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Omineca Miner Aug 11, 1917

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 THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
aimer
VOL. VI, NO. 50
HAZELTON. B. C. SATURDAY, AUGUST 11, 1917
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
SIR RICHARDIES SUDDENLY
British   Columbia's   Ex-Premier
Passes Away in London
���Will be Cremated
b
O
ENTENTE FORCES HARRY ENEMY
BRITISH AND FRENCH MAKE ADVANCES-
RADICAL CHANGE OF POLICY IN ADMIRALTY
SIR RICHARD McRRIDK
Ex-premier of British Columbia, and recently High Commissioner to London for this province,
who died in London on Monday.
Born at New Westminster on
December 15. 1870, he was graduated from Dalhousie University
at Halifax, 1890, and practiced
law in B.C. He was elected for
Dewdney to the provincial house
in 1898. Appointed minister of
mines in 1900, he resigned through
overwork. Became premier in
1903. He led his government
brilliantly for twelve years, but
was compelled to resign in 1915
through illness. He went to
London as high commissioner,
but was stricken with diabetes,
becoming almost totally blind,
and relinquished his position a
few months ago. Sir Richard's
body will be cremated and the
ashes sent to British Columbia
for burial.
London: Renewed advances
by British and French forces in
Flanders have been made, including the completion of the capture
of Westhoek.
French troops on the left flank
of the British line in Belgium
made further progress east and
north of Bixschoote last night.
British raiding parties blew up
German dugouts on a wide front
east of Monchy le Preux, in the
Arras sector.and further damage-
ed the Teuton trenches.
Entente warships since Friday
have been bombarding Turkish
batteries in Asia Minor,and have
silenced one battery and destroy-
an airdrome.
An explosion and fire in a big
chemical works in the east end
of London last night wrecked the
building and killed and injured
scores of workers.
Geddes, and his lieutenants to
make the British navy a great
weapon of offense. Jellicoe will
apparently remain as titular head
of the navy on the sea, but the
power will be in the hands of
Wemyss.
Rome: Italian patrol fighting
took place on the whole front
yesterday from Trentino down to
the Isonzo and across the Carso,
the enemy everywhere leaving
dead on the field and prisoners
in the hands of Cadorna's men.
BARBER BILL HAS
BEEN BONDED
By a deal completed this week
the Barber and Barber Bill claims,
constituting the Barber group.on
Nine-mile mountain, situated between the Sunrise and Silver Cup
properties and owned by Billy
Burken and Edgar Harris,became
bonded to H. Carleton. Development work will be commenced
on the property immediately, a
force under the direction of Al.
Harris beginning work almost
as soon as the deal was consummated.
Indications point to a resumption of activity on the silver-lead
properties on Nine-mile.
Washington: Admiral Jellicoe
is believed here to have been
eliminated from control of the
British naval forces on the sea
by the recent changes in the
admiralty. It is understood to
be the plan of the new first lord,
Hazebrouk, France: A new
poison gas is being used by the
Huns. Blindness and death follow quickly on its trail. British
medical officers are trying to determine the nature of the new
poison.
strife of a general election be
avoided. His offer is infinitely
more generous than the one previously made.
Ottawa: A conferenc took
place yesterday at Rideau Hall
between the Duke of Devonshire
and Baron Shaughnessy, Premier
Borden, Sir George Foster, Sir
Wilfrid Laurier, Graham and
Sifton, when Borden urged Lau- Winnipeg: The historic Liber-
rier to join him in a national al conference concluded yester-
government,  pleading that  the I day.
London: A conference of the
British labor party held at Westminster today voted to send delegates to Stockholm for a consultative conference in September
by a vote of 1,046,000 to 55,000.
The conference will consist of
delegates from all trade unions
and other labor and Socialist
representatives, and is expected
to have momentous consequences.
The ideas outlined for the conference clearly define this is not
a war of conquest, but the struggle
now being waged against ruthless autocratic governments must
be contii.ued until there shall be
no more warfare on earth. Belgium and Servia must be restored.
For the year ending March 31,
the British government received
��700,000,000 as its share in excess business profits.
RECORDS DETERMINATION
Meeting of Citizens Re-Affirms
Confidence in Ultimate
Victory
<T
X.
Resolved that on this the
Third anniversary of the
declaration of a righteous
war, this meeting of citizens
of Hazelton records its inflexible determination to
continue to a victorious end
the struggle in maintenance
of those ideals of Liberty
and Justice which are the
common and sacred cause
of the Allies.
^
NEWb PARAGRAPHS FROM HAZELTON AND ADJACENT DISTRICT
Montreal: The most violent
anti-conscription talk heard so
far was indulged in last night at
Lafontaine Park. Ferdinand
Villerieuve, the chief speaker,
announced another meeting as
soon as the governor-general signs
the bill. Not fear, he said, was
responsible for the opposition,
and this fact woul^l be shown in
the "trenches of Montreal" if
necessary.
A. W. Healy.of Prince Rupert,
was here this week.
R. S. Sargent went up to Telkwa on on Wednesday.
C. E. Bainter, of Prince Rupert, was in town this week.
Mrs. J. C. Sealy returned on
Monday from an extended stay
on the coast.
Among the visitors in Hazelton
on Thursday were G. MacDonall
and A. Elliott, of Steveton, B.C.
Dr. Badgero, the dentist, who
has been practicing here for some
weeks, went east to Prin ce George
last evening.
Mrs. A. DuHamel, of Ketchikan, Alaska, accompanied by her
daugher, Miss Irene DuHamel,
is visiting her son, Horace, in
Hazelton.
W. R. Dunwoody, of Nanaimo,
arrived last evening to take
charge or Hazelton police district, succeeding Chief Constable
Taylor, who, it is reported, has
been transferred to the Peace
River district.
H. S. Pellin, of Prince Rifpert,
came up on Monday.
C. G. Jonas, of Edmonton, was
among the week's visitors.
Aimer Lloyd came up from
Prince Rupert during the week.
J. L. Christie, the Prince Rupert traveller, was in Hazelton
during the week.
Allan Johnson, who has been
at Eighth Cabin for a considerable time, came down this week.
A social will be held in St.
Andrew's Hall on Tuesday evening next, under the auspices of
the Red Cross. No iurther information is available as we go
to press, but watch our daily
bulletin for further details.
Methodist Church
Rev. R. C. Scott will preach
tomorrow evening at 7:30 on the
subject: "Christ, the Lamb of
God."
Holy Communion.
All are invited.
T. G. Garrett, of Vancouver,
arrived last evening.
J. McDonald came down from
Telkwa yesterday morning.
Rev. R. C. and Mrs. Scott
came down on Tuesday from
Smithers.
J. M. Gallagher and Chas.
Musclow came down from North
Francois Lake on Wednesday.
Dr. Inman, the resident eye-
specialist of Prince Rupert, was
in Hazelton on Tuesday and
Wednesday.
J. F. Maguire will go to Prince
Rupert tomorrow, returning on
Wednesday next with his daughter, Mrs. D. B. Morkill, who is
coming from Vancouver to make
a short stay in Hazelton.
Dr. W. J. Sipprell, pastor of
Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church,
Vancouver, one of the most popular preachers in B.C., is expected to arrive here next week, and
will be the guest of Dr. and Mrs.
Wrinch at the Hospital.
A largely attended meeting
held in Assembly Hall on Sunday
evening last, for the purpose of
recording the determination of
the citizens to see this war out
to a victorious finish, enthusiastically and unanimously rose in
affirmation to the above resolution
moved by Rev. J. Field, who was
appointed chairman.
The first speaker of the evening was Wm. Grant, who made a
capable address in supporting the
resolution.
Dr. Wrinch, who followed,
spoke ably to the resolution, in
his customary convincing manner.
J. F. Maguire, speaking from
his experiences in many years of
actual contact with Germans,
delivered a forceful address in
giving his wholehearted support
to the resolution.
In an an earnest speech, S. H.
Hoskins disclosed the perfidy of
the Huns in relation to the Scriptures.
Following the last address,
the resolution, as moved by the
chairman, and seconded by Jack
Frost, who gave a few sidelights
on his personal experiences with
army chaplains at the front, was
put to the vote, and if the Kaiser
has any doubts as to whether the
British Empire would stay in the
war to the finish we take pleasure
in dispelling them by calling his
attention to the unanimous passage of the above resolution as
adopted not only by the people of
Hazelton, or Canada, but of the
whole Empire.
The proceedings opened with a
hymn, which was followed by a
prayer by Rev. John Field and a
Scripture reading by Rev. Dr. H.
C. Wrinch.
Interspersed among the speeches were a number of vocal solos
rendered by young ladies, who
included Miss Davis, Miss Gladys
McCready, Miss Goddard, and
Miss Smith, with Mrs. Chappelle
as accompanist, and whose offerings were accepted in an appreciable manner by the audience.
The program ended with the
Doxology and the singing of the
National Anthem by the assemblage.
The collection taken will be
divided among the local branches
of the war funds. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, AUGUST 11, 1917
bravest have striven and suffered and fallen."
Published every Saturday at Hazelton. the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada anrl Hritish Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign. Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $2.50 per inch per month: Reading
Notices, 20 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazette rates.
Vol. VI.
Saturday, August 11, 1917
No. 50
gBmEnaaEngfflBSiMB
Stofut-earat in ���fate
On Monday morning there died in London a man whose
achievements in carving the foundation of British Columbia's
greatness had made his name a household word amongst the
people of the west.
Stricken in the prime of his manhood with Bright's disease,
Sir Richard McBride, easily the most popular figure in British
Columbia, has passed on to his Maker, and a great statesman,
whom Premier Borden compared with the great Sir John A.
Macdonald, has been lost not only to British Columbia, but to
the British Empire.
Rapidly coming to the fore, after becoming Premier of this
province in 1903, Sir Richard was regarded as Canada's future
leader. He held his office with such distinction that his
government was sustained for twelve years and swept the polls
decisively in 1909 and 1912. Ill-health dogged him, however,
and relinquishing his duties in 1915,he went to London as High
Commissioner for British Columbia, his marked Imperialistic
tendencies promising much for his success in that position.
Illness, however,interfered with his endeavors,and Sir Richard
was obliged to resign early in the present year. He was
reported recently to be well enough to make the journey to his
native B.C. and the news of his sudden death came as a shock.
His death is a blow to all who were watching his progress, and
a sense of personal loss is felt by all who knew him. and there
are few indeed in this province who did not know him.
Sir Richard combined a magnetic personality with the
essence of true gentility and great wisdom. | His personal
charm towards all who came in contact with him Was the secret
ofj his remarkable rise.
Sir Richard brought British Columbia forth to the light of
prosperity. He did wonders for the development of the province
and only the advent of the European conflict stopped the
carrying out of his ambitious program.
"Dick" McBride is dtad; but while the history of British
Columbia remains, his spirit will always pervade it.
Will Check Prices
"The primary duty of a food
controller in Canada and the
United States," said Hon. W. J.
Hanna.in a recent interview, "is
to see that the men at the front
do not suffer from want of food,
and that our Mother Country and
our European Allies should not
suffer from want of food."
- "Have you power to check
prices?" Hon. W. J. Hanna was
asked.
"Certainly."
"Are you going to exercise it?"
"In the cases where we have
the necessary data we will not
hesitate to check prices," Mr
Hanna declared.
"\
IF YOU CAN'T FIGHT
YOU CAN AT LEAST
STAND BEHIND THE
MAN WHO FIGHTS
FOR YOU!
Where Copper is Going
Up to date the Allies have
placed orders for35,000,000 shells
in the United States,and a total of
101,000,000 pounds of copper,
46,750,000 pounds of lead have
been used in their construction.
A British 18-pounder, or 3.3-inch
shrapnel requires 5 pounds, 9|
ounces of brass, containing 66 to
70 per cent of copper, or nearly
3�� pounds. A small copper band
around the shell adds 4J ounces,
making the total copper 4.04
pounds. Spelter consumption per
shell of this size is about 1.87
pounds. Lead bullets weighing
7.92 pounds constitute the metal
load of the projectile.
SIR ROBERT BORDEN
APPEALS TO CANADA
On the occasion of the third
anniversary of the declaration of
war. Premier Borden gave out
the following message:
"Once more we reach the anniversary of that fateful day
three years ago when Germany
challenged the future democracy
and the freedom of the world.
The resolve of the nations of the
British Commonwealth is now
once more renewed. Today they
again affirm an invincible determination to sustain the ideals of
liberty and justice to a victorious
issue.
"The anniversary brings to us
proud but solemn memories. With
an intense realization of all the
sacrifice and sorrow entailed on
our people, we are conscious that
Canada has vindicated her place
among the world's greatest and
truest democracies. Assuredly
her sons have not suffered and
died in vain if liberty and justice
are to have any meaning in the
future of humanity.
"The forces of militarist autocracy are still strong and unyield
ing; the issue of the struggle still
hangs in the balance. In Europe
Lhe long repressed democracy of
Russia has not yet girded on its
full strength; on this continent
the mighty republic to the south
is still occupied in that necessary
preparation without which no
peace-loving people can throw
their full force into an armed
conflict. Not yet have the Allied
nations succeeded in throwing
their entire strength into tho
supreme effort; it will come; but
in the meantime, with the highly
organized and desperate forces
that are arrayed against us it
might be fatal if any nation
should relax its endeavor, whether
from loss of heart or in reliance
upon the strength of others. The
mightiest effort of each is need-
I ed to assure the triumphs without which all that is dear to us is
lost and the world's future
shrouded in darkness and despair. Let us today in Canada
close our ranks, nerve ourselves
for another year of struggle, and
with undaunted hearts consecrate
our fullest powers to the cause
for which already our best and
One Wise German
Copenhagen: Capt. Perseus,
the German naval expert, says
the British fleet cannot be beaten,
and tells the people that no naval
offensive can be undertaken.
Anger the Tailor
25%
off all men's furnishings
READY-MADE SUIT- $15\
Suit Made to Order���$35.00 j
NEW HAZELTON      .      B.C. I
I
S. M. NEWTON
The Prince,Rupert Empire man,
who is a candidate for the house
of commons for this Riding.
This is to introduce the man
who always fights for the rights
and interests of the masses
rather than for partyism.
THE CANADIAN PATRIOTIC FUND
Which assists the wives and families of Canada's gallant
soldiers, requires millions of dollars to keep the soldiers'
home fires burning.
District Treasurer: Stephen H. Hoskins, Government Agent
Hazelton Committee:
J.  E.  Kirby,  R.  E.  Allen,  J. K. Frost,   J. R. Barker,
and J. G. Powell.    Monthly Subscriptions are Solicited
THE CANADIAN RED CROSS
The Hazelton  Branch requests the support of all in its
efforts to assist in the noble work of this great humanitarian
organization.
Honorary Presidents: Mrs. (Rev.) John Field; Mrs. (Rev.)
W. Hogan
Chairman:   Dr. H. C. Wrinch
i
Vice-Presidents: S. H. Hoskins; Mrs. E. R. Cox; W.J. Carr
Honorary Secretary:  Miss J. C. Grant
Honorary Treasurer: H. H. Little, Manager Union Bank
Executive Committee:
Mrs. H. C. Wrinch,  Mrs. R. G. Moseley,  Mrs. Chas. Reid,
Miss Hogan, Rev. John Field, Rev. M. Pike. H. H. Phillips
Large or Small Contributions will be Gratefully Received
SOLDIERS'AID & EMPLOYMENT
COMMITTEE
Endeavors to supply soldiers from Hazelton district with
such comforts and necessities as cannot be readily obtained
at the front, and will assist them to re-establish themselves
in civil life when they return. The Committee is acting in
CO - operation   with   the   Provincial   Returned   Soldiers'
Commission and the Military Hospitals Commission
Contributions to the Soldiers' Aid Tobacco Fund are Welcome
Chairman: A. Ii, Macdonald
Honorary Secretary-Treasurer: J. K. Frost.
H. H. Little, R. E. Allen, F. B. Chettleburgh
H. B. Campbell, H. F. Glassey, G. W. McKay.   I
SOME CAN FIGHT, SOME
CAN WORK OR PAY ���
ALL CAN SERVE
v
. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY AUGUST 11, 1917
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
Only one Italian vessel was
sunk last week.
The coast shipworkers' strike
has been settled.
The B. C. salmon run this year
is abnormably low.
The first American draft will
be called on Sept. 1.
Copper is now quoted at from
$29 to $30 a ton, spot.
Cases of bubonic plague are
reported in Lima, Peru.
A strong anti-German feeling
pxists in Austro-Hungary.
Floods have caused much damage in the province of Quebec.
Members of the American
forces will be privileged to vote.
Coal shipments from the U. S.
to Canada will not be interfered
with.
Butte streetcarmen are striking
for a 25 per cent increase ih
wages.
The sum of $7,500,000 is being
loaned monthly to Belgium by
the U.S.
General Erdelli, military governor  of   Petrograd,  has   been
assassinated.
A U-boat scare this week caused the closing of New York harbor for a time.
Germany admits the loss of
"slightly more" than three submarines a month.
Returned soldiers are enlisting
again in Australia,being ashamed
of the slackers there.
War cost Canada $600,000,000
up to July 20, and her expenses
are now $850,000 a day.
A German munition factory at
Hennersdorf was wiped out by
an explosion on Sunday.
Over $400,000 was sent last
week from the U.S. for relief
work in Armenia and Syria.
Alvo von Alvensleben.the German capitalist, formerly of Vancouver, will be interned in Seattle.
King Alexander of Greece took
oath of office amid ��reat pomp
and ceremony at Athens on Saturday.
A London despatch says there
is no hope of the removal of the
British embargo on Canadian
apples.
Twelve perished when the
schooner Marsh foundered in a
storm on Lake Ontario on Wednesday.
Members of the R.N.W.M.P.
are not being encouraged to en-!
list as  their services are needed
in Canada.
The U.S. will have no crop
shortage next year, as the government will force the production of wheat.
Sir Lomer Gouin, premier of
Quebec, says that the province
will accept conscription If the
majority so declares.
The residen ce of Hugh Graham,
publisher of the Montreal Star,
was dynamited by antii-conserip-
tionis/s on Thursday.
Russia's national debt, which
before the war was placed at
9,000,0d0,000 rubles, is estimated
now at 50,000,000,OOD rubles.
British residents of Hong Kong
from the ages of 18 to 55 are
liable for military service under
a conscription act passed there.
Sir Sam Hughes objects to the
government program and says
the Canadian offices in England
are too large and overmanned.
Clerks are threatening to leave
the stores and a shutdown may
result in the mines when the
engineers quit at Butte, Mont.
M. Kovostoff, former Russian
minister of the interior, has been
arrested on a charge of misappropriation  of 1,250,000 roubles.
The Dominion government has
announced that it will take over
the Canadian Northern Pacific
system and will further finance
the G.T.P.
Men to the number of 175,000,
who signified their willingness to
change their occupations if tha
exigencies of war demanded it,
are being communicated with by
the National Service board with
the object of obtaining farm
laborers, of which there is a
shortage.
Addressing Soldiers' Mail
In order to facilitate the handling of mail at the front and to
ensure prompt delivery, it is requested that all mail be addressed as follows:
(a) Regimental Number.
(b) Rank.
(c) Name.
(d) Squadron, Battery or Company.
(e) Battalion, Regiment (or
other unit), Staff appointment or Department.
(f) Canadian Contingent.
(g) British Expeditionary
Force.
(h) Army PostOffice, London
England.
Unnecessary mention of higher
formations, such as brigades,
divisions, is strictly forbidden,
and causes delay.
o:iiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiiiiii[]iiiiiiiiiiiiroiiiiiiiiiiiiicoiiiiiiiiiiiiico:iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiii:iii!iiiiiiiiico
j Hudson's Bay Company |
HAZELTON. B. C.
Phone 3L
o
117e have just received a shipment
"T   of EZ fruit jars in pints, quarts
and half-gallons.     As the canning
season  will  commence  shortly,  it
would be wise to
secure your wants in this line early.
r
i
= We also carry Soft Drinks,  Lemonade,  Grape Juice, and =
�� Club Soda =
g Schlitz, Budweiser Cascade and  Phcenix   Beer,   in  quarts, g
= Calgary Beer in pint bottles. =
1 Imported Wines and Liquors always in Slock |
oiiiiiiiiiiiiiui!iiiiiiiiiic]iiiiiiiiiiiicc]iiiiiiiiiiii[03iiiiiiiiiiiico:iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiii[R
WATER NOTICE
(Diversion and Use.)
TAKE NOTICE that Herbert Dixon
Robertson, agent for the Green Mon- j
ster Mining Syndicate, whose address
is Princt Rupert, B. C, will apply lor
a license to take and u��e 16 cubic feet
persecond of water out of LnwrieCieek,
also known as Nicholson Creek, Which
flows north-easterly and drains into
Skeena River about three miles from
Usk.
The water will be diverted from the
stream at a point about three-quarters
mile from moutH of creek, and will be |
used for Domestic, Mining and Power
purposes upon the mine described as
Green Monster Mineral Claim. This'
notice was posted on the ground on the .
29th day of June, 1917. A copy of this
notice and an application pursuant
thereto and to the "Water Act. 1914,"
will be filed in the office of the Water
Recorder at Hazelton, B.C. Objections
to the application may be filed with the
said Water Recorder or with the Comptroller of Water Rights, Parliament
Buildings, Victoria. B.C., within thirty
days after the first appearance of this
notice in a local newspaper. The date
of the first publication of this notice is
July 21, 1917.
Green Monster Mining Co.,   Applicant. |
By Herbert Dixon Robinson, Agent.
The Miner is two dollars a year.
Labor Day
Celebration
Barbecue & Horseracing
Dance in Evening
COME ONE! COME ALL!!
AT TELKWA
Monday, September 4, 1917
\
Of
every description
(or  everybody
at   the
miner
HAZELTON, B. C.
L
^
CANADIAN  PACIFIC  RAILWAY
Lowest rates Prince Rupert to all Eastern Points via steamer
to Vancouver and Canadian Pacific Railway.
Meals and  berth included on steamer
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
S.S. "Princes* May" leaves Prince Rupert every SUNDAY,   at 6 p.m.
S.S "Princess Alice" or "Princess Sophia" leaves Prince Rupert
July 25th; Aug. lst, 4th, 11th, 18th, 25th; Sept. lst and 8th.
t&��S" Above sailings are subject to change or cancellation without notice.
J. I. Peters, General Agent, 3rd Ave. & 4th St., PriflCe Rupert, B.C.
^
J
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
LIVERY and STAGES
night.
We are prepared  to supply private
and   public  conveyances   day   and
Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
BEST DRY BIRCH, $6.50 A CORD
Consign your shipments in Our
Care for Storage or Delivery.
Address all communications tn Haselton.
Ruddy & MacKay
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
FARM LANDS
OREGON & CALIFORNIA RAILROAD CO. GRANT LANDS. Title to
same revested in United States by Act
of Congress dated June 9, 1916. Two
million, three hundred thousand Acres
to be opened for Homesteads and sale.
Agricultural and Timber Lands. Conservative estimate Forty Billion feet of
commercial lumber. Containing some
of best land left in United States.
Large Map showing land by sections
and Description of soil, climate, rainfall, elevations, etc. Postpaid One
Iiollar. Grant Lands Locating Co.,
Box 610, Portland, Oregon.
j    STUART J. MARTIN   I
|       Provincial Assayer       i
I
Ilazdtc:!,
B.C.
MINERAL ACT
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
HAZELTON MINERAL CLAIM, situate in the Omineca Mining Division
of Omineca District.
Where located:���On Nine-Mile Mountain, on the Babine trail.
TAKE NOTICE that J. C. K. Sealy
and George Railson,   per  his   attorney
Thomas   Railson,  Free Miner's Certifi- j
cates Nos. 98326B, 43167B, and 41366B,
respectively,intend sixty days from the
date hereof,   to  apply   to  the Mining |
Recorder  for a Certificate of Improve-
ments, for the purpose of obtaining a I
Crown Grant of the above claims.
And further take notice that action, \
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such   Certificate J
of Improvements.
Dated June 16, 1917.
GEORGE RAILSON, \
42-50 Per T. Railson, Attv.;
JOHN C. K. SEALY
RAILWAY and STEAMSHIP LINES.
Steamers sailing between Skagway, Juneau,
Wrangell. Ketchikan, Anyox, Prince Rupert,
Swanson Bay, Ocean Falls, Vancouver,
Victoria, Seattle.
Leave Prince Rupert for Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle,8 A.M. Saturdays
9 A.M. Mondays. (Saturday boat calls at Ocean ���'nils and Monday boat
calls at Swanson Bay.) For Anyox at 12 noon Fridays. For Ketchikan,
Wrangell, Juneau, Skagway. 12 noon Wednesdays. Fortnightly sailings
to Queen Charlotte Island points.
Arrive   Prince -Rupert from the South at 0:30 a.m. Wednesdays and 9
a.m. Fridays.
Passenger trains leave Hazelton Fast bound at 7:10 P.M. Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays.   Mixed train 1:55P.M, Tuesdays.   Wayfreight
1:86 P.M. Sunday.
Passenger trains leave Hazelton Westbound at 9:2(1 A.M. Fridays,
Sundays   and Tuesdays.      Mixed train  6 A. M. Sunday.     Wayfreight
11:85 A M. Monday.
For further information apply to any Grand Trunk Pacific Agent,or to
(>. A. McNlcholl.Aiit. Oon. FrolRhtand Passenger A-gant,Prince Rupert, B.C.
Maple Sugar
The Real Thing For the
Soldier at the Front
40c per pound
Up-to-Date  Drug Stores
Hazelton B. C.
Commercial Printing *'���
THE MINER OFFICE
MAKE YOUR DOLLARS
FIGHT
AT   THE   FRONT.
BUY
DOMINION OF CANADA
THREE-YEAR
War Savings Certificates
$ 25.OO for $21.BO
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INDIVIDUAL PURCHASES LIMITED TO |1SOJ.
FOR FULL PARTICULARS APPLY AT ANY BANK
OR ANY MONEY ORDER POST OFFICE
JVfl  9,   I��I7
flnanob   dcpartmint
Ottawa THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, AUGUST 11. 1917
MONDAY, AUG. 6
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
cabinet has been chosen.   Kerensky  is premier and minister of
war and  marine.     All factions
have declared  for unity.     The
constitutional democrats endorse
swing into
ine behind him.
The Russians are prepared for
London: The Teutonic armies
are still advancing, but against
increasing resistance, in eastern th" l"vmli'r ;l"'1 W1
Bukowina, and on the western
front are being slowly forced
back by the pressure of the Entente.
Gains made by the British in
Flanders on   Friday,   when  the
village of St. Julien was retaken,
was followed by an advance by
the French on their front. Notwithstanding inclement weather,
the French forces drove beyond
Kortekeer Cabaret, moving their
lines forward, while their patrols
pushed back the German outpost
THURSDAY, AUG. 9
:; ********************************* ***************��;
London: An air of expectancy
for big things prevails in London
today. Slowly, but surely, the
grip on Lens, the great coal center of France, is tightening. The
Canadians are now astride the
battle between the Dniester and ! Lens-Bethune road, within strik-
' Pruth rivers. iing   distance   of  the  positions
Berlin:   Five ministers,includ- which the enemy made in his last
ing foreign secretary Zimmerman, finance minister Lentzeand
Von Lobell
stand to hold the present line.
The official silence regarding
minister of the in-! operations in Flanders during the
past 24 hours is looked upon as
probably holding great significance.
The roar of the big guns as
they hurl tons of lead against
the German lines is distinctly
heard within thirty miles of
London.
! submarine warfare, believing that |    Speculation   has  been revived
may not be planning anothei sally
into the North Sea. The frequent
appearance of small German vessels from their bases is reported.
General Korniloff is steadfast.
Russia will never surrender. He
holds that if the country concludes a dishonorable peace she
will become a German colony.
Paris: Troops of the German
crown prince last night launched
attacks on French positions east
of Vauxaillon and west of the
in the Aisne
region, and met repulse.   Enemy
terior, have resigned. Dv. von
Kuehlman, ambassador to Turkey, will succeed Zimmerman.
A Hague newspaper says that
Kuehlmann lias  always  been  a
disciple  of  the  policy  of doing
and  explored considerable areas | everything to avoid further alien-
in advance of the French posi-1 ation with Britain by the ruthless
^Berlin announces  an  increase! Britain's   friendship   after   the as to wl.-tl.er Hi-  German   ll.-t
io  great violence in artillery fire j war is necessary to Germany,
on the Flanders front,  and ap-     Ottawa:    Parliament may dis-
parently a renewal of the great ��� solve or prorogue as   early   as
battle awaits but fine weather.    J August 18.
The situation  on  the  Russian i �����������__,���.���__., ,___.__.___,..
front continues favorable to the; Timuin-cnAv    att/-   o
central powers, but the Russians i WEDNESDAY, AUG. 8
i a* , ��� , y tt ************************************************;;
appear to be offering a stirrer]- "
resistance, particularly along the; London: With the ground fast
eastern Galician border, and con-j drying, every sign points to a
tinue to yield ground in Bukow-, renewal of the Ypres battle,
ina and in the Carpathians. Everywhere the artillery  fire  is
King George, on the third an- i beginning to increase.     Haig's
niversary of the war, sent iden- men continue to keep up nightly Californie plateau
tical cablegrams to the president: raids,   while   the   Germans   are'
of the U.S.,France and Portugal, attacking Hollebeke, meeting te-1 ,.air]s ri0,.((, of^St. Mihiel. in the
and to Italy, Japan, Servia and pulse. Hindenburg is letting Verdun sector, and in upper
Roumania expressing "the un- j severely alone that portion of the Alsace were checked by French
wavering determination of the line held by the French around |fire< On the greater part of the
British Empire to pursue the; Craonne and the Chemin des
contest until our joint efforts are Dames, possibly because the ad-
crowned with success and our vance of the British, threatening
common aims are attained."        j vital railroad communications, is
the more dangerous.
Five German planes have been
demolished  and eight put out of
action by the British.
: ficed one machine.
Important changes in the naval
, , ,     staff have been made by Geddes.
great factor in  determining the ���;   ,-.   ������ D .       .    i
, ,      ,. ���     . ! Sir Cecil Burney,second sea lord,
tate of Russia. .        .      ,   ,     ...        ,   .   ,  0
is replaced  by  Vice-admiral  Sir
London:     Lloyd George, who iRoslyn Wemyss,   Sir Burney to
has just returned from the Paris, do shore duty.     Allan  Garrett
conference,  speaking in Queen's | Anderson,  hitherto  chairman of
Hall,   declared  that a bad peace j the  wheat commission, succeeds
would  stagger  from one war to]Sir E. C. Geddes, first sea lord,
another.   There must be no next jas controller of naval  construc-
time for the Prussian war lords, ;tion.
Paris: French troops last night
broke into the lines of the German crown prince in the Champagne at three places, inflicting
losses on the enemy and bringing
back prisoners.
Germans sustained heavy loss
TUESDAY, AUG. 7 Iin   a   fruitless   attack   between
MIMaMMWMMMMi, j Avocourt wood and Hill 304, in
' the Verdun sector.
Petrograd: Austro - German
troops between the Dniester and
Pruth have been thrown back on
a front of ten miles from Chotin,
Chotin is at the junction of the
Zbrocz  and  Dniester  rivers, on
strong as could be evolved, and
his retention is absolutely indis-
pensible to the success of the
new-born democracy. The restoration of army discipline is an
immense task for the ministers.
The country faces still the most
critical period in its history.
Russians have evacuated Pros-
ukovu,   on  the  Bug river,   and i
Podolsky, 53 miles south.
New York: Fearing an early
Italian offensive more than any
other phase of the war, Austria
is frantically fortifying for defensive purposes, Germany's request for Austrian troops to reinforce the German armies facing
Russia being flatly refused.
Ottawa:   The senate has pass-j
ed the conscription measure, the
bill   heing  adopted   after   nine |
amendments had been  rejected.
HORSESHOER AND
General Blacksmith
Prices Cut in Half
Shoeing from $2 up���Shop Work
50 cents per hour
MAX. HIATT~T~HAZELTON
[
1
DENTISTRY
1
0
DR. BADGERO
Smithers, B.C.
O
I
HOTEL PRINCE RUPERT
THE LEADING  HOTEL  IN NORTHERN B. C.
: : EUROPEAN PLAN ::
One Dollar per day and upwards
25c. auto service to and from all trains and boats
PRINCE RUPERT     -       -       -     B. C.
James G. Powell
Provincial Assayer
analyticalIShemIs't
NEW HAZELTON    -       -    B.C.
Petrograd: A political confer-]
ence in the winter palace passed j
a resolution declaring its confid-j
ence in Premier Kerensky and i
inviting him to form his own |
cabinet.     These meetings are a
he said. A ghastly war is less
grim than an inconclusive peace.
Britain,he asserted,saved Europe
from Hun domination. The gallant troops of the Allies will cure;
the Kaiser of his stutter.
:;������������,Y,������T,,T���fr,���.T.,.,.YTr.r..r,���r���,;.'
Aisne front heavy  mutual  artillery fire continues.
Berlin:   British forces, after a
bombardment  of dreadful intensity, moved forward from  Nieu-
port.on the coastal section of the
yr/es.lcrjj Belgian front,   but were driven
i back after hand-to-hand fighting.
Flanders during the night.
Dublin: The Irish Home Rule
convention re-assembled today.
Importance is attached to the
interview of Chairman Plunkett
with King George. Sinclair Lis-
burn, a leading Ulster Unionist,
strongly favors a Home Rule
settlement including the whole
of Ireland.
Amsterdam: German Socialists
will oppose the new regime,
claiming that Michaelis does nrt
represent the German people.
Canadian Express
Money Orders
ISSUED   Payable  Everywhere.
J. F. Maguire
Financial and Commercial
Agent
HAZELTON
Assay Office and Mining Office
Arts and Crafts Building, 578 Seymour Strcei
 VANCOUVER, B.C.	
The Estate of J.  O'Sullivan
Provincial Assaycrs and Chemists
Established  181)7 by the late J. O'Sullivan,   F. C. S., 26 years  with
Vivian & Sons, Swansea.
MINING SURVEYS
Dalby B. Morkill
British Columbia Land Surveyor
HAZELTON   -   -   B.C.
iATS
DIRECT FROM ITALY
I  Green Bros., Burden & Co.
j ' Civil Engineers
I Dominion, British Columbia,
and Alberta Land Surveyors
? ' Offices at Victoria, Nelson, Fort George
I and New Hazelton.
s ' !���'. P. BURDEN, New Hazelton
!
I NOEL & ROCK 1
j HAZELTON, B. C. |
HAZELTON HOSPITAL,
ISSUES
TICKETS
! for any  period from one month upward at Si p<��r
j month in advance.   This rate Includes office con-
��� mltntion.* ami medicines, a* well us all costs while
5 j In the hospital.   Tickets obtainable  in   Hazelton
at the I'ost Office or the Drue Store; in Aldermere
from Mr. T J. Thorp; in Telkwa^from Dr. Wallace;
or by mail from ih*�� Modfoal Stinerlntenrinnl a' the
ii :: > ll,,-! i";
e
want
your hide
tw���������������..   ,.�������� r-urs^ t etts ana wool
HIGHEST MARKET PRICES PAID
I'air Treatment and Prompt Returns
Write ns for Price liist.
the Mcmullen hide & fue co.
4:t Alexander Street Vancouver. B. C.
FRIDAY, AUG. 10
It UAAMMMMmMMMM
l'ari.s: Canadians raided the
enemy lines northwest of Lens
during the night, tightening the
grasp upon the coal city. The
British let loose gas waves upon
the German lines along the sand
dunes of the Belgian coast.
Artillery duels and air fights are
the Russo-Galician borders,about|'reported everywhere.
Rouras
Extensive movements
London: Hollebeke, southeast
of Ypres, was the scene of heavy
fighting early Sunday morning, j
and was the object of a German
counter-attack last night. The
enemy was dispersed by British
artillery fire.
A  Tien-tsin despatch dated on
Friday says the cabinet has ap-!25 miles north of tl
proved  of China's declaring war (frontier. I behind   the   German   lines   are
against Germany, and the deci-i Korniloff is ruling with an iron reported by the aerial observers,
sion needs only the signature of hand. His prompt severity in j which, it is believed, indicate a
the president, who is in perfect'executing cowards has saved all I growing nervousness on the part
accord. A war proclamation will j worth saving of the Russian of the enemy by reason of the
likely be made at an early  date. | armies, and the German situation ! probable resumption of the Allied
Comment   of   leading   news- is now anything but enviable.       offensive in Flanders,
papers on the third  anniversary)    Kerensky  has immediately ac-     The German offensive in soutl
of the  war condenses  to:   "the cepted  the  new  responsibilities ! Russia has as its aim the capture
tide is flowing more strongly in!thrown  upon  him   by the conli-
favor of the Grand  Alliance." Idence of all parties and  has set
The end is not yet at hand, but is; to work.
not uncertain. No regret is ex- [ Rome: Italian airmen bombed
pressed that Britain took part in I the Austrian naval base at Pola,
the great struggle. 'Starting (ires in  naptha  depjts,
Petrograd:
The new Russian 'flames rising 1500 feet.
of Odessa. Bessarabia is likely
to become the center of operations. The harvest now being
reaped in Russia attracts the
foe.
Russia's fate hangs upon Kerensky.     The new premier is as
f

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