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Omineca Miner Apr 29, 1916

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 THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
mer
VOL. V, NO. 35
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, APRIL 29, 1916
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
AMONG THE MINING MEN
News   of   Development   From
Various Properties in Hazelton District
R. P. Trimble, who is operating
the Cassiar Crown property on
Grouse mountain,is preparing for
an active development campaign.
Camps have been started, and a
compressor plant will be installed
at once for the driving of the
500-foot tunnel. Frank Brown
has the mining contract. Mr.
Trimble is establishing his headquarters at Telkwa.
Alexander Sharp, M.E., with
Duke and Al. Harris, returned
yesterday from the Hazelton
View and Indian groups, which
Mr. Sharp examined on behalf of
the Erskine Smith interests. It
is understood that upon his report a more extended plan of
development will be adopted.
George McBean returned yesterday from a brief stay at the
Silver Standard mine, of which
he was the discoverer. While on
the hill.George did a little surface
prospecting, and uncovered several new showings of ore, one
especially being of considerable
importance.
Manager H. D. Cameron of the
Chicago group came in yesterday,
much pleased with the progress
of development work. Indications
are that there will be something
of importance to report from this
property in the very near future.
From the first of this month
all mining companies in B.C. will
receive 7.*5 for lead. From July
1 to the end of September the
price will be 8.30. The metal
was quoted at 9.29 in Montreal
the other day.
Chisholm Brothers are reported
to have made an important strike
of copper ore on the claims recently bonded by them in Howson
Basin. Assay values are said to
run high.
B.C. mines have paid $26,913,-
000 in dividends,equal to five per
cent of the total mineral production.
REBELLION I IRELAND CHECKED
ENEMY NOW ATTACKING BRITISH LINES-
TOWNSHEND'S FORCE OBLIGED TO YIELD
Dance Was a Success
The "Hard Times" dance held
last Monday in aid of the Patriotic and Red Cross funds, was
very successful, there being a
large attendance, with many
decidedly "hard time" costumes.
The prizes for the most appropriate costumes were awarded to
Mrs. Sinclair and Stuart Martin.
Over $70 was realized for the
above funds.
Smuts Makes Progress
London: Continuing their advance in German East Africa, the
British forces have occupied Kon-
doa, in the Irangi district.
Rev. F.L.Stephenson, formerly
of the Bulkley Valley, and one
of the most popular clergymen in
the north, is leaving Quamichan
to serve as chaplain with the
103rd Battalion, known as the
Timber Wolves.
London: The situation in Ireland is now well in hand. The
rebels have been driven out of
their positions in Dublin. Warships shelled Lioerty Hall, and
troops armed with bombs drove
the insurgents from St. Stephen's
Green. Four hundred rebels
have been made prisoners. It is
reported five hundred have been
killed in the revolt. The number
of men taking part in the movement is estimated at 12,000. It
is believed their arms were landed from German submarines.
Casement, who expects to be
hanged, has requested the authorities to use a silken cord.
against the Anglo-French armies
on the western front, and by
warships on the coasts of Great
Britain, in a last desperate effort
for victory.
Paris: No important events
are reported today on any part of
the French front. Yesterday the
Germans made an infantry attack
on a fifteen-mile front in the Verdun district, centering on the
Meuse. Bombs, gas, and liquid
fire were all used by the attacking
forces, which were repulsed.
Enemy troops which massed for
an attack near Avocourt were
dispersed by our artillery fire.
It is believed by military critics
that the German military and
naval staffs are engaged in preparations for a great offensi ve, both
London: The main offensive
of the enemy on the western
front appears to have switched
from Verdun to the British lines,
and a great battle is in progress
in the vicinity of Hulloch and
Loos. The Germans attacked simultaneously at a score of points.
Irish regiments.in a gallant counter-charge, recovered trenches
which had been occupied by the
Germans.
Further contingents of Russian
troops reached Marseilles this
morning and disembarked immediately.
London: It is reported that
General Townshend's force, which
has been besieged at Kut-el-Amara for months, has been compelled to surrender, owing to the
non-arrival of the relief column
and the failure of the supply
ship to reach the camp. The
vessel grounded in the Tigris,
only four miles from Kut-el-Am-
a r a , after a gallant attempt
to reach the  beleaguered force.
Plant A Vegetable Garden
A garden 60 x 100 feet should
produce sufficient vegetables for
a family of ten persons, and
leave some surplus for storage
for winter. Cultivated by hand,
it will occupy most of the spare
time of a city dweller. A man
cannot be a motor car or baseball
enthusiast and at the same time
make a success of a garden of this
size. However, even smaller
plots,if handled intelligently.may
be made to yield an astonishing
quantity of good,crisp vegetables
which have not lost their health-
preserving value in the store
window. Where the available
space is small, crops should be
selected that take but little space
and give quick returns. Cabbage,
potatoes,corn, egg-plant, peppers,
had better be dispensed with and
the space devoted to such things
peas, beans, spinach, tomatoes,
lettuce, carrots, beets and onions.
Tomatoes8hould be stake-trained.
The cultivation of vegetables is
easy and agreeable, and in the
days when meat, eggs, milk and
other staple articles are tending
steadily to increase in price, a
wider use of vegetable foods will
reduce living expenses and pro
mote health.
The best time for garden work
is early in the morning and in
the evening: so that it is well to
encourage the healthful habit of
early retiring and early rising.
If the work is done for the love
of it, rather than from necessity,
these hours will be the most
agreeable in the day.
CRIMINAL PRACTICES
IN LATE BY-ELECTION
Vallejo, Cal.: The Canadian
cruiser Rainbow captured the
power schooner Oregon in the
Gulf of California. The vessel
was en route to Guaymas, under
a German charter.
Petrograd: Quiet prevails along
the entire Russian front, owing
to the weather.
Rome: Numerous German attacks on the Isonzo front were
decisively repulsed.
Amsterdam: The Dutch tug
Noordsee was sunk and the
Swedish steamer Dickson, bound
for Amsterdam, was captured
and taken to Hamburg by the
German warships returning from
the bombardment of the English
coast on Tuesday.
Washington: Despatches from
Berlin received at the German
embassy today indicate that Germany will meet the American
demand for an immediate abandonment of the present practices
in submarine warfare. The nature
of the German proposals has not
been disclosed.
El Paso :   It is now   certain
that Villa is still at large.
Victoria, April 28:���The select
committee of the legislature today began its investigation of
alleged impersonation in the Vancouver by-election. The opposition members of the committee
fought against the hearing of
witnesses. John J. Kelly, a
Seattle man,testified that he was
one of ten men brought from
Seattle, and told of being taken
to vote three times for M. A.
Macdonald, who was described as
the "wet" candidate. He was
furnished with cards giving the
names,addresses,and occupations
of the dead and absent persons
he was to impersonate. He received ten dollars in addition to
his expenses.
At last night's meeting of the
advisory board of Hazelton Hospital, the superintendent, Dr.
Wrinch, reported a balance on
the right side of the financial
ledger. This creditable showing
has been made notwithstanding
that the attendance for the quarter has been slightly under the
average.
The baseball team will probably make its first appearance for
the season tomorrow afternoon,
when the boys expect to play
with the local Indian nine, which
has been playing for some weeks
and has so far won all its games
with other native teams. The
grounds are in excellent condition.
LOCAL NEWS PARAGRAPHS
Items Of General Interest From
Hazelton and Surrounding District
A. S. Gray was up from Cedarvale on Monday.
Mrs. Harry Hamblin is a visitor in Prince Rupert.
Red Cross membership cards
are now being issued.
R. C. Sinclair and family left
yesterday for Portland.
Mr. and Mrs. P. Slavin, of
Houston, are visiting Hazelton.
M. W. Sutherland returned on
Monday from a visit to the Chicago group.
Dr. Maclean, of Smithers, was
here on Thursday, on professional business.
Robert Langlands is spending
the week at Gitwangak as the
guest of Dr. Ardagh.
C. H. Dennis and A. J. Bates,
traveling men from Vancouver,
are in town this week.
Mrs. H. H. Phillips and children left on Tuesday for a visit to
relatives in Vancouver.
J. H. Bush, the Skeena Crossing freighting contractor, came
up on Thursday's train.
J. A. McDonald, road foreman
in the Bulkley Valley, returned
to Smithers on Thursday.
J. Anderson and J. E. Setter-
ington, of Prince Rupert, were
among Thursday's arrivals.
F. B. Chettleburgh, of the forest branch, arrived irom Telkwa
on Tuesday. Mrs. Chettleburgh
will join him later.
W. Blackstock, of the government telegraph servhe, returned
today from an inspection trip
through the Peace river country.
Dr. Sager, a graduate of Queen's
University, will arrive from the
East shortly, to take the position
of assistant to Dr. Wrinch at the
Hospital.
F. W. Henning, well-known
behind the desk at the Prince
Rupert Hotel, is spending a few
days here, accompanied by Mrs.
Henning.
Little Gordon Hoskins, youngest son of the government agent,
has been rather seriously ill for
some days, and is receiving attention at the Hospital.
Dr. Wrinch is gratified by the
showing made by his son Leonard, who won first place in his
class at the Easter examinations
at Vancouver, where he is attending high school.
Government Agent Hoskins has
made extensive improvements in
the grounds aboutthegovemment
offices, and plans to do a good
deal of gardening. He has been
using rhubarb from his garden
for three weeks.
Methodist Church
Rev. W. M. Scott will preach
tomorrow evening on the subject:
"The Call of Moses."
Special Music.  All are invited. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, APRIL 29. 1916
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
II
TUESDAY, APRIL 25
J
German Naval Raid
London: A squadron of German battle cruisers and light
cruisers, accompanied by destroyers, appeared off Lowestoft and
opened fire at 4:30 a.m. today.
Two men, one woman and a baby
were killed by their shells. Local
naval forces, aided by light
cruisers, beat off the enemy ships
in twenty minutes.
A naval battle in the North
Sea, between British and German squadrons, is reported to be
in progress.
British warships yesterday attacked and destroyed German
positions on the Belgian coast.
The warships subjected the fortifications and works to the heaviest bombardment of the war.
Enormous damage was done at
Zeebrugge, Heyst. Blankenburghe
and Knocke. Several ships were
sunk.
The Verdun Conflict
Paris: French troops have
made further progress on the
Verdun front, north west of Caur-
ette wood. A heavy bombardment is in progress at Morte
Homme, while there is comparative calm east of the Meuse.
We have captured German positions in the Vosges, near Bon-
homme.
Yesterday  three desperate efforts by the Germans to  capture
Mort Hom'ie were repulsed, lhe!
enemy  used  gas  and flame projectors. Their losses were heavy.
Another contingent of Russian
troops has arrived at  Marseilles.
Captured Traitor Casement
London: It is announced by
the admiralty that Sir Roger
Casement, the notorious renegade,
has been arrested while attempting to land a consignment of
guns and ammunition on the
west coast of Ireland. The arms
were carried by a German auxiliary cruiser disguised as a neutral
merchantman. The vessel wss
sunk and Casement and his companions were arrested. A German submarine accompanied the
ship. Casement will be tried for
treason.
Canadians Advance
London: As a result of more
heavy fighting around St. Eloi,
the Canadians now occupy new
but wet ground in advance of their
original positions. Many deeds
of gallantry are being reported.
Total  Canadian   losses  in this
engagement are now 1869.
Aerial Activity
London: On Monday morning a
hostile aeroplane appeared above
Dover, evidently on a scouting
trip.    It was driven off.
Four or five zeppelins raided
Lincolnshire last night and dropped 70 bombs. One man was
injured.
London: Eight British aeroplanes destroyed the Turkish-
German camp at Quatia, near the
Suez canal, forcing the withdrawal of the army.
Kaiser May Back Down
Washington: It is reported
the German reply, which is to be
made known at the end of the
week, will make certain concessions. It is reported that con
gress is not backing up Wilson in
his demands.
Carranza is pressing for a reply to his request for the withdrawal of the  American  troops.
=v\ j Villa, who is  wounded,   but not
|| incapacitated,
has moved into
the mountainous region northwest of Parral.
Turks Kill Hun Officers
Petrograd: Before the Russians
entered Trebizond, the Turkish
garrison revolted and killed their
German officers. A large number
of Turkish officials have been
assassinated   in  Constantinople.
Desperate Turkish attacks in
Aschkala district were repulsed,
the Russians in a surprise attack
capturing an important sector.
/T'
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26
Dublin Rebellion
London: A rebel outbreak in
Ireland, planned in conjunction
with the German gun-running
exploit, has been checked. The
Sinn Fein seized Dublin postoffice
and adjacent buildings.as well as
buildings in four different parts
of the city. In the fight which followed, three officers, five soldiers
and two policemen were killed.
Troops, with machine guns, are
arriving from Curragh, and Dublin has been placed under martial
law. The greater part of southern Ireland is under military control.
It is believed the attack on
Lowestoft was planned to distract attention from Ireland and
assist the conspirators. All the
British ships returned safely from
the pursuit of tho enemy squadron. Twenty officers and men
were wounded, but none killed.
The extent of the damage to
German vessels is unknown.
Sir Roger Casement is in the
Tower of London, awaiting trial
for treason.
On Western Front
Paris: An enemy infantry attack in Lorraine was repulsed.
Artillery fighting continues on
the Verdun front.
French aviators have destroyed
four German planes in duels in
the last few days. A French
aeroplane and a zeppelin fought
two miles above Zeebrugge at 3
a.m. today. The aeroplane fired
nine incendiary bombs into the
zeppelin.
Six   bombs  were  dropped   on
Dunkirk this morning. A woman
was killed and three men injured.
Says Germany Agrees
Providence : The Journal's
Berlin correspondent cables that
Germany will yield every point in
the submarine controversy with
the United States. The paper also
states that Von Bemstorff has
announced that the crisis is over.
In Mexico
El Paso: Col. Dodd's cavalry,
in advance of the American force
in Mexico, has been in an engagement, in which both sides suffered losses. It is not known
whether the opposing force was
Villa's or Carranza's.
THURSDAY, APRIL 27
land have occupied the buildings
in Dublin which had been seized
by the rebels. Loyal militia captured Liberty Hall.the headquarters of the rebels. The latter
lost fifteen killed and 21 wounded. The volunteers and police
lost eight killed and six wounded.
All government and financial
buildings are guarded by troops.
A general disarming has been
ordered, and many arrests are
being made.
Huns Disappointed
Berlin: Newspapers express
disappointment over the failure
of the Casement expedition, of
which much was expected. Casement claimed that 100,000 Irishmen were ready to revolt and
affect the feeling of America.
The ship was manned by picked
German seamen, and carried
20,000 rifles, machine guns, and
ammunition.
Big Guns at Verdun
Paris: The most terrific bombardment since the first attack
on Verdun is concentrated today
on Avocourt and Cote de Poivre,
the key positions of the French
line. The Germans have been
reinforced, while Russian troops
have been added to the forces of
Gen Petain. Determined infantry
assaults have been prepared for.
f
FRIDAY, APRIL 21
ings. Casualties so far reported
are 42 killed and 46 wounded.
Sir John Maxwell is in command
in Ireland.
Carson and Redmond, leaders
of the Irish parties in parliament,
expressed their abhorrence of the
uprisiug. Carson said he would
gladly join Redmond in efforts to
denounce and hunt down the
rebels, now and for evermore.
Great Force at Verdun
Paris: French positions at Verdun were bombarded last night,
but the Germans made no strong
infantry attacks. Half a million
Germans are now concentrated in
this sector, and the general staff
is said to be determined to capture Verdun by June 1.
There has been heavy fighting
on the British front, the Germans
entering advanced trenches,from
which they were driven with
heavy loss. Attacks at St. Eloi
and Hill 60 were repulsed. Irish
regiments have been especially
mentioned for gallantry in repelling gas attacks.
Battleship Lost
London: The battleship Russell was sunk in the Mediterranean, by a mine. Of her crew 124
were lost. Admiral Freeman, 24
officers and 676 men were saved.
The Russell was built in 1901 and
was the flagship of the Mediterranean squadron.
It is officially announced that a
German submarine was sunk off
the east coast, the crew of eighteen being captured.
The British submarine E22 has
been sunk.
New Hun Sub Sunk
Amsterdam: A German super-
submarine of the newest type was
sunk by a British trawler, while
examining two Dutch ships. Sixty men aboard were lost.
Bad News Expected
London: Stories in the press
concerning obtacles to the relief
of General Townshend are believed to presage news of disaster at
Kut-el-Amara.
U. S. Money For Casement
Washington: The secret service of the department of justice
is conducting a nation-wide investigation of alleged Irish-American plots against Great Britain.
f                         We Have j
JUST RECEIVED j
A Large And Varied Stock of .;-
FERRY'S   SELECTED
SEEDS
Irish Rebels Still Fight
London: Martial law is in effect throughout Ireland. Premier
Asquith informed the commons
that the situation still presented
serious features, indications pointing to the spread of disaffection,
especially in the south. Fighting
continues in the streets of Dublin,
the rebels holding several  build-
3II    ''   llll llll llll IHIi������IIH���Mlg
j Tread the Footpath
I
of Peace
This is the path of him who wears
"Invictus"
THE BEST GOOD SHOE
NOEL & ROCK
Hazelton, B. C.
KII���llll^��� llll���INI���llll���_ IIII���������!
���j
i
i
t
f Up-to-Date Drug Stores *
I  HAZELTON :: B.C.  I
I
Assay Office and Mining Office
' Arts and Crafts Building:, 578 Seymour Street
 VANCOUVER, B.C.	
i The Estate of J. O'Sullivan
Provincial Assayers and Chemists
Established 1897 by the late J. O'Sullivan,   F. C. S., 26 years with
Vivian & Sons, Swansea.
i HAZELTON HOSPITAL^
I for any period from one month upward at {1 per
| month in advance. This rate includes office con-
' luluuiim* and medicines, as well aB all costs while
I in the hospital.   Tickets obtainable  in   Hazelton
at the Post Office or the Drug Store; in Aldermere
l from Mr. T. J. Thorp; in Telkwa from Dr. Wallace;
] or by mail from the Medical Superintendent at the
Hospital.
The Irish Trouble
London: Premier Asquith announces that drastic action has
been taken to suppress the rebellious movement in Ireland. Outside of Dublin the country is
tranquil. The premier added that
steps were being taken to acquaint
neutral countries with the "real
significance of this, the most
recent German campaign."
Troops  from Belfast and Eng-
reduction and
GAIN or no gain the cause before the farmers of Canada is as clear as it was last
year���they must produce abundantly in order lo meet the demands that may
be made, and I believe this to be especially true in regard to live stock, the world's
supply of which must be particularly affected in this vast struggle."���HUN.
MARTIS BURRELL, Minister of Agriculture.
THE    FOLLOWING    STATEMENTS    ARE    BASED    ON     REPORTS   CONTAINED    IN
" THE AGRICULTURAL  WAR  BOOK,   1916."   PUBLISHED  BY   THE
DEPARTMENT  OF  AGRICULTURE.  OTTAWA,  ONT.
LIVE STOCK���The herd.and flocks of Europe
have been greatly reduced. When the war is over
there will be a great demand for breeding stock.
Canadian f.tnm ... should keep this in mind.
MEATS���In 1915 Great Britain imported (Hi4,.r>os
tons of beef, mutton and lamb, of which 864,346
tons came from without the Empire. Out of
41)0,420 tons of beef only 104,907 tons came from
within the Empire.
The demands of the Allies for frozen beef,
canned beef, bacon and hams will increase rather
than diminish. Orders are coming to Canada.
The decreasing tonnage space available will give
Canada an advantage if we have the supplies.
DAIRYING   -Home consumption of milk,buttei
and cheese hat increased of Late years. The war
demands for cheese have been unlimited. The
Canadian cheese exports from Montreal in 1916
were nearly $0,600,000 over 1914, Prices at
Montreal��� Cheese ; January 1916, 15)4 to 17
cents; January 1910, 1K>4' to 18H cents.
Ilutter : January 1916, '.'1 to 2S;l4 cents;
January 1016, :vj to 33 cent",
EGOS-���Canada produced $80,000,000 worth of
cgg> in litl'i and helped out Great Britain in the
shortage. Shippers as well as producers have a
duty and an opportunity in holding a place in
thai market,
WRITE TO THE DOMINION   DEPARTMENT  OF AGRICULTURE  AND  TO  YOUR
PROVINCIAL DEPARTMENT FOR BULLETINS ON THESE SUBJECTS
Tens of thousands of Canada's food producers have enlisted and gone to the front. It is only fair to them
that their home work shall be kept up as far as possible. The Umpire needs all the food thttl we can produce
in 1916.
PRODUCE MORE ASI) HAVE MORE
MAKIi LABOUR EFFICIENT
SAVE MATERIALS FROM WASTE
SPEND MONEY WISELY
THE   GOVERNMENT   OF   CANADA 4
THE  DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE THE  DEPARTMENT  OF  FINANCE
mmmmmmmmmimm^tmmmtmmmmmt^mmmmmmmmmmii^aKimtm^MXuJimat

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