west coast of
Vancouver Island, her crew of 25
being drowned. The C. P. R.
steamer Princess Maquinna at-
bc leased to one applicant.
activity by Lord Northcliffe, who;    Application for a lease must be made
has made  many  attacks on the
ministers through his newspapers.
1 Assay Office and Mining Office
Arts and Crafts Building:, 578 Seymour Streel
 VANCOUVER, B.C.	
The Estate of J. O'Sullivan
Provincial Assayers and Chemists
! Established 1897 by the late J. O'Sullivan,   F. C. S., 26 years with
Vivian & Sons, Swansea.
HAZELTON HOSPITALw
1 for any period frmn one month upward at SI per
month in advance. This rate includes office consultations and medicines, as well aB all costs while
' in the hospital. Tickets obtainable in Hazelton
at the Posl Ofiice or the DriiK Store; in Aldermere
from Mr. T. J. Thorp: in Telkwo from Dr. Wallace;
! or by mail from th" Medical Superintendent nt the
tlospi*.'il
by the applicant in person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district in which
the rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must
be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for shall be
The Imperial munitions  board
has taken over the  work of  the
Dominion shell committee.   Over I staked out by the applicant himself.
������,,.,, , Each application must be accompani-
100,000 skilled workmen are  en- j et) by a fee of $6, which will be refund-
gaged    in    the   manufacture    of*1 if  ���"" rights   applied   for  are   not
.    i .         .    ��������� ���        ��� , available, but not otherwise.    A royal-
munitions in 320 Canadian plants. | ty shall  be paid on the merchantable
���  ! output of
Henry Ford,   maker of motor
cars, has chartered a steamer  to
I carry  a peace delegation   from
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion and British Columbia
Land Surveyors
Offices at Victo. ia, Nelson, Fort George
and New Hazelton.
B. C. Affleck, Mgr.   New Hazelton.
New York to Europe, in the hope
of ending the war by Christmas.
Mis project is not regarded seriously.
The claim of Mcllwee & Sons,
the contractors, against Foley,
Welch &~Stewart, for profits on
the construction of Rogers Pass
tunnel; has been increased to
$642,000. The plaintffs were not
allowed to complete their contract.
Following mysterious warnings
part of the plant of the Du Pont
Powder works at Wilmington,
Delaware, was blown up on Tuesday, with a loss of 31 lives. Six
employees were injured. A
smaller  explosion   occurred   on
the mine at the rate of five
cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
' furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the
royalty thereon. If the coal mining
rights are not being operated, such
returns should be furnished at least
once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at
the rate of $10.0C an acre.
For full information application
should be made to the Secretary of the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa,
or to any Agent or Sub-Agent of
Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B. ���Unauthorized publication of
this advertisement will not be paid for.
58782.
Commercial Printing at
THE  MINER OFFICE
tempted a rescue, but was unable I Wednesday.
Time signals sent out by wireless from the Eiffel Tower in
Paris are received at one point
250 miles away bya strip of wire
netting supported but about 20
i inches from the ground.
NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that an application will be made to the Legislative
Assembly of the Province of British Columbia at its nex tSession on behalf of The
Naas& Skeena Rivers Railway Company,
a Company incorporated by the Legislative Assembly of the Province of British
Columbia, by Chapter 69 of the Statutes
of British Columbia, 1911, for an Act
to be entitled "The Naas & Skeena
Rivers Railway Act, 1911, Amendment
Act, 1916", extending the periods prescribed by Section 79 of the Railway
Act, within which The Naas & Skeena
Rivers Railway Company should bona
fide commence the construction of its
railway, procure the bona fide payment
up in cash of not less than fifteen per
cent of the authorized share capital of
the Company, and the expenditure of
such fifteen per cent in, upon and
towards the construction of its railway,
and the completion and putting into
operation of the said Company's railway; and for sneh further and incidental
powers as may be necessary.
Dated at Victoria, B.C., this 24th day
of November, 1915.
BARNARD, ROBERTSON,
HEISTERMAN &TAIT,
14-19 Solicitors for the Applicant. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1915
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
f
MONDAY, NOV. 29
Aerial Activity
Paris (official): In Belgium
one of our aeroplanes, setting
out in pursuit of a squadron,
succeeded in bringing down a
German aeroplane, which fell into
the sea off Westende-Bains. A
torpedo-boat and German small
boats started out from Ostend
and Middlekirke for the purpose
of rescue. Allied hydroplanes
and artillery attacked the small
boats and succeeded in sinking
one of them.
A squadron of ten aeroplanes
has bombarded the hangars at
Habsheim, east of Muelhausen.
Eight shells of 155 millimeters
and 20 shells of 90 millimeters
were dropped on the hangars,
which caught fire. One aeroplane
was damaged by our projectiles.
The enemy vainly attempted to
pursue. One German aeroplane
was struck by bullets from a
machine gun and compelled to
land. Another capsized near
Lutterbach.
In the region of Nancy a German aeroplane was attacked by
one of our pursuit aeroplanes.
The French machine, coming to
close quarters with the adversary,
succeeded in cutting it down.
Another German aeroplane which
took part in the combat turned
tail.
A German Report
Berlin (via London): With the
re-occupation of Rudnik, the
capture of 2800 prisoners, and
the fight of the "scanty remains"
of the Servian army into the
Albanian mountains, Germany's
operations against Servia have
been brought to a close, says the
official statement issuedvtoday at
the headquarters of the general
staff. The object of these operations, the opening of communications with Bulgaria and the
Turkish Empire, has been accomplished, it is asserted.
Italians Waking Up
Rome: With the advance of
the Austro-Germans and Bulgars
toward Albania and the possibility
of their reaching the Adriatic
Sea, anxiety is becoming more
manifest among Italian people,
owing to the threat against the
Adriatic, the control of which is
dear to the hearts of Italians.
Geneva: Reports received here
from Chiasso, on the Swiss-
Italian border, say that Gorizia
has fallen, the Italians having
entered the town from the north.
There is no official confirmation
of the report.
less  than  fifteen  encounters in
the air taking place on the 28th.
British airmen made a successful raid on German positions on
the Belgian coast. Fourteen aeroplanes blew up the German aerodrome at Gips and an ammunition
factory at La Chapelette. Two
1 German aeroplanes were brought
! down.
After exploding mines under
the enemy positions in the Souchez district, the French have
made an advance.
Gorizia Burning
London: Telegraphing from
Zurich, the Exchange Telegraph
company's correspondent there
says:
"A semi-official Austrian despatch received here says the
suburbs of Gorizia are in flames,
and that the evacuation of the
town by the remaining civilians
is proceeding methodically."
Rome: The Austrian forces
defending Gorizia have been
strongly reinforced and today's
statement issued at the headquarters of the Italian genera!
staff admits they succeeded in
some places in breaking the
Italian advance trenches, but it
is declared they were hurled
back after sanguinary hand-to-
hand fighting.
London:    A despatch to the
Times from Fiorina, Greece, dated
Saturday, says:
"The Bulgarians crossed the
Cerna river yesterday. Monastir has been evacuated. The
Serbian army is retiring in good
order."
I
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 1
\=
r
v
TUESDAY, NOV. 30
Kitchener Returns
London: Lord Kitchener returned today from his eastern
mission. Sir John French is also
in London today.
Sunk a Submarine
London: A German submarine,
attacked by a British aeroplane
off Middlekerke on Sunday, was
sent to the bottom, according to
an official report of Field-Marshal
French, which was given out by
the press bureau today. The
submarine, says Field-Marshal
French,   was seen to break in
Doubly Subscribed
Ottawa: It is announced today
by the minister of finance that
subscriptions to the Canadian war
loan exceed $100,000,000, being
more than double the amount
offered. Canada will henceforth
undertake the financing of her
own share in the war.
London : Bucharest advices
say Roumania will deliver an
ultimatum to Austria as soon as
the Allies have 500,000 men in
the field in the Balk:>ns.
An Austrian Crisis
London: The crisis in the
Austrian cabinet is regarded as
the most importani political incident of I he war. The ministers
of the interior, commerce, and
finance have resigned as a protest against the efforts of Germany to secure Franz Josef's
consent to the cession of Transylvania and part of Bukowina to
Roumania in return for benevolent
neutrality. Vienna is making
efforts through the Vatican to
secure a separate peace.
Teuton Reinforcements
London: A despatch to the
Morning Post, from Bucharest,
dated Tuesday, says:
"Feverish preparations are being made at Ruschuk, on the
Danube, west of the Roumanian
border, to accommodate 50,000
Austro-German troops who are
due to arrive there soon. Many
officers, with war materials, have
already arrived.
"Four Austrian monitors are
patrolling the Danube along the
whole length of Bulgarian shore
to where the Bulgarian  frontier
thefollowingstatementlastnight:]    Along the Isonzo,  the violent
"On Nov.28,Flight Sub.-Lieut. .attacks which the  Italians have
Viney, accompanied by a French for days been launching sgainst
officer, Lieut. Descinay, while
patrolling off the Belgian coast,
dropped a bomb on a German
submarine. The submarine was
observed to have had its back
broken.   It sank in a few minutes.
"During the same day Flight-
Lieut. Ferrand with Air-Mechanic
Oldfield, in a seaplane, shot down
a German Albatross seaplane off
Ostend. The Albatross dived
head first into the sea and sank."
On Russian Front
Petrograd (official): "In the
Riga district yesterday there
were successful actions by our
artillery on several points in the
halves.
The British commander further j joins that of Roumania."
reports much activity on the parti Successes in Air
of the artillery and aircraft, no'    London:  The Admiralty issued
the Austrians in an
obtain the key to
lessened generally,
various  points the
endeavor to
Trieste have
although at
big Italian
shells on
guns are still raining
the Austrian positions.
Russian Gains
London: Despatches to the
Italian newspapers which have
been re-transmitted to London,
report Russian successes in Bukowina. The Corriere D'ltalia's
Bucharest correspondent asserts
that the Russians have captured
Czernowitz, the capital of Bukowina, after four days fighting.
The  reports are  not   confirmed
region southwest of Pinsk.      On j from any source.
Sunday evening the enemy attacked the village of Komora, but
Will Assist in Balkans
Rome:     Italy   will   join
her
the attack ceased at midday on allies in Servia.     An   expedition
Monday and was not renewed,     j to operate from Albania is pre-
"On Friday evening, on the
left bank of the Styr river, one
of our units attacked  a  detach-
panng.
Germans to Retire
Saloniki: It is reported here
ment of the enemy west of the! that Von Mackensen's army has
village of Kozlinitchi. After a: been withdrawn from the Servian
bayonet fight, the greater part of If ront to Bulgarian territory.
the Austrians  were  killed   and; ���	
I tr
apparently the submarine which
torpedoed her was the same one
which sunk the British steamers
Malinche and Tanis. The crew
of the Colenso was given ten
minutes to abandon the ship,
which was then blown up. The
crew of the Colenso, numbering
32 men, put away in nine boats,
and arrived at Malta Wednesday
afternoon.
London: A despatch to the
Daily Telegraph from Athens
says a British coast defense gunboat, in Egyptian waters, has
been sunk by a German submarine.
W.A.
The sewing party in aid of the
Red Cross will meet at the Mission House on Dec. 9th, at 3 p.m.
As many members as possible
are asked to be present in order
to make arrangements for the
sale and pleasant evening which
will take place very shortly.
three officers and   83   Austrian
soldiers   were   taken   prisoners.
Our losses were four men  killed and ten wounded."
FRIDAY, DEC. 3
^n:
C
THURSDAY, DEC. 2
Kitchener's Report
London : As expected, the
statement concerning Lord Kitchener's mission, is-uied today,
is of much importance. The
Allies,  says  the war secretary,
Russians in Bulgaria
London: The invasion of Bul-
i garia by a large Russian army
| is reported.
Unconfirmed reports from Sal-
joniki to the London morning
papers state that Austro-German
fores, which were in possession
of the Veles district, have been
suddenly deflected toward the
Bulgarian-Roumanian frontier to
have succeeded in establishing a! meet a possible Russian attack,
line in the Balkans which ensures According to these despatches,
the defeat of the Austro Germans;, there is a feeling that the Bul-
but to hold it requires three jgarian army might not fight the
times the present Franco-British ' Russians  with the same spirit as
force.
The pressingef the Dardanelles
campaign with renewed vigor is
advocated,as well as the entrance
of a large Russian force into the
Balkans.
Review of Situation
London: Except for northeast
Montenegro, along the eastern
Serbo-Montengrin frontier and in
the Isonzo sector of the Austro-
Italian war zone, little fighting
of moment is taking place on any
of the numerous battle fronts.
In France and Belgium, virtually
nothing is going on except art.ll-
against the Servians.
Saloniki reports say Monastir
was occupied yesterday by the
Teutonic troops.
In the French drive on the
Bulgarian positions, a trench
containing 2000 Bulgarian rifles
was captured.
Under pressure from superior
lorces of Austrians, the Montenegrins are evacuating Plevje.
Austria Wants Peace
London: Confirmation of reports that Austrians are anxious
for peace is given by the arrest
of thirty-three  members of the
lery engagements, in which the! Austrian reichslag for participating in the peace movement.
German Divers Busy
A telegram lo Reuter's Telegram Co. from Malta says the
British steamer Colenso, previously reported sunk, was sent to the
French assert considerable damage has been done to the German
protective fortifications.
On the Russian front the fighting is virtually at a standstill.
The  Austro-Hungarian   forces
n
are continuing their inroads into j bottom by an Austrian submarine
north and eastern Montenegro, Jon Tuesday morning, and that
but the Montenegrins, aided hy
the Servians who escaped the
Teutonic net, are giving them
battle. In the northeastern sector the advance is north of and
toward Plevlje and against the
Gradina height. With the taking
of Prisrend Monday, the last
important town in Servia, except
Monastir, fell into the hands of
the Teutons.
Vienna reports that during the
month of November the Austrians
under General Koevess captured
40,800 Servians and 26,600 civilians fit for military service.
In southern Servia the cold
and snow are still holding up the
operations of the British and
French. Nothing official has
come through as to whether the
Bulgarians have as yet taken
Monastir.
Recruiting for New Corps
Orders have been issued for
the enlistment of men for the
Northern B. C. Battalion, which
will be under the command of
Lieut.-Col. Warden. The battalion will be concentrated at Co-
mox, where suitable accomodation has been procured.
NOTICE TO DELINQUENT CO-
OWNER
To Georjre M. Swan, or to any person or persons
to whom you may have transferred your Interests,
take notice that I, the undersigned co-owner with
you in the Cumberland. Russell and Sundown
(Russell Group) Mineral Claims, situated in Hunter Basin, in the Hazelton Mining Division of Omineca District, Province of British Columbia, have
done the required amount of work on the above-
mentioned claims for the year 1914 in order to
hold the same under section 24 of the Mineral Act
and if within 90 days of the publication of this
notice you fail or refuM to contribute J153:50,your
portion of Buch expenditure, together with the
costs of this advertisement, your lniereit In the
said mineral claims will become the property of
the undersized under Sot tion 4 of the Mineral
Act Amendment Ait of 1900.
J. N. CARR, Co-Owner.
Dated at Smithers, B. C, this ;i(Jth day of October, 1915. 9-21
= -
j Tread the Footpath I
of Peace
This is the path of him who wears
"hvictas"
I
s
i
I
s
3
NOEL & ROCK j
THE BEST GOOD SHOE
Hazelton,
���llll���-llll-
R. C.
0-!"!"l"|"M..!..M..|.r|,'i���[..:..;..i,.M���|..|.<|.,M���|.c>
Try our noted
"ANTI - CHAP"
For the Hands
Just arrived, a fine stock of
NEILSON ^CHOCOLATES
Look out for our Xnms stuck
Up-to-Date Drug Stores j
HAZELTON NEW HAZELTON
6-:-H+-).+-t.++^4.m..|.+4..t..|..1.4"h*++++< I
3
t
ANOTHER CARLOAD
OF
FLOUR and FEED
Has Arrived
We are able to give our customers the advantage of
the lowest market prices.
OUR GROCERY DEPARTMENT
is teeming with every requisite for the Xmas Cake and Pudding.
New, Fresh Stocks.
LOOK AT OUR
Buster and Sweater Coats for Children
R. Cunningham & Son, Limited
Established 1870
Fort Ejslnj:lon and Haztllon, B.C.

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