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Omineca Miner Mar 30, 1912

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 cfa*^
iCjsuA-^^cA-A.
THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER IN NORTHERN BRITISH GOLUi
������v��I:������ ���*���*��
aimer
VOL. I, NO. 31
HAZELTON, B. C. SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1912
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
MANN BliyS A
BIG COAL AREA
Canadian Northern Railway
Magnate Acquires Large
Acreage in Groundhog
GREAT FUTURE FOR FIELD
Famous Upper Skeena District will Soon
Take a Place Among the Creat Industrial Centers of the World is the
Prediction Made by Coal Experts
A red-letter day in the annals
of progress for Canada was written large in her history on the
15th of March when Sir Donald
D. Mann, through his proxy, Mr.
T. C. Holt, signed papers and
documents in Vancouver to purchase one hundred and forty-five
square miles of coal lands around
the head waters of the Naas
river, ��� says a Vancouver exchange. Comprising as it does
over ninety-two thousand acres,
this property is the controlling
neck of the whole far-extending
field of the Groundhog coal basin.
This but lately developed coal
area contains eleven known commercial seams, aggregating, say,
68 feet thickness in all of coal, of
the mueh-coveted grade of
smokeless, hard, anthracite coal,
only known to exist in quantity
in two other commercial centres
of industry in the world, namely,
in Wales and Pennsylvania, the
former district turning out annually less than five millions of
tons and the other ninety millions
to satisfy domestic, manufacturing and steam-raising uses
throughout the world's markets,
a fact demonstrated by the terrific havoc perpetrated in all foreign ports beyond the home centre by the present disastrous coal
strike in Wales and Great Britain.
A district seventy miles in
length north and south by thirty-
five miles in width east and west,
one covering six times the area
in size of that of hard coal in
Pennsylvania, all studded here
(Continued on page 3)
CONSERVATIVES ARE VICTORIOUS GREAT STRIKE
NEAR ITS END
RECORD AND POLICY
OF MCBRIDE ENDORSED
Will Be Incentive To Admin-
istrationTo Futher Advance
Province says Bowser
Hindu On Voters List
Vancouver, Mar. 29: -For the
first time in British Columbia a
Hindu has got his name upon the
provincial voters list, and is said
to have voted yesterday. His
name is Houssein Rahim. A
warrant charging him with perjury has been issued, but he has
not yet been located. Although
the election act states that Hindus, as well as Japanese, Chinese, and Indians, are not permitted to exercise the franchise,
Rahim is down on the Vancouver
list as a qualified elector. How
his registration came about will
be the subject of an investigation,
while Rahim, if apprehended, will
be tried for perjury. The Hindu's application for registration,
in filing which he took the necessary oath before W. E. Flumer-
felt, a prominent Liberal worker
and chairman of the Vancouver
school board, was accepted and
his name placed on the list just
prior to the last Dominion election. Yesterday Rahim not only
exercised thc franchise, but acted
as Socialist scrutineer in a city
polling subdivision. He has discarded the turban, and dresses
like an Englishman. He landed
in the city two years ago.
(Sueclal to The Miner)
Vancouver, Mar. 29:- Just before leaving for Victoria today,
Attorney-General Bowser, in an
interview, said of the result of
the election that it was a great
compliment to the government
to know that its work on behalf
of the province had been so much
appreciated by the electors. The
verdict will be a further incentive
to the administration to carry on
the work of development and
launch out in greater degree than
ever before. Although there are
many hardships in public life, he
said, such compliments as that
of yesterday will repay many
years of hard work. He considered the result also a great
personal compliment to the premier, and declared that no other
man could have accomplished as
much for British Columbia as Mr.
McBride has done. The elections
were unique, Mr. Bowser said,
in that for the first time in the
history of Canada and perhaps
of any other country with a system of government similar to
ours, a political party was obliterated at the polls in so far as
representation in the legislature
was concerned.
The attorney-general tendered
his thanks not only to the rank
and file of the Conservative party,
but also, as he expressed it, "To
all electors who used their influence to return the government
and to those Liberals who put
country before party in order to
encourage the government in its
work of developing this great
province on the Pacific seaboard
of Canada."
MEANS MUCH FOR FUTURE PROSPERITY SAYS PREMIER
li ICTORIA, March 29:���Speaking on the result of the election,
Premier McBride today said:
"The Government will more than ever realize its responsibility to
the people of the Province. The victory which the Conservative
party has achieved is a victory for the future of British Columbia; for
the Government will go on with those large issues, that are now but
dimly dreamt of, in regard to 'development and general prosperity.
In the past we have labored with many handicaps. We have so far
been enormously successful. That we will, as a Government, continue
to measure up to the general expectation, is my firm hope in view of the
magnificent attitude of the people as shown at the polls.
"From now on, British Columbia will forge ahead as never
before. Faith in the country's potentialities has been splendidly
vindicated. With that great warrant to back us, the Government
hopes to inspire confidence in the investing worlJ that the people of the
Province have themselves so plainly exhibited."
SKEENA'S MEMBER GRATIFIED
CRINCE RUPERT, March 29:-William Manson, who is
naturally highly gratified with the result of the election, said
"Everyone who has the interests of British Columbia at heart will be
pleased with the popular verdict which ensures the continuance of the
administration which has done so much for the Province and which will
do so much more in the future. Personally, I have to thank the
Electors of Skeena District for their emphatic endorsation of my course,
and assure them that their confidence in me will be an incentive to
increased efforts for the advancement of the district."
PARTIAL RETURNS OF SKEENA DISTRICT
When all Skeena District returns are in it is probable that William
Manson will be found to have as large a majority over the Liberal
candidate as that he obtained against Dr. Kergin in the last previous
election.      Following are the returnsjo far received:
W. Manion  A. Mamon   Montgomery Clayton
Returns from some of the
Skeena district polling places
may not be received for several
days. Reports from the Francois
and Ootsa lake polls are expected
tomorrow.
Vancouver, Mar. 28:���With a
complete Conservative victory
throughout the province, save in
Nanaimo, where a socialist was
returned; with every Liberal
candidate failing and several losing their deposits, Vancouver
cheered itself hoarse tonight in
automobile parades and on foot.
The same was true of all towns
up to Kamloops and down to
Nelson.
The demonstration commenced
here when the city returns were
half in, the count easily showing
the safe - return of the "Solid
Five." This was followed by
Clifford's defeat of Kennedy in
New Westminister by a majority
of nearly 700 and by Mackenzie's
defeat of John Oliver in Delta by
400 majority. As returns continued to come in, confirming the
story of victory, the cheering increased in volume, until reports
from Cowichan ancl the Islands
brought the climax of a complete
triumph of Conservatives over
Liberals for the first time in the
history of provincial elections in
Canada.
In Victoria Premier McBride
headed the poll with 3228 votes,
Thomson being second with 700
less. Davey, the lowest Conservative, polled 2475 against 2048
for Brewster, the highest
Liberal.
. Vancouver hailed with cheers
Lome Campbell's overwhelming
defeat of L. D. Taylor, this city's
ex-mayor, in Rossland, and
uttered a great sigh for that one
vote by which Taylor saved his
deposit.
Aldermere    9
Big Tunnel    4
Breckenridge   Ldg    4
Cedarvale     9
Copper, City    6
Georgetown _ ..   2
Hazelton  78
Hardscrabble     7
Hole-in-the-Wall     0
Inverness    li
Jedway _    7
Kispiox ...         3
Kitsumkalum  24
Kitselas..  13
Lome Creek    5
New Hazelton   17
Port Essington  13
Prince Rupert .338
Q. C. City 13
Sealey    17
Skeena Crossing 15
Rkidegate  13
South Bulkley  . ..   5
Stewart 33
Telkwa    . 21
Terrace.  .- 17
Twenty-mile    9
Vav Arsdol     2
Totals.
7
2
0
~3
0
07
2
1
I)
2
9
1
7
0
9
2
277
7
(i
5
3
1
27
4
9
1
 0^
452
9
0
0
"i
l
20
1
1
1
1
0
3
3
2
7
0
129
7
0
0
0
5
32
4
0
0
 0
230-
19
0
0
"i
o
4
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
49
0
1
0
0
0
3
(i
0
0
0
85
Total
44
0
4
9
11
3
169
10
8
4
10
13
28
21
7
33
15
793
27
30
20
16
11
95
85
20
10
 2_
1466
NO LIBERALS ELECTED
ONLY ONE SOCIALIST
Men Who Will Represent
Constituencies of Province
In New Legislature
This will be the composition of
the next legislature:
Conservatives:
Alberni, J. G. Wood
Atlin, Hon, H. E. Young
Cariboo, J. A. Fraser
Dr. Callanan
Cowichan, W. H. Hayward
Comox, Michael Manson
Cranbrook, T. D. Caven
Chilliwack, S. A. Cawley
Delta, F. J. A. Mackenzie
Dewdney, W. J. Manson
Esquimalt, R. H. Pooley
Fernie, Hon. W. R. Ross
Grand Forks, Ernest Miller
Greenwood, J. B. Jackson
Islands, Hon. A. E. Phillips
Kamloops, J. P. Shaw
Kaslo, Neil McKay
Lilloet, A. McDonald
Nelson, William McLean
Newcastle, R. B. Dier
New Westminster, T. Gifford
Okanagan, Hon. Price Elli9on
Revelstoke, Hon. Thos. Taylor
Richmond, F. Carter-Cotton
Rossland, L. A. Campbell
Saanich, Hon, D. M. Eberts
Similkameen, L. W. Shatford
Skeena, William Manson
Slocan, William Hunter
Vancouver, Hon. W. J. Bowser
A. H. B. Macgowan
C. E. Tisdall
H. H. Watson
G. A. McGuire
Victoria,     Hon. R. McBride
H. B. Thompson
H. F. H. Behnsen
Fred Davey
Yale, Alex. Lucas
Ymir, J. H. Schofield
I Independent Conservative:
Columbia, Harold Forster
Socialist:
Nanaimo, John Place
Miners' Minimum Wage Bill
Receives Royal Assent
And  Becomes Law
SETTLEMENT NOW LIKELY
Strikers Voting on Question of Returning
To Work���Suffering and Want Reach
Proportions of National Calamity-
Strike Costs Country Many   Millions
London, Mar. 29:���The King
has signed the minimum wage
bill, which thus becomes law.
The striking coal miners are now
voting on the question of returning to work under the conditions
prescribed by the bill, and early
resumption of mining is expected.
The strike has cost the men over
five millions. The suffering and
want among the families of those
affected have assumed the proportions of a national catastrophe.
Ballasting New Section
Strenuous efforts are being
made to place the Grand Trunk
Pacific track between Van Arsdol
and Skeena Crossing in condition
for acceptance by the government. It is the intention of those
interested to apply for acceptance
of the road between the points
mentioned by the fifteenth of
April, by which date the contractors expect to have the work of
ballasting completed. The roadbed is said to be already in good
condition as far east as Andi-
maul, and the ballast trains are
kept busy along the line.
Supplies For Groundhog
That predictions of great development in the Groundhog field
this season are well grounded is
made evident by the large shipments of supplies which have
gone over the toboggan trail
from Hazelton to the upper
Skeena during the last few
weeks. Two large outfits started
on Wednesday. Road Superintendent Williscroft sent in a large
quantity of supplies and tools,
which will be cached at convenient points for the use of the
trail crews which are to be sent
in as soon as it is possible to work
on the new trail. Frank J. Martin also sent in a number of toboggans with an outfit for the
development of a large group of
coal claims owned by Winnipeg
capitalists. Sufficient provision
has been made for the working
of a large number of men on
various properties as soon as the
snow is off. Pack trains have
been engaged to transport some
fifty tons of additional supplies
as soon as the trail is open.
Charlotte Islands and the Naas
country, which formerly went to
the old post, and the H. B. C.
decided to shut up shop. Port
Simpson was formerly the
point of departure for
Northern   Interior,  the
Many Lost Deposits
(Special to Tin' Miner)
Vancouver, Mar. 29:   Thirteen
Socialists and three  Liberals���
possibly six,  lost their deposits district of the Town.   The com
yesterday, while seven  indepen
dent candidates met  the
fate.    Following is the list:
Liberals���Delta, John   Oliver:
all  the|Kamloops, Leighton, (probably);
district I New Westminster, George Ken-
mittee
same messrs.
Zackon.
headquarters of the H. B. C, and|ne(]y; Saanich, Wm. Noble; Yale,
was at one time garrisoned by
forty of the company's men.
Ex-Minister Dead
(Special to Tho Minor)
Victoria, March 29:���Hon. C.
E. Pooley, the noted lawyer and
former speaker of the legislature,
died at midnight, shortly after
receiving the news of his son's
election in Esquimalt. Mr. Pooley,
who came here as a boy with the
pioneer goldseekers, was a cabinet minister in the Robson,
Davie, and Turner governments,
representing Esquimalt in the
legislature for many years.
McConnell, (probably).
Socialists - - Esquimalt, George
Oliver; Greenwood, Heatherton;
Nelson, Harrod; Okanagan, Sterling; Rossland, Casey; Skeena,
Montgomery; Vancouver, Bennett, Reid, Pritchard, Lord, McDonald; Victoria, Midgley; Ymir;
Pettipiece.
Independent��� Dewdney, Mc-
Neice; Esquimalt, Jardine; Islands, Winch; Nelson, Harry
Wright, former member; Skeena,
Clayton; Vancouver, Greer; Victoria, Perry.
Citizens Are Indignant
At a largely attended indignation meeting held by the citizens
of New Hazelton on Wednesday
night it was unanimously decided
that a committee of three be
elected to formulate and despatch telegrams to the Postmaster General at Ottawa and the
Post Office Inspector at Victoria
B. C. demanding the immediate
location of a Post Office in the
centre of the present business
elected
Moran,
consisting   of
Richmond and
Had To Use Aeroplane
Annual Masquerade
Projected Steel Industry
(Spedii to Tiio Miner)
Vancouver, Mar. 29:���Flaherty, an eminent engineering export, especially engaged by MacKenzie & Mann, accompanied by
James Sword, M. E., returned
today from a trip to Northern
British Columbia. They visited
Queen Charlotte Islands to
examine large deposits of magnetic iron ore. It is proposed to
utilize the ore in the smelting of
pig iron in works to be erected on
the ground. The establishment
of steel works at Port Mann, the
Pacific terminus of the Canadian
Northern, is also contemplated.
The engineers were very favorably impressed with the deposits.
They state the trip was a revelation of northern resources. The
projected works will involve the
London, Mar.  29: -Owing  to
the lack of fuel occasioned by the expenditure of milhons.
To Abandon Port Simpson
Port Simpson, for over three-
quarters of a century one of the
principal trading points of the
North Pacific, is to be abandoned
by the Hudson's Bay Company.
Of late years Prince Rupert has
absorbed the trade of the Queen
The annual masquerade dance j coal strike> the railways refused
of the Assembly Club will be held to run a special train for a
in the auditorium on Easter Monday evening, April 8. It is expected that the display of original
and fancy costumes will be unusually good, as many of those
who will attend are already preparing for the affair. Special
music will be furnished and all
arrangements will be of the best.
niov The Pool Tournament
ing picture company which | The pool tournament at the
wished to bring kinetoscope films I Galena Club is attracting a good
of today's Grand National Handi-! deal of attention. The semi-finals
cap race at Liverpool to London | last night were won by J. Sharpe,
in time for the evening perfor- j C. G. Harvey, W. Brewer, Edgar
mance. The company overcame Harris, in Class A, and A. Mon-
the difficulty by hiring Aviator cur, W. F. Brewer, E. Ford, J.
Hamel, who carried the films to, Mitchell in Class B. The final
the city in his aeroplane. ' games are to be played tonight. THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1912
The Omiimeca Mimier
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District oe British Columbia.
Macdonald & Rauk, Publishers and Proprietors.
MANY THOUSANDS OF
AMER1CANSARE COMING
Canadian Pacific Expects Immigration of 200,000 Farmers from Across Border.
LAND NOTICES
SUBSCRIPTION KATES:   Canada ancl British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year. Chicago, March 28:��� Notwith-
ADVERTISING  RATES:    Display,  $1.50 per inch per month;   Reading1 standing  the   attitude   of  R. B.
���������'������'���-���: ��� ' ' '���- : ' '  '  ; ''''���?* taaerflon, I0 cents per line for each subsequent  Be)inetti ^ Calgary member of
Parliament,     who    would   stop
Omineca Land District.    District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Roy Moseley, of
Hazelton, occupation bartender, intend to apply for permission to purchase tho following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted eighty
chains south of the southwest comer of
lot 813, thence north forty chains, west
forty chains, south forty chains, east
forty chains to point of commencement . containing 100 acres more or less.
Jan. S, 1912. Roy Moseley.
31
Legal notices inserted at B. C. Gazette rates.
Vol. I.
Saturday, March 30, 1912.
No. 31. American immigration into the
" northwest if he could, his former
[associate, J. S. Dennis, the right
��� hand of Sir Thomas Shausrhncs-
Once more have the people of British Columbia demonstrated Ly and in charge of the exten-i
their confidence in the administration of Hon. Richard McBride. sive landed interests of the Can-
Thursday's elections not only resulted in the complete justification adian Pacific,  stated enthusias-
of the policy and record of the Conservative government,  but es- tically  at  the  9ana(!ian   Lam!
.,,.,, ,. ���   ��� ,    ,....    ���   n      ,    .. I  .     ,,     Agents' convention that a great,
tabhshed a new record in provincial polities in Canada, it being the , .       .      ��� .,.,��������� ���,���,,i/i
i wave of American settlers would
move into Western Canada this
Conservatives Again Triumphant
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Peter Zbinden, of
Hazelton, laborer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains south of the southwest corner of
lot 818, thence north eighty chains,
oast eighty chains, south eighty chains,
west eighty chains to point of commencement, containing 040 acres more
or less. Peter Zbinden,
Jan. 5, 1912. 31
year.    He predicted that not less
first occasion on which the Liberal party has been utterly  defeated
in any of the provinces.
At this writing, it appears that the new legislature will consist J than 200,000 American farmers
of forty-one Conservative members and one Socialist.   There are j would take up homes in Canada
many who believe that the cause of good government is best'served before. 1913-    li is thouffht that
..       .     . , .     .,     ,    . , . ..the missionary  work now being
when there is at least some opposition in the legislature; but so undertaken by the company will
strong was the sentiment in favor of the continuance in  power of i result in an additional 100,000.
the present administration that the two opposition parties were|    The statement was made in the
unable to return more than one representative. I presence of about 40 general land
Mr. McBride and his colleagues return to power unhampered' agents connected with the Canadian Pacific's undertaking to
interest the American farmers in
the Canadian Northwest.   These
by opposition.
Their new  term of office will,  perhaps,   prove a "
severer test of their qualities as administrators and leaders than if
there were opposition. We believe they will emerge at the end of agents nave under them 3,000
the four year period with flying colors ancl with a record as clean sub-agents, many of whom are in
as that with which they enter it. attendance   at   the   convention.
The result of the four-cornered contest in Skeena district was With  the  adjournment o f the
a foregone conclusion,  the return of William Manson  with a good convention these agents will go
.   '      ,   . fiJ    ., , , .     .,     n .. into every state and territory of
majority being confidently expected by the Conservatives and the ^mc to exploit Canadian
tacitly conceded by those Liberals whose breadth of view was suf- opportunities and induce immi-
ficient to allow them an unprejudiced view of the situation.   The gration.
candidacy of Dr. Clayton proved to be what William Manson, before \ "Based on carefully tabulated
a Hazelton audience, told Clayton it was-a joke.   The Prince Ru-! fiSure3 supplied by our agents "
pert dentist, who wired his friends that he had captured Manson's
said Mr. Dennis, "I may prophesy
Feu ����p "���- :"?""': """Zul'T Z """ 7,TT T","|thtf 200,000 settlers will acquire
meeting here and had the town solid for him,  polled four votes in; land ������ Western Canada tnis sea.
171.   From Prince Rupert he wired to Hazelton that he would j gorii   There is renewed interest
sweep the city.   The sad fact is that in some thirty polling places'[ among   prospective    customers
so far heard from, including Prince Rupert and Hazelton,  Clayton \ owing to the administration of-
polled hardly one hundred votes, figuring as an ignominious last in ferin* in addition to Alberta rich
in the race which he boasted was as good as won. I whfat  ,la"ds ,in   Saskatchewan
T, , ..    , . .,   ., . , and   mixed   farming   lands  in
In Hazelton and its vicinity the campaign  was conducted in a j\far,jt0ba
spirit of fairness on both sides.   The Liberals put up an excellent.    it is thought that in addition
fight, but with the predominant feeling of the people strong for, to the 200,000 practically assured
McBride and William Manson,   their efforts to secure a majority in jthe campaign of exploitation just
Hazelton for their candidate were unavailing.  The vote polled here'being started  by  the  railroad
was smaller than that counted at the Dominion election last fall,! f��mpf"^nni T^-*" *" j?"'
.    ��� , ,, i tional 100,000 American settlers
owing to the impression that the former member would be returned, migrating to Canada, or 300,000
numbers who would have voted had the  result been in doubt not in all this year.
coming in to vote. j    The movement is already under
_���_ ��� . i way    a solid train of settlers'
Trade of the World view held by Englishmen   who'effects left Minneapolis over the
The world's international trade r00^ ^ar m*�� tne future of the Soo Line for Canada yesterday,
has doubled in value in the last emPirei Earl Grey said that as the Officials of the Soo Line in at-
fifteen years and shows foi* 1911; United Kingdom could not for- tendance at the convention state
a larger total than ever before jever n��lie l0 r)lay alone her pres-, they have orders for GOO cars
recorded. Thc bureau of statistics ent Part as a maker of righteous-! this early in the season to move
of the department of commerce nes8 throughout the world, the'immigrants'effects into Canada.
and   labor'at Washington  pub- ^htes' ��f a11  duties that lay! ���	
lishes each month the latest;betoi'e the present and coming Pound-Fountain Pen En-
available data on the trace of! statesmen of all parts of the em-1 quire W. J. Larkworthy's store,
each of the principal countries of l1u'e was the solution of the prob-
the world. A comparison of these lem of welding the autonomous
monthlv figures of 1911 indicates Portions each to develop the
that the trade of those portions strength of its own free aspiring
of the year for which figures are nationality.- Washington Post.
of
One
wagon,
office.
For Sale
four-horse    Studebakcv
nearly new.    C, Miner
available show   an   increase
between 5 and G per cent over
the corresponding period of last
Wanted
Ten pack animals ���horses or
mules.     State  age,  price,  etc.
Against Airships In War
 i            A petition signed by two hun-ir       i .��� i ,.       i-.i
year, and should this gain be dred notable people in Eumpe^/f'e'Y f K, i
shown in the figures for that has been issued by thc Interna- llt^^^VL?^ ���d
part of the year not yet reported,; tional Arbitration League pro-
the total international trade of | testing against the use of aerial
the world would approximate | vessels in war. The signatories
$17,000,000,000 of exports and appeal to all governments to
$18,500,000,000 of imports. | foster an   international   under-
These figures indicate that the standing which shall preserve the
international commerce of the world from "a new hideousness
worl 1   in   1911   aggregated ap-Lf warfare."   They also depre-1. Tnt' Government of British Columbia
n��m,'m��inl��   fhiwt-u (i,.���    liillinnu     i��� .1 .���        .,    , ,  ,   invite Competitive Bla'is for the general
proximately thirty-live   billions, cate the suggestion that aerial scheme andfdealgn for the proposed new
against thirty   billions in  1907, j warfare, by reason of its horror   University, together with more detailed
+,���*,���+���     -f^,,,.    Mlllnna    in     1QO/I     * r-.:_i.i.._  ii_-_ ' | Plans for the buildings   to   be  erected
lirst at an estimated cost of $1,500,000.
Prizes of $10,000 will be given for the
most successful Designs submitted.
Particulars of the competition and
plan of site may be obtained on request
price are not satisfactory.
Hudson's Bay Co., Hazelton.
       :n
TO CANADIAN ARCHITECTS
Competition for New University Build
Ingl to be erected at Point Greyt
near Vancouver, British Columbia.
twenty - four billions in 1904,
twenty billions in 1901 and sixteen billions in 1900.
Destiny of Canada
Canada destined to be the controlling power of the British Empire! Earl Grey's prophecy has a
ring that drowns the echoes of
Champ Clark's exordium on annexing the land of the aurora
borealis. The former governor
general of the Dominion was telling his countrymen at home, in
an address leading up to his remarkable pronouncement, of the
loyalty   and   patriotism    which
must frighten men from war.
from the undersigned
Illiterates In U. S.
Washington, Mar. 26:��� A pre-,,,,,,, ,,���.������,,,,,,,.,
liminary census statement issued !   Th�� designs to be sent in by July 31st,
by Director Durand shows that ' '"'tmmSSsmb op Education,
Parliament Buildings,
in 1910 there were 3,517,600 illiterates, unable to read or write,
among thc 71,580,270 persons ten
ten years of age or more in the
88
Victoria, British Columbia.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Susan Hicks Beach,
United estates.    IhlS   was  a  re- o f    Witcomb,   Gloucester,    England,
duction of from 10.7 per cent. toman'i.e(l.woman' inlVml8 Vi *Tnly for
���_ .    . Hil permission  to   purchase  the following
described lands:
Commencing ut a post planted about
4  miles in  a  southeasterly   direction
from the southeast corner of Lot 1068,
7.7 per cent since 1900.
The native-born  whites,  con
stituting 75 per cent, of the en
tire nonulation    had   nnlv  Ihrpp I Cassinl'; thence south 80 chains, east 80
lire population,   naci  oniy  wiree | BBftm, .'���nrth BO ohains .wast 80 chain.
three per cent, of illiterates; for-
imbues  all   parties   in   British eign-born had 12.8 per cent, and
America. Seemingly sharing the I colored persons 35.5 per cent.
chains, north 80 chains, west 80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
040 at res, more or less.
Susan Hicks Beach
January 4, 1912 28
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take nolice that Daniel Nicholson of
Hazelton, engineer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 1319, thence
north 20 ohains, west 40 chains, south
20 chains, east 40 ohains to point of
commencemet, containing 80 acres
more or less. Daniel Nicholson.
Jan. 16, 1912. 81
A Good Spring Tonic
Adams'
Compound Extract Sarsaparilla and Burdock
with Potassium Iodide
It renovates the whole system* A vitalizing blood medicine, restoring vigor and
healthy action to every organ*
$1.25 per bottle of 100 doses*
We carry a complete stock of Drugs and Toilet Requisites.
J. Mason Adams
Chemist and Druggist
lln/t'lioii,   II.   Oi
Cr
Omineca Land District.       District
of Coast, Range V.
Take notice  that Kenneth  Hulbert
Disque  of   Vancouver,     mill    owner,
intends to apply for permission to pur-1
chase the following described  lands.
Commencing at a post planted at the j
southwest corner of App. 18117, thence
south 40 chains,   east 20 chains,  north '
40 chains, west 20 chains to pointof com-1
mencement,   containing  80 acres more
or less. Kenneth Hulbert Disque.
January 23, 1912. 32
Omineca  Land Disttict.      Distrcit
of Coast, Raigc V.
Take notice that Mrs. Kenneth H.
Disque of Vancouver, married woman,
intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lands.
Commencing at a post pla-ited at
the N.E. corner of of pre-emption No.
1027, thence east 40 chains, north 80
chains, west 20 chains more or less to
the bank of Skeena river, thence following bank of the river in a southerly
direction to point of commencement,
and containing 240 acres more or less.
Mrs. Kenneth H. Disque.
January 23, 1912. 32
^
FARM LANDS
along the line of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway in Central British Columbia. Every mile of railroad construction
adds to the value of the land. Buy before the completion
of the railroad.
NORTH COAST LAND COMPANY, Ltd.
Suite 622 Metropolitan Building
Paid up Capital ��1,500,000. VANCOUVER, B. C.
--J
Omineca Land District.     District    i
of Coast, Range V.
Take notice that Elizabeth Deming
af St, Paul, Minn., U.S.A., spinster,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 20
chains east and 30 chains south of the
southwest corner of lot 221, thenee
east 80 chains, south 80 chains, west 80
chains, north 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 040 acres
more or less. Elizabeth Deming.
January 24, 1912. 32
fr-
A large assortment of
Real Photographic Post Card Views
Cameras and Photo Supplies
Omineca Photographic Company
Omineca Land District.      District
of Coast, Range V.
Take notice that Caroline Doming of
St. Paul, Minnesota, U.S.A., spinster,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the followingdescribed lands.
Commencing at a post planted 20
chains east of southwest cor. of lot 221,
thence south 2(1 chains, east 20 chains,
north 20 chains, west 20 chains to point
of commencement, containing 40 acres
more or less. Caroline Deming.
January 21, 1912. 32
Omineca Land District.      District
of Coast, Range V.
Take notice that Mrs. B. F. Hutchinson, of Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.A.,
occupation widow, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
southwest corner of lot 840, thence
cast 80 chains, south 80 chuins, west
SO chains, north 80 chains to point of
commencement, containing 040 acres
more or less. Mrs, E. F. Hutchinson.
January 24, 1012. 32
��
GALENA CLUB   *
7 Hazelton's Favorite Resort ^^wiL-*
M BOX BALL #1
r POOL AND BILLIARDS       f
'-%
Our Specialties in
WINTER DRINKS
Served Hot
Royal Chocolate Nutri Ox Beef Tea
Beef Cordial Tomato Bullion
Tomato Nectar
Fresh Oyster Cocktails
^=
Just received by express a shipment of latest copyright
Novels.     Call and look them over.
A Place To Spend Your Evenings
Omineca Land District.  Districtof
Cassiar.
Take notice that Edward J. Tate of!
Hazelton, retail trader, intends to j
apply for permission to purchase the |
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
40 chains east from the northeast cor-l
ner of lot H37, thence west 40 chiiins, !
south 40 chains, east 40 chains, north !
IU chains to point of commencement,
containing 160 acres more or less.
Jan. 29, 1012. Edward J. Tate.
THE QUALITY STORE
FANCY WAISTS,
WASH SKIRTS, Etc.
HIGHEST MARKET PRICES  TAID
FOR   FURS
Spring Dress Goods
C.V.SMITH
GENERAL MERCHANT
HAZELTON
Omineca Land District.    Districtof
Cassiar.
Take notice thnt Frank A. Jackson
of Hazelton, prospector, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
west side of Skeena river, three hundred
yards below the mouth of Bear river,
thence 40 chains south, 80 chains west,
40 chains north, 80 chains east to point
of commencement, containing 320 acres
more or less. Frank A. Jackson.
January 18, 1912. 33
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Sarah Jane Godfrey
of Nanaimo, married woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following descrilied lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
west side of Skeena river, three hundred yards below thc mouth of Bear
river, thence 40 chains north, 80 chains
west, 40 chains south, 80 chains east to
point of commencement, containing 320
acres more or less.
Jan. 18, 1912.      Sarah Jane Godfrey.
33
Do You Want A Pre-emption?
If so, now is the time to get one.
I have some choice selections.
Reginald Leake Gale, J. P.
Real Estate, Financial and Insurance
Telkwa, B.C.
v
Agent for G. T. P. Townsites
Gray & Milligan Brothers, Surveyors.
Surveys Promptly Attended To
 . THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1912
COAL NOTICES
Omineca Land Disnrict
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands;
Commencing at a post planted ten
miles north of the northwest corner of
lot 2179; thence north 80 chains, west 80
chains, south 80 chains, east 80 chains
to point of commencement, known as
claim No. 91. Frank A. Jackson.
Jan. 2. 1912.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
TaKe notice that Frank A. Jackson of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for ooal and petroleum over the lollowing described lands;
Commencing at a post planted 9 miles
north of the northweBt corner of lot
2179; thence north 80 chains, east 80
chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains
to point of commencement, known as
claim No. 84. Frank A. JacKson.
Jan. 1, 1912.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. JacKsonof
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands;
Commencing at a post planted nine
miles north of the northwest corner of
lot Z179; thence north 80 chuins, west 80
chains, south 20 chains, east 80 chains to
pointof commencement, known as claim
No. 85. Frank A. JacKson.
Jan. 1, 1912.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that FranK A. Jackson of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands;
Commencing at a post planted ten
miles north of the northwest corner of
lot 2179; thence north 80 chains, east 80
chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains
to point of commencement, known as
claim No. 90. Frank A. Jackson.
Jan. 2. 1912.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted six
miles north and 2 mile west of the
northwest corner of lot 2179; thence
south 80 chains, east 80 chains, north
80 chains, west 80 chains, to point of
commencement, known as claim No. 38.
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
British Naval Plan
P (J C  OMINECA AERIE
1 ��� V. 1j. Meets every Tuesday evening at eight o'clock in the Hazelton
Town Hall.   R. 0. Miller, W. Sec.
H. F. Glassev, W. Pres.
Latest Jewelry Novelties in Gold
and Silver.  High grade watches.
Watch Repairing.
O. A. RAGSTAD,   Hazelton
London, Mar, 28:��� Mr. Winston Spencer Churchill, first lord
of the admiralty, introduced in
the House of Commons the naval
estimates for the coming year.
The appropration called for is
$220,427,000, a decrease of $1,-
535,000 from last year. Mr.
Churchill accompanied the introduction with the promise of an
augmentation or a retardation of
the British naval construction to
correspond with Germany's naval
programme. He said he regretted the necessity of referring
specifically to Germany.
Mr. Churchill then went on to
tell of the conditions under which
naval competition would be
carried on in the next five years,
prefacing his remarks with the
statement that the two-to-one
standard was not necessary at
at present, although it possibly
would become so.
MAI BUYS il
BIO COAL AREA
(Continuetl from page 1)
with outcrops of this splendid
grade of coal, since the eleven
seams by lateral pressure were
compressed into waves succeeding waves, as synclines opposing
anticlines in an easterly and westerly direction, but with no extensive faults or breaks as steps,
save the one striking one, relieving the pressure as a line of
weakness, stretching from Des-
tingay mountain across the main
united Skeena river, over Anthracite river to the mountain of the
Devil's Claws, across Beirnes
creek to Mount Alec, onward
across the Naas river fork to
near the Ninth cabin of the
Yukon telegraph line. End pressure from the birth of the later
basalts of the lower Stikine river
created one notable anticline
forming the height of land or
divide of the watersheds to the
two forks of the Stikine river
(the Glam Skean and the Yetrye),
separated from those of the
Skeena river (Clua-Kaas and
Clua-Tahn-Tahn forks) and the
head of the Klappan river.
When these contracting pressures had ceased, then came the
stupendous grinding, wearing
down action of the glacial periods
which followed the tropical
climate under which the coal foliage grew, due to volcanic heating of rocks, this ice eroding
away many thousand feet in
depth of rock formation, and incidentally at the same time the
anticlines of the stratified eoal
measures, thus accounting for
the present outcropping of the
coal seams at the rims of each
| individual syncline, extending
', regularly about five miles across,
obviating any uncertainty as to
the universal existence of coal
seams throughout the length and
breadth of this abnormally large
coal basin. There are two series
J of seams, the upper and lower
j ones, probably amounting to over
three thousand feet in thickness
'in a vertical section, but the
upper series is not as extensive
as the lower owing to this glacial
and meteorological erosion.
No volcanic rocks have thrust
up their manifold heads since the
deposition of the coal during the
Jurassic and cretaceous era of
geological periods to destroy,
: fault or make uneven in grade
: these smoothly paralleling seams.
The cause of transcending from
: bituminous to anthracite was
l brought about by superthermal
steam probably during pre-glacial
time under incalculable pressure,
this thermal matter being forced
widecast throughout the entire
district to permeate all strata
alike, coal, conglomerates, sandstones and shales, having its
genesis in the stupendous intru-
ives tertiary basalts and other
igenous rocks breaking through
all obstructions of older formations on the lower Stickine and
coastal ranges.
This thermal process accounts
for the splendid homogeneous
grade of high fixed carbon, low
volatile matter, and so a hard,
smokeless fuel throughout the
whole eleven known commercial
sized seams, twenty, ten, six,
lour, three feet in thickness,
spreading over the entire extent
of this fine coal area, stretching
fifteen hundred and seventy
thousand acres in extent.
Before long miners by the
thousand will find work on this
new coalfield, towns will spring
up to supply their wants, families
will increase in numbers, lumber
mills will be busy, farmers will
find a ready market and there
will be a humming, thriving centre of industry growing by leaps
and bounds when the railway
takes the coal away to be shot
into fleets of steam colliers for
all ports, from Alaska and Panama to Patagonia, and across the
Pacific to Siberia, China, Japan
and Hongkong. The quantity of
of the coal in this territory is
apparent in its abundance, ample
to keep a large army of coal-
hookers active for several hundreds of years. The quality, by
passing below the outcrops past
the clay covered exposures down
to where the stereotype rock,
roof and floor are in place, where
the seams find themselves, has
been proven as run of the mine
of normal, even grade, where
development has passed through
the spheres of vuartz lenses and
niggerheads always present in
all anthracite countries at the
surface, here the true quality,
free from high ash and top dirt,
has been demonstrated to carry
184 to 87 per cent fixed carbon
: and from 5 to 6 per cent ash,
j this without any tests at all at
screening out soft partings or
! washing clay vugs from broken
j sized coals, as egg, stove, lump,
iPea, nut and the various mar
keted graded sizes, to afford
comparisons at its best with
Welsh, Pennsylvania and Pocahontas, all of which coals receive
careful mechanical treatment on
picking belts, screens and wash-
eries to reduce quantity of ash
before being thrown on the market. Costs of mining, hauling to
seaboard and favorable position
for cargo freight rates on a
northern, and so shortest, circuit
to Asia, all of these advantages
enable this coal, with its quantity,
proven quality and'high calorific
powers of British thermal units
134.18, to command all the seaborne coal trade of the Pacific
ocean in Asia, America and Australia against all comers, so receiving large contracts from the
fighting navies of the world, who
must have smokeless coal to give
no warning as to their whereabouts, to supply the mercantile
marine, ocean or coast bound,
scudding in endless numbers and
itineraries over this great ocean,
soon to multiply rapidly by the
opening of the Panama canal.
This coal can capture the prairie
trade of Canada and the United
States as far east as Port Arthur
in competition against Pennsylvania hard coal. Sufficient suggestions have been thrown out to
demonstrate the vast importance
of this new coalfield to Canada
and the British Empire to keep
the command of the world's trade
and its sinews of war under the
Union Jack.
Vr\r ^���aTp 520 acres of land in
CKJl OAK. the Bulkley valley.
This includes the Mosquito Flats
with 60 acres plowed, fenced and
ready for seeding.
H. COPPOCK, Hazelton, B. C.
Green Bros.,,Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion and British Columbia
Land Surveyors
Offices at Victoria, Nelson, Fort George
and Hazelton.
B. C. Affleck, Mgr. Hazelton Office.
JvWv'WflHtf' HMfnfHJ
���-,l,-j,ij|,iliij--j--l--j,-j,,iiiliiA1|||(j>-j,j^
FARM LANDS
Along the G. T. P.
From Kitselas to Fort George. From $8.00 per Acre Up.   I'
Why not own a quarter, half or section of good
land in a good country.
{ BRITISH COLUMBIA BROKERAGE COMPANY I
I Box 20, Hazelton, B. C.
f^ l&llMldl itj.fa;f|.l::>rif:.>L.tj it i.tnl:ili   tni'it. tulnt-iti it   ,t: .li.l: itJ . t, : ��� : ; f ��� ,��, J-fctj    L   tl   ��f.t.LJ..t.tI|   j. .1      f ��� ,|      I     fiblnldiSiilitf lt%
WTTTTT1"TT'I'TTT'I ���l"l,,ll I   lM?,,P"f*,l"l,,l ���|,,|"|""^T��*f�����!��� ������������������ ���^���h^'^^T"���l",l"l""l"T,l"VI ,l"l"l,,l"U
ED. V. McBETH
Successor to Union Transfer
and Storage Co.
Freighting Contractor
All Classes of Freight Handled with Care and Despatch
Hay and Oats for Sale.   Office at Omineca Hotel
Do You Realize
tnat in a town such as NEW HAZELTON
will be, in order to own the best property you
must be on the inside?
Six or seven blocks in the business center
of any town or city always command the
highest figures. Outside this radius property
values decrease in direct ratio as the distance
from this center increases.
Get in the business
center
In NEW HAZELTON this business center will be created by the Old Hazelton Business Men themselves. To any who have not
already bought we advise immediate action,
as outside buyers are quick to realize this
point and are snapping up lots surrounding
where Old Hazelton people have bought.
Buy on the inside of
NEW HAZELTON
Maps, Plans, Price Lists, Etc., are to be
seen at our office.
NEW HAZELTON
Section 2
Lot 882
known as
Kelly's Townsite
HARVEY & McKINNON
Local Selling Agents
or
CLEMENTS & HEYWARD
Fiscal Agents Vancouver, B. C.
Get in the business
center
Now, you may say, "I'll wait. I may
not want to continue in business in this district, or if I do, I may be able to get in
cheaper after awhile."
In answer to such an argument we would
say that every indication points to an era of
prosperity for this district undreamed of before. HAZELTON is on the tip of everyone's
tongue all over the continent, and a rush of
population and capital to this district is assured for the coming spring. You know we
have the resources and attractions to keep
them here.
Only one lime-
that's now
So if you buy now, on the inside of NEW
HAZELTON, you will be protecting yourself;
for even if you do not use your property yourself, you will be able co sell, at a handsome
profit, to someone who does. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, MARCH 30,  1912
o-
l
!
Halfway House
Most convenient and comfortable
stopping place for travellers between   Hazelton   and  Aldermere
LAKGE STABLES
FIRST-CLASS MEALS AND BEDS
FRANK VV. HAMANN
Proprietors
>.^*-..-fc....^...^fc...^fc.Q
THE HAZELTON
PANTORIUM
Oppoiiti-
Inuincca Hotel
ol his report on  Groundhog,  R.
C. Campbell-Johnson, in a letter
[ to the Vancouver News-Adver-
1 tiser, says:
Sir:   It possibly may not have
occurred to your correspondent,
| Mr. W. E. Duncan, that the exis-
|tence of an anthracite coalfield in
l-incit Equipped Bath     '    , .
Room in Town, the northern  portion  of British
 'Columbia  would  not necessarily
o*+++*+*+-i-+++*H.H.+*H"i"i"!-**+p < prevent his coal dotations in  the
GROUNDHOG COAL FIELD OF
GREAT EXTENT AND VALUE
Wellknown Engineer, Replying to Captious
Criticism, Publishes Additional Information
Concerning Wonderful Measures of Upper
Skeena Anthracite District.
Replying to  certain  criticisms! met one another, talked together,
E. J. Hill, Prop.
Dry Cleaning and Pressing
Prompt and Most .Satisfactory Service ]
Guaranteed
BATHS
I Skeena Laundry j \^$L
ate together, ancl swapped ideas
together at frequent intervals
from June to Oct., 1911, as they
mutually carried out each his own
line of work in the Groundhog
coal fields. Mr. Duncan hardly
got his supposition from Mr.
James McEvoy, B. Sc, late of
the Canadian Geological Survey
and assistant to the late \)r. G.
M. Dawson, and  who was  con-
I.ee Jackman, Prop.
Our Work is Good and our Rates
Reasonable.
Baths In Connection
Call and see us.       Next door to
Telegraph office.
*
+
Q'H"tM|"l"l'l|M|M|ii|ii|*i��,fi��i|^ii|ii|ii|ii[MTn|ii|imO
ALEX  MICHEL
Good Store and Road House
MOKICETOWN
Halfway between Hazelton and
Aldermere
Meals 50c   Beds 50c
TEAMING
All orders promptly and carefully
executed
Leave orders at Hazelton Hotel
A.M. Ruddy    i
1
llii/i'liim,   It. c.
Mines and  Mining
Good Properties for sale     Cash or on
Bond.       Development and
Assessment Work.
Carr Brothers
Six Years In This District.
Hll7.��'ltOII,     II.     <*.
ey receiving their just suiting engineer to the Crow's
on from capital by the j Nest Coal Company, for that en-
public. The coincident of his be- gineer and the writer wrote con-
lieving this moment to be an j lirmatory reports on the same
opportune time for criticism will | property for public- flotation, and
undoubtedly be of benefit to the ; consulted together carefully and
investor who will most assuredly j minutely on the details and l'u-
desire to buy in the northern an- j ture of the Groundhog coal; Mr.
thracite coalfields of Groundhog, ; Duncan hardly got his visions
despite Mr. Duncan's system of 1 perverted by Mr. C. F. Monckton,
asserting his personality as a Fellow of Geological Society
judge and critic, without having! (London), for the latter and the
the full technical facts of thej writer worked together the whole
case laid before him, and which summer for the same company.
in western mining parlance is It is up to Mr. Duncan then to
dubbed "Knocking." with a big give his authority, if he has any,
"K." To come down to facts re- for disputing the favorable opin-
garding the Groundhog anthra-! ions of three other eminent en-
cite coalfields being in tonnage jgineers, besides the opinion of
ami quality second to neither the the writer.
Pennsylvania nor Welsh fields, \ It is hard to know whether Mr.
would Mr. Duncan dispute that | Duncan is posinp as a mining en-
�� one basin traversed is seventy j gineer, a promoter, or a philan-
(j miles long by thirty wide by ex- thropist, but in  the two latter
I i tent, and in no singh.1 instance in I roles the writer will leave him in
( j that area is broken by the crest j solitary grandeur. As a mining
( I of any volcanic or intrusive rocks1 engineer would Mr. Duncan con-
II of a later geological date than the! sider that the outcrops of coal
I deposition of the coal measures?;seams and, more especially when
(Again, would Mr. Duncan dis- of anthracite variety, are to be
i  pute that there are at least ten , taken as normal and representa-
coal seams proven to be of com- tiveof the sizes and quality to be
mercial size, that is, that each | expected at even, say, one hun-
will pay handsomely to mine? Asjdred feet below the surface? Mr.
Mr. Duncan has never been on G. S. Malloch reported for the
the Groundhog coalfields he can- j Government only on surface ex-
not speak from first-hand know- posures, and from the results
ledge, therefore he must be captiously criticising from some
other source. He could not get
that   adverse  information  from
least three seams; however, more
were opened, making six in all
before work for the season ceased.
Further, he says the coal is an-
thracitic, and that is the question
now that Mr. Duncan raises and
which must be gone into, with
also the point of high in ash both
of which apply in Mr. Malloch's
words to surface outcrops prior
to any development and which
here also are proven by sinking
not to Lie typical in the field of
normal conditions. Mr. Malloch continues to state that the
basin is faulted considerably; of
course, this can only apply to the
southern end, which, he says,
alone he investigated. Now to
Mr. Duncan's contentions that it
is wrong to call the Groundhog
coal anthracite" The body of
mining engineers of the world,
the coal mine owners, the coal
brokers, the consuming public
failed to date to establish a hard
and fast line between anthracite,
steam, house and other coals,
one ceases and the other grade
begins, so custom in each part
must rule. By consulting a
"Text Book on Coal Mining," by
H. W. Hughes, a standard work,
on page 7, he describes anthracite
as follows: "The darker and
denser varieties of ordinary coal
gradually pass into the anthracite
LAND NOTICES
Omineca Land District.    Districtof
Cassiar
Take notice that Duncan Lamont of
Shandilla, farmer, intends to apply for
pel-mission to purchase the following
described lands.
Commencing at a post planted 10
chains south if the s.e. corner of lot
19(i(i; thence north 50 chains, east 80
chains, 80 chains more or less south to
edge of lake, west 80 chains meandering lake shore to point of commencement, containing000 acres more or less.
Feb. 16 1912. Duncan Lamont.
36
Omineca Land District    District of
Cassiar
Take notice that James B. Buchanan
of Hazelton. prospector, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands.
Commencing at a post planted eighty
chains southerly from upper end of Kit-
Wancool lake on the south shore; thence
west 40 chains, soulh SO chains, thence
40 chains more or less east to lake shore
80 chains meandering shore line north
to point of commencing, containing 320
acres more or less. James fi Buchanan.
Feb, Kith 1012 86
Omineca Land District.    Districtof
Cassiar
Take notice that James Franklin
Adams of Hazelton, Drug clerk, intends
to apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted sixty
chains northerly from upper end of Kit-
wancool lake and at s.w. corner of lot
1966: thence 40 chains south more or less
to edge of lake; thence 40 chains east
meandering shore line, 40 chains north,
40 chains west to point of commencement, containing 100 acres more or less.
Feb. is 1012. .James Franklin Adams.
36
LAND NOTICES
Omineca Land District
District of Coast Range V.
Take notice that Minnie Aldous of
Winnipeg Man., Married woman, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted about
1 mile distant and in a westerly direction from the s.w. corner of lot 865 Coast
Range V; thence north 40 chains, east
40 chains, south 40 chains, west 40 chains
to point of commencement, containing
160 acres more or less.
Feb. 21st 1912. Minnie Aldous.
36
District of
Omineca Land District.
Cassiar
Take   notice  that  Chas.   Russell  of
Hazelton, teamster, intends to apply for
varieties, which are characterized I SernTiSI? t(\ i)urehase the folIow'��s
described lands.
Commencing at a post planted  forty
chains westerly from upper end of Kit-
i wancool lake and on south boundary line
the fingers, are very hard and of lot 1967; thence 80 chains south, east
break with a conchoidal fracture. 130 chains more or less *�� ?dse ?f lake
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Minnie Calhoun, of
North Platte, Neb., Married woman
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted about
70 chains westerly and 1 mile northerly
from the n.e. corner of lot 1062; thence
south 80 chains, east80chains, north 80
chains, west 80 chairs to point of commencement, containing 640 acres more
or less. Minnie Calhoun.
Feb. 15th 1912. 36
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Alex Morales, of
Anaheim, California, prospector, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted 70
chains distant and in a westerly direction from the n.w. corner of lot 1062
Cassiar, thence south 80 chains, west
80chains, north80 chains, east80 chains
to point of commencement, containing
640 acres more or less.
Feb. 15th 1912.       36      Aljx Morales.
by the large amount of carbon
they contain.    They do  not soil
obtained from surface sampling,
since the Government do not usually allow their professors to
undertake    active   underground
Contractors' and Mining Machinery and Supplies
Building Materials
my friend, Mr. G. S. Malloch of I work; also on what development
the Geological Survey of Canada, i had been carried out up to the
as that gentleman and the writer; time of the professor's  visit by
( private enterprise.     In this case
at that time only two syndicates
had   carried   out   underground
| work, the first the Western  De-
CANADIAN       Concrete Machinery
<r
Skeena River Mail and Express
Consign all express packages for interior points in care
of tin- Pacific Transfer Co., 607 Third Ave., Prince
Rupert,   and insure prompt forwarding.
All BCCOUntl and correspondence addressed to Keirnes
& Mulvany, Box 806, Hazelton, B. C, will receive im-
modinti' attention.
Beirnes & Mulvany
Teaming and Dump Wagons i RAND CO.'S   Agricultural ImplementsJ^S??* c��"-v represented
Saw Mills and Supplies Products.    ,       Dairy Supplies       ijy Mr .ames McEvoy. and the
r '     " ] second the B. C. Anthracite Syn-
EN0UIR1ES solicited GASOLINE ENGINES CaWo*��7rei-E!dicate <of Quebec)   represented
by the writer, whose final  work
f TJ Tfen/facv/fo Tf    Prince Rupert B. C with a lar��e crew of mi"er" ^8
U II.   ndHUdJ>yaCt )!.,     ?Q Box 436>  r0ff.ce 3rd Aye< not completed prior to Mr.   Mai-
^ ' loch s last visit of inspection.   In
=^ j Press bulletin of the Department
'of Mines, Mr. Malloch states that
he spent the summer investitrat-
Ing the southern end of the basin
ancl does not claim to have traversed the area 70 by U0 miles.
He further says he found in the
part he examined 3,000 feet of
sediments with coal seams of
commercial (|tiiiiititics only at top
^ j and bottom, though there are a
few thin seams in intermediate
beds. It is these few thin seams
which correlated from Mr. Malloch's section, sent the writer on
January 25,   1912,   on the ridge
between the Cirques at the heads
of Davis and Anthracite Creeks,
and the Geological section worked
out conjointly by Mr. Monckton
and the writer, developed into
No. 8, a seam of coa! 5 3-4 feet
thick. No. 2 into 4 1-2 feet: and
No. 1 carries coal 27 inches,
shale 15 inches, coal 18 inches,
shale 18 inches, coal 12 inches,
making in all 4 feet !) inches
clean coal. This is about 300
feet vertically above a bed 500
feet ti.ick of main sandstones
separating the upper from the
lower series, which are directly
underlain by the Benoit seam.
Mr. Malloch goes on to say that
the   lower horizon contains at
re.
The formation of anthracite has
probably been effected by alteration of bituminous coals under
heat and pressure.    In the South
Wales coalfield the same seam of
coal, which is of ordinary bituminous variety in the eastern  dis-
j trict, passes by gradations into
I steam   coal   in   the   middle   of
!the field, while in  the western
! district it is changed into anthra-
I cite.    Enormous deposits of this
class of coal   are met   with   in
Pennsylvania, our own store  be-
ling   confined   to  South   Wales.
{Anthracite contains  from  93  to
'95 per cent carbon, 4  to 2 per
| cent hydrogen,   and   three   per
' cent oxygen.     It is practically
smokeless  when burning, and is
' much used where such a property
' is valuable, as for instance,  in
malt drying and in  some metallurgical operations.    The coke is
1 brittle.
Analyses���South Wales: Specific gravity, 1.392: carbon, 90.39:
hydrogen, 3.28; oxyegen, 2.98
nitrogen, 0.83; sulphur, 0.91; ash,
1.61; water, 2.00. South Wales
(near Swansea): Specific gravity,
1.348; carbon, 92.56; hydrogen,
3.33; oxygen, 2.53; ash, 1.58.
Pennsylvania: Specific gravity,
1.462; carbon,   90.45;  hydrogen,
thence 80 chains meandering lake shore
line north, '10 chains west more or less
to point of commencement, containing
400 acres more or less. Chas. Russell.
Feb. 16th 1J'12. 36
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that James Manley Calhoun of North Platte Neb., farmer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 70
chains westerly and 1 mile north from
the n.e. corner of lot 1062 Cassiar,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, east 80 chains to point
of commencement, containing 640 acres
more or less. James Manley Calhoun.
Feb. 15th 1912. 36
Omineca Land District.    District of
Cassiar
Take    notice   that Alfred    Edward
Omineca Land District
District of Coast Range V
Take notice that Victoria M. Morison
Player of Hazelton, accountant  intends | of Pj)rt Essjngton    spin8tert intends to
to apply lor permission to purchase the ,     for  ^rmissio^ to purcnase the
lollowing described lands. following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted 1 1-4
miles distant and in an easterly direction
from upper end of Kitwancool lake, on
shore of north side; thence 40 chains
east meandering shore line; 40 chains
north, 40 chains west, 40 chains more
or less south to lake shore, to point of
commencement, containing 160 acres
more or less. Alfred Edward Player.
Feb. 15th 1912. 36
Omineca Land District.    District of
Cassiar
Take notice that Jack Mitchell of
Hazelton, printer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands.
Commencing at a post planted at the
n.w. corner of lot 1519; thence west 40
chains, south 40 chains, east 40 chains,
north 40 chains to point of commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
Feb. 8th 1912    ' Jack Mitchell.
36
following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted at the
s.w. corner of lot 865 Coast Range V,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, to point
of commencement, containing640 acres
more or less. Victoria M. Morison.
Feb. 21st, 1912. 36
2,43; oxyegen, 2.45; ash,  4.67.
Omineca Land District.    District of
Cassiar
Take notice that Chas. A. McClair of
Hazelton, prospector, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands.
Commencing at a post planted at the
n.e. corner of Lot 1058; thence south
29chains, east 29chains, north 29chains,
west 29 chains to point of commencement, containing 80 acres more or less.
Feb. 8th 1912. Chas. A. McClair.
36
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Antonia   Friend   of
Like Ml'. Duncan, who says the; Anaheim, California,  Married   woman,
nvflrno-A in 92  ner   cent    em-linn  t '"tends to apply for a permission  to
a. ei age is yt pu   cent,   cai Don,  purcna8e tne following described lands.
and    quotes    Carway   anthracite      Commencing   at a   post   planted   40
carrying   less   cation,    so   Mr : c'hai,,ii in " southerly direction fromth-
Mughes is mixed in his classifica
tion of anthracite.   Let
An-
thence
north 80
US
Coal
at the   "South   Wales
(Continued on next page)
| n.w. corner of lot 1062 Cassiar
i south SOchains, west SOchains,
ii  I chains, east SO chains to point of  com-
"    J mencement, containing 640 acres more
or less. Antonia Friend
Feb. 15th 1912. 36
Royal
Soft Drinks
Sash and Door Factory
Hazelton's New Industry
Full stock of all kinds and sizes of Window
Sash, Doors, Office Fixtures, Interior Finishings
on hand or Made to Order.
Large stock of Lumber and Building Materials, Tinsmithing, Plumbing and Steamfitting.
Job and Shop Work a Specialty.
Plans and Specifications.
Stephenson & Crum
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS
Hazelton
"r*
are  made  here -
made anywhere"
"None  better
Try our Ginger Ale
Lemon Soda
Cream Soda
On Sale Everywhere
Royal Bottling Works
Hazelton, B. C.
Omineca Land District
District of Coast Range V
Take notice that Montague   Hate  of
Ottawa   Ont., clerk, intends   to  apply!
for permission to purchase the  following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted ahout
I mile distant and in a southerly  direc- [
tion from  the s.w.   corner of   lot 865, I
Coast Range V, thence south SOchains,
east 20 challfe, north 80 chains, west 20
( hains to point of commencement  containing Kill acres more or less.
Feb. 21st, 1912. Montague Bate.
86
Ominera Land District
District of Coast Range V
Take notice that William P. Murray
of Hazelton, broker, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands.
Commencing at a post planted ahout
1 mile distant and in a westerly direction from the s.w. corner of lot 865
Coast Range V; thence north SOchains,
west 80 chains, south 80 chains, east 80
chains to point of commencement containing 640 acres more or less.
Feb. 21st, 1912.       William P. Murray.
36
Omineca Land District
District of Coast Range V
Take notice that Marry N. Aldous of
Winnipeg Man., clerk, intends to apply
for permission to purchase  the   follow-
Ingdoscribed lauds.
Commencing at a post planted ahout I mora or less to the soulh aid
Omineca Land District   District of
Coast Range V
Take notice that William J. Lynch of
Hazelton, Accountant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands.
Commencing at a post planted on the
south bank of Skeena river, about forty
chains distant in a northerly direction
from the northwest corner of lot 1374
thence east about 40 chains, thence north
about 65 chains to southwest corner of
Chim-de mesh Indian reserve and following west boundary of said reserve to
bank of Skeena river, thence meandering bank of Skeena river in a southerly
direction to point of commencement,
containing 340 acres more or less.
Feb. 26, 1912. William J. Lynch.
36
Omineca   Land  District   District of ;
Coast Range V
Take notice that Drysdale Ogilvie of
Hazelton, prospector, intends to applv
for permission to purchase the following described lands;
CommeiK ing at a post planted on
right bank of Skeena river about two
chains in a southerly direction from the
southwest corner ot A.P. 7703, thence
20 chains north, 2C chains west, 20
chains south more or less to bank of
Skeena river, thence following bank
of Skeena river in an easterly direction
to point of commencement, containing
40 acres more or less. Drysdale Ogilvie,
Feb. 1, 1912. 34
Omineca Land District District of
Coast Range V
Take notice that Lewis C. Knauss of
Hazelton, prospector, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands;
Commencing at a post planted on left
bank of Skeena river about 80 chains in
a northerly direction from the southwest corner of the Ik-Shen-E-Cwalk
Indian Reserve No. 8, thence 20 Chains
east, 20 chains north, 20 chains west
most more or less to bank of Skeena
river, thenco following hank of Skeena
river in a southerly direction topoint of
commencement, containing 40 acres
more or less. Lewis C. Knauss.
Feb. 7, 1912. 34
Omineca Land District.    Districtof
Cassiar.
Take notice that Annie Rowbottom
of Nanaimo, married woman, intends
to apply for permission to purchase
the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains north of the mouth of Bear
river, thence SO chains north, 80 chains
west, 80 chains south, SO chains east to
point of commencement, containing 640
acres more or less. Annie Rowbottom.
January 18, 1912. 33
1 mile distant and.in a southerly direc
lion from the s.w. corner of lot 865
Coast Range V; thence south 80 chains,
west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80
chains to point of commencement con-
640 acres more or less.
Feb. 21st. 1912. Harry N. Aldous.
30      '
Hazelton Land District
Districtof Cassiar
Take notice that Eric Boje of Hazelton, occupation farmer, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following
described lands.
Commencing at a post planted at the
N.W. corner of Wm. Bell's Application
to Purchase in the vicinity of Lot   835,
thence west  20 chains, soulh 15 chains
of O.T.I'.
right-of-way thence westerly along
said right-of-way 15 chains more or
less to the Skeena river, thence following the said river easterly to Wm.
Bell's s. w. corner, thence north 20
chainB to point of commencement,
containing 60 acres more or less.
March 181912. 88 Eric Boje THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1912
The Churches
CHURCH OF ENGLAND
ST, PETEB'S, HAZELTON
Sunday Service's: Miirnintr at 11 o'clock; Sunday
School  :it 2,80  p;m,;   Native service, 8.80 p.m.;
Evening Service, 7 p.m.
Rbv. j. Field,
presbyterian church
hazelton
Services   held   every Sunday evening in   the
Church Room at 7.80 0 clock,
RBV. D. H. McLean.
I New Hazelton Hotel \
) Open for Business j
������ All Furnishings New ���
I EUROPEAN  PLAN j
j Rates: {
jj Rooms $1.00       Beds 60c' \
) Geo. C. Hartley, Proprietor \
I New Hazelton )
Sheehan's New
Restaurant
Opposite Union Bank
Pugsley St.
New Hazelton
j   Best Meals      First-class Service   \
I
I
I
I
(
O-
Only White Help Employed
DOC SHEEHAN
Proprietor
New Hazelton
Contractors
We will furnish quotations on all classes of
Buildings. Contract or
Day Labor. Job and Shop
Work. First-class workmanship guaranteed.
Call on us before you let
your work.
GROUNDHOG COAL
FIELD OF GREAT
EXTENT AND VALUE
(Continued from page 4)
nual" for 1912.     Their  typical
analyses   of anthracite give as |
follows:
Fixed Carbon.... 92.30 90.50 89.00
Volatile Matter..    4.30 4.90 5.80
Sulphur _..     .80 1.00 1.60
Ash      1.70 2.30 2.70
Water 90 1.80 1.00
The above is the view point of
the Welsh coal market, but one
not borne out by the Admiralty-
reports quoted in the Government Blue Books.
Let us look now at the United
States Geological Survey; Report
of the U. S. fuel-testing plant,
1908, page 2G7:
w
p
3
���g
a
jn
A.
3.10
Air-drying loss
Proximate.
Moisture        3.15
Volatile matter 11.00
Fixee carbon... 67.79
Ash  17.64
Selphur       .84
Ultimate (dried)
Hydrogen	
Carbon	
Nitrogen	
Oxygen 	
B.
2.40
2.98
10.94
64.14
21.94
.68
3
���3
A.
4.10
���B.
7.10
4.80   7.52
10.12 10.29
67.05 65.96
18.03 16.23
.64     .65
3.61   3.37
09.27 69.05
.66     .69
7.50   9.01
Richards & Knight
NEW HAZELTON
Do your shopping at Cohen,
Zackon  &   Co.'s  store and
SAVE MONEY
The  Largest  and   Best Assorted
Stock of
Men's Furnishings
In Northern British Columbia
We repair Jewellery of every
description. Satisfaction guaranteed, i	
We carry all the lending makes in
WATCHES
Mail Orders Solicited.
Cohen, Zackon & Co.
New Ila/.cllon
V. , ���
These are facts:
ttt 1. There will be only one
Hazelton. This is New Hazelton.
tOT 2. The decision of Railway
Commission is final. No Board
of Trade will change it.
��*#- 8. The G. T. P. Ry. owns
enough townsites now. The
Government builds the roads.
t9" 4. You need no bridge for
a town. You need the people.
B6T"5. Mining and mineral
wealth are our greatest asset.
New Hazelton is in center of it.
89" G. We have both drainage
and water here. No Skeena
water needed.
W -7. The railroad passes
through the town.- Not a mile
from it.
There are many more,     If interested in a coming interior town
See/: W Arnnttrbv Pi0"ccr
U.   IT. HrflUU Real Estate
Man, and he will give you more facts.
Office 1'ugsley Street
NEW HAZELTON, B. C,
Steaming Tests.
A. B.
Moisture        4.73    4.60 5.02
Volatile matter..     11.64   11.51 15.52
Fixed  carbon            65.05   66.51 64.51
Ash _      18.58   17.38 14.95
Sulphur 67      .60 .84
Ultimate (dried).
Hydrogen ...       3.53    3.58 3.66
Carbon      72.22   7.3.45 75,81
Nitrogen _���         .69       .70 .88
Oxygen        3.36    3.42 3.02
Ash ���.      19.50   18.22 15.74
Sulphur 70      .68 .88
Calorific values:  Calories, 6,483, 6,615
6,607; B. T. U., 11,669, 11,961, 11,893,
Finally let us look at the Canadian viewpoint in the "Coalfields of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta ancl Eastern British
Columbia," by D. B. Howling,
1909, page 43. In classification
of English coal, the ratio
between the oxygen and hydrogen percentages is used, along
with that of total carbon. In
Pennsylvania the practice has
been to arrange the coals in order
of fuel ratio; that is the relation
between the fixed carbon and the
volatile combustible matter. The
split volatile ratio is suggested
for Canada, a series of analyses
in which the calorific value of the
coal is also obtainable, have been
calculated to enable the three
elements- water, volatile combustible and fixed carbon contents���to make a constant quantity. For Groundhog take Anthracite Creek No, 8 seam, six
feet,
Per cent.   Extended.
Fixed carbon 86.71 91.1
Volatile matter        5.98 6.8
Water 2.00 2.8
Sulphur ...       .1.1
Ash , 5.15
All anthracite split volatile
ratio is obtained from above.
Will Mr. Duncan still contend
that the Groundhog is not an
anthracite hard smokeless coalfield, or that the coal seams exposed and proven anthracite on
surface will not improve when
sunk on, as they have in every
other coalfield? Also no hand-
picking on belts or washing tests
to eliminate ash have been
carried out on Groundhog coal to
compare with the elaborate preparations made for Welsh and
Pennsylvania before shipment.
Mr. Duncan continues: "Evidently extracted from the report
of the engineer, the expected
output of 30,000 tons a clay is ab- j
surd." His evidence will not
hold in a court of law, nor will!
similarly his supposition of the'
output, or his wild calculations!
as to railway, for no one can expect to be taken seriously when
the grade of the railway ia not'
known, so length required in
in construction not known, specific gravity of coal not established
ancl who then sits down to calculate without such data some
fancy problem of number of
trains required, amount of track,
etc. It is supposed that Mr.
Dawson will take exception to
the remark that the Canadian
Pacific Railway, the Canadian
Northern, the Grand Trunk Pacific and most of the western
American lines will all build from
seaboard to this coalfield to procure this hard smokeless anthracite coal, which will always displace oil as fuel, as has happened
all the time in Pennsylvania with
oil and coal together, on locomotives and steamers, on the score
of repairs, if for nothing else,
when these railways can each
own collieries of their own. As
to Mr. Duncan's philanthrophy
that the guileless public must be
protected against such unbalanced individuals as the writer,
the public themselves are the
best judges of honest motives.
The writer goes into this subject
of the value of Groundhog coal
not on Mr. Duncan's account,
but to educate others who have
not undergone the hardships and
strenuous work of opening up
far frontier coalfields, and who
want information first hand,
without sitting back in an easy
chair to belittle the exertions of
others. Your obedient servant,
Ronald C. Campbell-Johnson.
Outlaws Hunted Down
Omaha, March 28.--The hunt
for three convicts who broke out
of the Nebraska penitentiary last
week after killing three of the
prison officials ended with the
death of two of the convicts and
the capture of the third. Two
posses surrounded the convicts,
who, armed only with revolvers,
were exposed to a cross fire from
the rifles of the officers. Taylor
was killed by the bullets of the
officers after which Dowd, recognizing the hopelessness of the
situation turned his weapon on
himself. Morely was desperately wounded and surrendered only
when unable to continue the fight.
Roy Blunt, a young farmer whom
the convicts had compelled to
drive them in his sleigh, was
killed by a stray bullet fired by
one of the officers.
Hundreds Were Killed
Hongkong, Mar. 28: Latest
advices from Swatow, which has
been the scene of serious fighting
during the last week, say that
the German consulate has been
burned. Two gunboats have
arrived there.
More than 1,500 persons have
been killed at Canton and while
conditions are calmer there, the
outbreak is expected to be renewed at any time.
The bandit chief, Luk, addressing a meeting of merchants,
said that if the people's army
failed to secure victory over the
government, it would shell Shah
Mee, the foreign quarter, in
order to bring about foreign intervention.
Anarchistic Suffragettes
Chicago, Mar. 28: Bombs may
soon take place of window smashing bricks in England, Dr. Jessie
Murray of London, told a meeting of the Woman's Party here.
"You in America do not realize!
to   what   economic  straits  the
women of England have   been
reduced,"  she said.     "We are'
fighting for life ancl honor."
"The men are taking away our
means of living by legislation.!
they   are robbing our working
women of the privilege  to work
when they are eager and willing
to work to   support themselves. \
The   men  are  crying  for their j
places.    It has reached the stage I
of actual war. People have asked
why we do not substitute bombs
for bricks.   If our demands are
not granted soon,  I assure you
bombs will be used."
There Will Be Only One
HAZELTON
The Supreme Authority on Railway matters in Canada,
the Dominion Railway Commission, has decided that the
Station and Railway Yards Shall be at
NEW HAZELTON
Investments in Real Estate in New Hazelton now are as
safe as Vancouver, Winnipeg or Montreal. We have
purchased from Northern Interior Land Co., Ltd., of
Prince Rupert, the choicest
i
Lots In Section One
in the official townsite of New Hazelton.      You  can
secure lots in the
Business Section
at startling prices if you apply today.      Hundreds have
been waiting for a
Settlement
of the controversy regarding the railroad townsite.   The
matter is now finally settled for all time.
Your Opportunity
has arrived.       Prices will advance sharply.        Buy
now at the beginning and make the big profits
Natural Resources Security Co.,Ltd
Joint Owners and Sole Agents Fort George Townsite
Bower Building, 543 Granville Street, Vancouver, B. C. I
THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1912
Send For Catalogues
."UNDERWOOD" Typewriter.  "The Machine you will eventually BUY"
"MACEY" Filing Systems,  Office Furniture, Supplies, Etc.
C. H. HANDASYDE, Jr. Complete Office
P.O. Box436  PrinceRupert   3rd Ave.
Outfitter
(?~-
MEN'S WEAR
that gives Satisfaction,
and Reliable
Boots and Shoes
^
^s=
are Specialties at
LARKWORTHY'S
STORES
Hazelton and Sealey
HISTORIC WRECK IS
ENOULFED BY OCEAN
#���
Broughton & McNeil's
Chicken Lake Store
and Hotel
We are in the center of Hudson Bay Mountain mining district, and are able to supply the
Prospector, Miner, and Rancher with all necessary articles, always having a full stock on hand.
Our Hotel Accommodation is the best in the
district.    Excellent Meals and service.
Reasonable Rates.
Broughton & McNeil
Gus. Timmermcistcr, Mgr.
^^������"������"
f DRY LUMBER
Ready for Building in the
New Town
=^
Get pr'ce I from us before you build in New Hazelton.        We
are ready with the goods
Interior Lumber Company
Hazelton
J)
Old Battleship Maine Sunk
Off Havana --- Impressive
Ceremonies Mark Occasion
Havana, March 16:��� Under
lowering skies and a heavy sea,
the old battleship Maine, resurrected after 14 years' burial in
Havana harbor, today plunged
with her colors flying to her
everlasting rest 600 fathoms deep
in the waters of the Gulf. The
sinking of the hulk was carried
out precisely as planned, marking
the end of the work begun more
than a year ago.
After impressive ceremonies in
the morning, the bodies of the
dead were taken aboard the
armored cruiser North Carolina.
Minute guns were fired by the
North Carolina and the scout-
cruiser Birmingham and the batteries of Cabanas fortress until
the ships cleared the harbor.
He decks covered with Mowers
and palms and an American ensign floating from the jury mast,
where the mainmast formerly
stood, the Main put to sea on her
last voyage. On deck stood
Captain Johnny O'Brien, famous
as "Dynamite Johnny," skipper
of the filibustering steamers
"Dauntless" and "Three
Friends," acting as the Maine's
last pilot. As the wreck passed
the American squadron, the
crews manned the rails, the
marines presented arms, the
bandsmen on the quarterdeck
played the National Anthem,
while the minute guns boomed a
requiem.
Passing out of the harbor, the
flotilla headed by the Maine,
proceeded in silence with flags at
half mast.
When the three-mile limit had
been crossed,, the American
cruisers took up a position to the
eastward of the wreck, the Cuban
warships moved to the westward
and the accompanying vessels
were grouped to the north and
south.
The arrangements for the sinking consisted of numerous valves
in the bottom of the hulk and the
large sluiceways in the bulkhead
which, with all the doors in the
two permanent bulkheads remaining in the ship, were opened
at 5 o'clock.
!
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Ingineca Hotel
McDonell & McAfee, Props.
| The only family hotel in the district.       Private  dining  rooms,
j Night and day restaurant.     Modern conveniences.
1 Reasonable rates.    Good Stable in connection.
1   ..	
Dime Novel Hero Dead
Hazelt
on
Choicest of  Wines, Liquors and Cigars
always on hand.
i���iiii^��� uu������ iih^���im���un ii �� ii������mi���ini^���mi���nil^���iiii^���i
Denver, Colo., Mar. 29: The
body of Robert Dickey, widely
known as "Deadwood" Dick, lies
in the morgue here, awaiting
word from supposedly wealthy
relatives in Pennsylvania as to its
disposition. Dickey died in the
hospital ward of the city jail,
where he had been taken on a
charge of vagrancy. In the
[early days he was one of the
most notable figures in Colorado.
He served in the federal army in
the civil war and was noted as a
scout, Indian agent and United
States marshal. He made a fortune selling furs in Denver in the
early days, hut lost all later.
9
Stage leaves every Friday and every Tuesday morning
at 8 o'clock for Aldermere and Telkwa. Returning,
leaves Aldermere and Telkwa Tuesday and Friday
arriving here Wednesday and Saturday at noon.
Horses for hire for private parties.
Horses, Oats, Wheat and Bran for sale.
Another Bandit Caught
Oakland, Cal. Mar. 28: It was
learned here today that Herman
Diehm, alias Archie Clark, who
was captured last night after a
battle with the police, is wanted
in New Westminster, B. C, for
supposed complicity in the robbery of the Bank of Montreal last
September and in New York on
a charge of having aided in the
robbery of a postoffice at Richmond, Va., of $80,000. Diehm
was arrested on information from
Chicago charging h i m with
having murdered Dacey Corbett
on January 12.
Sanitation In Alaska
Washington, Mar. 26: -Alarming reports of the health conditions in Alaska have caused Secretary Macveagh to order Assistant Surgeon Emil Krulish of the
public health service to conduct
a modern campaign in sanitation
and hygiene in that territory.
*isp
SKEENA DISTRICT
Ferry, Kitselas, Skeena River
In accordance with chapter 85, R, S.
B. C, 1911, "Ferries Act" the Government of British Columbia invite applications for a charter for a ferry to ply
across the Skeena River at Kitselas.
Applications will he received by the
Hon. the Minister of Public Works up
to 12 o'clock noon on Monday tho 26tn
day of March, 1912.
The limit of the ferry shall extend
for a distant of one mile above and one
mile below said point.
The charter will cover a period expiring on the Hist March, 1914.
The ferry shall be operated whenever
required between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.
every day excepting Sundays.
Applicants shall give a description of
the scow or boat it is proposed to use,
which must conform in all respects to
the requirements of the "Canada Shipping Act, 1906," and amending Act.
Applicants shall state the  tolls   it is
proposed to ask for -
Each adult passenger.
"   child   (not  in arms)  under  13
years.
'    head of cattle, horse,   mule,   or
donkey.
'   each calf, sheep, goat, or swine.
"    vehicle   with    one    horse   and
driver.
''   cart or wagon with one horse
and driver, loaded.
"    vehicle   with  two   horses   and
driver.
"   vehicle    with  two horses  and
driver, loaded.
'    parcel of 25 lb. and under.
"   Freight, per 100 lb. and  under,
non-perishable goods.
The Government of British Columbia
is not necessarily bound to accept  any
application submitted.
J. E. GRIFFITH
Public Works Engineer.
Department of Public Works,
Victoria, B.C., 6th March, 1912.     30
COAL NOTICES
PUBLIC  NOTICE
Skeena Electoral District
Notice is hereby given that in the
event of a poll being necessary, such
poll will be open on the 28th day of
March, 1912, at South Bulkley, in addition to the places stated in proclamation dated March 2nd, 1912.
Of which every person is hereby required to take notice and govern himself accordingly.
Dated at Prince Rupert this 7th day
of March, 1912.
EDWARD DOUGLAS CLARKE,
Returning Officer.
LAND NOTICES
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Allison E. Fawcett
of Hazelton, bank clerk, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
one mile west from the northwest corner of Lot 831, thence south 40 chains,
west 80 chains, north 60 chains more or
less to river, thence easterly up stream
to point of commencement, containing
���120 acres more or less.
Jan. 11, 1912. Allison E. Fawcett.
29
Omineca Land District.    Districtof
Cassiar.
Take nolice that John K. Friend of
Los Angeles, California, prospector,
intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains east of the southeast corner of
lot 2170, thence 40 chains east, 40
chains more or less south to Bulkley
river, forty chains west meandering
river bank, forty chains more or less
north to point of1 commencement, containing 160 acres more or less.
January 24, 1912.        JohnK, Friend.
33
Omineca I.and District.    Districtof
Cassiar.
Take notice that Allan Q, Johnson of
Hazelton, laborer, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 160
chains east of Ihe northeast corner of
lot 2170, thence 40 chains west, 40 chains
north, 40 chains east, 40 chains south
to point of commencement, containing
16(1 acres more or less.
Jan. 24, 1912. Allan G. Johnson.
33
Omineca Land District.   District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Noah Webster
Calhoun, of Los Angeles, California,
retired, intends to apply for permission
to purchase thc following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
sixty chains north of mouth of 6-Mile
creek, thence south 30 chains, west 30
chains, north 30 chains, east 30 chains
to point of commencement, containing
120 acres more or less.
Jan. 25, 1912. Noah Webster Calhoun.
33
COAL NOTICES
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Walter Skelhorne
of Calgary, Alta., farmer, intends to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted on the
Skeena slope about 5 miles north and 2
miles east from the northeast corner of
lot 129, thence south 80 chains, west
80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80
chains to point of commencement,
known as claim No. 10.
Dec. 7, 1911. Walter Skelhorne.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post  planted six
miles north and 2 miles eastof the northwest corner of lot 2179, thence south 80
chains, east 80 chains, north 80 chains,
west 80 chains to   point of commencement, known as  claim No. 70.
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted six
miles north and2 miles eastof the northwest corner of lot 2179, thence south
eighty chains, west eighty chains north
eighty chains, east eighty chains, to
point of commencement, known as
claim No. 71.
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted six
miles north and 2 miles east from the
northwest corner of lot 2179, thence
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south 80
chains, east 80 chains, to point of commencement known as claim 72.
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 6 miles
north and 2 miles east of the northwest
corner of lot 2170, thence north 80 chains,
east 80 chains, south 80 chains, west 80
chains to point of commencement, known
as claim No. 73.
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Lund District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A.Jackson, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted six
miles north and two miles west of the
northwest corner of lot 2179, thence
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south
SO chains, east 80 chains to point of
commencement, known as claim No. 40.
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted twelve
miles north of the northwest corner of
lot 2179; thence north 80 chains, west 80
chains, south 80 chains, east 80 chains
to point of commencement, Known as
claim No. 95, Jan. 2, 1912.
Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands;
Commencing at a post planted eleven
miles north of the northwest corner of
lot 2179; thence north 80 chains, east 80
chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains
to point of commencement, known as
claim No. 93. Frank A. Jackson.
Jan. 2, 1912.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiaa
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described land;
Commencing at a post planted eleven
miles north of the northwest corner of
lot 2179; thence north 80 chains, west 80
i.hains, south 80 chains, east 80 chains
to point of commencement, knowii as
claim No. 92. FranK A. JacKson.
Jun. 2, 1911.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
TaKe notice that Frank A. JacKson of
Hazelton, nvner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal   and   petroleum over the following described lands;
Commencing at a post  planted   nine
miles  north and 2  miles  west  of  the
I northwest corner  of  lot  i.179;   thence
j north SOchains, cast 80 chains, south 80
'chains, west 80 chains to point of rom-
I mencement, known as claim No. 77.
Jan. 2,1912. Frank A. Jackson
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
TaKe notice that Frank A. Jackson of
Hazelton, miner, intends lo apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdes'-ribed lunds.
Commencing at a bolt planted nine
miles north and 2 miles west of the
northwest < orner of lot 2179; thence
north 80 chains, west 8(1 chains, south
80 chains, east 80 chains to point of commencement, known as claim No. 76.
Jan. 2. 1912. Frank A. JackHon.
Oml'teca Land District
District of Cassiur
Take notice that Frank A. JacKson of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply foru
license to prospect for coal und petroleum over the following described lands;
Commencing at a poBt planted twelve
miles north of the northwest corner of
lot 2179; thence north 80 chains, east
SOchains, south80chains, west80chains
to point of commencement, known as
claim No. 94. Frank A. Jackson.
Jan. 2, 1912.
Ominecn Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson, of
Huzelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted six
miles north and two miles west of the
north-west corner of Lot 2179, thence
north 80 chains, east 80 chuins, south SO
chains, west 80 chuins, to point of commencement, known as claim No. 39.
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Land District
Districtof Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to upply for a
licence to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at n post planted six
miles north and 2 miles west of the
northwest corner of Lot 2179, thence
south 80 chains, w<;st 80 chains, north 80
chains, cast 80 chains, to point of commencement, known as claim 37.
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
COAL NOTICES
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted ten
miles north and two miles west of t-.e
northwest corner of lot 2179; thence
north SOchains, west 80 chains, south 80
chains, east 80 chains to point of commencement, known as claim No. 87.
Jan. 2, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
TaKe notice that Frank A. Jackson of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands.
Commencing at a post planted 10 miles
north and 2 miles^west of the northwest
corner of lot 2179; thence north 80 chains,
east 80 chains, south 80 chains, west 80
chains to point of commencement,
known as claim No. 86.
Jan. 2. 1912 Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca LandlDistnct
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Juckson, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal  and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a'post planted seven
miles north and 2  miles  west of the
northwest corner  of  lot 2179,   thence
north  eighty   chains,  east SO   chains,
south 80 chains, west eighty  chains to
point of commencement, known us claim
No. 79. Frank A. Jackson.
| Jan. 2, 1912.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to upply for a
license to prospect for coul and petroleum overthe followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted seven
miles north and two miles west of the
northwest corner of Lot 2179, thence
north 80 chains, west 80 chains, south
80 chuins, eust 80 chains to point of
commencement, known asclaim No. 78.
Jan. 2. 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Land District
District of Cussiar
Take notice that Frank A.Jackson, of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted seven
miles north and one mile east of the
northwest corner of Lot 2179, thence
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, south
80 chains, west 80 chains to point of
commencement, known as claim No. 88.
Jan. 2. 1912. Frank A. JackBon.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackso.n of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted seven
miles north of the north-west corner of
lot 2179, thence north 80 chains, east
80 chains, south 80 chains, west 80
chains, to point of commencement,
known as claim No. 74,
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson
of Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for
permission to prospect for coal and
petroleum over the following described
lands:
Commencing at a post planted eight
miles north of the northwest corner of
lot 2179; thence north SO chains, west 80
chains, south 80 chainB, cast 80 chains
chains to point of commencement,
known as claim No. 82.
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson of
Hazelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license  to  prospect for coal and petro-
] leum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted eight
miles north nnd 2 miles   weBt  of the
northwest corner of lot 2179; thence
north 80 chains, west 80  chuins, south
80 chains, east 80 chains, to point of commencement, known asclaim No. 81.
Jan. 2, 1912. Frank A. Jackson
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiur
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson, of
Hazelton, miner, intenda toapply for u
license to [irospect for conl and petro-
leumovertiie following described lands:
Commencing at u poBt planted 8
miles north nnd one mile east of the
northwest corner of lot 2179, thence
north SO chains, eaat SO chains, Bouth
80 chains, west SO chains, to point of
commencement, known ns cluim No 89.
Jun. 2, 1912. Frnnk A, Jackson
Omineca Lnnd District
DiBtrict of   Cussiar
Take notice that Frnnk A. JackBon, of
Huzelton, miner, intendB to upply for u
license to proBpect for coal and petroleum over the lollowing described landB:
Commencing ut u post planted eight
miles north of the northwcNt corner of
lot 2179, thence north SO chuins, tut SO
chains, south SO chain!, west 80 chainB
to point of commencement, known
cluim No. 83.
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson.
Omineca Land District
District of Cassiur
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson, of
Hnzelton, miner, intends to apply for a
license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted s?ven
miles north of the northwest corner of
lot 2179, thence north 80 chains, west
80 chains, south 80 chuins, east 80
chains, to point of commencement,
known as claim No. 75.
Jan. 1, 1912. Frank A. Jackson
Omineca Land District
Diatrictof Cassiar
Take notice that Frank A. Jackson, of
Hnzelton, miner, intends toapply fora
license to prospect for coal nnd petroleum over the followingdescribedlands:
Commencing at u post plnnted eight
miles north and two milea weBt of the
northwest corner of Lot 2179, thence
north eighty chains, cast eighty chains,
south eighty chains, west eighty chains
to point of commencement, knowii au
claim No. 80.
Jnn. 2, 1912 Frnnk A. Jackson.
Commercial Printers
Miner Print Shop THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, MARCH 30, 1^12
r
���^
L^    ^J
Miner
Print
Shop
Oppotite Government Office
Hazelton
s	
AGREEMENT BETWEEN
G.T.P. MID P.G.E.R.
Complete Understanding Between Trans-continenal
Line and F. W. & S.
VIRGINIA OUTLAWS
ARE STILL AT LARGE
Men Who Raided Courthouse
and Killed Five, Including
Judge, Seek Refuge In Hills
Winnipeg, Mar. 26:--An agreement between the Grand Trunk
Pacific, the Grand Trunk Pacific
Branch Lines   Co.,   and   Foley,
Welch & Stewart, with regard to
the Pacific Great Eastern Railway
between   Vancouver   and   Fort
George, provide that tho first two
named companies,   which have
the right to construct a line of
railway between these two points,
shall waive their  charter  rights
for the building of such a line in
! favor of Messrs. Foley, Welch &
' Stewart.   In return for this, the
j latter firm agrees,  should they
receive a proposal involving the
accquisition of the majority of
the stock of the Pacific Great
Eastern,   that  they will serve
notice on the Grand Trunk Pacific Branch Lines Co., which shall
have  sixty   days  in   which  to
acquire control of the line.   It is
further agreed that all traffic,
passenger or freight, mail or express, originating on the Pacific
Great Eastern,   the routing of
which is under control   of the
company, shall be   routed   over
the G. T. P.   All traffic origina-
| ting on the G. T. P. and destined
i from Vancouver or points on the
line of the P. G. E. R.,  shall  be
routed over that line by the G.
T. P. The Canadian Express and
G.  T.  P.  Telegraph Companies
are to have the right to do business on the lines of the P. G. E.
'R., but the latter can,  if it desires,  engage in telegraph and
i express    business  on  its  own
! account.   In such event the G.
;T. P.  Telegraph Company and
I the Canadian Express Company
! shall   have the right to inter-
i change business,     The P. G. E.
IR.  is to use the terminals of the
! G. T. P. at Fort George, and this
(agreement is to continue for a
period of 20 years.
fifififififififififififififififififigfififififififififififififififififififififi
Hillsville, Va., March 26:���One
more death, that of Juror Augustus Fowler, has been added to
the list of fatalities of the Allen
raid on the Carroll Courthouse,
making a total of five. There
seems no immediate prospect of
capturing the Aliens and their
clansmen, who escaped to the
mountains after their sanguinary
visit to aid their brother, then
on trial for a felony. The reports which came from the mountains that Sidna Allen had been
captured, and that his wife had
been killed, proved erroneous.
Detectives who went to the Allen
home found it deserted. Floyd
Allen, left wounded after the
courtroom fight, Victor Allen and
Byrd Marion, charged with murder in the first degree, were
spirited out of town ostensibly
for Pulaski, with the possibility
that they might be taken to
Roanoke for safe keeping.- Ten
detectives went along to guard
the prisoners. One report today
was that the Aliens and perhaps
twenty of their clansmen had |
been located at Devil's Den, in I
one of tbe wildest regions of the j
Blue Ridge mountains, near the
Virginia - North Carolina line.
Respect for and confidence in the
process of the law have replaced
panicky demoralization following
the tragedy. The grand jury,
summoned by Judge Walter R.
Staples, quickly returned indictments against Floyd Allen, Victor
Allen and Claude Swanson Allen,
his sons, Sidna Allen, Friel Allen,
Westy Edwards and Sidney Edwards, nephews of Floyd Allen,
and Byrd Marion, all charging
murder. John F. Moore was indicted for felony, the charge
being that he assisted the Aliens
to escape.
For Sale
One 18-horse power pipe boiler
complete, with smokestack, pump
and fittings and 200 feet of new
pipe. Enquire at office of Inter-
or Lumber Company, Hazelton.
CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC CO., LTD.
Electrical Apparatus of all kinds; Compressors, Crushers, McKier-
nan-Terry Rock and Core Drills, Boilers and Hoists, Gasoline
Engines and Accessories.
Prince Rupert, Box 974, Graham Kearney, Mgr.
THE
nington
Typewriter -u ^
Perpetual   Pioneer
The No. 10 and No. 11
Visible Remington Models
are the Isiic.si expressions ol
Remington leadership.   They
represent the sum total of all
typewriter achievement���past
and present.
They contain every merit
that the Remington has
always had and every
merit that any writing
machine   bus   ever  had.
They contain, in addition,
new nnd fundamental
improvements that no typewriter has ever had; among
them ihe First Column Selector, thc First Built-in
Tabulator and the First Key-Set Tabulator. The Model
11 with Wahl Mechanism is also the First Adding and
Subtracting Typewriter. These improvements are the
latest contributions to typewriter progress, nnd they arc
Remington contributions���every one.
Thc Remington, the original pioneer in the typewriter
field, is the present day pioneer in all new developments
of thc writing machine.
Remington Typewriter Company
[ImorporAtcrij
818 Pender Street, Vancouver, B. C.
German Opinion
Berlin, Mar. 27;��� Public opin-i
ion in Germany has received the.
British proposals for partial limi-;
tation of armaments with a coolness that amounts to rejection.
What attitude the government |
will take has not yet been  disclosed,  but popular sentiment is j
plainly unfavorable.   The news-!
papers,   with   few   exceptions,
unite in declaring that Germany
must decide for herself how large
a fleet she will have.   The statement made by Mr. Winston Spen-
cer Churchill that a reduction  in
ship building operations on the
German  side will  be met with
similar reductions in England  is ]
characterized as a special effort
to prolong and even  to increase
British supremacy at sea.
Thirty Fatalities
San Antonio, Tex., March 28:���
Probably thirty or more persons
were killed in the explosion of a ,
locomotive boiler at the Southern
Pacific roundhouse here.
Twenty-seven bodies have been
recovered. The roundhouse and
cooper shops were wrecked by
the explosion, and many men
working in them were hurt by
falling walls. The victims were
said to b c strike-breakers who
have been working in the South-
em Pacific shops since the shopmen's strike began several
months ago.
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W.   A.
The next fortnightly sewing
party of the W. A. will be held
at the Mission House at a quarter
past three p. m. on Thursday,
April 4th.
During the past seven days
over 10,000 immigrants have
come across the Atlantic ancl
passed through Montreal.
Hundreds of settlers are passing through Winnipeg weekly for
British Columbia points.
Our
Garden Seeds
have just arrived
by mail and embrace all varieties.
Purchase them
now and avoid
delay for delay
means much to
the farmer. We
will give prompt
attention to all
mail orders.
Stop!
Look!
Listen!
Limited quantity
in barrels
$1.10
per gallon
Coal Oil
If you desire to save money read these
prices. You are assured a saving on
these articles used every day in the home.
Cream, family size, 6 cans for $1.00.
Gov't Creamery Butter, per lb. 50 cents.
Sugar in 18 lb. sacks $2.00.
Sugar in 20 lb. sacks $2.25.
PIGS FEET
Laing's in 1 lb. tins 3 for $1.00.
Davies' in 1 lb. tins 30 cents �� tin.
Ham at 30 cents a pound.
Bacon at 30 cents per pound.
POTTED MEATS
CORNED and ROAST BEEF
Clarks Potted Meats 10 cents a tin.
Devilled Ham,   25 cents and 45 cts a tin.
Corned Beef in 1 lb. tins 25 cents.
Corned Beef in 2 lb. tins 50 cents.
Roast Beef in 1 lb. tins 25 cents.
TAMALES
Tamales in tins 25 cents.
MUTTON
Roast Mutton in 1 lb. tins 30 cents.
Roast Mutton in 2 lb. tins 50 cents.
Boiled Mutton in 1 lb. tins 25 cents.
Boiled Mutton in 2 lb. tins 50 cents.
VEGETABLES
French Peas 25 cents per tin.
Green Peas 20 cent per tin.
Cream Corn 20 cents per tin.
Bull Dog Tomatoes 25 cents per tin.
Quaker Brand Tomatoes 30 cents a tin.
We also have on hand fresh
Turnips
Carrots
Potatoes
SAUSAGE
Frankfurters 60 cents a tin.
Cambridge Sausage in 1 lb. tins 30 cents.
Cambridge Sausage in 2 lb. tins 50 cents.
Vienna Sausage in 1 lb. tins 30 cents.
Dry Goods Dep't
White Lace Curtains, 2 1-2x3 feet long, from $1.50 to $4.00 per pair,
White Honey Comb Bedspreads $1.50 to $2.25.
White Marcella Bed Spreads, $5.00, $5.50 and $6.00.
Men's   Black  Cotton   Socks,   Heavy Weight,  25 cents per pair.
Men's White Lawn Handkerchiefs, 2 for 25 cents.
Boot and Shoe Dep't
Ladies' Field Boots, 14 inch top, in Tan and Black, $6.75 per pair.
Ladies's and Men's Walk-Over Shoes
We carry a good line of Men's Working and Prospectors' Boots, also a full
range of Shoe Pacs.
Agents for
Art
Tailoring
L/O., Toronto
Hundreds of rich, elegant patterns to select from.
Hardware Dep't
Our Hardware Department is complete. We carry all
lines for the Builder, the Settler and Prospector.
We also carry Mantles, Globes, Hollow Wire, Tees,
Nuts and Jams. Gasoline Tanks, Moore Lights and
attachments.
Bedsteads in full, 3-4 and single sizes. Folding Cots.
Springs and Duchess Mattresses.
Inlaid and Cork Linoleum.        Japanese Matting in assorted
patterns.        Carpet Squares and Rugs.
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R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd.
HAZELTON, B. C.
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fi THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, MARCH 80, 1912
MMgMjj
"Everything in Canvas"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
ISSUES
TICKETS
Prince Ritprrl, B.C.
HAZELTON HOSPITAL
for any period from one month upward at SI i
month in advance. This rate inoludea ofllco consultations imii modlclneu, :is well us alt costs while
in the hoapitftl. Tickets obtainable in Hasolton
from K. C. Stephenson and Fi-od Flolcli In Al-.i.-t-
mere, from Rev. F. 1.. Stephenson, or at tho Hospital from tho Medical Suporlntt ndetit.
Steph
&Cn
Local and Personal
W. J.   Driver returned today
from a lengthy visit to Seattle.
Today's arrivals report numer-
Contrac-tor A. L. MeHugh was!ous  slides   along  the   railway,
in town on Tuesday. causing some delay to trains.
Jack Hartley, of Aldermere, is
spending a few days in town.
To    Aldermere   belongs   the
distinction of being the only point
G. A. Rosenthal is expected to Iso far heard from to give Clayton
Undertakers and
Funeral Directors
Special attention in Shipping Cases
Hazelton, B, C.
in Telkwa.
T. J. Thorp,
a majority. The vote for Alex
Manson in Kispiox confers a
similar fame on that place.
Irythe police court yesterday
morning David Gieff was convicted on a charge of supplying
.. ,       .        liquor to Indians and  was  sen-
is spending a few days tenced to pay a fine 0��- $300 and
costs, with the alternative of six
months' hard labor.
arrive from the coast in a few
days.
John Oakes, of Aldermere, was
a visitor in Hazelton during the
week.
R. J. McDone
eca bote
the Ingin-
J. P., is about
estate   office
to
in I
(     A. Chisholm
General  Hardware
Builders'   Material
Miners'   Supplies
Hazelton, B. C.
Selling Off
open    a   real
Aldermere,
Dan. Stewart, of New Hazelton, left for Prince Rupert on
Wednesday.
Duncan Ross
Vancouver  and
business trip.
T. E. Hankin returned on Wed
j
)
\
\
I uppi
Two prospectors named O'Neil
and Wright, hailing from Prince
Rupert,     managed    to    reach
Groundhog via the Naas  from
Stewart,   after an  exceedingly
is on his wavtolhard triP-   The-V started to re-
Victoria   on a turn over the same route about
victoria,  on a the m ddle of the month.
Hugh A. Harris, who spent the
nesday from his latest'trTp to the wintei''" Vancouver and Seattle,
upper Skeena country. returned to Hazelton on  ihurs-
clay.   He states that thousands
of people are making enquiries
We are getting ready to move and
will sell the balance of our stock at
surprising
Low Prices
Smoking Tobaccos, Cigars,
Cigarettes, and Candies.
The Best of Everything
Overland Cigar Store
Slinger & Ayerde
( A Word In Season
To Farmers Only
Look over your implements
and machinery and let us know
your repair wants. I am prepared to do your work or
supply necessary parts for
your machinery, implements,
wagons, and plows. DON'T
WAIT, avoid the lush of
spring work.    :-:    :-:   :-:    :-:
C. F.Willis
Blacksmith. Horseshoer
Hnaclton, it. c.
Charles Morton, porter at the
Telkwa Hotel, died on Thursday
: of last week, of pneumonia.
J. W. Morison came up from
Port Essington on Monday ancl
spent the week in Hazelton.
W. J. Sweeney and Roy McDonell returned on Wednesday
from their trip to Groundhog.
Angus Stewart spent a couple
of days in town, returning to
Prince Rupert on Wednesday.
Barrister R. DeB. Hovell was
deputy returning officer at Hazelton, with A. E. Player as poll
cleric.
Gordon Wilson i.-; on his way
up the river. He will join Win.
Kennedy in the real estate business here.
Thursday April 4th.  has been
lixed as the date of the annual
smoker   of the   Hazelton
Association.
about this district, and many
will come in during the present
season to share in the prosperity
of Omineca.
Citizens who have not yet
cleared away the winter's accumulation of rubbish from their
premises should attend to the
matter without delay. The chief
constable states that the police,
in their capacity of sanitary inspectors, will require everybody
to conform to the health regulations.
W. C. Macdonald and William
Flanna, two Prince Rupert men
who have secured valuable coal
property in the Groundhog district, came in from the coalfield
on Monday. They report that
preparations for extensive devel-
.... opment work are being made,
Rifle and predicts that the wonderful
seams of the upper Skeena will
,.  ,-     u    ..,., ,     |       .    ,,,   nt'   nit-   great   utiracnun  of  the
Colin H. Munro, who has been PQm;n~ ,��,,<,,,���
spending a  few weeks on the i comine season.
Buck river, returned to Hazelton S   In consequence of representa-
on Thursday. ' tion made to the federal govern-
The Rifle Association committee! ment, an order has been issued
expects to arrange hexing and PJW*1* for the acceptance of
wrestling events for the smoker I n>*ht lettergrams for transmis-
on Thursday 910n over tne Dominion govern-
,,    !���.���. .     ,     ,ment telegraph  system,   begin-
Roy E, Williams, whoi has ningon April 1. The rate for
spent the winter at southern the letter telegrams will, as on
points, is expected to return to, other lines, be the same for fifty
telkwa shortly. | worcjs as the day rate for ten
Geoffrey Macdonell has the i words, with one-fifth of the ten-
greater part of his sawmill plant word rate   added for each ad-
I
I
For Fine  Cigars,   Cigarettes  (
and Tobaccos go lo ;
G.T.P.      j
Cigar Store and I
i
i
i
I
i
)
\
Soft Drinks, Confectionery,
Books and Magazines
Baths In Connection
J. B. Brun,    - -    Propritor
in Telkwa, ready for installation
on the new site.
A minstrel entertainment, in
aid of the Church of England
building fund, is to be held at
Telkwa on April 12.
A small  slide at Hardscrabble
! carried away  several  lengths of
jtrrck, somewhat interfering with
railway traffic for a day or two.
The  impression   is growing in
the Bulkley valley that the G. T.
i P. intends to establish its Valley
I town about three miles north of
Telkwa.
Wilfred Macdonald and William   Hanna    returned   to the
(F
~-"\
We Arc Sole Agents for
National Cash Registers
Dayton Computin g Scales
Heintzman Pianos
In Northern B. C.
W. Wark & Son
JEWELERS
,  P.O. Box 76 PRINCE RUPERT
^ if
ditional ten words or less.
Edgar Boling, the pioneer prospector of Tacla lake, continues
working on his promising claims
in that district. He informs The
Miner that the ore specimens he
recently sent here were from the
Mineral Peak claim, where he
had ore from the grass roots. He
is now tunneling from the lake
level on another vein, which runs
parallel to number one, 250 feet
distant. He has in his new
workings a full face of quartz
spotted with galena, zinc blende
(so-called rosin zinc, the only
merchantable zinc found) and
gray copper.
Groundhog   coalfield   on  Thurs-     The followi     were d      t
day.     George Larocque accom- tumi      office,bs  at the polling
pameci mem. i p]aces [n the jnterior of gkeena
Dr. Wrinch asks The Miner to! district: Skeena Crossing, J. S.
express the thanks of the Hos-| Cline; Sealey, B. G. Ellis; Hazel-
pital authorities to the Skating! ton, It. DeB. Hovell, New Hazel-
Club for the donation of the pro- j ton, James Richmond; Big Tun-
ceeds of the last hockey game,     nel Camp,   A. D. MacKay; Kis-
T.   T.   Dunlop   and  William | IJSv.fb.?'. C�����ei"i.?ib��-e' fcn
Croteau,     both     well     known
(
I  Nothing for the Ladies
t  Nothing for the Babies
But the
j Best of Everything
I     for the Men
throughout the district, have
formed a partnership, and will
enter the real estate business in
Telkwa.
The Hospital Aid Association,
composed of ladies of Hazelton,
held a sewing meeting at Mrs.
' Wrathall's residence on Thursday
afternoon. This organization is
doing useful work.
W. R. Johnson, a settler on the
1 Babine-Stuart   portage,   was in
'town for the election.     He reports excellent weather in the
Babine   district,  with   a   light
: snowfall for the winter.
George Beirnes and J. K. Ashman took Thursday's train for
the coast. They are on their way
to Vancouver, on business connected with their coal holdings
in the Groundhog district.
Thos. Allen has sold his barber
shop and pool room at Skeena!
McPherson; Twenty-mile, Wm.
Paterson; Glentanna, C. A
Newitt; Chicken Lake,
Hoops; Aldermere, T. J.
Telkwa, T. T. Dunlop;
Bulkley, Dan McGlashan;
Francois Lake, J. W. Henkel;
South Francois Lake, Harry
Marment, Ootsa Lake, Harry
Morgan.
E.  M.
Thorp;
South
North
"Squd" Murphy Dead
A pioneer rancher of the Bulk-
ley valley,  John Murphy,  died
at Twenty-mile on Monday.    He
had been ill for some time at his
home in   the  valley,   and   was
being   brought to the hospital
when    death    overtook     him.
"Spud" Murphy, as he was generally  called,  was  well  known
throughout the district.   He was
one of the first to go to Rossland,
on the inception of that camp,
where he operated the pioneer
brewery.    Interment took place
i Crossing to Ethan Allen. Tommy I j"  the   Hazelton   cemetery   on
' left this morning for an extended I Wednesday   afternoon,   services
trip,    which   will    include   the | being conducted by Rev.  D.  R.
Olympic games at Stockholm.
McLean.
Noel &. Rock
Outfitters to Men
j Ilazolton. R C.
W. A. Williscroft, road superintendent for this district, is on
, his way to Victoria, to complete
! arrangements for the season's
; road and trail work in Omineca.
I He will bring a number of horses
and additional outfit for use in
the work.
Parliament Nearly Through
Ottawa, Mar. 29:���It is expected that all business before
the house of commons will be
closed tomorrow and that parliament will be prorogued on Monday.
Mii^MM^^fi^^^MiliEilililiMl^^^^^^^^^SiiiM
lARGENTS BIG STORE
We carry the largest stock of stoves in town
Stoves
AIR TIGHT HEATERS    I    COOK STOVES, Sheet
from $3.50 up. [ Iron, $16.00 up.
KITCHEN RANGES, $26.00 to $63.00
Doors
PLAIN DOORS, 2-8x6-8, 2-6x6-6, at $4.75 and $5.50
GLASS DOORS, size 2-8x6-8, at $9.50
Carpenters' Supplies at
lowest prices.
K-
!
Boots
Before buying your spring boots call and see our large stock.
We are satisfied we can please you both in quality and prices.
Shoe Pacs
If you want dry feet wear  Gendron's Penetang Shoe  Pacs.
We carry them in three lengths.
We make a specialty of
outfitting camps, and
give our best attention
to filling orders and supplying  transportation
ARGENT
MMMM.^%

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