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Omineca Miner Jan 27, 1917

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 ,
THE LEADING WEEKLY NEWSPAPER OF NORTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA
VOL. VI, NO. 22
HAZELTON, B. C, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1917
PRICE $2.00 A YEAR
TWO PRISONERS ESCAPE
Offenders Make Bold Dash for
Freedom Yesterday
Morning
The police are hot on the trail
of Joseph Petzl, alias Smith, and
Martin Cunningham, petty offenders who succeeded in escaping
from Hazelton lockup early yesterday morning. It appears that
Petzl hid himself in an unused
and unlocked cell, and when
Special Constable Johnson, who
was in charge of the lockup,
opened the door of another cell
about 2 a.m. to give a drink of
water to a prisoner he was locked
in the cell by Petzl, who then
released Cunningham. The two
provided themselves with revolvers from a locker in the police
station, and discarded their jail
clothing for overalls, after which
they disappeared. When the
armed and threatening men left,
Johnson gave the alarm by shouting, and Chief Taylor hurried to
the station and organized search
parties. It was learned that the
fugitives had stolen a railway
speeder and proceeded east. Their
early capture is expected.
Petzl, who is of German extraction, recently served six months
for supplying liquor to Indians,
and on his release was warned to
leave the district. This he failed
to do, and six weeks ago he was
sentenced to six months' imprisonment for vagrancy. Cunningham was serving three months
for supplying, with an extension
of two months for a previous attempt to escape.
Yesterday's Bulletin
London: Details of the recent
naval engagement in the North
Sea have not yet been made public by the admiralty. The battle
was fought on a dark night, under conditions hitherto regarded
as impossible.
France is experiencing the severest cold weather it has seen
for many years, and military operations are at a standstill.
A German surprise attack to
the south of Berry au Bac was
repulsed by the French.
Lieut. Guynemer, the famous
French airman, brought down
his 27th German machine yesterday.
London: Greece is meeting
all the demands of the Allies in
full, and has apologized for the
attack o n Entente forces last
month.
Bulgaria declares its efforts to
gain peace are quite sincere,
Manchester: The immediate
"conscription" o f accumulated
wealth, as a means of lightening
the financial burden of the war,
was demanded b y a resolution
unanimously adopted yesterday
at the annual meeting of the Labor party,     The resolution calls
BRITAIN'S RESOLUTION HARDENS
NATION DETERMINED TO FIGHT TO A FINISH-
ENEMY REDUCED TO ENLISTMENT OF CRIPPLES
London: The nation is getting
down to serious work. First steps
towards civil mobilization indicate Britain's adamantine determination to fight to a finish and
to victory. Men and women are
being recruited for war work.
Foreign securities will not be
requisitioned, but all holders are
required to report particulars to
the treasury.
Paris: It is believed here that
the Huns must soon yield.having
no more reserve troops. Men
previously considered totally unfit are being called to the colors.
As an instance, a soldier with a
glass eye was appointed captain
of artillery. The last calling up
of recruits resembles a slave raid
in Belgium, every possible man
and boy being forced into the
army.
London: The Kaiser,ac:ording
to reports, plans to make his
58th birthday the occasion of an
other peace move, with terms
more acceptable to the Entente.
The Pall Mall Gazette calls upon President Wilson to visit the
battlefields of Europe and get a
direct view of the war, not to
look at it from a distance o f
thousands of miles.
Paris: German attacks along
the front from Avocourt wood to
Deadman hill were repulsed with
heavy losses.
The enemy penetrated French
trenches near Hill 30.
Along the Somme two enemy
attacks were stopped by British
artillery fire.
Guynemer brought down his
28th enemy aeroplane.
London: A rmall German vessel bombarded the east coast of
England. Only a few of the
shells fired reached the shore.
There were no casualties and
the damage was slight.
London:    Lloyd  George says
that i n the Imperial conference
the representatives of the overseas dominions will be on an
equality with those of Britain,
and nothing affecting the great
struggle will be withheld from
the conference. The object i s
to concert efforts and exert the
maximum strength of the Empire to achieve its great aim.
Some changes in Imperial organization are predicted by the
premier.
Conferences which were held
in London recently to discuss and
determine questions relating to
the naval policy f>f the Allied
fleet in the Mediterranean were
entirely satisfactory.
Washington. A thrilling patriotic appeal was made by Hon.
Elihu Root to an audience which
cheered the British navy. The
speaker denounced attempts to
force peace without victory.
for taxation of not less than 15
shillings in the pound on all unearned incomes; direct taxation
on land, and nationalization of
the banking system.
The conference rojeted, by a
vote of more than three to one a
resolution favoring immediate
peace negotiations.
Petrograd: German attacks
near the Tirul marsh were repulsed. Enemy counter-attacks
pressed the Russians back one-
third of a mile along the southeast course of the river Aa.
Severe cold weather has halted
operations on the Roumanian
front. Along the Danube there
is artillery firing across the river.
Russia will not consider peace
with the Germans as equals.
Buenos Ayres : Despatches
from Montevideo declare that the
commerce raider has been identified as the former Hamburg-
American liner Cap Ortegal. Her
fate is still unknown.
HOSPITAL PATRON'
ANNUAL MEETING
W.A.
The fortnightly sewing party
will be held on Thursday next,
February 1, at 3 o'clock in the
Mission House. All ladies of
the town will be very  welcome.
The embargo on Greek shipping has been raised. The
Greeks will retain enough vessels
for their own needs, the Allies
taking the remainder at fixed
rates.
The largest attendance yet recorded at any Hospital meeting
marked the annual meeting of
patrons which was held at Hazel
ton Hospital on Thursday evening. The annual report, presented by Dr. Wrinch, medical
superintendent, showed that 244
patients had been under treatment. Of these, 185 were discharged cured, 28 discharged
improved, 5 discharged unimproved, 12 passed away, and 14
remained under treatment The
total number of days' treatment
during the year was 5934, an increase over the previous year.
Disbursements of approximately $14,000 were shown, with a
cash balance of $421.88, and a considerable excess of assets over
liabilities.
R. S. Sargent was re-elected
patron's representative on the
advisory board.
Germany has prohibited all imports from Switzerland, except
those for which permission is
given.
Canada's total enlistments to
date number 393,000, making an
army seven times as big as the
Duke of Wellington's.
Hospital Meeting
Officers' reports presented at
the annual meeting of Hazelton
Agricultural and Industrial Association showed that the operations
of the organization during 1916
had been highly successful.
The meeting, which was held
in St.Andrew'sHall last evening,
was well attended, and the discussion indicated that the members of the association were
determined to make the 1917
Fair at Hazelton even a greater
success than that of last year.
The election of directors resulted in the choice of the following
members: President, Dr. H. C.
Wrinch; vice-president, J. C. K.
Sealy; hon. secretary, Stuart J.
Martin; hon. treasurer, F. B.
Chettleburgh; directors: H. F.
Glassey, James MacKay, James
Swann.
Mrs. Temple's Telegram
John Brown,
Elm Avenue,
Pickleton.
I implore you to see me at once.
Husband must not know.    Happiness depends on you.   Shall be
in all day waiting for you.
Clara Temple,
99 Curzon St.,
Mayfair.
Assembly Hall, Feb. 20.
LOCAL NEWS PARAGRAPHS
Items Of General Interest From
Hazelton and Surrounding District
G. C. Killam, of Smithers, is a
visitor in Hazelton.
R. S. Sargent is spending a
few days in Smithers.
La grippe is a fashionable ailment in Hazelton at present.
E. C. Annes, the geologist, arrived from Edmonton on Tuesday.
C. H. Keithly, of Prince Rupert, was among Wednesday's
arrivals.
Gordon Wilson, who has been
in Alaska for a year, is spending
a few days in town.
Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Jones came
up from Skeena Crossing yesterday, for a brief stay.
Mrs. McDougall and Miss Dorcas McDougall were passengers
for Prince Rupert on Tuesday.
Carl Jensen, who has been absent from Hazelton for four
years, returned from the coast
this week.
After defraying all expenses in
connection with the bridge celebration and dance on Tuesday,
the committee had in hand a
balance of $8, which was contributed to the Soldiers' Aid.
There is a considerable local
demand for the new war savings
certificates, which are to be obtained at the Union Bank. A
noteworthy feature is the receipt
of applications from a number of
young people of both sexes.
Bridge Celebration
A notable occasion in the history of the town was the formal
opening on Tuesday of the Hazelton bridge across the Bulkley.
The bridge had been in use for a
week or so, but it was felt that
its completion was a matter of
too great importance to go unmarked, and Tuesday's celebration was arranged. At 2:30 a
crowd followed the Indian band
to the bridge, where Rev. John
Field delivered a brief address in
his usual happy style, declaring
the new structure duly open for
traffic.
The evening event was a dauce
given by the citizens in Assembly
Hall, which was well-attended
and enjoyable. J. S. Gray and
J. F. Adams came from the Valley to furnish the music, and
succeeded in pleasing all. Dancing continued until after three.
Coming Events
Jan. 30���Hazelton Board of Trade,
Annual Meeting, Progress Club Rooms,
8 p.m.
Feb. 20���Hospital Concert and Play,
Assembly Hall. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1917
The World's Doings in Brief
News Notes from Many Source*
MINERAL ACT 'ojiiiiiiiiiiiicaiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiicojiiiiiiiiiiiicojiiiiiiiiiiiicojiiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiiaiiiiiiiiinicg
Certificate of Improvements      =
Japan is experiencing a political crisis.
Many Syrians are dying of
starvation.
Edmonton will drop the single
tax system.
Lassen Peak, in California, is
again in eruption.
Over 1400 German papers have
ceased publication.
Canada's trade last year exceeded two billions.
The British parliament will be
reopened on Feb. 7.
Italian banks have loaned 250,-
000,000 lire to Russia.
Belgians are now being deported from Brussels.
Conditions in Belgium are reported worse than ever.
Women will not be admitted
to practice law in England.
Bilingual teaching is being
abolished in Manitoba schools.
W. F. Tye advocates the mer-
gingoftheG.T.R.,G.T,P..N.T.R,
and C.N.R.
The proprietor of a Paris restaurant was fined $40,000 for
selling absinth.
E. S. Topping, the original
owner of Le Roi mine, is dead in
Victoria, aged 73.
The Imperial government will
be asked to provide better news
facilities for Canada.
The new war savings certificates are already meeting with a
ready sale in Ottawa.
Before their retreat, the Roumanians saturated a million bushels of wheat with oil.
An American estimate of the
loss caused by the war, exclusive
of shipping, is six billion dollars.
Tbf British food controller has
issued orders curtailiner the production of beer 70 per cent.   The
output of spirits will be also restricted. The measures are justified on a food-saving basis.
E. N. Rhodes, deputy speaker
in the Canadian house of commons, has been appointed speaker.
The Dominion government will
build two motor ships, to carry
B.C. merchandise by the Panama route.
A "Khaki League" is being
formed, to look after the interests o f soldiers and sailors
throughout the Empire.
A resolution to extend the life
of the Dominion parliament will
be introduced on the return of
Premier Borden from the Imperial conference.
Bopp, Von Schack, and Von
Brinker, the German conspirators,
were sentenced to two years'
imprisonment and $10,000 fines
in San Francisco.
Liberals in Vancouver and Victoria have registered objections
to the dismissal of R. A. Ren-
wick, deputy minister of lands,
who was discharged to make
room for a prominent Liberal.
NOTICE
AJAX MINERAL CLAIM, situated in
Omineca mining division of Omineca
district; located on Rocher de Boule
mountain, on Juniper creek, adjoining
the Iowa mineral claim on the south.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Jas. E. Dean
of Hazelton, Free Miner's Certificate
No. 43174B, acting as agent for Charles
F. Booth, Free Miner's Certificate No.
43178B, intend sixty days from the
date hereof to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant for the above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements.
Dated this second day of December,
A.D. 1916. Jas. E. Dean.
I Hudson's Bay Company j
HAZELTON. B. C.
o o
a   Groceries, Drygoods, Boots and Shoes, Hardware, Wholesale Liquors   M
TEAS
Jamieson's   Green.
_lb.     .50    R
Amber per 3-lb.  pkg.   1.00    g
MINERAL ACT
Certificate of Improvements
NOTICE
HAZELTON VIEW. LEAD PICK,
MOOSE.ELK MINERAL CLALVIS.sit-
uate in the Omineca Mining Division of
Cassiar District.
Where located:���On the West slope
of Rocher de Boule Mountain.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Dalby B.
Morkill, of Hazelton, B.C., B.C. Land
Surveyor, acting as agent for New
Hazelton Gold-Cobalt Mines, Limited,
(N. P. L.), Free Miner's Certificate
No. 5598C, intend, sixty days from the
date hereof, to apply to the Mining
Recorder for a Certificate of Improvements, for the purpose of obtaining a
Crown Grant of the above claims.
And further take notice that action,
under section 85, must be commenced
before the issuance of such Certificate
of Improvements. 21-2!)
Dated this 15th dav of January, A.
D. 1917.
D. B. Morkill
"MADE IN CANADA"
FORD TOURING CAR
Price $495
The Ford is logically the Car for this country.
It can take the hills ahead of them all, and
rough roads affect it not at all. It has an
engine with a record.     It is serviceable and
dependable.
All cars completely equipped, including electric headlight.     Prices f. o. b. Ford, Ontario.
RUDDY & MacKAY
Local Agents
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
Jxyrd
Synopsis of Coal Mining Regulations.
H.B. No. 1	
..lb.
% .60
H.B. No.2	
..lb.
.50
H.B. No. 4	
-lb.
.45
H.B. No. 6 3-lb.
tin
1.25
Lipton's A	
..lb.
.60
Tetley's Sunflower	
..lb.
.45
Tetley's Green	
.lb.
.50
Agrakellie 5-lb.
box
2.25
Blue   Ribbon.--	
..lb.
.50
Jamieson's Tiger	
..lb.
.40
Jamieson's Brown. .-
lb
.50
COFFEES      1
H. B. Imperial.  .lb.     .45    g
Chase & Sanborn's lb.     .45    S
English  Breakfast lb.     .40    3
S3
Jamieson's J. &M lb.     .50    5
Jamieson's   Bonanza lb.     .35    S
Geo. Washington���-J-lb. tin    .85    ��
Reindeer Condensed Coffee S
x
 and Milk, tin    .35    =
ojiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiro3iiiiiiiiiiiico3iiiiiiiiiiiito3iiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiniiiiico
f^OAL mining rightsof the Dominion,
^ in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and
Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the
Northwest Territories and in a portion
of the Province of British Columbia,
may be leased for a term of twenty-one
years at an annual rental of $1 an
acre. Not more than 2,560 acres will
be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be made
by the applicant in person to the Agent
or Sub-Agent of the district in wnich
the rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must
be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurveyed
territory the tract applied for shall be
staked out by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied by a fee of $5, which will be refunded if the rights applied for are not
available, but not otherwise. A royalty shall be paid on the merchantable
output of the mine at the rate of five
cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall i
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of mer- j
chantable coal mined and pay the
royalty thereon. If the coal mining
rights are not being operated, such
returns should be furnished at least
once a year.
The lease will include the coal mining
rights only, but the lessee may be permitted to purchase whatever available
surface rights may be considered nee- J
essarv for the working of the mine at j
the rate of ?10.0C an acre.
For    full    information    application
should be made to the Secretary of the I
Department of the  Interior, Ottawa, ,
or  to   any   Agent  or   Sub-Agent  of I
Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N.B. ���Unauthorized publication of
this advertisement will not be paid for. ;
-58782
lf~-
=\
%-.
CANADIAN  PACIFIC RAILWAY
Lowest rates Prince Rupert to all Eastern Points via steamer
to Vancouver and Canadian Pacific Railway.
Meals and  berth included on steamer
For VANCOUVER,   VICTORIA   and   SEATTLE
S.S. "PrinceM Maquinna" leaves Prince Rupert every SUNDAY, at 6 p.m.
S.S. "Princess Sophia" leaves Prince Rupert 6 p.m. Nov. 11th,
25th; Dec. 9th, 23rd; Jan. 6th, 20th; Feb. 3rd.
J. I. Peters, General Agent, 3rd Ave. & 4th St., Prince Rupert,RC   j
Express, General Drayage and Freighting
I
I1VFRY finA STACFS We are P>*Pared t�� supply private
Lill USX I UllU OiflXJLikJ and public conveyances day and
night.     Our stages meet all trains at South Hazelton or New Hazelton
BEST DRY BIRCH, $6.50 A CORD
Consign  your shipments in  Our
Care for Storage or Delivery.
Address nil communications to Hazelton.
Ruddy & MacKay
HAZELTON and NEW HAZELTON
Commercial Printing at
THE  MINER OFFICE
;t&p
RAILWAY and STEAMSHIP LINES.
Steamers sailing between Skagway, Juneau,
Wrangell, Ketchikan, Anyox, Prince Rupert,
Ocean Falls, Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle.
Leave Prince Rupert for Ocean Falls, Vancouver Victoria, Seattle,
Friday at 9:00 A.M. For Anyox Wednesday at 12 midnight. For
Ketchikan, Wrangell, Juneau, Skagway, Wednesday, January 10, 24,
February 7, 21, March 7, 21, at 1 p.m. Fortnightly sailings to Port
Simpson, Stewart, and Queen Charlotte Island points.
Arrive Prince Rupert from the South every Wednesday at 10:30 A. M.
Eastbound trains leave Hazelton: Passenger,Wednesday and Saturday,
7:10 p.m. Mixed 1:56 p.m. Tuesday.     Wayfreight 12:30 p.m. Saturday.
Westbound  trains leave Hazelton:  Passenger Tuesday and Thursday,
9:46 a.m.    Mixed 6 a.m. Sunday.    Wayfreight 11:35 A.M. Sunday.
For further information apply to any Grand Trunk Pacific Agent.or to
G. A. McNicholl.Asst. Gen. i-'iririit ami Passcnuer Airent.Prince Rupert, B.C.
TO INVESTORS
THOSE WHO, FROM  TIME TO TIME, HAVE
FUNDS   REQUIRING   INVESTMENT
MAY   PURCHASE   AT   PAR
DOMINION OF CANADA DEBENIUB
| DPMI
IN SUMS OF $500, OR ANY MULTIPLE THEREOF
Principal repayable lst October, 1918.
Interest payable half-yearly, 1st April and lsl October by
oheque (free of exchange al any chartered Bank in Canada) at
the rale of five per cent per annum from Ihe dale of purchase.
Holders of this slock will have Ihe privilege of surrendering
at par and accrued interest, as ihe equivalent of cosh, In payment of any allotment made under any future war loan issue in
Canada other than an ist-ue of Treasury Hills or other like short
date security.
Proceeds of this stock are for war purposes only.
A commission of one-quarter of one pcT cent will be allowed
to recognized bond and stock brokers on allotments made in
respect of applications for this stock which bear their stamp.
For application forms apply to the Deputy Minister of
Finance, Ottawa.
DEPARTMBNT OF FINANCE, OTTAWA
OCTOBER 7th, 1916. THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27. 1917
i
e umineca
iner
Published every Saturday at Hazelton, the Center of the
Great Omineca District of British Columbia.
A. R. Macdonald, Publisher and Proprietor.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: Canada and British Possessions, Two Dollars a
year; Foreign, Three Dollars a year.
ADVERTISING RATES: Display, $2.50 per inch per month; Reading
Notices, 20 cents per line for each insertion. Legal notices inserted at B. C.
Gazette rates.
Vol. VI.
Saturday. January 27, 1917
No. 22
WHAT THE WAR
MEANS IN BRITAIN
An English correspondent telling of the nation's war activities
says:
There are today in Great Britain over 4000 firms engaged in
the production of war material,
and not one of them before the
war had had even an hour's experience in that class of work.
Nearly 100 colossal plants have
been erected, and some 3,500,000
people, of whom 700,000 are women, find employment therein.
That is a miracle of improvisation
that must, I suppose, be unique
in industrial history.
We are now turning out in three
weeks as much eighteen-pounder
ammunition, in two weeks as
much field-howitzer ammunition,
in eleven days as many medium
sized shells, and in four days as
many heavy shells as we were
turning out in the whole of the
first year of the war. The enormous British armies overseas
have been (quipped with rifles
and machine guns solely from
domestic sources. Every month
we aie manufacturing twice as
many guns as the entire army
possessed eighteen months ago,
the production having multiplied
sixfold in the last year.and being
still rapidly on the increase.
Americans, I imagine, have little
idea of the tremendous scale on
which things are done. Since the
beginning of the war we must
have ordered and paid for abroad
or manufactured at home���mainly
the latter ��� about 100,000,000
yards of woolen cloth.as much of
flannel, as much of cotton, about
a thousand million buttons, and
another thousand million horse
shoe nails. 60,000,000 pairs of
socks, 30,000,000 blankets, 10,-
000,000 woolen gloves, 50,000.000
brushes, 25,000,000 knives and
forks, a thousand million sandbags, 7,000,000 razors, over 2.000
miles of wire rope, a thousand
million pounds of flour,250,000,000
pounds of crackers, and at least
200.000.000 pounds of Tommy Atkins' delight���I mean, of course,
jam and marmalade.
Besides this we have increased
our navy by the tonnage equivalent of between fifty and sixty
super-dreadnaughts; our merchant marine is today all but as
large as it was at the opening of
the war, in spite of all losses;
London remains the financial
clearing house of the world, and
the British people have brought
the value of their ordinary ex
port trade to a figure that must
soon surpass the returns for the
most prosperous years of ptace.
And yet, I daresay, there are still
Americans who believe thai British labor has not pulled its proper
weight.
But as the climax to all her
other achievements Great Britain
has converted herself into a military power of first rank. After
raising an army that far outdistanced in point of numbers any
army ever raised on the voluntary
system, she has thrown aside the
prejudices of centuries and imposed universal military service
on all her men between the ages
of eighteen and forty-one. Five
million men enlisted in the army
from the British Isles before conscription came into force. By
the time the war is over at least
twelve per cent of the population
will have served with the colors.
And this new army,drawn from
every class and profession and
r
MAKE YOUR DOLLARS
FIGHT
AT   THE   FRONT.
BUY
DOMINION OF CANADA
THREE-YEAR
War Savings Certificates
$ 80.00   roR   $21.BO
BO.OO     " -43.OO
100.00    "       se.oo
INDIVIDUAL  PURCHASE* LIMITED TO IIBO.l.
FOR FULL PARTICULARS APPLY AT ANY BANK
OR ANY MONEY ORDER POST OFFICE
JAN.  9.  1*17
FlNANOK    DlPtnTMINT
Ottawa
trade in the United Kingdom,has
shown during the last five months
on the Somme, in what is by far
the greatest battle in this or any
other war, that they can beat the
Germans at their own game.
The troops that could carry such
positions as Fricourt, Contalmai-
son, and Thiepval can carry anything, and the Germans know it.
We have developed the scheme
of attack which, they attempted
at Verdun, and we have turned
it against themselves on a far
bigger scale, with a far heavier
weight of men and metal behind
it and with far greater results.
Since the battle of the Somme
began over 700,000 of the enemy
have been put out of action, and
what has happened on the Somme
is a mere joke to what is cominjr.
We can continue it indefinitely;
we can repeat it in other sectors
when the right moment strikes.
Combined with the stranglehold
which our fleets maintain on the
arteries of German life.our armies
in France and Flanders, backed
up by a commissariat, medical,
transport, supply and repairing
organization that is the last word
in military efficiency, are a guarantee of victory as good as any
nation could desire.
The world did not know, Germany certainly did not know, I
am not sure that we even knew
ourselves, of what Great Britain
was capable when all her resources of character and material
were extended to the uttermost.
But we know now; the measure
has been taken; a great crisis has
supplied the test, and the nation
which Germany affected to despise has become the chief instrument of that downfall which the
coming year will assuredly regis
ter.
%
BLACKSMITH WANTED
For part time; pay 50 cents an
hour. Other work obtainable.
Good position for old man or one
with family.if willing to do other
work. Ruddy & Mackay, Hazelton, B. C.
INSURANCE
of all kinds.
LoWMt    R��te��.      Strongest    Companies.
Prompt and Liberal Settlement!.
Mining Machinery and Supplies.
Cradock's Wire Cables.
Estimates given for Tramways.
J. F. MAGUIRE,   Hazelton
lmmrmmte mm J Mmnmfmeimrtrt' Agent.
HOTEL PRINCE RUPERT
THE LEADING HOTEL IN NORTHERN B. C.
11 EUROPEAN PLAN I :
One Dollar pet day and upwards
25c. auto service to and from all trains and boats
PRINCE RUPERT B. C.
Green Bros., Burden & Co.
Civil Engineers
Dominion, British Columbia,
and Alberta Land Surveyors
Offices at Victoria, Nelson, Fort George
and New Hazelton.
F. P. Burden. New Hazelton
r.
STUART J. MARTIN
Provincial Assayer       C
Hazelton,
B.C.
DALBY B. MORKILL
British Columbia Land Surveyor
w   MINE SURVEYOR   M
Hazelton. B. C.
Surveys of Mineral Claims, Townsites,
Timber and Coal Leases, Etc. arid General Engineering Surveys.
The obtaining of Crown Grants attended to. tf
IF YOU CAN'T FIGHT
YOU CAN AT LEAST
STAND BEHIND THE
MAN WHO FIGHTS
FOR YOU!
THE CANADIAN RED CROSS
The Hazelton Branch requests the support of all in its
efforts to assist in the noble work of this great humanitarian
organization.
Honorary Presidents: Mrs. (Rev.) John Field; Mrs. (Rev.)
W. Hogan
Chairman:  Dr. H. C. Wrinch
Vice-Presidents: S. H. Hoskins; Mrs. E. R. Cox; W.J. Carr
Honorary Secretary: Miss J. C. Grant
Honorary Treasurer: H. H. Little, Manager Union Bank
Executive Committee:
Mrs. H. C. Wrinch,  Mrs. R. G. Moseley, Mrs. Chas. Reid,
Miss Hogan. Rev. John Field, Rev. M. Pike, H. H. Phillips
Large or Small Contributions will be Gratefully Received
SOLDIERS' AH) & EMPLOYMENT
COMMITTEE
Endeavors to supply soldiers from Hazelton district with
such comforts and necessities as cannot be readily obtained
at the front, and will assist them to re-establish themselves
in civil life when they return. The Committee is acting in
co - operation   with  the   Provincial   Returned   Soldiers'
Commission and the Military Hospitals Commission
Contributions to the Soldiers' Aid Tobacco Fund are Welcome
Chairman: A. R. Macdonald
Honorary Secretary-Treasurer: R.E.Allen, District Forester
S. H. Hoskins,  A.  E.  Player,  Wm.  Ware, Jos.  Naylor,
H. H. Little, J. K. Frost, F. B. Chettleburgh
SOME CAN FIGHT, SOME
CAN WORK OR PAY ���
ALL CAN SERVE
THE CANADIAN PATRIOTIC FUND
Which assists the wives and families of Canada's gallant
soldiers, requires millions of dollars to Keep the soldiers'
home fires burning.
District Treasurer: Stephen H. Hoskins, Government Agent
Hazelton Committee:
J. E. Kirby, H. H. Little, R.E.Allen. J. Naylor, Wm. Ware
and C. V. Smith.     Monthly Subscriptions are Solicited THE OMINECA MINER, SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1917
THE MINER WAR BULLETINS
C
MONDAY, JAN. 22
z%
Rio Janeiro: It is believed the
Hun raiders are flying the American flag. The captain of a Brazilian steamer met four vessels
suspected of being German commerce-destroyers. Brazil will
send a ship to protect her neutrality. Interned Teuton vessels are
preparing to put to sea to reinforce the raiders. One hundred
sailors from the German gunboat
Eber, interned at Bahia, are
reported to have embarked on
the Swedish steamer St. Croix,
which left Rio four days ago..
The boat is said to have met a
German raider on the high seas,
for the purpose of putting these
men aboard.
London: The death roll of
Friday's munition factory explosion is three hundred dead and
many injured. Buildings were
destroyed and people killed on
the opposite side of the Thames.
Men in the street more than a
mile away were thrown down by
the concussion. The detonation
was such that buildings miles
away were rocked, Fire broke
out, involving a large flour mill
and other industrial concerns,
while houses also were enveloped
in flames. Fragments of factory
machinery weighing tons were
found a mile and a half from the
factory. Many people crowded
into the Underground Railway
stations, believing an aerial raid
was in progress. There were no
panics in theaters or elsewhere.
British were successful in a raid
last night east of St Eloi. There
was considerable artillery activity
on both sides, particulary along
the line north of the Somme. The
enemy was dispersed northeast
of Neuve Chapelle.
Paris: There was violent artillery fighting south of Lassigny.
An enemy surprise attack against
our trenches failed. We were
successful in a raid northwest of
Soissons. in which we captured
prisoners.
In Alsace there was an encounter between patrols in the sector
of Burnhaupt. A strong recon-
naisance attempted to reach our
lines in the region southwest of
Altkirch, but was repulsed.
On the Belgian front there was
bombardment from both sides in
the Ramscapelle sector.
London: In the eastern theater
there were artillery actions in the
region of Magerro and Tarnova,
on the Vardar and in the direction of Doiran. Russians made
a successful raid in the Sparavina
zone. The rest of the front was
quiet
/T
TUESDAY, JAN. 23
Rio Janeiro: The southern sea
swarms with warships searching
for the Hun raider. No word of
its capture has been yet received
and it is believed the marauder
has changed the scene of its activities.
Pernambuco: The German
raider Vineta, which wrought
havoc with Allied shipping, is reported sunk by the British cruiser Glasgow, 129 miles off Para.
The news, though not confirmed,
is regarded as authentic.
London: A successful daylight
raid was carried out against the
enemy's trenches southeast of
Loos. The enemy suffered heavy
losses. We took a number of
prisoners.
We entered the enemy's lines
north of Neuve Chapelle last
night. German artillery is active
in the neighborhood of Rancourt
and Serre, and in Ypres sector.
Britain expects another campaign of German "ruthlessness"
on land and sea which will quite
eclipse any military efforts heretofore made by the central powers. Berlin reveals with bitterness the increasing food scarcity
in Germany. People are now
compelled to take their own potatoes to cafes.
Fans: German forces last
night made two attacks on the
and even to align Russia on the
side of the Teutons.
Brusiloff i s confident of a decisive victory, and predicts that
the Allies will completely rout
the Germans this year.
Washington: In a speech to
the senate, Wilson said peace
could not be long delayed. H e
declared for an international
league, to enforce equal rights
and the freedom of theseas.sug-
gesting the adoption of the Monroe doctrine to keep the world's
peace.
The German embassy says the
speech will please Germany.
Verdun front, on the right bank
of the Meuse.   Both were driven
back by the French fire.
Artillery was active in the sector of Cote de Poivre.
Petrograd: Artillery is active
in the direction of Kovel and the
region west of Velick. At various points the enemy's wire entanglements have been damaged.
No events of importance have
occurred.
In his statement that there
could be no thought of peace until the Allies were victorious, the
Czar sounded the death-knell of
the pro-German elements, which
since the outbreak of the war
have plotted for a separate peace
WEDNES., JAN. 24
London: Commenting on the
speech to the senate, Allied newspapers say President Wilson has
gone on " a trip to the azure ".
The British and French,and even
the American press unites i n
praising the president's heart at
the expense of his head, declaring his scheme to be utterly
Utopian. The Morning Post
suggests that Wilson,if he wants
to end the war and bring about
a lasting peace, should get in and
fight alongside the Allies.
Washington : Wilson denies
having received secret terms of
peace from Germany.
Bryan praises Wilson's speech.
Roosevelt criticises the speech
and says Wilson's grand and eloquent promises are ridiculous and
insincere. It is worthless, the
ex-president says, to make promises while failing to keep those
already made,
London: Official figures show
that the casualties in the explosion near London were 69 killed,
72 seriously injured, and 328
slightly injured.
The British have sunk two
German destroyers in the North
Sea.
All young men from the age of
18 in Great Britain have been
called up to train for home defense.
The Times says the violation of
Swiss territory by the Germans
is not impossible, and such an
invasion may be undertaken if it
suits the Kaiser. An eminent
strategist predicts a big smash
through the Alps to turn the Allies' flank.
British forces in German East
Africa are steadily closing in on
the enemy, whc is now almost
surrounded.
Many more Canadians have
been awarded the military medal
for bravery under fire.
Paris: Two German airplanes
were brought down by our men.
Petrograd: An enemy attack
in the Oituz valley, on the Roumanian front, was repulsed.
On the Caucasus front a Turkish attack was repulsed.
Our submarines sank a steamer
and nine schooners in the Black
Sea.
Buenos Ayres: The German
raider has apparently disappeared as mysteriously as it arrived.
The report of its sinking is not
credited here.
(|       THURSDAY, JAN. 25    ]
^ J
London: Persistent rumors
from Holland say that from six
to ten German destroyers were
sunk in Monday night's engagement between British and German sea forces in the North Sea.
The German destroyer V69 arrived at Ymuiden barely afloat,
with scores of wounded German
sailors. Vessel and men will be
interned by the Dutch authorities.
A German warship, greatly
damaged, is reported to be on its
way to a Dutch harbor.
An official statement issupd in
Berlin says a British destroyer
was sunk, and claims that all the
German vessels except the V69
returned with slight losses.
I n the last ninety days 470
merchant vessels have been sunk
by enemy submarines. 187 being
British and the remainder neutral.
London: A successful raid on
enemy trenches northeast o f
Neuville St. Vaast was carried
out yesterday, prisoners being
taken.
There was bombing activity in
the neighborhood of Fauquissart.
French troops made successful
raids last night at Chilly, south
of the Somme, and in the Woevre
district.
Lieut. Guynemer has brought
down his 26th enemy airplane.
The most severe weather of the
winter is gripping central and
northern Europe.
Petrograd: German troops in
the Riga region have pressed
back the Russian lines for about
a mile and a half in the Tirul
swamp, and on the Aa river,
east of Kalnzemu.
Complete liberties will be given
to Jews in Russia.
London: There will be no alteration in the Allies' program.
Wilson's speech will not cause
an iota of change in their pians
and nothing can alter them until
the coming campaign is fought
out. Victory must precede peace.
British statesmen credit Wilson with the highest motives,
but are astounded at his remoteness from actual facts.
The government has taken
steps to meet the threatened attempt to starve Britain by the
increased use of submarines. A
plan of revolutionary character
is being prepared.
Bristol: In a speech here last
night Bonar Law gave what is
regarded as Britain's official reply to Wilson's senate speech.
Mr. Law said the president's aim
was to gain peace now, while the
Allies wanted a secure peace for
the future. "This", said the
minister, "is our aim and our
only aim."
TRY
OUR
Wampole's Cod  Liver Oil
(Tasteless)
;UP-TO-DATE
DRUG STORE
HAZELTON, B.C.
The Miner is two dollars a year.
Assay Office and Mining Office
Arts and Crafts Building-, 578 Seymour Street
 VANCOUVER, B.C.	
The Estate of J. O'Sullivan
Provincial Assayers and Chemists
Established 1897 by the late J. O'Sullivan,  F. C. S., 26 years with
Vivian & Sons, Swansea.
iKIl���.llll���llll���.llll.���IIH���llll���-lit!
Just Arrived
A Full -Line of
WINTER MITTS     -
-      AND GLOVES |
Come in and see them!
NOEL & ROCK
Hazelton, B. C.
nn���un���mi���nn���nn���iiii���uu
ISSUES
TICKETS
HAZELTON HOSPITAL
for any period from one month upward at f 1 per
month in advance. This rate indudeB office consultations and medicines, as well aa all costs while
in the hospital. Tickets obtainable in Hazelton
at the Post Office or the Drue Store; Jn Aldermere
from Mr. T, J. Thorp; in Telkwa from Dr. Wallace;
or by mail from the Medical Superintendent at the
Hospital.
Ranges from $16.00 to $80.00
Le Roys, Nos. 7-8-9, 16.00 to 19.00
Surveyors, 15.00
Teslin Folding, 4-hole,$10: 2-hole, 4.50
B. C. Heaters, 24" 6.25;   30" 7.25
Airtights, 18" to 36", 2.75 to 15.00
Herald Box Stoves, 8.50 to 12.50
R. CUNNINGHAM & SON, Limited
HAZELTON, B. C.
THE    MINISTER    OF    FINANCE
REQUESTS
THE
PEOPLE    OF    CANADA    TO
BEGIN NOW
TO
SAVE   MONEY   FOR   THE
NEXT WAR LOAN
JAN. ��. III?
DEPARTMENT OP FINANCE
OTTAWA
���
��� ������ ��� i MM I .-
	
*^"*<MMM

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