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Omineca Miner May 12, 1917

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THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTH
BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. VI, NO. 87
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, MAY 12, 1917   'Sf'
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
WRIT AGA.W GRAFTERS
Provincial    Government    Suing
Foley, Welch & Stewart
For Millions
Victoria, May 12:���-The provincial government has issued a writ
against Foley, Welch & Stewart,
bringing action to compel the
contracting firm to complete the
P.G.E. railway or pay the sum
of $14,000,000 to the government,
which in that case would itself
undertake the completion of the
road. All companies connected
with Foley, Welch & Stewart are
joined in the suit.
U. S.  War Taxes
Washington, May 9:-With the
unanimous non-partisan hacking
of the ways and meanscommittee,
the new war tax bill to raise
$1,800,000,000 in the next year
was reported to the house. Its
passage within a few days is
expected.
The new income tax for individuals is four per cent, with an
exemption of $2000 for married
persons and $1000 for those unmarried. There is a graduated
supertax on incomes over $5000.
Corporations are to pay 6 per
cent. These increases are effective from the beginningof the
year.
The inheritance tax is increased; all import tariffs are increased
10 per cent, and 10 per cent duty
is imposed on articles now on the
free list.
Letter postage is to be three
cents and postcards two cents,
newspapers paying postage under
the zone system.
Liquor and tobacco taxes are
doubled and stamp taxes placed
on telephone and telegraph messages, theaters,club dues,moving
pictures and lllms. Newspapers
are taxed 5 per cent on advertising* collections.
How You Car/-'. Iclp
Do not  throw away  your old
clothes, hats, hoots or rubbers.
The  Red  Cross  Society has use
for them all.
Next week the school-children
will make a house to house collection of all these articles, so
please have in readiness anything
you have to give.
Renew Your Miner's License
Mining Recorder Kirby calls
attention to the necessity for
renewing free miner's certificates
on or before May 81.
Ottawa: Quarter sections of
land for returning soldiers, with
loans of money, are recommended
by Hon. W. J. Roche, minister
of the interior.
London: Dutch despatches say
Hollweg is in a difficult position,
repeated postponements of his
speech on Germany's war aims
causing gt*eat dissatisfaction. 'The
Bavarian premier, Count Hertig,
is mentioned as a possible successor to the chancellor.
ALLIES ASSUME OFFENSIVE IN MACEDONIA-
RUSSIA REMAINS AN UNCERTAIN FACTOR
London: The Franco-British
offensive on the western front is
temporarily halted today. Official reports indicated that there
were no major fighting actions,
but scores of local advances,
counter - attacks, repulses, and
general skirmishing, which may
be preliminary to the resumption
of the concerted general movement.
The British were successful in
a raid near Ypres. The Germans
still maintain footholds at Fres-
noy and Bullecourt. Fresnoy is
almost completely encircled, and
both places will soon be in the
bands of the British.
Fighting on the Macedonian
front is on a serious scale, and
enemy losses have been heavy.
General Sarrail's long-awaited
push is new in progress.
A prominent military expert
says there are no certain grounds
for anticipating an early peace;
the road that leads to victory is
a long one.    Britain must call all
Schlisselburg workmen are reported to be revolting, with the
announced determination of forming a separate  republic.     Their
her able-bodied citizens; France
needs support and the U. S. is
urged to supply men to keep the
ranks full.
Lloyd George says   the   food I leader has been arrested
problem   will   soon   be   solved.
The enemy cannot starve Britain.
Britain's shipbuilding program
is colossal.      After the  war  the
Amsterdam: The German food
dictator says the empire is able
to await the new harvest.
Empire will have more ships than I
Rome:     There are indications
the rest of the world eombined. that the Itillian armies have
It is intended to build three mil- sta,,ted a ��eneral offensive, with
lion gross tons every year. Trieste as its object.	
Paris: The Belgian flag is to Washington: The U.S. is not
fly over Constantinople, and Bel- disposed I" treat separately with
gium will be given'control of the Germany, but will consult the
Dardanelles, according to the re- s"
vised plans of the Allies respect-     The president has been granted
.[power to raise an army, the house
  and   senate  agreeing   upon   the
Petrograd   :     Asserting   that terms of selective service.     If
ing Turkey.
Russia cannot betray  its  Allies,  voluntary   enlistments   for   the
ids regular army and militia fall off
conscription will be enforced.
The   Italian   navy    has   sunk
the president of the duma pie
with the people to stand firm and
ensure the defeat of Germany.
The duma and the people apparently are not yet united for a commonwealth.
thirteen   Austrian submarines in
the   Mediterranean   during   the
last three weeks, says an Italian
-(official.
Delta Ships Another Car
H. E.Clement, M.E., manager
of the Delta, was in town on
Wednesday. He states that the
the second carload of ore from
this properly was sent to the
smelter this week. The workings
are looking well, and excellent
progress   is  being   made.      The
management is making an effort
to Secure belter road facilities,
which are much needed for the
development of mining properties
on Rocher de Boule mountain,
Moving Pictures of War
Considerable interest is being
taken in the moving pictures
"With Lhe Allied Annies",which
are to be shown in Assembly Hall
on Monday and Tuesday evenings.
There will be different pictures
each night. Capacity crowds
are expected to witness these
famous war films.
Opened Insurance Office
Wm. Grant has opened an office
on Ominecastreet.and will handle
lire, life and accident insurance,
as well as a general agency business. He makes a specialty of
bookkeeping.
W.W. Wadleigh, of Edmonton,
was here during the week, in
connection with hydraulic and
dredging leases in the Peace
River district, which he and his
associates propose to develop.
FRIDAY'S WAR
DESPATCHES
London:     Along   tin    entire
' Macedonian   front  of   100  miles
the Allies  have   opened  a   great
offensive,      Bitter lighting is   in
progress,    the    Entente    troops
making gains.    It is believed the
I Balkan drive has been begun in
order to force the withdrawal of
German troops from the western
! front, where  reserves are con-
��� centrated
In the Lake Doiran region enemy trenches were taken on a
front of two miles.
News from Russia is increas-
. ingly gloomy. Radical socialists
and visionaries threaten to overthrow the government, and the
Isituation prevents effective mili-
j tary action.
Austria is reported to be seek-
' ing separate peace by negotiations
j through Switzerland.
London: The British have regained more ground at Fresnoy.
The Germans continue counterattacks on Haig's forces and have
assumed the offensive on a very
small sector.
Paris: During the night the
French stormed and captured a
German position in the region of
Chevreux.
Nivelle is widening the French
wedge in the German line across
the slope and plateau of Vauclere.
London: British airplanes bombarded Zeebrugge and a flotilla of
tOrpedoboalS bombarded German
positions on the Belgian coast.
Eleven Hun destroyers fled
from four British vessels of the
same class, refusing battle.
Two more hospital ships have
been torpedoed.
Seventy lives were lost in the
sinking of a big Steamer, Details are withheld.
U-boat losses are decreasing.
Only 2-1 vessels were sunk last
week. The number of submarines destroyed shows an increase.
Petrograd: Germans were defeated on the Russian front,fighting having been resumed over
almost the entire Russian positions. Enemy attacks were repulsed with losses, particularly
in the Dvina region.
A coalition government in the
near future is forecast.
Copenhagen: Sweden is now
pro-Ally. Germany is said to be
much concerned over the great
changes in Swedish sentiment.
Pekin: The war party was
defeated in the first test vote in
parliament, although a mob outside the buildings clamored for
war.
Coining Events
May  14-15 -Moving Pictures, "With
tin' Allied Armies," Assembly Hall.
I    July  2    Annual General Picnic, HoS-
! pital Park.
LOCAL NEWS PARAGRAPHS
Items Of General Interest From
Hazelton and Surrounding District
Miners' Licenses expire May
81.
W. Laing, of Turner, Beeton
& Co., is in town.
Fred. Hagen was down from
Telkwa on Monday.
F. and W. Harrison came in
from Rpcher de Boule on Tuesday.
L. H. McLean was down from
Telkwa for several days this
week.
R. C. Harlow, of the G. T. P.
engineering staff, was here yesterday.
Rev. M. Pike left on Tuesday
for the Methodist conference at
Victoria.
Mrs. H. A. Harris, of New
Hazelton, is visiting Mrs. Jas.
MacKay.
Edgar Harris returned on Wednesday from a vacation trip to
Vancouver.
Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Smith, of
Vancouver, were among the
week's visitors in Hazelton.
A. L. Can others, public works
engineer for this district, is here
on his first tour of inspection.
Government Agent Hoskins and
Chief Constable Taylor spent the
weekend in the  Bulkley  Valley.
The Soldiers' Aid has received
subscriptions amounting to $28.30
from  the Rocher de Boule mine,
for April.
A very successful dance was
held in Assembly Hall last evening, the proceeds going to the
public school fund.
At the executive meeting of the
Red Cross on Monday evening
another remittance of $126 to
headquarters was ordered.
dames MacKay left on Tuesday
For Vancouver, to purchase additional equipment for Buddy oc
MacKay's freighting business.
\V. \V. Anderson.the new manager of the Hudson's Bay store,
is bringing his family over from
New Hazelton, having rented the
Cox residence.
Monday is the last day on which
applications for registration as
voters can be received for the
next revision. Ladies especially
should note this fact.
Dr. Sager and family have gone
to Smithers, where Dr. Sager
will temporarily attend to the
practice of Dr. Maclean, who arrived here yesterday to fake
charge of the Hospital during
Dr. Wrinch's absence at the
Methodist conference.
J. F. Maguire returned on Sunday from a business trip to the
Bulkley Valley towns. He slates
that conditions in that district
I appear very favorable. During
, his stay in Telkwa a carload of
I farm machinery was received at
j that point by the farmers organi-
| zation. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, MAY 12, 1917
inner
published eveky saturday at hazelton, the center of
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions. Two Dollars a
year: Foreitrn, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $2.fi0 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 20 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazette rates.
1916 Production
The total  value of the metal
and mineral production in 1916 as
the | shown  in the preliminary report
on mineral production of Canada,
which has just  been   published,
was $177,357,454, which, compared
with a production in 1915 valued
at $137,109,171,shows an increase
j $40,248,283,or 29.3 per cent. The
| previous   maximum    production
i was $145,634,812. in 1913.
In 1915 British Columbia pro-
Vol. VI.
Saturday, May 12, 1917
The alliance between Britain and the United States.symbolized
by the display of the Stars and Stripes over the British parliament
buildings and the Union Jack over the state building at Washington,
No. 37!duced 20.92 per cent, of the total
production of Canada; in 1916
this province produced 22 65 per
cent, of the total. The mineral
production  of British  Columbia
.   ! in 1915 was valued at $28,689,425;
and evidenced in a more concrete manner by the war conference in j jn ^gjg jtg va]ue was 149 191 744
or an increase of $11,502,319.
The total production of gold in
placer and mill bullion and in
j smelter production in 1916 is
] estimated at $19,162,025, as com-
the American capital,is the topic of many editorials in the papers of
the United States, and these, with the exception of German-American
organs, hail the association of the English-speaking races as one of
the most hopeful developments of these troubled times.
Hon. A. J. Balfour.as head of the British mission to the United
States, has been enthusiastically greeted in the American capital
and the cities which he visited. In a statement to the Washington
press, he said:
"Our confidence in the assistance we are going to get is not
based upon such shallow considerations as those which arise out of
formal treaties. No treaty could increase our undoubted confidence
in the people of the United States, who having come into the war,
are going to see it through. If anything is certain in this war,that
is certain.
"Two years and a half have elapsed since the great American
public have been watching the blood-stained drama across the ocean
and I am well convinced that they believe as each month passed
that it was no small, petty interest, no struggle for territory, no
struggle for national ambitions, or the satisfaction of small national
interests, but the liberties of mankind that were animating the
Allied countries. Now, after watching it, you have felt yourself
impelled to join the ereat contest. I feel certain you will throw
into it all your unequalled resources, including your resources of
invention and production, and your man-power, and, having come
to that decision, nothing will turn you from it until success shall
crown our joint efforts."
But still other words of Mr. Balfour's,uttered twenty one years
ago and now recalled to our mind, says the Literary Digest, are
receiving almost as much discussion in the American press as the
things he says today. Addressing the British parliament in 1896
on the tense situation then existing between Great Britain and the
United States because of a boundary dispute between Venezuela
and British Guiana, he spoke thesp startlingly prophetic words:
"It can not but be that those whose national roots go down into
the same past as ours, who share our language, our literature, our
laws, our religion,everything that makes a nation great���it can not
be but that a time will come when they will feel that we and they
have a common duty to perform, a common office to fulfill, among
the nations of the world."
And he followed this with another prediction which is yet to
be fulfilled:
"The time will come, the time must come, when some one.some
statesman more fortunate even than President Monroe, will lay
down the doctrine that between English-speaking peoples war is
impossible."
"Why not call this the Balfour Doctrine, as a memorial of the1
present visit?" suggests the New York Globe, which adds:
"It expresses a thought every good American and sincere friend
of mankind must welcome.     Great Britain and the United Slates
acting together in Informal alliance can  secure for the  world ai
peace of justice and captain a new world-organization as beneficent I
as the old organization has been maleficent."
"It is inconceivable," says the New York Journal of Commerce,
"that a union of policy and purpose for the prosecution of an armed
conflict against a common enemy should not survive the attainment
of the immediate purposes for which it is formed." And the New
York Tribune suggests that perhaps the greatest consequence of
the world-war will be the inauguration of "a new era in the
English-speaking world."
Another view,that of Germany, is voiced by Dr. Alfred Lohmann,
of Bremen, "that President Wilson has delivered his whole nation
into the hands of England, and has concluded not only a political
but an economic alliance with the former motherland." Says this
observer:
"The fact that America has already adopted the principle of
the 'economic war after the war' i3 sufficient evidence that the
union of the Anglo-Saxon races has created an entirely new basis
for world-economics, because it means an Anglo-Saxon economic
bloc. Europe must arm itself against this danger betimes. If
Wilson has dropped the Monroe doctrine for America, let us
formulate a sort of Monroe doctrine for Europe���'Europe for the
Europeans.'	
"In the future the English Channel will divide Europe from
North America. In the future there will be three rival economic
blocs���the European Continent, the Anglo-Saxon *\orld, and Asia
under Japan's leadership. The South- and Central-American
nations will in all probability refuse to serve as vassals to Anglo-
Saxondom. With more than 200,000,000 consumers, the European
bloc will easily hold its own against Anglo-Saxondom."
pared with 918,025 fine ounces
valued at $18,977,901 in 1916, an
increase of $184,124, or about 1
per cent. The production of gold
in British Columbia in 1916 was
$4,550,868 as against $5,651,184
in 1915,a decrease of 20 per cent.
The production from the Yukon
Territory amounted to $4,391,669
as against $4,750,450 in 1915, a
a decrease of 7.5 per cent.
The production of silver in 1916
was 25.669,172 fine ounces valued
at $16,854,653 as against 26,925,-
960 fine ounces valued at$13,228,-
842, in 1915,a decrease of 3 6 per
cent, in quantity, but an increase
of 27 per cent, in value. In British Columbia the production was
3,235,764 ounces valued at $2,-
124,635, as against 3,565,852ounces valued at $1,771,658 in 1915,
showing a decrease in quantity
of about 9 per cent, and an increase in value of about 20 per
cent. The Yukon production was
360,466 ounces valued at $263,686
in 1916, as against 248,049 ounces
valued at $123,241 in 1915. An
increase in quantity of 45 per
cent, and in value of about 92
per cent.
In 1916 the total copper contents of smelter products credited
to Canadian ores and estimated
recoveries from ores exported
amounted to 119,770,814 pounds,
which would be worth $32,580,507
at the average monthly price of
refined copper in New York,
27.202 cents a pound. The production in 1915 was 100,785,150
pounds, and at 17.275 cents a
pound the average price for the
year would be worth $17,410,635.
There was thus an increase in 1916
of 18,985,664 pounds, or 18.8 per
cent, in quantity and $15,169,422,
or 87.1 per cent, in  total  value.
The British Columbia production of copper in 1916 was 65,-
086,119 pounds, as compared with
56.692,988 pounds in 1915, an increase of 8,393,131 pounds, or
14.8 per cent. The 1916 production in this province included
47,904,282 pounds recovered in
blister and matte and 18,181,827
pounds recovered from ores shipped to United States smelters.
The coast mines, including the
Britannia, Texada Island and
Anyox mines, together with the
shipments from Hazelton, are
credited with 44,048,065 pounds,
and the Trail Creek and Boundary
mines with 22,038,054 pounds.
The increase in 1916 has been
entirely from the coast properties.
The total production of nickel
in 1915 was 82,958,564 pounds,
which at 35 cents per pound,
would have a total value of $29,-
035,497. The total production in
1915 was 68,308,657 pounds, showing an increase in 1916 of 14,-
649,907 pounds, or 21.5 per cent
r~
���%
IF YOU CANT FIGHT
YOU CAN AT LEAST
STAND BEHIND THE
MAN WHO FIGHTS
FOR YOU!
THE CANADIAN PATRIOTIC FUND
Which assists the wives and families of Canada's gallant
soldiers, requires millions of dollars to keep the soldiers'
home fires burning.
District Treasurer: Stephen H. Hoskins, Government Agent
Hazelton Committee:
J.  E.  Kirby,  R.  E.  Allen,  J. K. Frost,   J. R. Barker,
and J. G. Powell.    Monthly Subscriptions are Solicited
THE CANADIAN RED CROSS
The Hazelton  Branch requests the support of all in its
efforts to assist in the noble work of this great humanitatian
organization.
Honorary Presidents:  Mrs. (Rev.) John Field; Mrs. (Rev.)
W. Hogan
Chairman:   Dr. H. C. Wrinch
Vice-Presidents: S. H. Hoskins; Mrs. E. R. Cox; W.J. Carr
Honorary Secretary: Miss J. C. Grant
Honorary Treasurer: H. H. Little, Manager Union Bank
Executive Committee:
Mrs. H. C. Wrinch,  Mrs. R. G. Moseley,  Mrs. Chas. Reid,
Miss Hogan, Rev. John Field, Rev. M. Pike, H. H. Phillips
Large or Small Contributions will be Gratefully Received
SOLDIERS' AID & EMPLOYMENT
COMMITTEE
Endeavors to supply soldiers from Hamilton district with
such comforts and necessities as cannot be readily obtained
at the front, and will assist them to re-establish themselves
in civil life when they return. The Committee is acting in
co - operation   with  the   Provincial   Returned   Soldiers'
Commission and the Military Hospitals Commission
Contributions to the Soldiers'Aid Tobacco Fund are Welcome
Chairman: A. R. Macdonald
Honorary Secretary-Treasurer: J. K. Frost,
H. H. Little, R. E. Allen, F. B. Chettleburgh
H. B. Campbell, H. F. Glassey, G. W. McKay.
SOME CAN FIGHT, SOME
CAN WORK OR PAY ���
ALL CAN SERVE
%. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, MAY 12, 1917
SOME OF THE
LEADING
MANUFACTURERS WHO HAVE DISTRICT AGENT LIVING HERE
The following are lines you will ne
Holbrook's Worcestershire Sauce         Holbrook's
Holbrook's Punch Sauce                Holbrook's
WE WOULD BE Gl
HOLBROOK'S LIMITED,
p A p tr p wE have it for
1    A i    ��. S\   YOUR EVERY NEED
Wrapping Papers    -    Paper Bags
Twines   -   Toilet Papers
Stationery -   School Supplies
Roofing and Building Papers
ed for Spring delivery.     We can i
Pints  Malt Vinegar         Holbrook's Malt Vinep
Quarts Malt Vinegar     (         Holbrook's Sardina
.AD TO SUBMIT TO YOU OUR BEST 1
1006 MAINLAND ST.
Renwick & Cunliffe, Ltd.
VANCOUVER, B. C.
WHOLESALE
CHINA, CROCKERY, GLASSWARE,
Etc.
When You Say "Ship at Once,"
WE DO SO
....   -     i      ,    ...                       ..  _
Tiake prompt shipment from Stock.
ar in Bulk         Rose's  Lime Juice and  Cordial
s in Oil                 (Pints, ^-Litres and Magnums)
PRICES ON ABOVE
VANCOUVER, B. C.
CARHARTT
THE   WORLD'S   LARGEST
OVERALL
MANUFACTURER
THE GARMENT THAT ENDURES.   IF IT IS HADE BY Carhartt,
EVERY WORKMAN WANTS IT.       Unequalled Khaki Garments.
Columbia Paper Co-, Ltd*
Vancouver and Victoria, B.C.
B. G Branch Factory: Vancouver
Full range of SAMPLES and CATALOGS
t kept in Hazelton.
All ENQUIRIES answered promptly by mail
or PERSONAL VISIT, as desired.
AGENT FOR DISTRICT-PRINCE RUPERT TO PRINCE GEORGE.
J. F. MAGUIRl
HAZELTON
Everything at the   Manufacturers'
LOWEST PRICES.
Prompt delivery can be made as a rule.
BEST QUALITY and most favorable terms.
IT COSTS NOTHING TO ENQUIRE AND ORDER THROUGH ME, AND IT MAY SAVE TIME
n ���MBUHHK
BHBUBSBaH
cacKSSiSfiraEssiaaisix M'W"";T���,^TF^7',TrTOT/Trrai*ipr^ ��
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
Liberia  has joined the Allies.
Platinum is quoted at $105 an I
ounce.
May win at was 3.19 in Chicago!
yesterday.
The U. S. loaned France $100,-
000,000 this week.
Elihu Root will head an American mission to Russia.
Zaimis has agreed to form a
new cabinet for Greece.
Turkish persecution of Jews in
the Holy Land continues.
October wheat dropped below
the $2 mark at Winnipeg.
Canadian rail way men ask for a
sixteen,hour maximum day.
W. McRae has been appointed
chief of police in Vancouver.
Sweden has abolished all private trade in beer and wirte,
German agents are again reported busylin South America.
German ships seized by the U.S.
will be in use within four months.
Bri (Jan's loans to her dominions
and Allies average $9,000,000 a
day.
Humors concerning another
German raider come from Montevideo.
Grave food riots occurred at
Mainz, Germany, eight being
killed.
Premier Hughes carried Australia in this week's general
election.
British war expenditure i s I
thirty-seven and a quarter mil-1
lions a day.
Argentina is trying to organize
a peace congress of South American republics.
An Italian mission has reached
the U.S. Its object is to arrange
for ships and coal.
British casualties in the Arras
offensive have been from 50 to
75 per cent less than those sustained in the Somme drive.
The British government has
introduced another war vote, of
��500,000,000.
Announcement of the new war
taxes caused a slump in the New
York stock market.
Many were injured in an explosion at the Dnpont powder
plant at Bristol, l'enn.
Alberta veterans' association
declares that enlistment is the
best win-the-war'movement.
Lieut. Robinson, the first airman to bring down a zeppelin, is
a prisoner of war in Germany.
The German government is
hunting down peace propagandists  throughout the Empire.
British and Russian socialists
refuse to attend the conference
be held in Stockholm next month.
Wilson called thirty leading
congressmen into conference on
Wednesday to discuss war measures.
Under the selective draft system single and independent married men will be first called up in
the U.S.
A settlement of the Irish question is believed to be near at
hand. The government may
give county option.
Rationing will be made compulsory in Great Britain after
July 1 unless the people voluntarily conserve food.
New American dreadnoughts
will be equipped with special
armor, requiring at least three
torpedoes to sink them.
AHunaeroplanedropped bombs
on the northeastern outskirts of
London, killing one and injuring
two. Damage to buildings was
slight.
A powder explosion at Osaka,
Japan, killed fifty persons and
injured many others. Four thousand houses and over thirty factories, warehouses and public
buildings were demolished.
The woman Frankie Russell,
charged with complicity in the
murder of the late Chief of
Police McLennan in Vancouver,
was acquitted by the jury.
Eighteen hundred interned officers and men from German ships
have been set to work on h 500-
acre tract in North Carolina.
They will receive soldiers'  pay.
During the last four weeks,
according to Washington estimates, the Germans succeeded in
sinking their intended quota of
one million tons of Allied and
neutral shipping.
Viviani, Roosevelt and Hughes
spoke in the Metropolitan Opera
House, Philadelphia, on Wednesday night, for the benefit of the
French war orphans. Boxes sold
at $1000 each and single seats as
high as $250.
One-third of the mammoth
munitions plant of the Federal
Dyestuff and Chemical Co., at
Kingston, Tenn., was destroyed
by an explosion on Tuesday-.
One dead and two fatally injured.    Cause unknown.
01lllllllll[IIC3IIIIIIIIIIIIC3IIHIIIIIIIICO3IIIIIIIIIIIICO3lllllllllNIC0:illllll]|||IUIIIIIIIIIIIIt3llllllllllli:0
| Hudson's Bay Company j
HAZELTON. B. C.
0 * P
^   Groceries, Drygoods, Boots and Shoes, Hardware, Wholesale Liquors   g
STEEl WIRE
FENCING
Poultry and
Rabbit Proof
in 10-rod rolls
$8��i
00
It is an exceptionally good buy.
Let us have your order at once;
we have only a small   supply.
BEERS
VICTORIA PHCENIX,
CASCADE,
Quarts, per bottle, .25
BUDWEISER,
Quarts, per bottle, .40
STOUT
Hudson's Bay, XXXX,
Quarts, per bottle, .25
01ll!lllllll!inilll!IIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIC03IIIIIIIIIIIIW3lllllllllllltO3lllllllllllinimilllllllC3llllllllllllt0
<T
FARM LANDS
OREGON & CALIFORNIA RAILROAD CO. GRANT LANDS. Title to
same revested in United States by Act
of Congress dated June 9, 1918. Two
million, three hundred thousand Acres
to be opened for Homesteads and sale.
Agricultural and Timber Lands. Conservative estimate Forty Billion feet of
commercial lumber. Containing some
of best land left in United States.
Large Map showing land by sections
and Description of soil, climate, rainfall, elevations, etc. Postpaid One
Dollar. Grant Lands Locating Co.,
Box 610, Portland, Oregon.
CANADIAN  PACIFIC  RAILWAY
Lowest rates Prince Rupert to all Eastern Points via steamer
to Vancouver and Canadian Pacific Railway.
Meals  and   berth  included on steamer
^
V
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
S.S. "Princess Maquinna" leaves Prince Rupert every SUNDAY, at 6 p.m.
S. S. "Princess Sophia" leaves Prince Rupert   May
May 11th, May 21st, and June 3rd.
J. I. Peters, General Agent, 3rd Ave. & 4th St., Prince Rupert, B.C.
J
Ice Cream
and
Soft Drinks
Up-to-Date  Drug Stores
Hazelton     -      -      ���     B. C,
Commercial Printing at
THE  MINER OFFICE
���saw ������i m����������������i���wm
RAILWAY and STEAMSHIP LINES.
Steamers sailing between Skagway.  Juneau.
Wrangell,  Ketchikan, Anyox, Prince Rupert,
Ocean Falls, Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle.
Leave Prince Rupert for Ocean Falls, Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle,
Thursday at 12 midnight. For Anyox Wednesday at .12 midnight. For
Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau, Skagway, Wednesday, April 4th, 18th;
May 2nd, 16th, 30th,at 1 r.M.    Fortnightly sailings to Queen Charlotte
Island points.
Arrive Prince Rupert from the South every Wednesday at 10:30 A. M.
Passenger trains leave Hazelton Eastbound 7:10 P, M. Wednesday and
Saturday. Mixed 1:58 P.M. Tuesday. Wayfreight 12:30 r.M. Saturday.
Passenger trains leave Hazelton Westbound at 9:46 A.M. Tuesday and
Thursday.  Mixed train 6 a.m. Sunday. Wayfreight 11:35 a.m. Sunday.
For further information apply to any Grand Trunk Pacific Agent.or to
G. A. MoNIcholl, Asst. Qon. Freight and Pusaogw Aucnt.Princc Rupert, ICC.
Green Bros.,  Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion, British Columbia,
and Alberta Land Surveyors
Offices at Victoria, Nelson, Fort George
and New Hazelton.
F. P. Burden, New Hazelton
STUART J. MARTIN
Provincial Assayer
Hazelton,      -      -      B.C.
1 THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, MAY 12, 1917
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
MONDAY, MAY 7
London:
troops.     Fierce fighting for pos-
|session of the town was in prog-
j,*A��s|ress all day Monday.     North of
There is a lull in the jthis sector German attempts have
fighting on the British front. Air!    r,,u ', ���  ...
I    there was heavy fighting on
combats resulted in our favor.five Sunday near Soissons,the French
German machines being brought | mMng further KainSi which are
down.
General Smuts believes peace
will come before winter. He asserts that Germany is already-
defeated.
Electricity may provide the solution to the food problem. Recent experiments indicate that a
large crop increase can be obtained through new scientific
methods. Current from overhead
wires has been sent into the
ground with astonishing results in
stimulating the growth of plants.
Paris: French forces captured
German positions on a front of six
now being consolidated.
London:' The bravery and dash
of the Canadian troops in the
recent operations is the subject
of much praise. From all along
the British lines congratulations
are being heard.
Montreal: There were stormy
scenes in connection with a recruiting meeting held at the
Monument Nationale.
Washington: The U.S. will at
once  raise nine regiments of en-
Russians fear an attempted
drive by the Germans. General
Korniloff has ordered the reorganization of the reserveelements
to stem the expected attack.
New York: Cables say the
situation in Russia is clarifying
rapidly and a virtual coalition
government has been formed, including soldiers' and workmen's
representatives.
Amsterdam: Hoi I wegpostponed
again his peace speech, announced
foryesterday. Hehopesforevents
which will facilitate his task.
Indianapolis: A broken rail
caused the derailing of the train
on which the French mission was
many have the,purpose of influencing sentiment in Russia.
Petrograd: Russia wants free
passage through the Dardanelles
as an essential of future peace.
London: Less than 35 British
vessels were sunk last week.
A Correction
Editor Miner: I have just
heard that the Omineca Herald,
published at New Hazelton yesterday, coptained an item to the
effect that Mr. D. B. Morkill and
myself are intending to remove
from Hazelton and live at the
Northern Hotel at New Hazelton
and as some people have asked
me here if this is a fact, I shall
be much obliged if you will allow
traveling last night.    No one was me to avail of your columns for
badly injured.   Pro-German work
is suspected.
Paris:     The Allied conference
gineers. Thiscountry will furnish arranged  for a great concerted
men for the lines of communica-
WEDNESDAY, MAY 9
kilometers,   taking an important;tion.     They  will be drawn from
strategical position   covering the j employees of railroad  and tele-
plateau region of Cerny-Laonnois j graph companies, and will not be
and Craonne, with four thousand connected with the army organi-
prisoners.     Assaulting wavps of zation.
Germanswere everywhere broken
in   their   attempted   counter-attacks.     The French commander
says the deadly combat will continue until a decision is  reached.
The Allied conference in Paris
fully discussed the war situation
and leached  complete  accord.
Germany has seized all property
of Frenchmen, a recent imperial
decree ordering the liquidation of
the property of alien subjects, as
a step towards confiscation. The
Allies are expected to combine
the pledges they hold in the
form of German securities.
Petrograd: Russia seeks peacp
without annexation or indemnity.
Delegates to the workmen's and
soldiers' conference have made a
declaration that Russia does not
aim at domination over other nations, nor does she intend to deprive them of their national patrimony. The council desires to
establish a durable peace on the
basis of the rights of nations to
decide their own destiny. An
extraordinary session of the duma
will be convened immediately.
Rome: Austrian troops have
been defeated by the Italians on
the Carso front.
Berlin: Hollweg is to make a
statement in  the   reichstag  on
London: With the clearing up
of the weather a vigorous aerial
offensive has been resumed by
the British. Seven German balloons have been shot down.
Bullecourt is the scene of heavy
fighting, the enemy having made
continuous counter-attacks since
Saturday in' herculean efforts to
patch up the Hindenburg line.
Australians forced a big
the defences of the enemy
ing a thrust of a mile into the
German lines. Enemy artillery
is extremely active.
The spirit displayed by the British is quite unconquerable. They
suffered like heroes rather than
fall back from newly-won positions. The enemy counter-attacks
are proving costly to him, and
every advance made by Germans
means a big sacrifice of  troops.
Berlin: German forces stormed
and recaptured Fresnoy from the
British, taking more than 200
prisoners  and six machine guns.
Paris: Germany's retirement
from France must come unless
Hindenburg can soon stop the
French drive. Proof that this is
realized by enemy commanders
Tuesday on the military, political I was brought by yesterday's fight-
and  economic situation.     It  is I jng, the Germans making super-
effort to stamp out the submarine
menace. The U.S. navy will take
part in the co ordinated plan.
Lloyd George is highly satisfied
with the results of the conference.
London: The British have recaptured a large portion of Fresnoy from the Germans. The
enemy is sacrificing life recklessly
in the endeavor to hold up the
British advance.
Pekin: The whole cabinet
urges parliament to declare war
on Germany.
Paris: French troops defeated
German counter-attacks in the
Rheims sector and took enemy
first line trenches on a 1200-meter front northwest of Chevreux,
gap  in in ear Craonne.
achiev
A shipment of the latest styles
in men's shoes, including the
famous neolin-soled patterns, has
been received by Noel & Rock.
Canadian Express
Money Orders
Issued and paid
J. F. Maguire
Branch Agent
HAZELTON
Un
doubtful whether  he  will
Germany's peace terms.
Washington: Whatever the
naval consulting board's anti-submarine plans may be, no hint of
them is to be published. The report has not yet reached Secretary Daniels.
Balfour addressed the house of
state human efforts to save the Rheims
THURSDAY, MAY 10
London: Around Fresnoy hostile forces concentrating for attack to the north were dispersed
by our artillery. To the west we
improved our position. Slightly
northeast of Hargicourt we advanced our positions. Northeast
of Gavrelle we repulsed an enemy
attack. East of Armentieres an
enemy raiding party was repulsed.
Bullecourt is nearly encircled by
the Australian-sand thisimportant
strategic poin t may fall into British
hands any moment. Its capture
might force the abandonment of a
large section of the German line.
The combined captures by the
French and British since April 1
total 49,000 prisoners.
Paris:   Staggering losses were
salient by hurling  picked   troops inflicted upon repeated assaulting
into the breach made by the
French. The flower of the army,
which Hindenburg was saving
for the final, decisive action, is
now being sacrificed. Entirely
apart from the Anglo-French offensive between Aisne and L"ns,
representatives. He said peace the Germans are facing an equal
and material civilization might !mena��! i" Champagne, where the
bring peril to free government, ' keystone of the entire German
since there was a power focussing | front is threatened. I n the last
all its resources, knowledge and
civilization on the*task of making
waves of Germans desperately
attempting to retake French positions on the Chemin des Dames.
All attacks failed. Northeast of
Chevreux the French took some
trenches with 160 prisoners.
Washington: Dr. Egan, minister to Denmark, says that according to his advices the German people fully believe they
will  ultimately win the war, and
itself moral and material master
of the world. Against that danger the free peoples have banded
themselves together.
Chicago:    Joffre and  Viviani
addressed an audience of 15,000.
TUESDAY, MAY 8
\ifjf\r .........................iniimiii..^
I few day 6000 prisoners have been I that peace suggestions in  Ger-
captured,making a total of 29,0001 -
taken by Nivelle since April
London: Heavy.counter-attacks
by the Germans on the British
front have been repulsed. Haig's
forces are closing in around
Bullecourt. Unofficial reports say
the town has been entered by our Us more powerful than ever
16.
Rome: The Kaiser had a narrow escape from assassination
while motoring to Berlin. An
unidentified man fired three shots
at the emperor, two bullets striking the car and the third going
wild. The would-be assassin was
arrested.     The police are silent.
Petrograd: The goverment is
much stronger. The provisional
leaders emerged from the recent
turmoil brilliantly, having effected
a compromise with theproletariat,
which is quite loyal.     Miliukoff
NOTICE
In the matter of an applic-
* ATION for the issue of a duplicate
Certificate  of  Title to Part of Lot
Fifty-three (53), Town of Hazelton,
known as Lots Three (3) and Four
(4), according to Map 543.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
it is my intention to issue at the expiration of one month after  the first publication hereafter,  a duplicate of the
Certificate   of   Title   for   the   above
mentioned lands in the name of Edward
Howe Hicks-Beach, which Certificate
of Title  was issued on the 13th day of
June, 1906, as number 12531-C.
Dated this Fifth day of April, 1917,
at the Land Registry Office, Prince
Rupert, B.C.
H. F. MACLEOD,
33-7 District Registrar.
giving the statement the necessary correction.
When I was enquiring at the
Northern Hotel a few days ago
regarding the accomodation there
on behalf of a friend who was
anxious to get the information,
I mentioned that my wife and
daughter (Mrs. D. B. Morkill)
might be coming up here on a
visit during the summer and
might find it convenient to stay
at the Northern Hotel for a while
and, as I was in the building at
the time, 1 took a look through
it just to see the nature of the
accomodation for ladies. I found
everything looking pretty nice,,
and got all the information II f
wanted from the courteous man-j��
ager, Mr. Reid, but I did not'
conclude any arrangement on behalf of anyone. It is quite a
mistake to say that either Mr.
Morkill or myself intends to remove from here to New Hazelton
and the item to that effect published by the Herald is no doubt
the result of a misunderstanding
of lhe nature of my enquiries at
the hotel.
Thanking .von in anticipation of
being good enough to insert this
in your issue of today,
Yours Truly,
May 12, 1917. J. F. Maguire
B0RSALIN0
HATS
DIRECT FROM ITALY     i
e
NOEL & ROCK Ii
Hazelton, B. C. j
i������mi���.un���iiii���nn������ un���ii it
DENTISTRY
DR. BADGERO
Smithers, B.C.
 O
i
6
HOTEL PRINCE RUPERT
THE  LEADING  HOTEL  IN  NORTHERN B. C.
:: EUROPEAN PLAN ::
One Dollar per day and upwards
25c. aulo service to and from all trains and boats
PRINCE RUPERT B. C.
DALBY B. MORKILL
British Columbia Land Surveyor
:a   MINE SURVEYOR   :::
Hazelton. B. C.
Surveys of Mineral Claims, Townsites.
Timber and Coal Leases, Etc. and General Engineering Surveys.
The obtaining of Crown Grants attended to. ,      tf
Assay ^Office and Mining Office
Arts and Crafts Buildinf, 578 Seymour Streel
 VANCOUVER, B.C	
The Estate of J. O'Sullivan
Provincial Assayers and Chemists
Established 1897 by the late J. O'Sullivan,  F. C. S., 26 years  with
Vivian & Sons, Swansea.
HAZELTON HOSPITAL^
for any period from one month upward at $1 per
nrmth in advance. ThiB rate includes office consultations and medicines, as well as all costs while
In the hospital. TicketB obtainable In Hazelton
at the Post Office or the DruR Store; in Aldermere
from Mr. T. J. Thorp; In Telkwafrom Dr. Wallace;
or by mail from the Medical Superintendent at the
HonpitAl
WAR   MOVIES
Dr. Joseph T. Mandy will present his
Stirring   Moving   Picture   Travelogue
"WITH THE ALLIED ARMIES
tt
on Monday and Tuesday Nights
IN ASSEMBLY HALL, HAZELTON
Most   Wonderful Fighting Pictures Ever Shown ���
Authorized by the General Staffs of the Allied Armies
Film Comedies and Drama
Different Pictures Each Night
Adults 50 cents Children 25 cents
JUST IN FOR
THE SUMMER
CHILDREN'S
NOBBY TREAD SHOES
LADIES' WHITE
CANVAS SHOES
GARDEN TOOLS OF ALL KINDS
R. Cunningham & Son, Limited

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