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Omineca Miner Jan 13, 1917

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 THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. VI, NO. 20
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1917
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
DESPATCHESJF THE DAY
Telegraphic News From Many
Cities Condensed for
Our Readers
Washington: A serious situation has developed between Russia and China over a clash recently reported, in which two to four
hundred Chinese were killed by
Cossacks.
Washington: The Entente reply to Wilson's note has been
received and is being deciphered.
Juneau: A drastic prohibition
bill, planned to make Alaska
"bone dry," has been introduced.
Philadelphia: Harry Thaw attempted suicide by slashing himself with a razor. His condition
is grave.
New York: A series of terrific
explosions wrecked a portion of
the plant of the Canadian Car
Company's ammunition works at
Kingsland, N.J.
Kingsland: The fire which
destroyed the 80-acre plant of the
Canada Car Co. was of incendiary
origin. Hundreds of families
are homeless. Only two men
were killed, 1400 employees escaping the fire and explosions.
Damage, $16,000,000.
New York: No Greek ships
have arrived at New York for
several weeks, as a result of the
virtual blockade of Greek shipping.
Dublin: The military authorities suppressed an American
moving picture depicting Irish
historical events.
Vancouver: John T. Scott,
organizer of the Vancouver Liberal plugging, is enjoying life at
Long Beach, Cal. The deportation order was cancelled last
week.
San Francisco: Bopp, the
German consul here, was found
guilty of conspiracy. He will
appeal to a higher court.
New York: The Deutschland
left Bremen on Jan. 2, bound for
New London, Conn.
Quebec: A two-million-dollar
fire occurred this morning.
Regina: The worst blizzard
for years is raging. Train and
streetcar service is interrupted.
New York: It is seven above
zero here today.
Ottawa: Temperance advocates
have decided upon a prohibition
campaign covering the entire
Dominion.
Fair Association
The annual meeting of Hazelton Agricultural and Industrial
Association will be held in the
Progress Club rooms at 8 this
evening. All members are requested to attend, as the election
of officers and other business of
importance will be on the program.
Methodist Church
Dr. Sager will preach tomorrow
evening. Special music. All
are invited.
ALLIES UNITED AND DETERMINED
NO WAVERING AMONG EMMIES OF HUNS-
BRITAIN LAUNCHES GREATEST WAR LOAN
London: Public approval greeted the publication of the Allies'
reply to President Wilson's note,
the terms of which were made
known yesterday.
It is considered here that the
Allied conference in Romemarked
a turning point in the war. The
council indicated unmistakably a
closer union of the Entente for
the unflinching prosecution of
the war, and showed that no nation in the grand alliance was
wavering in the firm determination to win, and the conviction
that the Allies' ideals and aims
in the war were founded on justice and righteousness.
He wishes to discover what his
next move should be.
German diplomatists are outspoken in denunciation of the
Allies' peace note, declaring that
the terms will never he accepted.
London: The "Loan of Victory"
is meeting with a wonderful reception. The Bank of England
was compelled to smash precedent
by opening its doors before nine
o'clock to accommodate the great
crowd of applicants for bonds.
Hundreds of thousands have already been issued.
Washington: President Wilson
has begun a careful study of the
Entente reply to his peace note.
Roumanianstook the offensive and
drove the enemy more than a mile.
London: Although Greece has
ostensibly agreed to all the Entente's demands, Constantine's
government must return a more
definite answer to the ultimatum
before the Allied blockade of
Greece will be raised.
Paris: The night was calm
along the whole western front.
German casualties since the
beginning of the war have been
4,010,160.
Petrograd: In the Oituz valley, on the northern Roumanian
front, the Russians have been
pressed back further by the Teutonic forces.
In the Kasino river region the
London:  British troops in Mesopotamia took 300 yards of Turkish trenches on the right bank of
the Tigris, capturing 178 prison
ers.
PUBLIC OPENING OF
BULKLEY BRIDGE
To celebrate the opening of the
big bridge across the Bulkley
river, the citizens of Hazelton,
acting through a committee of
business men, are arranging for
a public opening of the new
structure on Tuesday, Jan. 23.
Part of the'program has already
been decided upon. In the afternoon there will be a procession
across the bridge, the Indian band
taking a leading part, while the
evening event will be a big dance
in Assembly Hall. Everybody
in the town and district is invited
to this function, which should be
a most enjoyable affair,as special
music is being arranged for, while
the catering has been undertaken
by the Hazelton Hotel. No invitations are being sent out, but
all are expected to attend.
Hospital Concert
Arrangements are now complete for the production of "Mrs.
Temple's Telegram" by Hazelton
Dramatic Society on Feb. 20.
The play is well cast and the
members are working hard for
what they hope will prove to be
a banner performance. This is
the first year this most amusing
comedy has been available, and
the residents of Hazelton and
district are promised a treat
which they will do well not to
miss.
Hazelton Red Cross
The regular monthly meeting
of the executive of Hazelton
branch of the Canadian Red
Cross Society was held on Monday evening, when very satisfactory reports from the various
committees were heard.
Sixty pairs of socks are on
hand towards another shipment
and a fresh supply of wool has
been ordered. Socks are in great
demand at present and the ladies
of the district are specially requested to give ; 11 spare time
available to the knitting.
Receipts for the month were
very encouraging and $100 was
ordered sent to headquarters.
Members will shortly receive
cards stating the date of the
expiry of their membership, and
it is hoped that a prompt response in renewals will be forthcoming.
ALIEN FINED FOR
HAVING FIREARMS
NEW TELEPHONE
SYSTEM SHORTLY
The new switchboard for the
Northern Telephone Company's
Hazelton exchange has been
completed and will be shipped
from Vancouver on Monday.
Manager Maguire is making arrangements for the immediate
installation of the new system,
which will be a great improvement over the present overloaded
party-line arrangement. A further increase in the company's
business is certain to follow the
inauguration of the improved
system, which will be up-to-date
in every respect.
Appearing before Magistrate
Hoskins yesterday on a charge
of having firearms in his possession, contrary to the order-in-
council of Sept., 1914, Mike
George, a Bulgarian, yesterday
pleaded ignorance of the regulation. As the case was the first
of the kind before the court, the
defendant was leniently treated,
getting off with a $20 fine.
The order requires all alien
enemies to surrender to the police
all firearms, ammunition and explosives in their possession, and
provides for heavy fines or imprisonment in default. It will be
well for any residents of enemy
nationality who have not complied
with the law to do so at once, as
future culprits will be more
severely dealt with.
Progress Club
All members of Hazelton Progress Club, andcitizens generally,
are asked to attend the annual
meeting of theorganization, which
will be held in the rooms of the
Club on Tuesday evening next,
Jan. 16, at 8 o'clock. Election
of officers and reports.
W.A.
The fortnightly sewing parties
will begin again on Thursday
next, Jan. 18. at 3 o'clock in the
Mission House, when the president hopes as many members as
possible will be present, it being
a business meeting.
LOCAL NEWS PARAGRAPHS
Items Of General Interest From
Hazelton and Surrounding District
M. W. Pineo arrived from Fort
Fraser on Tuesday.
E. D. Knaff.of Seattle.stopped
off here on Wednesday.
H.E. Carleton,the mining man,
was in town on Wednesday.
J. S. Hicks arrived from his
Bear river ranch on Sunday.
A. M. Kipp, of Chilliwack, is
spending a few days in Hazelton.
Robert Sparrow was here from
Telkwa on Tuesday.on his way to
the coast.
J. F. Maguire is not likely to
return from Vancouver until the
end of the month.
W. Langlands, of Calgary, who
is a brother of Mrs. John Newick,
is among the visitors of the week.
Major C. B. North is among
the Canadian officers mentioned
in Field Marshal Haig's despatches for distinguished conduct.
Severe storms, which laid the
telegraph lines low in all directions, left Hazelton without wire
facilities from Sunday to Wed-
nosday.
The Indian hockey team last
night administered a bad beating
to a scratch team of town players,
the score being 6-1. The game
was played for the Soldiers' Aid.
Jas. MacKay returned from
Smithers on Thursday with a fine
team of draught horses which he
purchased in the Valley for Ruddy & MacKay's freighting outfit.
The cabin occupied by Wm.
Leverett was gutted last Saturday night by a fire of accidental
origin. The fire brigade, with
the chemical apparatus.again did
excellent work.
Snowslides on the lower river
interrupted the train schedule
early in the week, but the passenger trains got through, though
Wednesday's train from the west
was several hours late.
MASK CARNIVAL
FRIDAY EVENING
Arrangements are now being
completed for the mask carnival
to be held by Hazelton Athletic
Association on the rink next Friday evening. There will be races
and a broomolo game, as well as
numerous prizes for costumes.
Skaters will unmask at 9:30.
Coming Events
Jan. IS���Hazelton Liberal Association
Annual Meeting, St. Andrew's Hall, 8
p.m.
Jan. 16���Annual Meeting of Hazelton
Progress Club, in Club rooms, 8 p.m.
Jan. 19���Mask Carnival, Hazelton
Rink.
Jan 23 -Public opening of new Bulk-
ley Bridge. Dance in Assembly Hall/
8:30 p.m.
Jan. 30-Hazelton Board of Trade,
Annual Meeting, Progress Club Rooms,
8 p.m.
Feb. 20- Hospital Concert and Play,
Assembly Hall. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13. 1917
ranneca
mer
basis of $1 a pound for 80 per
cent of the molybdenite content;
��� j 80 per cent being the assumed
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the . recovery made in cleaning this
Great Omineca District of British Columbia. ! mineral up to the grade required
by the munitions board.     This
grade is 85 per cent molybdenite.
"Thus a 5 per cent ore would
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:   Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a  be   worth   $80  and a 10 Per cent
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year. | ore $160 a ton, less the following
ADVERTISING  RATES:     Display,  $2.5(1  per  inch per month:   ReadingI charges:
Notices, 20 cents per line for each insertion.    Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazette rates.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
Vol. VI.
Saturday, January 13, 1917
The people of Canada are living extravagantly. There can be
no doubt on that score, and it is the one feature of the situation
which causes uneasiness. Business is remarkably brisk, so brisk
that the extravagance of the public is to some extent justified. The
danger of the spending orgy into which Canada seems to have
plunged lies in the fact that our imports are growing by leaps and
bounds. In other words, says Maclean's Magazine, we are sending
more money out af the country than we should in time of war.
Taking the figures issued by the Department of Trade and
Commerce in October it is found that the imports for the preceding
twelve months totalled $716,930,113, as against $421,677,217 for the
previous twelve months. This is approximately $300,000,000 increase
and the total is startling enough to make every Canadian slop and
think. The increase is partially explained by the advance in prices
���but not entirely. After due allowance is made for advancing costs,
there still remains a wide margin that can only be explained on the
ground of larger buying.
Another explanation is that people are demanding quality in
what they buy. The "flush" condition of the average household
purse has removed the scruples which once attached to buying the
best. People are now demanding the best and are quite ready to
pay for it.
The increase in imports is reflected, of course, in domestic
consumption. Manufacturers cannot turn out goods fast enough
to fill their orders.- Wholesalers are in the same case and the retail
merchant has become so busy that the mere selling of goods is the
least of all his troubles. This.of course,is an eminently satisfactory
state of affairs. "Better business than usual" is a motto that will
help win the war, as it means increased production and increased
optimism. But when it leads to a sudden upleap in imports.so large
that our favorable balance of trade is threatened, it becomes evident
that prosperity is beginning to act like old wine. It is time to call
a halt. We cannot afford any further enlargement of our buying
abroad.    The war situation demands conservation.
A disturbing factor also is the advance in the living costs. The
most staple articles of food are going up almost to prohibitory prices.
Butter and eggs are becoming luxuries; and at their present rate of
skyward flight will soon be found only on the tables of the very
rich. Bread, milk, sugar, everything is volplaning at a rate that
spells fortunes perhaps for a lucky few and privation for the many.
The advances have caused a cry of "combine" from one end of
the country to the other. Newspapers are loudly demanding
enquiries, and their columns are full of suggestions that for the
most part are so unpractical as to be almost ridiculous. After all,
the explanation is not hard to find. It is a case of suppiy and
demand. When the latter exceeds the former prices go up. Canada
cannot sell so much to Great Britain and keep prices down at home.
It is very illogical for the farmer, for instance, to complain of the
price of flour when he is getting record prices for his wheat. The
city man has to pay the high price for bread without the consolation
that the farmer has, but then he is earning more than he ever did
before.
It is not intended to assert that the present high prices are
justified. It is not to be denied that some men are making huge
fortunes by profiteering at the expense of the public. With our
present very much involved systems of distribution, however, an
era of high wages and heavy demand is bound to become a time of
high prices. A policy of retrenchment only on the part of the
public would bring prices down.
In the meantime it should be possible to evolve some measures
to restrain the upward tendency; but any discussion of the means
is beyond the scope of this article. The fact remains that the high
cost of living is th�� most striking outward manifestation of the
present prosperity of the country. People who were not enjoying
a measure of prosperity could not live where the bare necessities
of life were so high.
Yes, Canada, is prosperous. Men are earning wages much
larger than ever before, especially those engaged in work on
munitions. It is stated as a fact that some men on piece work are
earning $8 and $10 a day who formerly earned little more than that
per week. Women and girls who went into munition work for
patriotic reasons are in many cases only too glad to stay for purely
pecuniary considerations. Their earnings are most surprisingly
substantial.
"1. Mining and sorting to 5 or
! 10 per cent.
"2. Transportation from mine
No. 20; to railway.
"3. Freight to Ottawa or Renfrew, $16 a ton on carload lots;
$3.6 a ton on smaller lots.
"4. Milling or concentrating
cost, from $5 to $10 a ton.
"A little figuring for each case
will determine what grade of
crude ore will stand its charges���
usually nothing under 5 per cent
molybdenite (not molybdenum)
will leave much profit.
"There are two places in Canada where such lower grade ores
can be cleaned up and paid for;
the ore testing laboratories of the
.Mines Department, Ottawa, care
G. C. Mackenzie; and the International Molybdenum Company,
of Renfrew and Orilla, Ont. F.
J. Mackenzie isits representative
and   is now in British Columbia.
"The Canadian munitions resources commission is interested
in getting supplies of this mineral
forward as quickly as possible to
meet war demands, and anyone
who can should try to furnish
such ores while the price is high
and the necessity exists. J. C.
Cwillam, care Gwillam, Crisp &
Mackay, Pacific Building Vancouver."
mm
\
HAZELTON LIBERAL
ASSOCIATION
The annual meeting of the
above Association will be held on
Monday evening next, Jan. 15,
at 8 o'clock, in St. Andrew's
Hall. A full attendance of members is requested.
STUARTJ. MARTIN,
Secretary
INSURANCE
of all kinds.
Lowest   Rates.      Strongest   Companies.
Prompt and Libera] Settlements.
Mining Machinery and Supplies.
Cradock's Wire Cables.
Estimates given for Tramways.
J. F. MAGUIRE,   Hazelton
Insurance and Manufacturers' Agent.
HOTEL  PRINCE RUPERT
THE  LEADING  HOTEL IN  NORTHERN II. C.
: : EUROPEAN PLAN  : I
One Dollar per day and upwards
25c. au!o servict lo and from all trains and boats
PRINCE RUPERT B. C.
Market for Molybdenite
Prof. J. C. Gwillam, of the
Canadian Munition Resources
Commission, who has been inquiring into the possibilities for
an increased production of molybdenite, which is in demand for
munitions   work,  gave the fol
lowing memorandum concerning
molybdenite.and prices and methods of disposing of it:
"There is a good market now
for the mineral molybdenite,
which is needed for making ferro-
molybdenite, used in munitions
and other work.
"The   general   price   is on  a
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion, British Columbia,
and Alberta Land Surveyors
Offices at Victoria, Nelson. Fort George
and New Hazelton.
P. P. Burden, New Hazelton
STUART J. MARTIN
Provincial Assayer
Hazelton,      -      -      B.C.
DALBY B. MORKILL
Hritish Columbia Land Surveyor
:::   MINE SURVEYOR   :::
Hazelton, B. C.
Surveys of Mineral Claims, Townsites,
Timber and Coal Leases, Etc. and General Enginporing Surveys.
The obtaining of Crown Grants attended to. tf
i
IF YOU CAN'T FIGHT
YOU CAN AT LEAST
STAND BEHIND THE
(AN WHO FIGHTS
FOR YOU!
THE CANADIAN PATRIOTIC FUND
Which  assists the  wives and families of Canada's gallant
soldiers, requires millions of dollars  to Keep the soldiers'
home fires burning.
District Treasurer: Stephen H. Hoskins, Government Agent
Hazelton Committee:
J. E. Kirby, H. H. Little, R.E.Allen, J. Naylor, Wm. Ware
Monthly Subscriptions are Solicited
THE CANADIAN RED CROSS
The Hazelton  Branch  requests  the support of all in its
efforts to assist in the noble work of this great humanitarian
organization.
Honorary Presidents: Mrs. (Rev.) John Field; Mrs. (Rev.)
W. Hogan
Chairman:   Dr. H. C. Wrinch
Vice-Presidents: S. H. Hoskins; Mrs. E. R. Cox; W.J. Carr
Honorary Secretary: Miss J. C. Grant
Honorary Treasurer: H. H. Little, Manager Union Bank
Executive Committee:
Mrs. H. C. Wrinch,  Mrs. R. G. Moseley,  Mrs. Chas. Reid,
Miss Hogan, Rev. John Field, Rev. M. Pike, H. H. Phillips
Large or Small Contributions will be Gratefully Received
SOLDIERS'AID & EMPLOYMENT
COMMITTEE
Endeavors to supply soldiers from Hazelton district with
such comforts and necessities as cannot be readily obtained
at the front, and will assist them to re-establish themselves
in civil life when they return. The Committee is acting in
co - operation   with   the   Provincial    Returned   Soldiers'
Commission and the Military Hospitals Commission
Contributions to the Soldiers' Aid Tobacco Fund are Welcome
Chairman: A. R. Macdonald
Honorary Secretary-Treasurer: R.E.Allen, District Forester
S. H. Hoskins,   A.  E.   Player,   Wm.   Ware,  Jos.   Naylor,
H. H. Little, J. K. Frost, F. B. Chettleburgh
SOME CAN FIGHT, SOME
CAN WORK OR PAY ���
ALL CAN SERVE
��������� THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1917
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Sources
Wheat is two dollars in Chicago.
Canadian casualties in 1916
were 53,837.
An earthquake in Formosa
killed 300 persons.
The cost of the war to date has
been fifty billions.
Sir Douglas Haig has been
created a field-marshal.
More than six feet of snow fell
in Vancouver last year.
The French parliament re-assembled on Wednesday.
Carranza is said to be buying
munitions and arms in Japan.
Victoria observatory recorded
127 earthquake shocks in 1916.
Mayor McBeath of Vancouver
was re-elected by acclamation.
Sir Hibbert Tupper says Canada
should have compulsory service.
Minnesota lumber camps are
closed, owingtoI.W.W. troubles.
Much loss was caused by a fire
in the business section of Valdez.
Sixty thousand persons in Massachusetts are addicted to drug
habits.
Sir Frederick Borden, minister
of militia in the Laurier cabinet,
is dead.
Australia has resumed exports
of mutton, but only to Great
Britain.
Captain John Lauder, only son
of Harry Lauder, has been killed
in action.
Captain F.C.Selous.the famous
hunter, was killed in action in
East Africa.
Roosevelt calls Wilson's peace
note immoral, dishonest, and an
aid to Germany.
The British government has
ordered 125 freight locomotives
in Philadelphia.
Three hundred invalided soldiers are expected to arrive in
Canada each week.
All stocks of alcohol in Great
Britain have been requisitioned
by the government.
Col. W. F. Cody ("Buffalo
Bill") died at Denver on Wednesday, at the age of 73.
The Consolidated expects to
produce 11,000,000 pounds of refined copper at Trail this year.
The Portland Oregonian declares that Oregon has prospered
during its first year of prohibition.
The warehouse of Wood, Val-
lance & Leggatt, in Vancouver,
was burned, with a loss of $500,-
000.
Hungary has only one-seventh
of the amount of grain required
by the nation between now and
August.
Ottawa city council asks for
the restriction of dairy exports
to any but British and Allied
countries.
Under Nebraska's new prohibition law it is a criminal offense
to inform a man where he may
obtain liquor,
Plans for reconstruction in the
occupied districts of France are
being prepared by a French
cabinet committee.
To increase railway efficiency,
the British government has
withdrawn one hundred trains
from service, and has increased
fares, except for working people,
fifty per cent.
The U.S. may be asked to annex Lower California, a Mexican
province which has held aloof
from the revolution.
In expectation of early peace,
German steamship agents are
soliciting freight in Scandinavian
countries for the U.S.
Rasputin, the Russian monk
reputed to have had much influence with the Czar, is reported
to have been murdered.
Delegates to the Allied war
council in Rome were given a
great ovation at the close of the
cenference on Saturday.
Hon. P. E. Blondin has been
made . postmaster general, being
succeeded as secretary of state
by Hon. F. L. Patenaude.
An appeal for the Canadian
Patriotic Fund has been issued
by the Duke of Devonshire,
Canada's new governor-general.
Besides supplying a good deal
of war material to her allies,
Great Britain has advanced them
over ��600,000,000 for war purposes.
A three-year-old Jersey cow
owned in Portland produced an
average of 2J pounds of butter a
day in 1916. This is the world's
record.
The grand sherif of Mecca, who
supports the Allies, has been
declared "King of the Hejaz",
and will rule over 100,000 square
miles of Arabia.
The Brewster government has
appointed three Liberals, E. S.
Winn, H. B. Gilmour.and Parker
Williams, as members of the
Workmen's Compensation Board.
The Pall Mall Gazette has been
purchased by Sir Henry Dalziel,
a prominent supporter of Lloyd
George, and is likely to become
the British premier's mouthpiece.
On Jan. 1 the whole island of
Newfoundland went "dry". The
manufacture and sale of liquor is
prohibited, and patent medicines
containing alcohol are also banned.
The final result of the soldiers'
vote on prohibition for B. C. will
not be known for several week?.
It is now thought the majority
for the measure may be much
reduced.
Complaints against the Canadian army medical corps were
investigated by an official board,
which declared the charges were
"Unjustifiable, mischievous, opposed to Canadian sentiment,
unwise, end regrettable."
One of the richest mines ever
opened in England���the Levant
Mine, Corn wall���lies almost wholly under the sea. Tin and copper to the value of over two
millions have been extracted by
the Levant miners from beneath
the ocean, for of the 40 miles uof
galleries in the famous mine the
greater part lie directly under
the water, the lower gallery but
one running out over a mile from
the shore. Not far from the
Levant lies another rich.submar-
ine copper mine, the Bottallack,
which began to leak so badly
years ago that it had to be abandoned.
MINERAL ACT
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
AJAX MINERAL CLAIM, situated in
Omineca mining; division of Omineca
district; located on Rocher de Boule
mountain, on Juniper creek, adjoining
the Iowa mineral claim on the south.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Jas. E. Dean
of Hazelton, Free Miner's Certificate
No. 48174B, acting as agent for Charles
F. Booth, Free Miner's Certificate No.
43178B, intend sixty days from the
date hereof to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant for the above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85,   must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this second day of December,
A.D. 1916. Jas. E. Dean.
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations.
COAL mining rightsof the Dominion,
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and
Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the
Northwest Territories and in a portion
of the Province of British Columbia,
may be leased for a term of twenty-one
years at an annual rental of $1 an
acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will
be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made
by the applicant in person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district in which
the rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must
be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for shall be
staked out by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied by a fee of $5, which will be refunded if the rights applied for are not
available, but not otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable
output of the mine at the rate of five
cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of merchantable coal mined and pay the
royalty thereon. If the coal mining
rights are not being operated, such
returns should be furnished at least
once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of the mine at
the rate of $10.0C an acre.
For full information application
should be made to the Secretary of the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa,
or to any Agent or Sub-Agent of
Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B. ���Unauthorized publication of
this advertisement will not be paid for.
-58782
Commercial Printing at
THE  MINER OFFICE
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! Hudson's Bay Company |
I HAZELTON. B. C. |
��   Groceries, Drygoods, Boots and Shoes, Hardware, Wholesale Liquors   ��
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H.B. STOUT, XXXX, quarts, per 6 bottles, $1.50
VICTORIA PH(ENIX BEER " " $1.50
SCHLITZ BEER, quarts, "     "      $2.40
We are still able to supply our FAMOUS RUM
Mail orders promptly attended to
Ask for our LIQUOR
PRICE LIST.
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CANADIAN  PACIFIC RAILWAY
Lowest rates Prince Rupert to all Eastern Points via steamer
to Vancouver and Canadian Pacific Railway.
Meals and berth included on steamer
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA  and   SEATTLE
S.S. "PrinceM Maquinna" leave�� Prince Rupert every SUNDAY, at 6 p.m.
S.S. "Princess Sophia" leaves Prince Rupert 6 p.m. Nov. 11th,
25th; Dec. 9th, 23rd; Jan. 6th, 20th; Feb. 3rd.
J. I. Peters, General Agent, 3rd Ave. & 4th St., Prince Rupert,RC  j
Express, General Drayage and Freighting!
/ IVFRY nnA VTACFK We are Prepared to supply private I
LrlTLslll UIIU UJ/lUXiU and public conveyances day andj
night.     Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton.
BEST DRY BIRCH, $6.50 A CORD
Consign your shipments in Our
Care  for Storage or Delivery.
Address all cummunicationa to Hazulton.
Ruddy & MacKay
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
fRUHK
RAILWAY and STEAMSHIP LINES.
Steamers sailing between Skagway, Juneau,
Wrangell, Ketchikan, Anyox, Prince Rupert,
Ocean Falls, Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle,
Leave Prince Rupert for Ocean Falls, Vancouver Victoria, Seattle,
Friday at 9:00 A.M. For Anyox Wednesday at 12 midnight. For
Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau, Skagway, Wednesday, January 10, 24,
February 7, 21, March 7, 21, at 1 P.M. Fortnightly sailings to Port
Simpson, Stewart, and Queen Charlotte Island pointa.
Arrive Prince Rupert from the South every Wednesday at 10:30 A. M.
Eastbound trains leave Hazelton: Passenger,Wednesday and Saturday,
7:10 P.M. Mixed 1:56 p.m. Tuesday.     Wayfreight 12:30 P.M. Saturday.
Westbound trains leave Hazelton:  Passenger Tuesday and Thursday,
9:46 A.M.   Mixed 6 A.M. Sunday.    Wayfreight 11:35 a.m. Sunday.
For further information apply to any Grand Trunk Pacific Agent,or to
G. A. McNicholl.Asst. Gen. Freight and PaMung-er A��ent,Prince Rupert, B.C.
���BSSST.""
I  DPMI
TO INVESTORS
THCSE WHO, FROM  TIME  TO TIME, HAVE
FUNDS   REQUIRING   INVESTMENT
MAY   PURCHASE   AT  PAR
DOMINION OF MEM DEBENTURE STOCK
IN SUMS OF $500, 01? ANY MULTIPLE THEREOF
Principal rcpayab'o let October, 1919.
Interest payable hale-yearly, 1st April and lst October by
cheque (free of exchange uI any chartered Hank in Canada) at
the rate of five per cm   per annum from the date of purchase.
Holders of this stock will hove tho privilege of surrendering
at par and accrued tntoretti, us the equivalent of cash) in payment of any allotment made, under any fut..re war loan issue in
Canada other than an issue of Treasury Hills nr other bke short
date security,
Proceeds of this Btooll are for war purf-iSW only.
A commission of one-quarter of one per cent will be allowed
to recognized bond and st""k brokers on aliotineuts made in
reaped of applications for this slock Which bear their stamp.
1'or application forms apply to tho Deputy Minister of
Finance, Ottawa.
DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA
OCTOBER 7th, 1916. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13. 1917
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
c
THURSDAY, JAN. 11
London: Rendered fearful by
the continued success of the Russian offensive movement along
the Riga-Mitau road, near the
northwestern end of the Russian
battle line, the Germans are pouring all their available reserves
into the thinning lines which are
facing the Czar's troops in this
sector. The Russians apparently
are preparing to extend their
attack until it reaches the dimensions of their great offensives
in Galicia and Volhynia. This is
the concensus of opinion, not only
in Allied circles, but also in the
capitals of the central powers.
Petrograd: Russian troops, pursuing the offensive successfully
inaugurated a few days ago, attacked the German lines in the
region of Lake Babit, west of
Riga, where they scored an advance of more than a mile. An
enemy position between Tirul
marsh and the Aa river was captured, with 21 heavy and 11 light
guns.
Berlin: Renewed Russian attacks with stronger forces.south-
west of Riga, near the northern
end of the eastern front, were
unsuccessful.
London: The British government is preparing to launch the
great "Loan of Victory", which
will, it is hoped, be the last flotation in connection with the war.
Paris: Heavy rains have interfered with activities o n the
Franco-Belgian front, and there
is no news of importance from
the western battle line.
Portuguese troops have arrived
on the French front.
Geneva: Although fearing a
Teutonic effort to attack France
through Switzerland, the Swiss
army is staunchly determined to
defend its country at all costs
against invasion from any source.
George to the premiership orders
received by the Ottawa munitions
board have redoubled in vigor.
The expenditure in Canada of
scores of millions of dollars on
munitions plants of many kinds
has been recently authorized. In
some cases new plants have been
ordered which cannot possibly be
ready for some months. When
completed the resources of the
national service commission will
be strained to provide labor for
their operation.
T
FR1DAY, JAN. 12
London: It is learned that the
Entente reply to Wilson's peace
note makes specific designation
of its terms of peace, which include the restoration of Belgium,
Servia and Montenegro and complete reparation for the damage
they sustained; the evacuation of
the invaded territories of France,
Russia and Roumania, with such
reparation as is considered just.
The terms also require the liberation of Italian Slavs, Roumanians
and Czech Slavs from foreign
domination, and the retirement
of the Turkish empire from
Europe. The terms provide for
the reorganization of Europe, with
guarantees of a stable regime,
founded upon respective nationalities, and full liberty and security of all nations. Russia's
claim to Constantinople is not
specifically alluded to. The Turkish clause is considered to mean
indirectly the replacement of
Turkey by Russia at the Dardanelles. The assurances of Emperor Nicholas of Russia concerning
Poland are endorsed.
London: Six lines of entrenchments covering the town of Rafa,
on Sinai peninsula, were taken by
British troops, who captured 1600
Turks.
Amsterdam: German Social-
Democrats are circulating a petition to be sent toBethmann-Hol-
weg, demanding that Germany
give up her plans of conquest
and make peace at once.
London: The reply of the
Entente nations to President Wilson's peace note has received the
approval of the Allied governments, and is now en route to
Washington.
Ottawa: There is no evidence
of an early peace, but on the
contrary all preparationsare being
made for a protracted struggle.
Since  the   elevation   of   Lloyd
Athens: Greece has finally
agreed to comply with all the
demands of the Entente Allies.
London: The British battlf ship
Cornwallis, 14,000 tons, was torpedoed and sunk in the Mediterranean. The warship was built
in 1904 and carried a crew of 750.
London: The ' 'Loan of Victory''
has been launched in Britain. It
is expected to be the greatest loan
in history. The bonds will carry
5 per cent interest, and will be
issued at 95. They will run for a
term of thirty years, but are optionally redeemable at the end of
twelve years. There is also an
optionary loan offer at 4 per cent.
This will be free of tax, and is
issued at par.
Speaking at Guildhall, Lloyd
George said the Kaiser's peaec
offer was a trap baited with fine
words. "We all want peace," he
declared, "uut it must be a real
one."
Geneva: ��A new monster zeppelin, the L-40, made its first
flight over Friedrichshafen and
Lake Constance yesterday. It is
equipped with speciaily-designed
propellers, which make virtually
no noise. A machine on board
the craft, when put into operation,
covers the airship with smoke resembling a cloud, so that the aircraft cannot be seen from below.
A gun of larger caliber than previously used is mounted on top
of the craft. The new airship
will join the air fleet in the North
Sea. Another such craft is half
completed.
TRY
OUR
Wampole's Cod  Liver Oil
(Tasteless)
UP-TO-DATE
DRUG STORE
HAZELTON, B.C.
iiii���. iiii-���un���nn���-mi������ mi���n ��
I      Just1 Arrived      j
A Full Line of
The Miner is two dollars a year.
Assay Office and Mining Office
Arts and Crafts Building, 578 Seymour Street
 VANCOUVER, B.C..	
The Estate of J. O'Sullivan
Provincial Assayers and Chemists
Established 1897 by the late J. O'Sullivan,   F. C. S., 26 years with
Vivian & Sons, Swansea.
J
j WINTER MITTS     -       j
1 AND GLOVES I
I
Come in and see tkem!
I
S
! NOEL & ROCK
I
Hazelton, B. C.
inln-
HAZELTON H0SPITAL=s
for any period from one month upward at SI per
month in advance. This rate includes oflice con-
lultationB and medicines, as well as all costs while
in the hospital. Tickets obtainable in Hazelton
at the Post Oilice or the Drug: Store; in Aldermere
from Mr. T. J. Thorp; in Telkwa from Dr. Wallace;
or by mall from the Medical Superintendent, at the
Hospital.
Paris: A German attack on
Caurrieres wood, in the Verdun
region, was repulsed. The enemy
suffered heavy losses. Germans
in the front line trenches are
sending a call for peace on slips
of paper. Constant raids and
bombardments fray the nerves
of Germany's soldiers.
Mil-
I
-Il4.il-
-ii+ii-
-ll+K-
RAW FURS!   RAW FURS!
TRADERS and TRAPPERS
r
I
Rome : The Allied council,
which has just concluded its deliberations, is considered one of
the most important of the war.
It has definitely soldered the link
between the Allies���their brotherly sympathy and stern resolution to achieve the final victory
which will assure lasting peace,
right and justice.
Petrograd: The Germans gained two heights north of the river
Oituz, in Roumania.
A New Fur Exchange
Trappers and handlers of furs
will be interested in the announcement of the Edmonton
Fur Exchange, Limited, in this
issue. The organization is under
the direction of S. M. Hacock, a
fur expert of high standing, who
is well known in this district.and
it will doubtless handle mnch of
the trap harvest of Omineca district. We recommend those of
our readers who are interested in
furs to communicate with the
Exchange.
| He EDMONTON FOR EXCHANGE, Ltd.
is open for business and offers facilities
unexcelled   for  buying  and  selling fur. |
MODERN        EXPERT       EFFICIENT 1
Our location is central   in Edmonton. I
Our Premises are J
DRY        COOL        FIREPROOF        SANITARY 1
Our   showrooms,   wherein   the   fur   is I
examined by the buyers, are I
THE LARGEST IN CANADA I
We do not buy fur.     We sell your fur I
by competitive sale to the highest bidder, j
thus assuring you of the highest market
price at all times.
Our Sales are
ADVERTISED WIDELY
We carry Insurance on your fur while
in the Exchange. We charge you a
commission of "5 per cent for selling.
We give real service and more money.
Correspondence Invited
The EDMONTON FOR EXCHANGE, Ltd.
ADAMS BUILDING     -      -       .     EDMONTON
The world's gold production in
the last quarter of a century
equals that of the preceding 400
years; and the silver output since
1878 equals that of the preceding
400 years, so says the Financial
American. The gold money of
the world has doubled in the last
20 years, and the silver money of
the world has decreased one-half
in the same period. These facts
are shown in a compilation by
the foreign trade department of
the National City Bank, of New
York, suggested by the exceptionally high price of silver, of
which the United States is now
the world's largest producer,and
the large flow of gold, of which
$600,000,000 was imported since
the beginning of 1916.
Ranges from $16.00 to $80.00
Le Roys, Nos. 7-8-9, 16.00 to 19.00
Surveyors, 15.00
Teslin Folding, 4-hoIe, $10: 2rhole, 4.50
B. C. Heaters, 24" 6.25;   30" 7.25
Airtights, 18" to 36", 2.75 to 15.00
Herald Box Stoves, 8.50 to 12.50
R. CUNNINGHAM & SON, Limited
HAZELTON, B. C.

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