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Omineca Miner Oct 10, 1914

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THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER IN NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. IV, NO. 6
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1914
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
PATRIOTIC FUND SWELLS
More Contributions Received By
Committee���Indians
Will Help
A good addition to Hazelton's
share in the Canadian Patriotic
Fund ia reported this week by
Government Agent Hoskins, and
it is certain that the local subscriptions will amount to a substantial sum.
Chinese and Japanese residents are well represented on the
list, and the Indians of the town
promise to do their share. On
Thursday evening, Mr. Hoskins
was asked to attend a meeting
of the chiefs' council, called to
consider the war situation, which
he explained at length. The
native leaders expressed their
desire to do something for the
Patriotic Fund, and promised to
take some action.
Following are the week's subscriptions:
Previously acknowledged $513.00
H. G. Peters .
5.00
A. Eberhardt
1.00
C. Hicks Beach      .    _ .
5.00
R. A. Sampare   .
5.00
T. G. Johnson
5.00
Lee Jack man
2.50
Mrs. Gee Shee
2.50
Wing Quong       .      ,
.50
Lee Sou ,      ���      .      .
.50
Lee Fong   .      .      .
1.00
Chow Wal
.60
Lee Tong    .
1.00
Chow Hoy     .
2. CO
Chow Tong.      .
2.50
Sam Lee.      .
5.00
Nag Man Din
.50
Nag Man Sik .
.50
Wong Won .
1.00
Stephenson & Crum
10.00
Bob McDonald    .
1.00
Hugh Taylor .
2.50
Thefollowingadditional month
ly subscriptions have been
proni-
ised:
W. J. Carr    .
$ 6.00
Sperry Cline
2.50
R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd
10.00
Germans Have
Taken Antwerp
A despatch received as we
go to press states that Antwerp has fallen, after a gallant defence. The bombardment of the forts lasted for
ten days, the big siege guns
of the Germans doing immense damage and rendering
the defences untenable.
WILFUL MURDER IS
CORONER'S VERDICT
The coroner's inquest into the
death of Bert Taylor was concluded on Saturday, when the
jury brought in a verdict that
the deceased came to his death
from wounds inflicted by a person or persons unknown. The
investigation showed that Chief
Minty and his subordinates had
left no stone unturned in their
prompt efforts to discover the
murderer. Twenty-two witnesses were examined.
Bowser Goes to Cariboo
Vancouver, Oct. 9: -Hon. W. J.
Bowser has left for a week's
visit to Cariboo district, in accordance with earlier plans.
GERMAN GUNS THUNDERING AT ANTWERP
BELGIAN GARRISON WILL RESIST TO THE LAST-
ENEMY IS PRESSED BACK IN NORTHERN FRANCE
London,  Oct. 10:���The outstanding feature of the war is the j days,
siege of Antwerp, which still continues, the defences holding out! army.
although the thunder of the powerful German guns can be heard
for twenty miles. The bombardment of the inner forts and outlying parts of the city began on Thursday. It is unofficially reported that two of the inner forts have been silenced and that the city
is burning in four places. The Belgian army is said to be heading
for Ostend. Experts are now beginning to think chat Antwerp
will be able to hold out until relieved. Meager reports show that
the garrison is making a brave fight.
Berlin has warned the German people against, excessive optimism, stating that the garrison at Antwerp is making a desperate
resistance.
The Ursuline convent has been destroyed by German shells.
In an attempt to smash a force of Allies, south of Antwerp,
a large body of German troops yesterday was caught in a trap and
destroyed. It is believed the Allied force at this point was one
which landed at or near Ostend and was reported on Thursday to
be marching to the relief of the beleaguered Belgians at Antwerp.
Additional reports show great suffering among refugees from
Antwerp. Officers of the garrison declare they will hold out to
the last.
There appears to be little change in the situation in France.
In the serious engagement at Roye, it is officially stated, the Allies
have taken sixteen hundred German prisoners in the last two days.
Fort Conde, on the Aisne river, held by the Germans for sixteen
has been  taken, by the aid of the  big guns of the  British
Paris last night reported that the Allies had made advances.
The official bulletin  also states that the situation  is satisfactory
from a Franco-British point of view.   The battle still continues.
In recent engagements on the East Prussian frontier, the
Russians have captured ten thousand German prisoners and forty
guns.
Driven from Poland, the Germans are making a stubborn
stand, with reinforcements from Koenigsberg.
It is officially announced that British airmen have made another
successful raid on Dusseldorf, Germany, dropping a bomb on one
of the airship hangars and destroying a Zeppelin. In this they
repeated the successful tactics of Sept. 23.
The Japanese have mounted siege guns on a mountain
dominating the Tsing Tau forts, and their reduction is considered
only a matter of days.
The Austrian garrison of Przemyl is reported to have surrendered the fortress to the Russian besiegers.
Colonel Burland, who left Montreal recently to take charge of
Canadian Red Cross work in London and on the battle front, is
dead, of heart disease.
The Australian parliament has voted $500,000 for the relief of
Belgian sufferers.
The Servian and Montenegrin troops continue their advance
against Austria.
THE MINER'S TELEGRAPHIC BULLETINS TELL STORY OF GREAT WAR DAY BY DAY
London, Oct. 5:���Despatches from the battle front say the
Allies, having successfully repulsed all German counter-attacks,
have again taken the offensive. Near Roye, yesterday, the Germans made several violent attacks on the Allies' line, without
success. The Allies then advanced, and trench after trench of the
German position fell into their possession. The .center has driven
the enemy further back towards the north. At Roye, which is
near Noyon, the Germans had been reinforced.
In the fighting around Antwerp, the Germans have gained
some ground, the Belgians taking up a new and strong position on
the river Nethe. One of the Antwerp forts on Saturday wiped out
an entire German regiment.
Conflicting reports concerning the campaign on the Russian
frontier are coming in. The most dependable indicate that the
greatest battle of the Russo-German conflict is being fought at
Cracow, where large forces of Germans and Austrians are arrayed
against a great Russian army. In the north fighting still continues
Both sides claim victories.   The Czar has left for the front.
The German press now admits the occurrence of cholera
in Get many and Austria.
In their campaign against Austria, which is being fought
along the river Drina, the Servians have made further gains.
The cruiser Empress of Russia, formerly a C. P. R. liner, was
in action off the Island of Cebu, with the German auxiliary cruiser
Princess Alice, which carried $10,000,000 for the relief of Germans
in Tsing Tau. The Alice, broken and shattered by the fire of the
Empress of Russia, fled within the three-mile limit and was beached
to escape destruction.   The money is still aboard.
A London military writer says that, but for strong reinforcements, the German army commanded by von Kluck would have
met with complete disaster last week. As it is, the circle is being
drawn tighter daily around the Kaiser's greatest army and ablest
general.
Ottawa, Oct. 5: The Canadian government has consented to
the enlistment of 2,500 soldiers in British Columbia. They may
have a permanent camp and training grounds on Vancouver Island
this winter. If a second contingent is sent to the front, it is
probable that a majority of the men will come from the west.
London, Oct. G: -The Tsar is now on the Russo-German frontier
while the Kaiser is also reported to be in East Prussia. The
Russians won a great victory at Augustowo, on the Nieman river,
where the Germans suffered severe losses in killed, wounded and
prisoners. The enemy was forced to evacuate the provinces of
Suwalki and Lomza, in their retreat abandoning large quantities
of war material.
The next great battle of the war, it believed, will be at Cracow,
where it is expected three million men will be engaged, making it
the greatest and pos.sibly the decisive battle of the Russian
campaign. It is believed by many that the war will soon end if
the Russians take Cracow, as their march on Breslau and Berlin
would quickly follow.
Paris despatches say the conflict between the Allies' left wing
and the right of the Germans continues with great violence, north
of the river Oise. As yet there is no decisive result. At certain
points, an earlier despatch said, the Allies had to yield ground.
A midnight announcement says the situation is satisfactory.
ln the Argonne region the Allies have repulsed day and night
attacks.
President Poincare is at the battle front.
Reports of fighting Arras and Valenciennes show that the
Allies are attempting to envelop von Kluck in a net of steel.
Berlin says British ships have arrived at Lisbon to transport
Portugese troops to the front, Portugal having decided to send a
force to the aid of the Allies. It is also reported from the Germar
capital that three of the Antwerp forts have fallen. This is officially denied. Antwerp reports that the Germans are still flinging
away infantry in desperate attempts to capture the forts, and have
lost 8000 men, Thus far, the forts of the outer ring have suffered
little harm. The big guns of the German army are being worker
by Krupp employees in plain clothes, owing to losses among thi
gun layers.
Protests to Holland resulted in an investigation of the chargi
that Germans were using the Dutch flag to carry on trade in con
traband of war. Holland admits that the complaints were justified. To end the contraband trade, Rotterdam may be declared in
a state of siege.
A great meeting at Milan, Italy, urged the Italian government
to enter the war. Attempts of the police to restrain the crowd;^
were in vain. A Socialist deputy from Trent, Austria, addresser!
the meeting saying that the people of Trent awaited liberation by
their Italian brethren.
Ottawa, Oct. 6:���A shipment of an additional 1000 horses, witi
a large supply of ammunition, both for the use of the Canadiat'
troops, left Quebec yesterday for England. There was no convoy,
for which reason 1,800 Belgian reservists, chiefly from the United
States, were left behind. They may go with the second Canadia'
force, should one be sent. The matter rests with the war office,
which has given no decision as yet.
A large party of Austrian workmen, in New York, announce
that they are coming to Canada. The immigration department
will bar them.
London, Oct. 7:���As yet the violent battle which is proceeding
north of the river Oise, between the Allies' left and the German
right, has had no definite result. Along the rest of the battle
front in France the situation is unchanged.
The German forces continue to retreat in East Prussia, having
met defeat all along the front in that district. The enemy have
been forced to abandon their fortified positions between Wierzbolo
and Lycki
A despatch from Antwerp says the municipal officials have
been notified by the German military governor that bombardment
of the city was imminent, suggesting that all those who wish to flee
should do so at once. Bordeaux advices say Hon. Winston
Churchill is in Antwqrp, in conference with the Belgian authorities.
The Japanese have taken the Marshall Islands, German colonies in the Pacific, north of New Zealand. These islands have an
area of 160 miles. The capture brings the total loss of German
colonies since the opening of the war up to half the area of the
German empire proper,
A report, which has not been confirmed, says that von Moltke,
chief of stall' of the German forces, has been deposed by the Kaiser
for refusing to carry out the latter's orders for an airship attack on
England. The Kaiser has also made many changes in the location
of his generals.
A number of members of the Legion of Frontiersmen, from
Western Canada, arrived in London yesterday and made an appeal
direct to Lord Kitchener to go to the front.     They were accepted.
Victoria, Oct. 7: -The proposed winter military camp on
Vancouver Island for all Canadian troops is under consideration at
Ottawa, where Sir Richard McBride will arrive today. He will
visit New York before returning.
Vancouver, Oct. 7: A Japanese regiment is to be organized in
Vancouver and its services offered to the British Empire. Two
hundred and fifty Japanese are now seeking naturalization.
London, Oct. 8:���Another exploit of the British submarine E-9
is reported by the official press bureau.     On Sept. 23, in a raid off
(Continued on Psge Four)
LOCAL NEWS PARAGRAPHS
Happenings of the Week In and
About the Town of
Hazelton
The Copper Tavern, Skeena
Crossing's handsome new hotel,
is now open for guests.
Vegetables from the Sealy
wardens won a number of prizes
at the Prince Rupert Exhibition.
Mrs. T. T. Ailken and her
baby daughter left on Thursday
for their home at North Bulkley.
F. M. Dockrill, of Vancouver,
<pent a couple of days in Hazel-
Ion this week, on his way to the
Bulkley Valley.
James Turnbull, of the forest
branch, returned yesterday from
in official visit to Skeena Crossing and Andimaul.
Local hunters are preparing for
a field day with the grouse and
lucks on Monday, which is
Thanksgiving Day.
Mrs. Hogan, of Victoria, mother of Miss Hogan, head of the
nursing staff at the Hospital, is
visiting her daughter.
Hankin Bros, have sent into
fown samples of unusually large
md fine potatoes, grown on Glen
Meadow ranch, near Hazelton.
Pete Jensen, the Ingineca pio-
leer, returned this week from hia
���mmmer's work in the placer
liggings of the Upper Findlay.
The Royal Bank is now in-
tailed in its new office in the
\ldous    &     Murray     building,
���vhich has been handsomely fitted
'ip.
J. C. Nesbitt, who has been
(respecting between Tacla and
Mation lakes, returned to town
m Tuesday with some fine samples of ore from new discoveries.
Early on Monday morning fire
destroyed C. Fernua's cabin.
Mr. Fernua barely escaped without injury, losing most of his
���fleets. The cause of the fire is
unknown.
The election of fire wardens
l'or the town, conducted on Monday by the government agent,
resulted in the choice of R. S.
Sargent, Jos. Nay lor and Chas.
Hicks Beach, who will inspect
all buildings.
This has been a splendid season for gardens in this vicinity.
Roots and vegetables have done
exceptionally well, nearly every
garden about Hazelton showing
a big yield. Government Agent
Hoskins estimates the yield of
potatoes in his large garden at
27 tons to the acre.
The party which has been surveying to the north ol Groundhog
under T, H. Taylor, returned to
Hazelton on Tuesday. The members report an excellent season
nnd the accomplishment of extensive base line surveys. They
saw a great deal of game. Included in the party were D.
Jenkins, J. A. Challoner, R. D.
Ross, and eight others.
The International Irrigation
Congress is now in session in
Calgary. ie Omineca
v
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION KATES: Canada anil BritiBh Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $2.HO per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 211 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices Inserted at B. C.
Qazette rates.
Vol. IV.
Saturday, October io, 1914.
No. (J
It is evident, trim reports of mining and smelting activity
throughout the province, that the effect of the war on the mining
industry is much less serious than was anticipated. During the
first weeks of the great conflict, pessimism seemed to be general
among those interested in British Columbia's minerals, and there is
no doubt that mining, in common with all other industries, received
a setback. Those who feared the worst were soon enlightened,
however. As one of the basic industries, mining could not be long
interrupted, and soon the smelters were again in the market for
ore; stoping and shipping were resumed, and development continued on many properties.
In Rossland, for instance, it is announced that mining operations are in progress on a scale not approached in many years, the
copper-gold mines shipping- an average of 1,200 tons a day, as
against 000 to 800 tons a day l'or August. While copper may not
recover its tone for some little time, it is evident that the Consolidated has every faith in the future.
The'outlook for silver and lead is still brighter. The British
demand for the heavy metal will shortly have a stimulating effect,
and normal prices are looked for in the immediate future. Silver
has appreciated, owing to the strength of the London market, and
the price is practically certain to be high enough to warrant the
operation of the silver-lead mines.
It is not to be expected that the financing of new mining
ventures will be an easy matter for some time to come, but there
is good reason to believe that, in Lhe end, the war will not have an
ill effect on the development of our minerals. When peace is
concluded, there will inevitably be a large amount of capital available for investment. Much British money, now tied up, will be
put to new uses, and we believe that, as a result of the Imperial
consolidation brought about by the war, this capital will be invested
mainly within the British Empire. lf our prospectors and miners
keep "plugging away," developing their propfrties as best they
can, their reward will come when the war has reached an end and
the financial market resumes a normal condition.
ROCHER DE BOULE I have  not  been   in the tunnel or
TUNNEL CUTS VEIN . raise, and we have heard no ofli
cial statement concerning tbe
the facts, but we believe these
reports are in the main correct
and that the big thing for which
we have been waiting and hoping
Abiut three weeks ago it was
rumored that the long cross-cut
tunnel which the Montana Continental Development Co. are
driving had encountered a small
vein at about the point where
they expected to cut the big
Rocher de Boule vein for which
theyhavebeen running. The management asserted that this was
not the vein for which they were
were looking and that a recent
survey had demonstrated that
they would have to drive about
fifty feet further. Be that as it
may, a "no admittance" door was
constructed at the mouth of the
tunnel, and since that time an
atmosphere of mystery has
shrouded the operations at the
mine like a dense fog. It was
observed, however, that immediately after the erection of the
"no admittance" door, the demeanor of the men who are most
interested in the outcome of this
very important mining operation
seemed to undergo a marked
change. The superintendent
gave more time to his meals, the
has at last materialized and that
recent developments have proven
the Rocher de Boule to be a great
mine with a long and prosperous
life.
Congratulations are in order
all along the line, and while we
are about it let us not forget to
take off our hats to the men who
had the sand to furnish the large
amount of capital necessary for
this great undertaking, and those
others who had the skill and
energy to push it to a successful
conclusion. "By their works ye
shall know them"���and they have
certainly made good. ��� Skeena
Crossing Chalcopyrite.
Good Mining Profits
The Alaska Treadwell mills
crushed 79,254 tons of ore in
June, yielding gold worth $119,-
115 by amalgamation, and $95,-
335  by  cyaniding 1784  tons of
I concentrate.    The estimated net
manager reverted   to   his daily] profit was  $125,630.     Develop-
habitsof shaving,and manicuring
his finger nails, and the president
ment in the mine totaled 391 ft.,
and the stock  of broken ore de-
E. C. Beardon has just returned from a prospecting trip on
Skeena mountain and has been
successful in finding some very
fine copper showings.on which he
has made six locations for him
self and others interested with
him.���Chalcopyrite
���
H
���
m
a
The Favorite    CAD P FNT Q
Shopping place  JfigAiggU  O
MINERS' PROSPECTORS* and SETTLERS' SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY
Time to think of Warm Clothing
��� Cold Weather is on the way ���
Our Fall and Winter Stock, which is now
arriving from the manufacturers, includes a wide
range of seasonable goods
Ladies' and Men's Sweater Coats, Underwear, Hosiery, Gloves and Mitts
THE OMINEQA MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1914.
l^W<i*TOS-S��B**W.-^^
A Wonderful Institution
Thus says the Chicago Herald:
What a queeer, queer thing the
British Empire is when you come
to think of it!
In ordinary times you would
naturally judge from the way
Ireland and the dominions and
colonies talk about Great Britain
that the poor old country didn't
have a friend on earth.
In ordinary times some part of
the British Empire is always berating the home government.
In times of peace everybody
feels at liberty to assume a possible revolution in India, separation of the dominions, and all
sorts of other disastrous things.
In times of peace the Empire
is always moreor less "doomed,"
according to the statements of
many gloom-laden British subjects.
But in times of war how suddenly things look up in that
queer, queer British Empire!
"1 haven't a thing to take
back," says Ireland, "but under
the circumstances kindly show
me the enemy as soon as possible.    I want to get at him."
"Yours of recent date received," says Canada. "Am sending men as fast as they can be
gotten ready and transportation
secured."
"Reserving for a more auspi-
picious time any hatred a part of
our population justifiably bears
to England," says South Africa,
"we are prepared to do our utmost in the present war."
"Serious local dissatisfaction
will arise, sahib, unless Indians
are permitted to give their lives
for the honorable empire, now
that it is at war with foreign
nations," says India.
It's everywhere the same
story. In time of peace it's
"Confound your stupid, unreasonable, fat-headed, doomed, arrogant soul!" In time of need
it's "Count on us to the limit!"
Which is why we say that the
British Empire is a queer, queer
institution.
To this we might add that the
present crisis shows that the
strongest bond of Empire is one
that cannot be seen���a bond of
sentiment.
1D__M_-IU____M
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Others Follow
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For Men we have received a large assortment of
Pants, for all walks of life
We aim to keep our stock complete and up to
date in every department of our stores
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School   Supplies, Scribblers, Pens, Pencils, etc., etc.  ���
SEL R.S. SARGENT *Wn
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Timber Sale X 233
SEALED TENDERS will be received
by the Minister of Lands not later than
noon on the 26th day of August, 1314,
for the purchase of Licence X 233, to cut
1,013,000 feet of timber situated in the
vicinity of the Kitseguecla Indian Reserve, Group 1, Cassiar District.
Three years will be allowed for the
removal of the timber.
Further particulars of the Chief Forester, Victoria, B. C. 48-52
COAL NOTICES
The Miner is two dollars a year
to any address in Canada; to
United States, three dollars.
put in  overtime at  figuring on ! creased 38,464 tons   The Alaska
the profits to be made on twenty j Mexican mill crushed 19,824 tons,
per cent   copper  ore  with   the
price of copper on a war  basis.
Smiles appeared on faces where
no smile was before, and there
wasn't a grouch on tjie job.   The
mystery  continued   for a time,
but it was too good to keep long,
and it has at last leaked out thai
instead  of driving ahead on the
tunnel  as  has been persistently
asserted,  they are  raising on a
five-foot vein which carries more
or less ore.     We do not know
this of our own knowledge, we
Timber Sale X 231
SEALED TENDERS will be received
by the Minister of Lands not later than
noon on the 25th day of September,
1914, for the purchase of Licence X 231,
to cut 3.369,000 feet of timber, adjoining Lot 2390, and located south of Andimaul, Cassiar District.
Three years will be allowed for the
removal of the timber.
Further particulars of the Chief Por-
seter, Victoria, 11. C. 48-4
yielding a total of $41,383. of
which $14,773 was profit. No
development was done in the
mine, but expenses include work
in the 700-Et.. Claim for the
Company by tho Treadwell company. The Alaska United mills
crushed 38,601 tons, yielding
$76,480, with a profit of $15,778.
There was a loss of $182!} on
work at the 700-ft. Claim, the
ore averaging $1.67 per ton.
Stock of broken ore in the Ready
Hill linn mine     inn. ouaori      97 _.fifl ' _' the P0,t Office or the Drug Store; In Ald.rm.i_
DUIllOn mine    inCredSea     i*.,.OU   fromMr.T.J.-h-rp;in_e.kw--.-mDr. Wallnr.;
I,,,, g or by mall from the Medio.) Superintendent at the
10ns. I Hoipltal.
"Everything inCanvas"
Prince Rupert Tent and Awning Co.
Prince Rupert. B.C.
HAZELTON HOSPITALS
for any period from one month upward at tl per
month In advance. This rate Includes office consultations and medicines, aB well as all costB while
in tbe hospital.   Tickets obtainable in  Hazelton
Hazelton Land District.     District of
Cassiar
Take notice that I, Arthur H. Smythe,
of Vancouver, B. C. broker, intend to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described land-
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Section 36, Township 57, thence east 80 Chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains, north 80 chains,
tu point of commencement, 640 acres;
claim No. 13.��� A.H.s., n.w. cor.
Arthur H. Smythe.
June 5, 1914. D. O. Wing, Agent.
Hazelton Land District.     District of
Cassiar
Takenotice that I, Arthur H. Smythe,
of Vancouver, B. C, broker, intend to
apply for a license to prospect for coal
and petroleum over the following described land-
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Section 36, Township 57, thence west 80 chains, south 80
chains, east 80 chains, north 80 chains,
to point of commencemeit, 640 acres;
claim No. 14.���.A.H.S., N.E. cor.
Arthur H. Smythe.
June 5, 1914. D. O. Wing, Agent.
Hazelton Land District.    District of
Cassiar
Take notice that I, Frederick G. Colquhoun, of Vancouver, B. C, broker,
intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described land���
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Section 36, Township 57, thence north 80 chains, eaBt 80
chains, south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
to point of commencement, 640 acres;
claim No. 16.���F.G.C, s.w. cor.
Frederick G. Colquhoun.
June 5, 1914. P. O. Wing, Agent.
Hazelton Land District.     District of
Cassiar
Take notice that 1, Frederick G. Colquhoun, of Vancouver, B. C, broker,
intend to apply for a license to prospect for coal and petroleum over the
following described land-
Commencing at a post planted at the
northwest corner of Section 36, Township 57, thence west 80 chains, north 80
chains, east 80 chains, south 80 chains,
to point of commencement, 640 acres;
claim No. 16.��� F.o.c.s.E. cor.
Frederick G. Colquhoun.
June 6, 1914. D. O. Wing, Agent.
tr-
The GALENA CLUB
���-������  Under New Management ���***^���_
Hazelton*!
Favorite
Retort
POOL AND AMERICAN BILLIARD TABLES
Finest Cigars, Cigarettes, and Tobaccos, Choice
Confectionery,   Fruits,   Ice Cream,   Soft Drinks
GRAHAM ROCK
PROPRIETOR
TO THE EAST
Passenger Trains leave Hazelton at 5:18 p. m., Wednesdays and Saturdays, for Prince George, Edmonton,
Winnipeg, etc., making connection at Winnipeg for
principal eastern centers.
Uie the Grand Trunk Railway System eaat of Chicago
TO THE SOUTH
S.S. "PRINCE GEORGE" leaves Prince Rupert every Friday at 9 a.m. for
 VANCOUVER, VICTORIA and SEATTLE	
For through tickets, apply to local agent or to
A.   DAVIDSON,   -   GENERAL   AGENT,   *   PRINCE RUPERT,  B. C.
pOMMERCIAL PRINTING OF THE BEST
V<    CLASS AT THE MINER PRINT SHOP
fc
Bulkley Valley Farm
Lands For Sale
These Lands are close to the main line of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Railway, which is now running trains through the
Bulkley Valley. There is a ready local market for all produce. Land prices are reasonable. Terms are easy.
Write for full particulars to
NORTH COAST LAND COMPANY, Ltd.
Suite 622 Metropolitan Building
VANCOUVER, B. C.
Paid up C-plUl $l,S0O,O0O. THE
QUALITY STORE
Highest market prices paid for
Raw Furs
DRY GOODS
Men's Furnishings
Hardware Groceries
C. V. SMITH
GENERAL MERCHANT
HAZELTON
DENTISTRY
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DR. BADGERO
Smithers, B.C.
Mines and Mining
Good Properties for sale ��� Cash or on
Bond.       Development and
Assessment Work.
Carr Brothers
Eight Years In This District.
Hn-rHiili.   II.  C.
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The Distributing Point
for the Great Northern
 Interior	
Prospectors, Miners,
Landseekers, Surveyors
and Sportsmen will find
the merchants of Hazelton prepared to meet
every requirement in
outfit and supplies. Having been engaged for
many years in outfitting
parties for the Northern
Interior, Hazelton business men are qualified
to give valuable advice
and assistance to newcomers.
Hazelton is situated at
the confluence of the
Bulkley and Skeena
rivers, a mile and a
quarter from South Hazelton station on the
Grand Trunk Pacific
railway. Enquiries
may be  addressed  to
e
iner
Hazelton, B.C.
ffffl OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1914 .
.g-_iU!!IJ_JU��*U&^^
 ���  |,-..*_r_.i-_r*.-'"-iT milHtlllllll..illlllllll
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The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
Lassen   Peak,   the   California
volcano, is again reported active.
Four were killed in an explosion which destroyed a fireworks
factory in Chicago.
Bubonic plague and typhoid
fever are reported to be raging
in Constantinople.
HIIIIMIIIIIIIIHIIMlllll
The Russian mail steamer Kolyma is reported fast in the ice.
off Cape North, in the Arctic.
There is in Newfoundland a
growing sentiment in favor of
confederation with the Dominion.
British Columbia manufacturers are meeting with success in an
aggressive    campaign    for   the
development of home mamifac- to Rev.   Dr.   Carman, who has
tures. I retired.
giiiiiitiiiiitaiiiiiiiiiiiiaimiiiiiiii.o.iii!iimiiirQ.iiiiiiiiiiifco]iiiiiiMiitinimMiiifiiaiiiiiiiniiico
B 2
j Hudson's Bay Company f
29 and the war would end on
November 7. One of her predictions was that the Kaiser
would be killed on September 29.
The C. P. R. has completed its
two new bridges over the Pitt
and Harrison rivers, completing
its double-track system for a distance of 82 miles from Vancouver.
It is expected that the Methodist General Conference will
endorse the proposal to unite the
Methodist, Presbyterian and
Congregational Churches in Canada.
Rev. Dr. Chown, of Vancouver, has been appointed general
superintendent of the Methodist
Church in Canada, in succession
An Italian priest has invented
a pocket wireless apparatus with
which he is said to have intercepted French and German
radiograms.
A son of Abdul Hamid, ex-
Sultan of Turkey, is to be
made Prince of Albania, instead
Willie Hoppe, the American
billiard champion, defeated Melbourne Inman. the English champion, in a combination match at
English and American billiards
on Saturday.
Hon. Mackenzie King, formerly minister of labor for Canada,
of Prince William of Wied, who Ihas been appointed by the trust-
has abdicated.
Rustem Bey, Turkish minister
at Washington, has left the
United States, following his refusal to explain remarks derogatory to that country.
ees of the Rockefeller Foundation
to conduct an international investigation into the relations
between capital and labor.
A French prophetess, who has
gained fame by predicting the
present war and the death of the
Pope, declared that the French
would enter Germany on October
The prohibition of the sale of
vodka in Russia during the war
has already had such an excellent effect that the government
has ordered the indefinite continuance of the new law, which
is proving a great factor in the
regeneration of the peasantry.
GROCERIES   DRY GOODS
HARDWARE
Of Best Quality at Popular Prices
A full Assort-
ment of
a
i
LIQUORS "'""''"Iii! |
|     HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY     f
1 HAZELTON, B. C. |
oiiiiiiiiMiii[]iiiiiiiiiiii.:iiiiiiiiiiiito]iiiiiiiiiiiito-iiiiiiiiiiiiro:iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiir.iiiii!iiiiiico
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
/ 11/FRY ntlA *\TA(IFK Wt' me prepared to supply private
LilVlmitl UIM kJlftXJimU arl(j ,jUblic conveyances day and
night.     Our stage, meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
Coal and Wood delivered promptly.
Ruddy & MacKay
Consign  your shipments in  Our
Care  for Storage  or  Delivery.
Address all communications to Hazelton.
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
CANADIAN PACIFIC  RAILWAY
BRITISH COLUMBIA  COAST  STEAMSHIP SERVICE
S. S. "Princess Royal" leaves Prince Rupert every SUNDAY at 8 p. m.
S. S. "Princess May" or "Princess Sophia" le ves Prince Rupert every
SATURDAY at noon
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
^
^
Tickets to and from all parts of the world.
Steamship Tickets
J. G. McNab,   Cor. 3rd Ave. and 4th St.,
Atlantic and Pacific
Prince Rupert, B. C.
J
Juniper Creek Mines
The Juniper Creek Mines Co.,
which is operating the Great
Ohio, has recently had a survey
made of its underground workings, which demonstrates that
the crosscut now being driven
from vein No. 1 to tap the Great
Ohio vein must be projected 48
feet further to reach its objective
point.
The tunnel on No. 1 vein has
been driven 365 ft. and the crosscut from No. 1 has progressed
90 feet, with 48 ft. more to make
before it reaches its goal, the big
ore body of the Great Ohio vein.
When this point is attained it
will afford a vertical depth of
444 ft, with a back on the vein
of 554 ft.
The Juniper Creek Mines Co.
is to be congratulated upon having a property which can be
brought to such an advanced
stage of development at a cost
which is relatively trifling when
compared with the great results
obtained.   Chalcopyrite.
LAND NOTICES
Peace River Land District.   District of
Omineca.
Take notice that D. D. McKinnon,
of Vancouver, restaurant keeper, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 200
feet below the crossing at Old Ho^em,
on the south bank of the Omineca river,
thence south 80 chains, west 80 chains,
north 80 chains, east 80 chains, to this
point.
Aug. 22, 1914. D. D. McKinnon.
Peace River Land District.   District of
Omineca.
Take notice that Walter Ramsay, of
Edmonton, merchant, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains ea.st.rly from the northwest
corner of L. I). May's application to
purchase, thence south 80 chains, east
80 chains, north 80 chains, west 80
chains along the bank of Omineca river,
to point of commencement.
Aug. 22, 1914. Walter Ramsay.
Peace River Land District.   District of
Omineca.
Take notice that May McKinnon, of
Vancouver, married woman, intends to
apply for permission to purchase the
following described lands:
Commencing at a post planted 80
chains westerly from the northeast
cornerof D. D. McKinnon'sapplication
to purchase, thence south 80 chuins,
weBt 80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80
chains along the bank of Omineca river,
to point of commencement.
Aug. 22, 1914. May McKinnon.
Peace River Lantl District. District of
, Omineca.
Take optica that Frank Boston, of
Vancouver, watchman, intends to apply
for permission to purchase the following described lands.
Commencing at a post planted 80
chain! suuthcrly from the northeast
corner of   D. D. McKinnon's northeast
iiOh-
"iiOn-
-HO"-
Thorp & Hoops
Real Estate, Financial and Insurance Brokers
ALDERMERE, B. C.
Sole district agents for E. G. Prior & Co., Victoria, Agricultural Machinery and Implements, Wagons, Etc.
Fire,   Life,  Accident,  and Employer's Liability Insurance.
We represent the best companies.
Good Pre-Emption Near the G. T. P.
about the Bulkley Valley write us.
l���0��-_--,lll NOn        ,ih        tUBm���mtm���em
!We Can Locate You On a Goo
If you desire information abt
-iiO"
���iiOn-
-mOii-
-uO
^J Drugs and Toilet Articles.   Kodaks,
Kodak Supplies. Printing and Developing.   ^ Gram-a-phones  and  Records.
Stationery
The "Up-To-Date" Drug Stores
Hazelton
It is feared  that Stefansson,
the Arctic explorer, is lost.  With
two Companions, he Started over ' corner, thence south 80 chains, west 80
chains, north 80 chaitiB, east Ml chains.
Aug. 22, 1914. Frank Boston.
Peace River Land District.   District of
Oniineca.
Take notice that H. E. Fetherstonhaugh, of North Vancouner, married
woman, intends to apply for permission
to purchase the following described
lunds:
Commencing at a post planted 16
miles from mouth of riveron east bank
of Manson river, thence east 80 chains,
nurth 8(1 chains, west 80 chains, south
80 chuins along bank uf ManBon river,
to point of commencement.
Aug. 10, 1914.   II   Iv Fetherstonhaugh.
o���
L. D. Fulton, Mgr.
���MM���*���.||Qll ������ "II ���
New Hazelton
��� nil������ HOll������ nil������
ll.rold Prica J. R. (.i-.hi.ni
PRICE & GRAHAM
B.C. Land Surveyor!
and Civil  Engineers
HAZELTON   AND  SMITHERS
London Bulletin!       ....       V.m o,,v,.
Brili.h Columbia
McRAE BROS., LTD.
STATIONERS &   PRINTERS
the ice for Banksland in March
last; but the westward movement of the ice has been so great
that the party is unlikely to have
reached safety.
The railway compartment was
full of men, all of whom, with
one exception, were discussing
the war from beginning to end
(says the Manchester Guardian).
The exception sat quietly in his
corner and listened to what was
being said. It was not until the
train had almost reacht-d the end
of its journey that he made a remark. "I suppose," he said, as
he got ready to disentrain, "we'll
give 'em Home Rule, same as we
did the Boers?"
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion and British Columbia
Land Surveyors
Offices at Victo. ia, Nelson, Fort George
and New Hazelton.
B. C. Affleck, Mgr.   New Ha-elii n.
Architect,' -n.i Engineer*.' Suppliea
Kodak,, Loose Leaf Svalema
Remington Typewriter!, Office furniture
Prince Rupert, B. C.
Assay Office and Mining Office
Arts and Craft:  Building. _7S Seymour Street
 VANCOUVER, H.C	
J. O'SULLIVAN, F.C.S.
Pr.vlnclal Assayer and Chemist
' Assayer for 26 years �� iih Vivian It Suns. Swansea
Charges Moderate     ::    Correspondence Solicited
LAND NOTICES
LAND NOTICES
Peace River Land District.   Diatrict of
Oniineca.
Take notice that L. W. May, of Ed-   Peace River Land District
inonton,   doctor,   intends   tn apply for
permission  to  purchase  the following
described lunds:
Commencing  at  a  post   planted  su
chains  easterly  from John A. Shaw'a i chase the fo'lfowlng described Innds
northwest corner application to pur- \ Commencing at a post planted at the
chase, on the south bank of Omineca I northeast corner of I). D. M< Kinnnn'a
river, thence Bouth 80 chains, eaat 80 application to purchaae, thence south HO
chains, north 80 chains, west 80 chains | chaina, eaat 80 chains, north 80 chain*,
along the bank of Omineca river, to ��� west 80 chaina along the ba>ikof Omin-
point of commencement. eca river, to pointof commenceineiit.
Aug. 22, 1914. L. W. May. ' Aug. 22, 1614.   R. O. Fetherstonhaugh.
Peace River Land Dlltril t.   Di.slrii t of l Peace River Lnnd District.    Distiict of
Omineca. Omineca.
Take notice that John A. Shaw, of I Take notice that Willinm MaeLaren,
Edmonton, broker, Intendl to apply f.>r ol Calgary, broker, intends to aiiply
permission to purchase the fullowing for permission to purchase the fol low-
described lands: ing deacribed lands:
Commencing  at   a   post   planted   80      Commencing   Bl   a   post   planted 80
chains  easterly   from    the   northweat chalni  down   from   II. E.   tethcrston-
cornerof R. D. Fetherstonhaugh's ap-   haugh's southwest corner of application
plication to purchase, on soutli bunk of | to purchase,    tlience  east  80   chains,
Omineca river, thence south 80 i hains,   north .HO  chains, wesl 80 chnins, south
east  80  chains, north  80 chnins, west J 80  chains   along   th(  bank  of   Manson
80 chains   along thc bank of  Ominecn   river to point of Commencement,
river, to pointof commencement. j Aug. 10, 1914. William Ma.l*aren.
Aug. 22, 1914,                  John A. Shaw.   ��� ���.        ,       . ,,. , ,.-,._
 Peace Liver Land District.    District of
Distriel of I Omineca.
Omineca. I    Take in.lice lhat   Henrietta  Plumbe,
Take  notice that   R. D. Fetherstnn-   of North Vancnuver, widow, intends to
Ml inc
lullnwing described binds:
Commenoing  at  a post, planted at the
intendB to apply for permission to pur
foi
southwest corner of Fetheratonhaofa _
application tn purchase on Manson river, thence east 80 chains, south 80
chains, west 80 chains, north 80 chaina,
along the bank of Manson river, to
point of commencement.
Aug. 10, 1914. Henrietta Plumbe. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 10, 19.4
THE MINER'S WAR BULLETINS
(Continued from Page One)
Heligoland, the E-9 sank the German cruiser Hela. Yesterday the
submarine, which is under the command ol' Lieut.-Commander Max
Horion, made another dash, this time into the German waters off
the mouth of the river Ems, sinking a German destroyer. The E-9
returned safely to port.
On the western portion of the battle front in France, violent
linhtiiiK continues from a point nine miles northeast of Arras to
near the Belgian border, The German cavalry are held in check
north of Lille, having been driven back between Chaulesand Roye.
'lhe Allies have made advances at certain points along the center.
In the Woevre region all German attacks have been repulsed.
The broken remnant of the German army defeated at Augus-
towo, on the Russian frontier, continues its retreat. The Russians
continue lo advance in the district of Lyck, and the German offensive movement on the river Niemen has been completely checked,
with great loss to the enemy.
An official casualty list published in Berlin gives German
losses in killed, wounded and missing as 117,000 up to Sept. 1.
The total German losses to date are three hundred thousand.
Cholera is spreading among the Austrian troops.
The Belgian government has been moved to Ostend. There
has been heavy fighting near Oudenarde, where the Belgians, after
an hour's battle, were reinforced and repulsed the Germans with
heavy loss.
Six Austrian torpedo boats and destroyers are reported to have
been sunk off the coast of Dalmatia, by mines.
In an air duel over the lines of the left wing, a French aviator
was victor over two Germans, who were burned to death in the
explosion of their petrol.
Berlin slates that civilians atLanaeken. Belgium, had attacked
German troops, making reprisals necessary. Lanaeken was
bombarded, its church destroyed and all houses along the road from
Lanaeken to Ton_fres were burned.
A German cruiser and two gunboats are reported sunk in Kiau
Chan Bay.
Ottawa, Oct. 8: -Sir Robert Borden announces that Canada
will send a second contingent of twenty-two thousand men as soon
as Lord Kitchener gives the word.
San Francisco, Oct. 8:--An Austra i in vessel arriving here
reports that Papeete, Tahiti, an undefended French colony, was
_helled by German cruisers.
Ottawa, Oct. 8: It is learned that the Canadian expeditionary
force landed in England today. Reports say the people of London
are anxious to give the Canadians a reception. An enthusiastic
demonstration is assured if the force passes through London.
Hon. Sam Hughes, minister of militia, sailed today from New
Y'uk to England, where he will consult with the war office author-
hies regardii g tie second contingent.
London, Oct. 9:���The siege of Antwerp is on in earnest, the
G"t mans now having a force variously estimated at from 125,000
to 250,000 men before the forts, with many large siege guns, which
have already thrown numbers of shell, into the city. Zeppelins
have also dropped bombs in the city. Twenty deaths have been
r iorted from shells and bombs. Refugees by thousands are
leaving for Holland. The Belgian army, headed by King Albert,
marched out of Antwerp yesterday. The direction taken is not
stated, but it is believed the force has gone west to meet a large
British force which left Ghent yesterday for Antwerp. A great
battle appears to be imminent. If successful in defeating the
Germans and driving them from before Antwerp, the Allies will
be on all sides of Von Kluck's army. 'lhe German plan is to prevent this by taking Ant.verp for use as a base for the second
defence line.
The name of one force which is now operating against the
Germans before Antwerp was deleted by the censor. Some say it
is Russian.
Reports from the besieged city tell of many pathetic scenes
during the flight of the townspeople. Even the sick from the
hospitals and the patients from asylums have been removed.
A Paris dispatch gives an official account of the situation along
the battle front in Northern France. There have been violent
encounters (luring the day, notably at Roye, where the conflict on
the Allies' left wing has been concentrated for some says. In some
places the Allies have advanced their lines, but otherwise the
situation, in the main, is unchanged.
The Belgian government, now at Ostend, may cross the
Channel to England, to remain during the war.
A despatch from Rome says Field Marshal von Moltke,
reported to have been dismissed by the Kaiser, still holds his
position.
An unofficial Vienna report says the Bulgarians have attacked
and defeated the Servians at Islip, Servia.
During the Russian advance, which steadily continues, the
Ci.ar'8 troops have reached Marmaros Sziget, after annihilating an
Austrian force which opposed them.
The Montenegrin army administered a defeat to Austrian
forces In Herzegovina.
Russian troops are again making progress in Fast Prussia.
CENTRAL FRANCOIS
AND UNCHA NOTES
een
�� More
(Special Correspondence)
Jack Blackman, a reservist of
the 17th Lancers, "Death or
Glory Boys," recently left to
join his old regimeut. He was
given a hearty send-off and left
with the good wishes of all.
R. L. Ramsay, assistant provincial agriculturist, representing the live stock branch of the
department of agriculture, visited Uncha Lake settlement and
expressed himself as pleased
with what he saw in the district.
He is looking over the various
districts to find a suitable location
for an experimental farm.
The new government road
connecting the Uncha Lake
settlement with Francois Lake is
now open for travel. Construction was ably carried out by A.
Blayney, with a number of set-
lers. It is remarked by many
that for the small amount of
money available, excellent work
was accomplished.
��� There is a general hope that
the public works department
will not find it necessary to curtail expenditure in this district
| on account of war conditions.
j The carrying out of the road-
| building program is of vital importance to the development of
this great district.
Chapman Bros., of Central
Francois, have begun construction of a barn and roothouse.
The Rambler, gasoline launch,
i now making regular trips to the
east end of Francois lake, going
down on Thursdays and returning on Fridays. She picks up
passengers and freight at the
v trious landings. During the
rest of the week the boat does a
ferrying business between Hen-
kel's and Keefe's landings,
proving a great convenience, as
compared with the rowboat
me hod of crossing.
In connection with the ferry,
the Northern Telephone Co. has
established a branch line from
Robbin's cabin on the north side
of the lake to Burns Lake.
Charges are seasonable, and the
service is of benefit to the settlers.
The oat crop, which is being
harvested, is a bumper yield of
fine grain. All the hay crop was
put up in fine condition, weather
conditions being excellent. Roots
and vegetables this season are
looking better than ever.
THE
FREE WAR MAPS
Premier In Ottawa
Ottawa, Oct. 9: In an interview here today, Premier McBride of British Columbia said
that province was prepared to
give every possible aid to see
the war through to a finish.
Conditions in British Columbia,
he said, were good, and railway
development was continuing.
During the Civil war in the
United States the copper industry
was not injured to any extent,
the price ranging, during tin-
four years of unpleasant condi
tions from 17 to 66 cents a pound.
The average production during!
that time was about 20,000,001)
pounds a year. The Granby and
B. C. Copper companies were not
then in existence.���Ledge.
Braves Take First Game
Philadelphia, Oct. 9:-The first
ball game of the world's series
was played here today. Boston
won from the Athletics by 7-1.
Experiments have been made
by the United States Bureau of
Mines in combining limestone
with coke as fuel, forming a
liquid slag which runs freely and
avoids clinker and ash troubles.
A large assortment of Jaeger's
famous English underwear.socks,
sweaters, etc, has been received
by Noel & Rock and will be sold
at catalog prices.
The Miner is twodollarsa year
to any address in Canada; to
United States, ihree dolltrs.
MASONS CALL FOR
HOSPITAL FUNDS
The Canada Masonic Lodge of
London is making an appeal to
every Free Mason in Canada to
contribute at least one dollar to
assist it in fully equipping the
Queen's Canadian Military Hospital, which has been presented
to the British Government under
the auspices of the Canadian
War Contingent Association.
A base hospital is being established in London with an auxiliary
hospital at Folkestone. The
subscriptions will be devoted to
the relief of wounded soldiers
who are fighting for the Empire
and for the principles of Free
Masonry.
Subscriptions are to be sent to
Sir Frederick Williams Taylor,
Montreal, treasurer in Canada,
who is acting with Sir Richard
McBride and Hon. William Bowser, Victoria; Dr. E. D. McLaren,
Vancouver; and other eminent
Masons of Eastern Canada.
Southern Alberta has two feet
feet of snow this week.
EVERY READER OF THE OMINECA MINER
MAY HAVE A WAR MAP FREE
A map 3 1-3x2 1-2 feet, showing clearly every
boundary, every city, every town, village, hamlet and river in the whole European War area.
Each map in a neat folder of convenient size.
���_H*��.>.*l*��fct> ���*���*..> *>h��i  ����� n �������������� *���> .��!����������������>!��������> 10
Just Arrived    \
FOR  FALL AND WINTER
WEAR
A SPLENDID ASSORT-
rt ment of the celebrated
JAEGER UNDERWEAR,
SOCKS, SWEATER COATS
VESTS, PAJAMAS, etc.
These goods require no recommendation. They are
the best manufactured in
England. 	
IF you have not inspected
our HOBBERLIN samples for Fall and WinterTail-
ored Clothing, you cannot
realize how nobby they are.
NOEL & ROCK
Hazelton, B. C.
The Family Herald and Weekly
Star of Montreal has secured exclusive rights for the War Map
prepared by the celebrated map
firm of G. W. Bacon & Co.,
Ltd.,  of London,  Eng.     It is
beyond question the most comprehensive map printed.
The Miner has completed arrangements by which our readers can secure a copy of this
excellent map free of charge.
Here is our offer good for 30 days only
The price of The Family Herald
and Weekly Star ��� Canada's
greatest newspapei���is one dollar a year.
The price of The Miner is two
dollars a year.
We now offer both papers for
one year each, including a copy
of the Family Herald's War
Map, size 30 x 40 inches, in a
neat folder of convenient size,
for only $2.50.
This offer applies to al) subscribers, new or renewal, who
pay for the two papers inside
the next 30 days from this date.
To follow the war situation intelligently, The Family Herald
War Map is necessary. It should
be in   every   Canadian   home.
Phone 300 P.O. Box 1635
HARRISON W. ROGERS
ARCHITECT
Special Attention to Out of Town Clients
Suite One, Federal Block.
PRINCE RUPERT, B. C.
_____ a.il, _____________*_   ____\ i
STUART J. MARTIN
Provincial Assayer
HAZELTON        -       B. C.
EXPERT
Watch Repairing
WATCHES   -   JEWELRY
O. A. RAGSTAD,    Smithers
Orders may be left at Noel & Rock's, Hazelton
LAND NOTICE
ORDER AT ONCE
The Omineca Miner
HAZELTON, B. C.
Hazelton Land District. District of
Cassiar.
Take notice that Alexander Austin,
of Prince Rupert, b. c, laborer, intends to apply for permission to purchase the following described lands:   ���
Commencing at a post planted about
500 feet northerly from quarter-way
cabin, Ave miles south from Fifth
Cabin, Yukon telegraph line, thenca
west 80 chains, north 80 chains, east 80
chains, south 80 chains, to point of
commencement, containing 640 acres
more or lesa. 4*1*1
Aug. 18, 1914, Alexander Austin,
m
The Miner is two dollars a year,
)_jJ__kJt\mtmm-\tmkmy^
, .  hf
R. Cunningham & Son, Ltd.
PORT ESSINGTON Established 1870
HAZELTON
Our Winter Stock of Knit Goods
UNDERWEAR FOR CHILDREN
Knitted suits and dresses, jerseys, sweater coats, warm and comfortable as well
as smart and dressy. We have these in the famous Dr. Jaeger, Stanfield and
Pen-Angle, each make t-presenting fine value.
WOMEN'S KNIT GOODS
A full range of Jaeger's Underwear, Piece and Union Garments, in every
weight; knitted hats and caps, in the very latest styles. Ladies' sweaters and
sweater coats, golf sets, night robes, dressing gowns, and bedroom slippers.
Dr. Jaeger's New Catalogue*
These catalogues are being mailed to every availahle address
direct from Montreal. If you do not receive one, ask at our store
for a copy. Any of these lines which we do not stock we supply
at short nolice. The prices are the same all over Canada.
Walk-over Shoes
A shipment arrived this week and embraces some very fine lines for Fall wear
as well as some light weights. The low-heel shapes for ladies should be very
popular.    We have them in button and lace.
Shooting Season
TWO MONTHS MORE OF GROUSE SHOOTING
A good line of shooting coats at $3.50. 12, 16 and 20 gauge shells.
Smokeless Powder, 75c a box.    Rifles and Shotguns at all prices.
R. Cunningham & Son, Limited
A-i^-. +*+*+*4r*+*+*^++*+++++*��*+*+ *********

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