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Omineca Miner Feb 21, 1914

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THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER IN NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. Ill, NO. 25
HAZELTON, B. O, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1914
PRICE $2.00 A YE/ R
THREE SHOT
BYJPDIT
Passengers*on"Canadian' Nor-
therniKilled While Attempting Capture of Robbers
Vancouver, Feb. 20: ��� While
resisting two bandits who boarded a Vancouver bound Great
Northern train near [Bellingham
tonight, three passengers were
shot and killed; Thomas Wads-
worth, Canadian Pacific Railway
conductor, who was returning as
a passenger from California,
H. R. Adkinson, a Vancouver
building contractor, and R. L.
Lee, of Bremerton, Wash.
The three men attempted to
capture one of the bandits, and
were shot dead by the other.
Both then escaped. A reward
of $5000 is offered for their
capture.
Kitwangar Suicide
A ��� Kitwangak Indian, Daniel
Wells, committed suicide by
drinking carbolic acid while temporarily insane. Coroner Hoskins held an inquest on Tuesday,
the jury bringing in a verdict to
the above effect.
Hockey Champions
Victoria cinched the championship of the Pacific Coast Hockey
League at Vancouver on Saturday night, by defeating the latter
team.
The champions will leave for
the East on March 2, to meet the
winners of the Eastern Championship, for the Stanley Cup,
the first game to be played on
March 9.
Demand Peace
El Paso, Feb. 20:���A mass
was held here today to condemn
the inaction of the United States
government in the matter of intervention, and the restoration
of peace in Mexico. Three more
Englishmen are reported missing.
Loan Bill Favored
Victoria, Feb. 21:���Lieutenant-
go venor Paterson gave his assent
yesterday to the loan bill, and
bill amending Canadian Northern extensions act. Premier McBride introduced a bill giving
further aid to the Canadian Northern construction by bond guarantee not exceeding $10,000 per
mile on main line.
Lumber Company
Re-opens Sawmill
The Interior Lumber Co. have
decided to at once resume operations at their mill on Two-
mile creek. A crew left Thursday to get the camps in shape
and commence logging, and it is
expected sawing will commence
in about ten days. About fifteen
men will be employed in logging,
and this number will be considerably augmented when the mill
starts.
Prisoner Escapes
By scaling a 12-foot fence
surrounding the jail yard, on
Wednesday, a Russian prisoner,
serving a five-month sentence
for supplying whiskey to Indians,
made his escape. He has not
been recaptured to date.
Will Appear in Smithers
The comedy "Turn Him Out,"
which was staged here a week
ago, is billed for Smithers next
Wednesday night, with the same
caste. The proceeds will be donated to the Hazelton Hospital
X-ray fund.
C. P. R. Extension Cost
Vancouver, Feb. 21:���Canadian
Pacific extension work this year
will cost eighty-five million dollars. Of this, ten millions will
be expended in British Columbia,
double tracking and making extensions.
The regular St. Andrew's Society meeting, which should have
been held last 'Friday night, was
postponed on account of other
attractions. The next meeting
will be held on Friday, Feb. 27.
ALASKA TOHAVE RAILWAY
Washington, Feb. 19: ��� The
Alaska railway bill was passed
by the United States Senate on
Thursday by a majority of over
two hundred. President Wilson
will sign the bill at once. The
line, which is to run from the
coast to the coal-fields, will cost
thirty-five millions. It is generally believed that the railway
will greatly benefit the coast
cities of British Columbia.
Parliamentary News
Victoria, Feb. 20:-Sir Richard
McBride will leave for Ottawa at
the close of the present session
for a conference on provincial
matters, among them being better terms for British Columbia.
A petition, with ten thousand
names, was presented in the
House onWednesday by Mr. Wood,
member for Alberni, urging
votes for women.
Parker Williams raised criticisms on alleged extravagance on
public works, and was offered a
personal tour of the province to
examine the work that had been
accomplished. The charges were
denied.
Earthquake shocks were felt
at Montreal and Ottawa last
week,
British Columbia Mining
Vancouver, Feb, 19:���Mining
in British Columbia for the year
1913 was reviewed at the annual
convention of the Western Institute in Vancouver. Last year
proved to be a banner period in
the history of mining in the
Province, the returns constituting
a record. The total of distributed profits was two millions four
hundred thousand dollars.
Commission Report
Victoria, Feb. 18:���The report
of the agricultural commission is
expected within a day or two.
Some of the institute resolutions
dealt with in the report are:
Settlement of logged-olf lands,
exemption of agricultural improvement from taxation, and
reduction of taxation on agricultural communities.
"Tango teas" will be permitted
in the city hotels of Vancouver,
that are provided with a ballroom, on condition that tea is the
strongest beverage served to
the guests.
FORH MILLIONS WASTED  .
BY LAURIt R GOVERNMENT
Extravagance or Worse Marked Construction of National
Transcontinental, Says Report of Commission���Economy
Neither Practiced nor Encouraged
Ottawa, Feb. 14:- That the
National Transcontinental Railway cost $40,000,000 more than
was necessary, in the conclusion
of the commissioners appointed
they believe that, in at least
three cases, advance information
was made use of by the successful tenderers.
The report states that in one
G. T.P. Train Service
Extended to Mile 337
to investigate the construction of I case the firm of Davis & Co. re
the line, under the direction of j ceived no less than $740,000 for
the Laurier government. Thej doing nothing, and which, had
commissioners conclude their, the commission and the govern-
voluminous report as follows: j ment performed their duty, they
"We find that the Transcontin- < never would have received. On
ental Railway Commission,  the | proper classification the contract-
Grand Trunk Pacific Railway and
those having charge of the con-
tors were overpaid   $3,300,000.
Gross extravagance,  the report
struction of the railway, did not | declares, marked the whole con-
consider it   desirable or necessary to  practice  or  encourage
struction of the line, and example after example is quoted.   For
economy in the construction of I instance the engine houses on
this road. We find that, without | the line were built without con-
including the money which was j tract, the prices to be arranged
unnecessarily spent in building; afterwards. In consequence of
the railway east of the St. Law-: this, these buildings cost $800,-
rence River, $40,000,000 at least 000 more than they otherwise
was needlessly expended in the j would.
building of this road." On   station   buildings    alone
The commission criticizes the could have been saved $204,000,
methods of letting tenders in un-' on freight sheds, bunk-houses,
reasonably large sections which: etc., $300,000 could have been
resulted in eleven firms getting saved. The report shows that
all the work and sub-letting it to the government at no time sug-
100 sub-contractors. As one in- [ gested to the commission to be
dication of the handsome profits' careful in its expenditures,
derived by these eleven firms, it' Though the early returns showed
appears that they pair $8,800,000: that the cost was mounting be-
in profits for that part of the
work  which they let to sub-con-
yond that of any single track
tractors.   The commissioners find
that in a number of the largest
constructed in America, the government. continued   indifferent
contracts the contracts were not and the commission went on with
let to the lowest tenderer, and j its extravagance.
Local and District News Notes
William Holland is in the Hospital, suffering from pneumonia.
P. Doherty, C. Doherty and J.
Rangell arrived from Fort Fraser
this week.
S. H. Crum and A. E. Player
returned from a business trip to
Prince Rupert Saturday.
P. C. Folwell, L. H. Campbell,
and R. H. Imlioff, of Vancouver,
came in last Sunday.
A. N. Johnston and G. P.
Allen, of Johnston Bros., Ltd.,
Vancouver, are spending a few
days in town.
Emil Alson and Pete Jenson
left for a season's work-on the
Findlay river yesterday.
H. Brundage, who has been
spending a couple of weeks on
the coast, returned last Saturday.
R. B. Bowden is calling on the
local trade this week in the interests of McKay, Smith, Blair
& Co., Vancouver.
Miss Steel will spend a couple
of weeks with Mrs. Graham at
New Hazelton, before leaving
for her home in Vancouver.
E. H. Hicks-Beach reports the
sale of 320 acres in the Kispiox
Valley to a Saskatchewan buyer.
The price was not given out.
Angus   Beaton   has  returned
from theValley, where he has been
I spending the  winter,  and will
leave in a few days for Groundhog with T. H. Taylor's party.
He will be engaged in laying out
supply depots.
J. Thorne and W. Blackstock
are leaving tonight with a crew
to rush the construction qf the
telegraph line to Smithers.
F. G. Dowling, superintendent
of the Yukon telegraph service,
came in from Smithers Thursday
and will leave for Prince Rupert
tomorrow.
T-. H. McCuhbin, of Pacific,
has been gazetted as deputy mining recorder for the Omineca
mining division, with sub-recording office at Pacific.
A party composed of Fred
Glendinning, Charles Munroe,
George Hauk, and Walter Aitken
are leaving for their placer claims
on Manson creek Monday.
Chief of Police Gammon left
on Thursday for Victoria, on official business, Constable McAul-
ay coming in from Aldermere to
take charge during his absence.
An exciting game of broomolo
was played yesterday afternoon
between the Government office
staff and the Forestry department, resulting in a tie, 2-2.
Although the teams played overtime, they were unable to break
the tie, and the game was called
on account of darkness,
Timetable No. 8, which has
just been issued by the G. T. P.
Railway, provides for an exten
sion of the passenger and general freight service to Wordsworth, at mile 337, to take effect
Feb. 22nd. An accommodation
train will leave Smijibers -as at
present, on Sundays'and Thursdays at 8.30 a.m.,'\amviftg -at
Wordsworth at 6.30 p.m., returning will leave Wordsworth. Saturdays and Wednesdays at 6.30
a.m., arriving at Smithers at 4.30
p.m.
Silver Standard Ore
The contractors engaged ii
hauling ore from the Silvei
Standard completed their contract last Monday, having broughi
down over 7300 tons since Christmas. There still remains a carload to be sacked, which will bi
hauled later. About 25 horses,
used on this work, were shipped
to the end of steel today.
NEW RAILWAY
Vancouver, Feb. 19:���The
Prince John arrived here on
Tuesday with ninety additional
tons of Silver Standard ore for
Trail smelter.
Hanging Bungled
Vancouver, Feb. 20:���According to a Calgary despatch, the
hanging of Jasper Collins, the
Missouri youth who murdered
John Banson, of Calgary, was
the most bungled affair of its
kind in the history of Canada,
Collins lived for twelve minutes
after being cut down.
SCOTCH RANCHER'S DEATH
Vancouver, Feb. 20:���Interna-
national complications may result
from the assassination of William
Benton, a Scottish ranch owner
of El Paso, Texas. Benton was
court-martialled and shot by order of General Villa, near Jaurez
on Wednesday, after being found
guilty of conspiracy, and provoking and insulting General Villa.
Benton was not represented by
counsel at his trial, one report
stating that he was murdered
first and then court-martialled.
The British ambassador at Washington has taken up the case.
Re distribution Bill
Ottawa. Feb. 20: ��� Premier
Borden's re-distribution bill
was given the second reading
at Ottawa on Thursday, and was
sent to a committee of nine to fix
the boundaries.
Smithers Bridge
Work on the bridge over the
Bulkley is progressing very
rapidly, more than half the piling being completed. The temporary bridge has been a great
advantage to ranchera on the
east side of the river, several
carloads of vegetables, hay and
pork having been hauled over
and marketed in Smithers.
Welsh Coal Interests Obtain
Charter for Line Through
Groundhog Coal Lands
Ottawa,-..Feb. 19:-The Railway Committee has granted a
charter for the^incorporation of
th-e Pacific Peace River and Athabasca RuiL^aV./
' At the "back" of this enterprise
is A. D. Thompson, of Cardiff,
Wales, who is head of the greatest coal mining business in Great
Britain.
The line will start at the mouth
)f Naas River, and will take an
���asterly course to the Groundhog
smokeless coal deposits, the only
coal-beds of that description on
the Pacific coast, thence eastward to the Peace River, and
lollowing in a southerly direction
to Prince Albert, a distance in
all of about fifteen hundred miles.
The Bill was reported upon
practically without discussion,
and has been favorably commented on by newspapers everywhere.
C. N. R. Seeks Federal Aid
Ottawa, Feb. 19:��� The Cana-
dianNorthern railway, in seeking
further federal aid, asks for
twenty-five millions, to be secured
by a deposit of common slock,
Much of this money is needed
for construction' work on the
British Columbia division of the
road. Much opposition is being
directed to the measure from
members on both sides of the
House.
Vancouver, Feb. 21:���Figures
submitted at Ottawa show that
the Canadian Northern Railway
has had a total of two hundred
and twelve millions of federal
and provincial aid by way of
guaranteed bonds. Of this British Columhia has guaranteed
forty-two million dollars up to
June of last year.
The material is now on hand
for connecting Smithers with the
government telegraph line, and
the construction crew will arrive
on Saturday night, in readiness
to start operations Monday morning.
Retail Merchants Object
Victoria, Feb. 17:���That the
legislation passed by the house
last year, which gave authority
to farmers' co-operative associations to borrow money from the
government at 4 per cent, with
which to aid the fruit industry
by installing cooling plants, etc.,
is being carried too far, was
claimed by a delegation from the
British Columbia Retail Merchants' Association, which met
Attorney-general Bowser last
week.
The delegation members said
i that the farmers' associations
! were   now   using   government
funds for  the establishment and
I
operation of several co-operative
stores. Thus, in addition to buying with cheap money, they were
also selling, ami In that way competing with ordinary merchants,
( who had to pav a great deal more
! than 4 per cent for money and in
addition paid a heavy revenue
and personal property tax, from
which farmers' co-operative concerns were exempt.
Mr. Bowser is taking the subject up with his colleagues. THE OMINECA MINER. SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21, 1914
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display. $1.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, lfi cents per line l'or each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazette rates.
Vol. III.
Saturday, February 21, 1914.
NO. 25.
The real significance of lhe report on the construction of the
National Transcontinental Railway lies in the possibility that the
G. T. P. Railway Co. may repudiate its agreement with the Government and take over the Eastern section on completion.
The possible cost of the road, amounting to $234,000,000, entailing a rental charge upon the leseenf the road of nearly $15,000
a day, presents a burden that the G. T. P. is likely to refuse to
assume. If the aggreement were repudiated, the result would be
that the whole Eastern section from Moncton to Winnipeg would
remain a charge upon the Government, and would either have to
be operated by them or allowed to pass into the hands of some
other railway at a rental far below that which the G. T. P. is expected to pay, and a consequent loss to the country.
In any case the National Transcontinental is today and will
continue to be a terrific burden on the country. With the extravagance and waste that lias marked its construction, there is small
chance of it ever being of real value to the West, as an influence
in the reduction of freight rates by giving competition to the privately-owned railroads. Further than this, through the whole of
Q lebec and New Brunswick it parallels the Intercolonial.
The report of the commissioners absolutely bears' out the
p wition taken years ago by Hon. A. G. Biair, when Minister of
Railways, who strongly objected and finally withdrew from the
Laurier Government because of his opposition to the plans as far
as they affected the Eastern Provinces. Most of the Maritime
members agreed with the report of the commissioners in their
findings that the New Brunswick section should never have been
built. It is not and never will be a commercial necessity. If the
G. T. P. does refuse to take over the Eastern section it is likely the
Government would have to link up the National Transcontinental
with the Intercolonial, making a Government road from Halifax to
Winnipesr, although with the tremendous cost, it is a question when
the line would ever pay, and if it would not add still more to the
burJen that has been so long carried in the shape of Government
railways.
The attitude of the Opposition towards the report will be
awaited with interest. It is likely that when the printed report is
available, Sir Wilfred Laurier will move a resolution differing with
the report and criticizing its findings.
There is also talk of an investigation being ordered by the
Liberal majoriy in the Senate. This would be independent of the
present inquiry, and would be with the avowed object of backing
up the course which was pursued by the late administration in the
construction ofthe railway. This inquiry would be conducted by a
committee of the Senate.
At any rate, charges are so significant and far-reaching and
the amount involved is so large that it is as least certain that the
whole matter cannot end with the submission of the report to
Parliament.
The Government at no time suggested to the commission to be
careful in its expenditures, although the Opposition was continually
pointing out that the road was being extravagantly built. Though
the yearly returns showed that the cost was amounting beyond that
of any single track railroad ever constructed in America, the
Government continued indifferent and the commission extravagant.
The Government never exercised any authority over the commis-
sion excepting in the La Tuque case, and then only in the way of '   v
extravagance.
When the bill for the construction of the railway was being
discussed in the House of Commons, Mr. Fielding, then Minister
of Finance, stated that he had been advised by experienced railway men that the cost of such a railway from Quebec to Winnipeg,
1,341 miles, would be $;.5.000 per mile,  or $47,040,000,  and  from
the government is to confine fox
breeding in British Columbia to
the provincial limits, so that
all live foxes caught here will
have to remain. The department!
is not expected to throw any obstacles in the way of those who
intend to import live foxes, however. The new regulations also
provide for the issuance of permits to those who intend to go
into the animal-breeding business,
breeding such fur-bearing animals as foxes.
ln the past under Schedule B
of the act it has been unlawful
to shoot certain animals in certain sections at certain times.
The new amendments provide
for the abolition of Schedule B.
Hereafter all game will be considered closed. That is to say.
any man taking a gun under his
arm for the purpose of shooting
game may as well put it back in
the gunrack unless he knows that
there is an order in council providing for an open season for the
particular game he is after.
Protection  of a different dis-
cription is given  licensed trappers, who may select territory
with the knowledge  that others j
will  not  be permitted   to   trap,
within one mile.    All disputes as
to trapping grounds will be set-
tied by the game warden or gov-1
ernment agents.
Dealers in fur will be required
to keep a record of all transactions, giving the names of vendors of pelts. They will be prohibited from dealing in the skins
of wapiti, moose or cariboo, as
well as deer.
The prohibition against carrying guns without a license will
not apply to trapshooters, target
shooters, or militiamen. Boys
under sixteen must be accompanied by an adult with a license.
For any offence under the act
the licenses of hunters may be
cancelled or new ones may be refused in the future. Guides'
licenses may be refused on the
grounds of incompetence, breach
of contract, or misdemeanors
under the law.
North of the 55th parallel possessors of pelts may hold them
up to three months after the
closing of the various seasons,
and possessors south of that degree may hold pelts two months
subsexuent to the closing of the
season. The game department
will  have authority  to   extend
Grocery Department
UP-TO-DATE
Fresh
goods  arriving every week
Try HUNT'S
Supreme Quality
Table Fruits
Fresh Fruits
ORANGES
LEMONS
BANANAS
CIGARS��TOBACCO
A fine line,
prices    on
Smok
es.
Special
good
Buy
)OX.
Hay
Oats
Feed
Fl
our
CHINAWARE
A few pretty sets
Call and see
SPEC1AL-R. S. SARGENT
Black Cashmere Sox
Three Pairs        -       $1.00
Again we call your attention
to the necessity of keeping your feet
DRY
We have Rubbers of
different kinds suitable to your needs.
Come and get fitted out
We are Agents for the famous
"Shorts" Mackinaw
o Any size made up for you
We have a  few  Reversible
Coats at special prices, suitable
for outdoor work
Other lines of Dry Goods and
Staples too numerous to
mention.
BEDDING
Blankets and Comforts
Pillows        -        Linen
GUNS
Rifles and Shotguns
of leading makes
"We have the Guns
and the Powder, too."
Harness
Harness parts
Fixings, etc.
Hardware
Building and
Shelf Hardware
Cutlery
Big Ben Clocks
AND
TABLE LINENS
Fit for the King's table
o���~~ ������
INGERSOL WATCHES
For Sale
Hockey Boots
AND SKATES
We carry the famous
M'PHERSON LIGHTNING
HITCH  HOCKEY BOOT
RGENT,
General Merchant
1
i'i
I'
G. L ?. Restaurant
AND HOME BAKERY
Opposite Police Office.
BREAD, CAKES, PASTRY
No Orientals Employed
Conroy & Swann, Props.
HAZELTON
Fewer Out of Work
Ottawa, Feb.  18:��� There are
fewer men out of work in all the
year in Canada because of strikes
or lock-outs than ever   before.
Labor conditions in this respect
Moncton to Quebec, 460 miles, at $bl,250 per mile, or $14,375,000, have not been so good for &
a total of $61,145,000. great many years,  is the state-
Contracts were let for most of the road, and on September 20,
1911, there had already been spent $109,000,000,   and  Mr.   Gordon
Grant, the chief engineer, estimated that when completed the road
would, exclusive of interest, have cost $161,800,000.
If the road is completed at this cost by the end of 1914, the G.
T. P. will commence to pay rent at the beginning of 1922 on  this
amount with $18,700,000 interest added, making an annual rent of
$5,400,000, or $14,800 per day.
Assuming that the G. T. R.   Railway  will commence to pay
interest on the cost of construction in 1922, the road will have cost
the country for principal and interest $234,651,521.
W. J. JEPHSON
BARRISTER and SOLICITOR
of British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan
NOTARY  PUBLIC
Room 11,Postoffice Bldg.,Prince Rupert
and Hazelton, B.C.
EXPERT
Watch Repairing
WATCHES   -   JEWELRY
O. A. RAGSTAD,    Smithers
NEW PROVINCIAL out the permission of the provin-
GAME REGULATIONS! cial game department.   The pur-
| pose of this is to prevent black
Victoria,   Feb.  16:-The   pro-1 fox breeders from sending foxes
vincial  game   regulations   have out 0f Britisn Columbia, and it
been  consolidated and amended |jB thus expected that the black
in a new  act  which   Hon. W. J,
Bowser,   attorney-general, intro
duced  in  the  House  last week
ment of  the labor   department
this morning.
With regard to the question of
employment the department
states that there is a good deal
of lack of work felt in the West
and in the cities of Toronto and
Montreal, but in the eastern half
of Canada generally conditions
are particularly good at present.
The department looks for a "letup" in the western situation within a short while.
Harold Price J. R. Graham
HAROLD PRICE & CO.
British Columbia
Land Surveyor!
HAZELTON  AND  SMITHERS
1 London Building
llrili.h Columbia
Vancouvor
An important feature of the
anending act is the stipulation
that hereafter live foxes must
not be imported or exported with-
fox breeding industry, insofar as
this province is concerned, will j~
remain at  home.   It is declared I Assav. ���0f,f,ic? *nd Mining Office
that Yukon has practically been
denuded, so  to speak, hundreds
of the valuable animals having
been exported.   The intention of
Arts and Crafts Building, 578 Seymour Street
VANCOUVER, H.C
A. Chisholm
General  Hardware
Builders'   Material
Miners' Supplies
Hazelton  and  Smithers
J. O'SULLIVAN, F.C.S.
Provincial Assayer and Chemist
Assayer for 26 years with Vivian lc Sons, Swansea
Charges Moderate    ::    Correspondence Solicited
Union S.S. Company
of B. G, Ltd*
SS, CHELOHSIN
FOR VANCOUVER
Wednesdays at   2   p. m.
SS. CAMOSUN
FOR VANCOUVER
Saturdays at   10   a. ra.
FOR  GRANBY  BAY
Tuesdays and Fridays
at 8 a, m.
Phone 116
ROGERS' STEAMSHIP AGENCY
Prince Rupert
SMOKE THE NEW CIGARS
,e Baron and Viscoujunih
A PRODUCT OF B. C.
S"thseale GALENA CLUB
W. F. BREWER, Proprietor
Hazelton'*
Favorite
Retort
^=
=J
HOTEL
Reasonable
Rates
Best
Cuisine
NORTHERN
New Hazelton
B. C.
Choicest of Wines
Liquors and Cigars
Largest and most modern Hotel
in the Northern Interior. Modern
 conveniences	
R.  J.   MCDONELL    -    PROPRIETOR
OlIIIIIIIIIIIIQIIIIIIIIIIIIDIIIIIIIIIIIIIIOJIIIIIIIIIIIItOllllllllllllltOJIIIIIIIIIIIinilllllllllllC.lllllllllillCO
Through Service to the South |
TrainsLeaveHazeltonSundays & Thursdays 10:18 a.m. 2
Arrive Prince Rupert same days    -   -   - 5:15 p.m. _
3   Steamer "Prince George"     leaves Prince Rupert   -   Fridays 9 a.m. |
g   Steamer "Prince Albert"  \ .    ������ ���. , ���     ,      c    ,      . f-i
8             or "Prince John" ' leaves Prince Rupert   -  Sundays 6 p.m. g
=    For full information, reservations,  etc.,   apply  to  local  Agent or  to H
|            ALBERT DAVIDSON, General Agent, PRINCE RUPERT, B.C. _
~                                                       Agency for all Atlantic Steamihip Lines ~
ojiiiiiiiiiiiiQiiiiiiiMiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiico]iiiiiiiiiiiico]iiiiiiiiiiii[o:iiiiiiiiiiiiE3iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiinii:o
"Everything in Canvas"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
Prince Rupert. B.C.
ISSUES
TICKETS
HAZELTON HOSPITAL
for any period from one month upward at fl per
month In advance. Thin rate Include! office con-
lultatlonn and mcdlcinei, aa well as all coiti while
in the hospital. Tickets obtainable In Hazelton
at the Poet Office or the Drug Store; In Aldermere
from Mr. T. J. Thorp; ln Telkwa from Dr. Wallace;
or by mall from tha Medical Superintendsnt nt tha
HotplUl.
Skeena Laundry
Lee Jackman. Prop.
Our Work is Good and our Rates
Reasonable
I    Suits Cleaned and Pressed
f  Call and see us.        Next door to
f Telegraph office.
o��'i"i''i"i"��ii"i��i"i")"iHiiii'iii��i(i.)ii>iHiiHm.j; THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 21. 1914
COAL NOTICES.
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Claim No. 1,
Take notice that B. R. Jones, Merchant of Skeena Crossing, British
Columbia, intends to apply for permission to prospect for coal and petroleum
on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles west of the south west corner
of Lot 3390, Cassiar, and marked B. R.
J., N. W. corner, thencesouth 80 chains,
thence east 80 chains, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains to point
of commencement, and containing 64o
acres more or less.
January 6th, 1914. B. R. Jones.
Eric Wickner, Agent.
Oniineca Land District.  District of,
Cassiar.
Claim No. 2.
Take notice that B. R. Jones, Merchant, ""of Skeena Crossing, British
Columbia, intends to apply for permission to prospect for coal and petroleum
on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles west from the south west corner of Lot 3396 Cassiar, and marked B.
R. J., N. E. corner, thence south 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
north 80 chains, thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or less.
January 6th, 1914. B. R. Jones.
Eric Wickner, Agent.
Omineca Land District. District of
Cassiar.
Claim No. 3.
Take notice that B. K. Jones, Merchant, of Skeena Crossing, British
Columbia, intends to apply for permission to prospect for coal and petroleum
on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles west from the south west corner of Lot 3396 Cassiar, and marked B.
R. J., S. E. corner, thence north 80
chains, thence west 80 chains, thence
south 80 chains, thence east 80 chains
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or less.
January 6th, 1914. B. R. Jones.
Eric Wickner, Agent.
LAND NOTICES
Omineca Land District.  District of
Coast, Range V.
Take notice that John Jaynes, of
Duncans, British Columbia, occupation
clerk, intends to apply for permiasion to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
south-west coiner of Lot 349, Coast
District. Range 5, and being the northwest corner of the land applied for,
thence south 40 chains, thence east 20
chains, thence south 20 chains, thence
east 20 chains, thence north 40 chains,
thence west 20 chains, thence north 20
chains, thence west 20 chains to point of
commencement. John Jaynes.
Nov, 28, 1913. M1B-23
COAL NOTICES
Hazelton Laud District.    District of
Coast, Range 5.
Take notice that John Laurenson, of
Prince Rupert, B. c, occupation miner,
intends to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
and a half miles east and one mile
south from the mouth of Kitnayakwa
river, thence south 80 chains, east 80
chains, north 80 chains, west 80 chains,
to point of commencement.
Dec. 15, 1913. John Laurenson.
Tne World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
The Earl of Minto is seriously
ill at his home in Scotland.
The passenger rate war on the
Atlantic steamship lines is ended.
The first parcel mailed in Vancouver under the new postal
rates was addressed to Smithers.
The sale of sweepstake and
lottery tickets of every kind has
been made illegal in Vancouver.
Omineca Land District. District of
Cassiar.
Claim No. 4.
Take notice that B.   R.  Jones,   Merchant,    of Skeena   Crossing,   British
Columbia, intends to apply for permission to prospect for coal and petroleum
on the following described lands:
Hazelton Land District.     District of
Coast, Range 5.
Take notice that John Laurenson, of
Prince Rupert, B. c, miner, intends to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
and a half mileB east and one mile south
from the mouth of Kitnayakwa river,
thence south 80 cliains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, to point
of commencement.
Dec. 15th, 1913 John Laurenson
A company is being formed to
run a sardine canning factory on
the shore of the Sea of Galillee.
The mercury dropped to 48 below zero at Cobalt last Wednesday, 50 below at Cochran, while
a temperature of 62 below is reported from White River,Ontario.
Andrew Carnegie gave $2,000-
000 last week to be used for the
promotion of international peace,
Marconi has succeeded in lighting an electric bulb at a distance
of six miles by a wireless current.
The Eastern states are in the
grip of a severe blizzard, according to a Sunday despatch from
New York, seventeen lives having been lost during the recent
cold spell.
The latest fashion freak is the
trouser skirt. A woman appeared in Hyde Park, London,
wearing this garment, which had
a crease down the center and upturned ends.
Commencing at a post planted
3 miles west from the south
about
west corner of Lot 3396 Cassiar, and marked B.
R. J., S. W. corner, thence north 80
chains, thence east 80 chains, tlience
south 80 chains, thence west 80 chains '
to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or less.
January 6th, 1914. B. R. Jones.
Eric Wickner, Agent.
Omineca Land District. District of
Cassiar.
Claim No. 5.
Take notice that B. R. Jones, Merchant, of Skeena Crossing, British
Columbia, intends to apply for permission to prospect for coal and petroleum
on the followingdescribed lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles west and 1 mile north from the
south west corner of Lot 3396 Cassiar,
and marked B.R.J., S.E. corner, thence
north 80 chains, thence ivest 80 chains,
thence south 80 chains, thence east 80
chains to point of commencement, and
containing 640 acres more or less.
January 6th, 1914. B. R. Jones.
.    Eric Wickner, Agent
Omineca Land District.  District of
Cassiar.
Claim No. 6.
Takenotice that B. R. Jones, Merchant, of Skeena Crossing, British
Columbia, intends to apply for permission to prospect for coal and petroleum
on the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted about
3 miles west and 1 mile north from the
south west corner of Lot 3396 Cassiar,
and marked B. R. J., S. W. corner,
thence north 80 chains, tlience east 80
chains thence south 80 chains, thence
west 80 chains to point of commencement, and containing 640 acres more or
less.
January 6th, 1914. B. R. Jones.
Eric Wickner, Agent.
LAND NOTICES
Omineca Land District.  District of
Coast, Range V.
Take notice that Charles Hicks Beach
of Hazelton, B.C., occupation clerk,
intends to apply for permission to
purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Lot 349, Range V,
Coast District, and being the northeast
cor. of land applied for, thence west 20
chains, south 40 chains, east 20 chains,
north 40 chains to point of commencement and containing 80 acres more or
less. Charles Hicks Beach,
Oct. 11, 1913. Dan McDougall, agt.
Omineca Land District. District of
Cassiar
Take notice that James Bell, of
Glasgow, Scotland, occupation telegraph operator, intends to apply for
permission to purchase the following
described lands:
Commencing at a post planted at thc
northwest corner of Lot 2391 C assiar,
thence 20 chains west, 20 chains south,
thence following Skeena River to the
southwest corner of Lot 2391 Cassiar,
thence north to point of commencement,
containing 40 acres more or less.
Nov. 10, 1913.       14-22       James Bell.
Hazelton Land District.      District of
Coast, Range 5
Take notice that John Laurenson, of
Prince Rupert, B. c, miner, intends to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
and a half miles east from the mouth
of Kitnayakwa river, thence west 80
chains, south 80 chains, east 80 chains,
north 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dec. 15th, 1913. John Laurenson.
Hazelton Land District.     Districtof
Coast, Range 5
Take notice that John Laurenson, of
Prince Rupert, B. c, miner, intends to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
and a half miles east of the mouth of
the Kitnayakwa river, thence east 80
chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dec. 15th, 1913. John Laurenson.
Hazelton Land District,     District of
Coast, Range 5
Take notice that John Laurenson, of
Prince Rupert, B. c, miner, intends to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
and a half miles cast from the mouth
Qf the Kitnayakwa river, thence north
80 chains, east 80 chains, soutii 80
chains, west 80 chains, to point of
commencement.
Dec. 15, 1913. John Laurenson.
Hazelton Land District.     District of
Coast, Range 5.
Take notice that John Laurenson, of
Prince Rupert, B. c, miner, intends to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
and a half miles east from the mouth
of the Kitnayakwa river, thence north
80 chains, west 80 chains, south 80
chains, east 80 chains, to point of commencement.
Dec. 15, 1913. John Laurenson.
Hazelton Land District.     District of
Coast, Range 5.
Take notice that John Laurenson, of
Prince Rupert, B. 0,, miner, intends to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
and a half miles east~nnd one mile north
from the mouth of the Kitnayakwa
river, thence north 80 chains, west 80
chains, south 80 chains, east 80 chains,
to point of commencement.
Dec. 15, 1913. John Laurenson.
Hazelton Land District.     District of
Coast, Range 5.
Take notice that John Laurenson, of
Prince Rupert, B. c, miner, intends to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted two
aud a half mileB east and one mile north
from the mouth of thu Kitnayakwa
river, thence north 80 chains, east 80
chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
to point of commencement.
Dec. 15, 1913. John Laurenson.
OH-
-iiO"-
-iiO"-
-nOii-
More than 250,000 soldiers were
on the sick list in the French
army during the month of January.
Ice on the great lakes is reported to he light, and the early
opening of navigation is expected.
Citizens of Edmonton are raising a fund of $50,000 to be used
to explore the natural gas field
of Vegreville.
Thirty-one nations have taken
official action in anticipation of
participating in the Panama exposition next year.
It has been officially announced
in London that the Prince of
Wales will not make a tour of
the Empire as reported.
There is a strong probability of
the term of the Duke of Con-
naughtas Governor-general being
extended another year.
Winning third place out of a
total of 122 teams competing is
the record of the Vancouver regiment, 72nd Seaforth Highlanders of Canada, in the militia signalling competition of 1913.
Sleighs and Cutters
^=== AT POPULAR PRICES =-=, B
Harness that  will  Last
Everything in Farm
Machinery
Every
Sleigh
Equipped
with
New
Brakes
DON'T WAIT
Until Too Late
PLACE YOUR
ORDER NOW
 WITH	
Seven
New
Varieties
Cutters
and
Stages
CHETTLEBURGH & SINCLAIR
Hazelton   -:-   Telkwa
During the year 1913 Great
Britain built fifty-eight per cent
of the world's shipping. This
shows a decrease from the two
preceding years, and indicates
that foreign nations are going
into shipbuilding.
Only natives of Panama and
Americans will be employed hereafter in the higher grades of service on the Panama Canal.
The latest Zeppelin airship attained an average speed of sixty-
five miles an hour on her eight-
hour trial trip on Saturday last.
The express companies state
that they have no intention'of reducing their rates as a result of
the inauguration of the parcel
post.
The constitutional struggle is
growing sharper in Sweden,
King Gustav still persisting in
his endeavor to secure a liberal
cabinet.
Robert Thelen, a German avia-
tor.made a world's altitude record
last week for a flight with four
passengers. He attained a height
of 9,350 feet.
Thomas Hardy, the well-known
British novelist, married his secretary and typist, Miss Florence
Dugdale, last week. He is in
his 74th year."
^ Drugs and Toilet Articles.   Kodaks,
Kodak Supplies. Printing and Developing,   fl Gram-a-phones  and  Records.
Stationery
Weather conditions havingbeen
-���Oiideal in Southern California, it is
predicted   that    this    season's
orange crop will amount to at
least 40,000 cars.
1 The "Up-To-Date" Drug Stores
1
C�����MH
Hazelton
*OlH.
L. D. Fulton, Mgr.
-im���nOii������nil-
New Hazelton
-nOn������nu���ii i
The new light-house at Cape
St. James, Queen Charlotte Island, has a light earring twenty-
four miles to seaward, and is to
be put in operation this week.
Mrs. Emmeline Pankhurst, the
suffragette leader, who ha9 been
! staying in Switzerland for some
j time,  returned to London   last
' week to resume her propaganda.
Two machine guns and a barge
load of ammunition were unloaded from the British flagship Suffolk and sent by train to Mexico
city last week, for the protection
of the British legation. A company of marines accompanied
the battery.
The Paris Society of Biology
has announced that the vermiform appendix is a useful organ.
After an injection into a patient
of a minute quantity of dry
appendix powder, better work
by the stomach was obtained
within half an hour.
^
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
We are prepared to supply private
and   public  conveyances   day  and
Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton
LIVERY and STAGES
night.
Coal and Wood delivered promptly.
Ruddy & MacKay
Consign your shipments in  Our
Care for Storage or  Delivery.
Address all communications to Hazelton.
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
tr
\~
CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
BRITISH COLUMBIA  COAST  STEAMSHIP SERVICE
Steamer "PRINCESS "BEATRICE"
Leaves Prince Rupert for Vancouver, Victoria and Seattle every
SUNDAY AT 8  P.M.
Let Us Arrange Your Trip East
Tickets to and from all parts of the world.       Atlantic and Pacific
Steamship Tickets.
For Tickets, Reservations nnd Information apply to
G. McNab,   Cor. 3rd Ave. and 6th St.,   Prince Rupert, B. C.
=^\
C. P. R. Denies
Montreal, Feb. 19:-"On the
contrary, the C. P. R. has never,
directly or indirectly, protested
to the British government or any
other government against .the
Panama Canal tolls, and the company does not care a rap what
conclusion is finally reached."
This statement was made by
Sir Thomas Shaughnessy yesterday after seeing a Washington
despatch which credited Senator
0'Gorman with the declaration
that the C. P. R. was inspiring
the demand of the British government for the repeal of the
tolls exemption clause.
Suffragettes Use Cannon
Blackburn, Eng., Feb. 17:���
Militant suffragettes fired today
a huge cannon captured from the
Russians in the Crimean war.
For sixty years it had stood silent
as an ornament in the city park.
The whole city was shaken by
the explosion and people flocked
into the streets in the darkness,
fearing that a mine disaster had
occurred in the neighborhood.
It was not until daylight that
the cause of the explosion was
discovered, and it was then found
that the suffragettes had carefully cleaned from the bore of
the gun over half a century's
accumulation of gravel and stones
before ramming home a heavy
charge of gunpowder.
In the vicinity was a notice inscribed: "Wake up Blackburn;
the Labor party, which claims to
stand for justice and freedom,
supports a government that tortures women under the "Cat and
Mouse Act."
-nil���mOm-
-IIOM-
���HOli-
-nO
ON-
Thorp & Hoops
Real Estate, Financial and Insurance Brokers
 ALDERMERE, B. C.
Sole district agents for E. G. Prior & Co., Victoria, Agricultural Machinery and Implements, WaRons, Etc.
Fire,  Life,  Accident,  and Employer's Liability Insurance.
We represent the best companies.
We Can Locate You On a Good Pre-Emption Near the G. T. P.
If you desire information about the Bulkley Valley write us.
���Hll���-iiO'l���-Mil������ ������On������ mi������'lOll������ iiii-��� nil������ i
���nO
^
BULKLEY VALLEY FARM LANDS
FOR SALE
/7^HESE LANDS are located close to the main line of
V-J the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway, which is being
constructed through the heart of the Bulkley Valley, one
of the best farming districts in British Columbia.
Steel is now laid through Telkwa, and trains will soon be running
from Prince Rupert to this point. There are good roads to all parts
of the Bulkley Valley from Telkwa.
The Bulkley Valley is an ideal dairying and mixed farming district,
with a market for all kinds of farm produce.
We own all the land we offer for sale, and can give a guaranteed title.
Our lands were all very carefully selected several years ago by experts in the land business. We sell in tracts of 16(1 acres or more.
Our prices are reasonsonale and terms are easy. Write for full information to
NORTH COAST LAND COMPANY, Ltd.
Suite 622 Metropolitan Building
Paid up Capital Sl.600.000. VANCOUVER, B. C.
=5<v.
o]imiuiiiMDiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiico]iiiiiiiiiiii[0]iiiiiiiiiiiic6]iiiiMiiiiiiDiiiiHiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiiiiico
= -   - ��� ��� 3
���
i
j Hudson's Bay Company
1 GROCERIES
DRY GOODS
HARDWARE |
1 of Best Quality at Popular Prices 1
��� s
===== =
LIQUORS *tny��kt$��
��
A full Assortment of
_ i
|     HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY     1
| HAZELTON, B. C I
o]iiiiiiiiiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiHiiiiiiiico]iiiiiiiiiiiito]iiiiiiiiiiiito]iiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiitiiiitiaiiiiiiiiiiiici THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY. FEBRUARY 21, 1914
Phone 300 P.O. Box 1C35
HARRISON W. ROGERS
ARCHITECT
Special Attention to Out of Town Clients
Suite One, Federal Block,
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Duminiun and British Columbia
Land Surveyors
Offices at Victo.ia, Nelson. Fort George
and New Hazelton.
B. C. Affleck, Mgr.   Now Hazelton.
F. (I. T. Lucas E. A. Lucaa
LUCAS & LUCAS
Barristers and  Solicitors
Rugt-rs Building
Cur. Granville nnd Pender
Telephone Seymour 598 VailQUUVer, B. C.
Smithers Notes
WISH TO ACQUIRE
ALASKAN PANHANDLE
)tM#*iN'*******iHi*ii***+**+*
:   McRAE BROS., LTD.
STATIONERS &   PRINTERS
4
i
; t
j,         Architects' and Engineers' Supplies ���.
1                 Kodnltt, Loose Leal Sysleim .).
J. Remington Typewriter*. Office Furniture ��
| Prince Rupert, B. C. |
<{^H.*.I..M'.;-l"l��!"l-I��i"l"l"i-r"l*-!*-i"l*-i"M*I:.
Mines and Mining
Good Proportion l'or sale ��� Cash nr on
Bond.       Development and
Assessment Work.
Carr Brothers
Eiglit Years In This District.
lln/,-11,,11.   II.   < .
p O
I  ,1. A. l.oKoy .1. Nation  (
j Hotel Winters j
���   Cor.   Abbott and Water Stives   ;
i       Vancouver       I
I .
i European Plan $1.00 to $2.60 J
j Rooms with liaths.    Hot and Cold ;
f Water.     Steam Heated. I
| Motor hus Moots   All Boats and [
j Trains. I
THE
QUALITY STORE
Raw Furs Bought and Sold
Full line of Dry Goods
MEN'S FURNISHINGS
Hardware, Groceries
C. V. SMITH
GENERAL MERCHANT
HAZELTON
Clothes That
Hold Their
Shape
J
Hobberlin Clothes are always tailored right They
always hold their shape.
No part is stinted. We can
please the most particular
dresser with Hobberlin garments. Drop in and have a
look at the new spring
samples.
NOEL & ROCK |
Hazelton, B. C.
(From Thursday's Review)
John 1). Charleson arrived from
Nechaco Saturday.
Sanitary Inspector Avison arrived in town this week.
F. L. Charleson left on a busi-1
ness trip to Prince Rupert this
morning.
Mrs. Orchard is reported to be
making Rood progress at the Ha-1
zelton Hospital.
Superintendent Ramsay, of Foley, Welch & Stewart, left for the
end of steel today.
G. A. Woodland, of the Standard Oil Co., was a business visitor in town this week.
Albert Davidson, general agent
of the G. T. P., Prince Rupert,
was up on Wednesday.
Surveyors who have been working on the Ulrick quarter section
have completed their subdivision.
The Assembly Club is holding
one of the regular fortnightly
dances in the Prince Theater tonight.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bowness,
of Decker lake, spent a few days
in town this week, leaving for
the coast Thursday.
It. T. Bishop, of the New Hazelton branch Union Hank, relieved A. E. Fawcett here for a
lew days.
F. P. Chettleburgh, of Ttlkwa,
and Merrick Harvey, Copper
River, were among the arrivals
in town this week.
Mrs Patrick, who was removed to the Hazelten Hospital, suffering with a severe attack of
tonsilitis, is reported much improved.
Rev. Father Coccolo spent several days in Smithers on his way
from Fort St. James to Prince
Rupert, and will return shortly
to visit the Babines.
Road Superintendent Carr has
received instructions to start
corduroying the approach to the
new bridge, and has already
started work on it.
Geo. J. Frizzell arrived on Saturday's train from Rupert.
George spent five weeks in California, but says he prefers the
bracing climate of the North o
that of California.
Miss Margaret and Mr. Harold Silverthom returned from
school in Vancouver last night,
and were met here by their
father, leaving this morning for
their home in Pleasant Valley.
Mrs. (Dr.) Wrinch and son
Arthur, of the Hazelton Hospital,
arrived Wednesday to spend a
few days with Rev. and Mrs.
Batzold. This is Mrs. Wrinch's
first trip to th-i valley.
Fresh eggs and fresh fruit at
Sargent's.
Ottawa, Feb. 17:���The British
Columbia members intend to
draw the attention of parliament
and the government during this
session to the question of Canada
opening negotiations for the turning over of the Alaskan panhandle, now owned by the United
States, to the Dominion. The
question will probably be brought
up by Dr. Thompson, member
for the Yukon, and he will be
supported by the British Columbia members, and also by the
Alberta representatives, who are
to a lesser degree interested.
The Alaskan panhandle consists of islands of the Alexander
Archipelago and a strip of coast
on the mainland running south
from Alaska proper as far as the
fifty-fourth degree. It consists
of a fringe along the British
Columbia coast no less than 536
miles long and from eight to
thirty-five miles wide, shutting
off the Yukon territory, the
northern half of British Columbia
and the entire Mackenzie Basin
from free access to the Pacific
Coast. Northern Alberta is also
shut off from free access to the
sea, and as that northern country develops this promises to lie a
serious menace to its prosperity.
The history of the panhandle
is interesting:   Alaska originally
belonged to Russia. The traders
of the great Russian-American
Trading Co., coming across the
northern Pacific, followed the
line of easiest communication,
and planted their stations along
the coast, while the Hudson's
Bay Co., coming from the east,
had spread its network of posts
from the interior westward.
When the two companies came
into collision the two governments found it necessary to define their respective spheres, and
this they naturally did in accordance with existing interests.
The coast, with the Russian stations, was given to Russia: the
interior, with the Hudson's Bay
Co. stations, to the British company. , When the United States
purchased Alaska it secured also
the panhandle.
The British Columbia members
will propose that the Canadian
government take the matter up
with the United States and the
Imperial government with a
view to making some exchange
of territory, British Honduras
and British Guiana, both being
suggested.
Peace River Agriculture
Edmonton, Feb. 18: ��� John
Harris, formerly of Oklahoma,
and H. L. Adair, of Southern
Alberta, have the distinction of
taking the first steam plows into
the Peace River country,   north
of the 55th parallel of latitude,
where they will engage in grain
growing and mixed farming.
Harris has a tract of 4,000 acres
in the Grande Prairie district,
and Adair has between 4,500 and
5,000 acres near Lake Saskatoon,
in Northwestern Alberta. These
plows will break from 40 to 50
acres of land in 16 hours, working two shifts. Harris is planning to break 2,400 acres this
spring, and seed it to wheat and
barley, which he will feed to
stock next winter. Heads of implement houses in Edmonton report that twenty steam plows
have been contracted for delivery during April and May. This
means that many thousands of
acres of virgin lands will be broken and cultivated this year.
Unionist Victory
London, Feb. 18:���The by-election held in the Wycombe division
Buckinghamshire, today, was
won by the Unionist candidate
with a majority of two thousand.
The Home Rule controversy
remains a grave issue, according
to the Times, which says it is the
greatest national crisis in the
last three hundred years.
Naval Economy
London, Feb. 18:--There will
be no British naval maneuvers
this year, says the London Mail,
which will mean the saving of
$2,500,000.
MEXICAN BANDIT
CASTILLO CAPTURED
Vancouver, Feb. 19: ��� Castillo, the Mexican bandit chief,
who killed fifteen Americans by
setting fire to a train and then
sending it into a tunnel near the
U. S. border, has been captured
by American soldiers. He and
his followers have been turned
over to General Villa. All will
be executed.
Rebels Wreck Train
Mexico City, Feb. 17:���Rebels
again cut off the oil supply from
Tampico over the railroad into
San Luis Potosi, this time emphasizing their work by the total
destruction of a paasehger train,
and killing and wounding many
passengers.
Working For Peace
Washington, Feb. 19:���A visit
today to the State Department
by Sir Cecil Spring-Rice, the
British Ambassador, who is
known to be disposed to close an
harmonious action by the United
States and Great Britain in re
gard to Mexico, gave rise to a
report that greater pressure will
be brought to bear upon General
Huerta, in an effort to shake his
determination to remain at the
head of affairs in the Mexican
capital.
Tailoring is as much an
art as painting���every
MWf CLOTHES
C^WK BROS. &-
./-1LLCN   LIMITED.
Fresh  baker's bread daily at
Sargent's.
William IL Holland
GENERAL STORES AT
HAZELTON & KISPIOX
WOOD WOOD
Send   In  Your  Order
150 Cords good Birch Wood
for s.il" at $7.00 per cord delivered lo unv pint of tlie eity
  at your door 	
Alio Good Dry Lumber for Sale
Good Warm Blankcls. all
sizes  and  colors.     Wool
Caps.    Sweater Coats for
Men and Women
William  H.  Holland
Special at Sargent's: Ladies'
two and three buckle overshoes;
regular $2.50 and $3.00 values,
for $1.65.
NOTICE
IN    THE    SUPREME   COURT   OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
In the matter of the Administration
Act,   and   in  the matter  of the   Estate of Oscat   Soderborg,  deceased,
intestate,
TAKE NOTICE Hint hy an order of
His Honour Jtldge Young, dated the
With day id' February, 11U4, I was appointed Administrator of the estate
of the said Oscar Soderberg. All parties
having claims against the said estate lire
hereby requested to forward the same.
pmpei ly.verilied, to me, before the 14th
day of March I.H4, and all parties indebted to the said estate are required
to pay the amount of their indebtedness to me forthwith.
Hated 1.0th Eebruury, 1914.
Stephen H. Hoskins,
26-26 Official Administrator
Hazelton, B.C.
garment is a masterpiece in cloth.
Cook Bros. & Allen,
Limited label is an
insurance policy of
satisfaction.
E.
w
i?i
K-/
V>t
Our Spring and Summer Samples
are here, showing a larger and better
range of classy fabrics than ever before
Drop in and let us take your measure while the range
is complete
!l
R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd. I
if
ffiSmfc^
i\

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