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Westminster Daily News Sep 7, 1912

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 1
���'   �� 'V.i.;* -h.p-.' . ' 'J'j  ',: i ���'** '.���':*   *���'������'
v ;;?.
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EXPERT VIEW ON
ERASER RIVER
Master of Strathspoy  Finds
Sailing Directory Out of
Date.
System of Keeping Channel Clear (s
Adaptation from Three Great
Waterways.'
ANOTHER SHVSCRAPE R
ON COLUMBIA STREET
Trapp Block Is    Being   Transformed
Into   Seven  Storey; Building���
Interesting Foundation.
OFFICERS RESIGN
FROM ASSOCIATION
"l was extremely pleased to find
the somewhat pessimistic account given ln the British Admiralty
Sailing directory tor this part of the
Paciflc coast, to be absolutely obsolete
and largely Incorrect." Such waa the
dictum of Captain E. Todd, the courteous muiiter of the British steamship
Strathspey, now unloading over 6000
tons of Bteel mils at Port Mann for
the Canadian Northern railway, to a
Westminster Daily News representa
tive yesterday.
The   observation     bad     particular
reference  to  the  supposed   perils  of
navigation  in the  river,  the  draught
of  water and Lhe  bridge.    "With    a
skilful pilot," pursued the captain. "I
find those dangers non-existent.   This
river  has  great  possibilities, and    I
have had experience of most of   the
large rivers of the world.    Not many
rivers can take a draught so large.
The Best Methods.
"I   notice  that  the  authorities    on
the  Fraser rlvor have got the    best,
methods of keeping the channel clear '
and   deep���a  sort  cf combination  or
adaptation  of  tbe  systems  employed
on    the    Scheldt,    In    Belgium,    thc
Yangtse ln China, and the Suez canal.
You have got the bailt out dams as
in the Scheldt and Yangtse. and the
brushwood training wpIIs which have
been found s>o successful In the Suez
canal.
"/*s a commander ot large steamers
trading nil over tho world fir a
period rf twelve years I feel confident
In von ting r.iy opinion," Thus the
captain cn tho Kraser.
Another skyscraper is assured for
Columbia street Messrs. Gardner
and Mercer, architects, are at present
preparing  plans lor alterations
Financial Situation in London Causes
Some Anxiety Arrong Edmcnds
Ratepayers.
MET TEACHERS TROM   (MARTIN POWfll TO    iklSiJum^
All THE BRITAINS!     Hf BROUGHT HEReI     fi ^ J"
I Novelty    of   Transportation���English
Hospitality���Delighted Returned
Westminster Visitors.
May Arrive Forthwith If Present Decision of American Court Is
Not Appealed.
Edmonds, 8ept. 5.���The rpsirnnttnn   	
* - taaaa *�� -������& Sr��S!s^S?^R
The    Misses   A. L. and Oeraldine
appointment
a conirn
foundations
The Strathspey's Skipper.
Ca&tj��ln Todd Is a native of Sunderland, tlte famous seaport on the Wear
county of Durham, England, a-xd has
been a nallor from boyhood. Kor the
laat Hve yearn Uo has beon a. cupt&ln
in tho service ttt the Str-ith lino. c>1*h-
gow. Se-.il.im!. I'revlmiH to that tlmo
he commanded vosnfls In the Stan
line service, a comrany so called
from each cf its shipR being Mined
from countries ending In the syllabi"
"stan." snrli aa Hindustan, Turkestan
etc. In Ihe latter line he wa.. lon^
ongafi( (I In the trade between New-
York ai d China.
Clear   n   Fcrtnioht.
The Strathspey. Ills present ship. Is
400 frr-t long, 53 fe��t broad and drew
22 feet of A-ater when she berthed at
Port Mann. She Is a 10.000 ton,
weight end measurement, boat. She
arrived at Port Mann last Saturday
with 6060 tons of steel rails from
Sydney, Nova Scotia, and the captain
expects to b-> clear of her cargo by
the 20th Inat. The vessel will then
proceed to Nanaimo to coal, thence
to Seattle, and from there voyages
to Australia, -then "Ho for merrie
England." and the end of the trip
round the world.
The Strathspey left North Shield*
on the Tyne, England, on May 29,
sailing through the wild Pentland
Firth in the north of Scotland. She
steamed through a dense fog for
nearly 1000 mile.i in the Atlantic and
crossed the exact placa whore the
Ill-fated Titanic sank to her doom
With over 1600 souls on board.
Relics of Titanic.
Quite a large quantity of wreckage
belonging to that ship was observed
in the neighborhood, and enormous
Icebergs were pasRed In the vicinity.
Sydney was reached without mishap
on June 0. and tlie gallant skipper Is
justifiably provd of creating a record
in loading at that port. In b!x diys
with two g:'.r.n;a the Strathspey shipped 6060 slf"A rails and 1200 tons of
bunker coal fnr her long run.
Too Much for Chilean*.
Leaving Svdney on June 17 tempestuous weather was enoountered going through the Magellan straits, but
on July 2 the Strathspey put ln at
the little port of Coronel in Chill,
where she reccaled. The Chileans
there are not accustomed to 1200 ton
orders and the vessel was unduly delayed for six days. Having replen-
lahed her coal supply the Strathspey
put to sea on August 1. From Coronel
to the Gulf of Georgia the sea was
as smooth ns i> billiard table, in the
language of the captain, and the
ship averaged nine knots (ten miles!
an hour, until she docked at Victoria
on August 29. where in accordance
with the regulations for vessels coming trom a foreign pqrt, she was
quarantined, got a clean bill of
health and came up the Fraser.
    of   the   present
building are being reinforced In order
to bear tbe additional weight of the
four extra floors. The plans are as
yet only in a tentative form aud the
details of the structure have still to
be worked out. The building will
cover a ground floor area of 66 by 132
feet and the front will be faced with
white terra cotta, giving a hand
some appearance.
The ground floor, with the execp-
tion of a few minor changes, will be
left ns it is at present, while the
other six storeys probably will be
divided into warehouses for the storing of hardware.
The foundations at present* being
constructed are causing quite a little
interest among the contractors and
builders of the city on account of
their peculiar nature. The ground is
unusually soft all along Front street,
and previously . it has been found
necessary to erect the foundations cl
new buildings on piles. In this case
it was impossible to use a pile driver,
jand Instead an Inverted lintel or
mud still of reinforced concrete is
being built. Each floor will weigh
250 pounds to the square foot so that
It will be necessary to make the
foundations unusually strcng.
The contract for the superstructure
of the addition has not been let as
yet, but tenders will be called for
in a few days. After the ccntrac' is
awarded the worl: will taku about
three months to complete.
ERECT PAVILIONS
FOB ROYAL VISH
That on  Crescent
Magnificent Setting-
Stone  Being  Prepared.
Park  Will    Have
Foundation
Charged with Cruelty to Animals.
Cruelty to horses was the charge
against Abe Welnes yesterday before
Magistrate EdniondB in the city police
court. Welnes brought in to the city
market two horses which were totally
unfit to bt worked, and he was soon
under the care of the pollce. After
hearing the evidence of the officer
who made' the arrest, the court charged the defendant with the costs and
suspended sentence on the man agreeing to destroy the animals. They
were destroyed.
City Engineer Blackmail Is preparing plans for the royal pavilion to lie
erected at Albert Crescent where the
otyto authorities will formally w<i-
come (he Duke of Connaught on the
DOaulon of his visit here on September 21.
The stand will be erected on the
open space behind the Simon Fraser
monument, facing the Fraser river
and South Westminster. Seating room
wlll be provided for fifty people with
a platform  in front for speakers.    It
evening in Moreton ball. .������
The resignations came after some
little discussion aa to the wording ol
the minutes of the last meeting held
some months ago. Several of ths
members took exception to the writ
ten minutes, and, after nearly ever)
member present had had his little sa}
in the matter, a vote of censure upol
the chair and the secretary was
passed by a narrow majority.
Thereupon Mh P. B. Brown, the
president, and Mr. H. Sworder, tht
secretary, tendered their resignations
They were accepted and forthwith
Mr. W. McCuragh and Mr. W. S. Rost
were appointed president and seere
tary respectively pro tem. The little
cloud that overhung th.e meeting from
the outset did not deter the member*
from entering into discussion upon
several items of Interest to thi
locality.
Mr. VV. S. Rose brought up the
question of tbe financial situation
and stated that every ratepayer lr
Burnaby should take an Interest ir.
this for. If the bond3, wliich are e*.
present on the London market, re
main unsold, many of the employees
of the municipality will be out of
work during the winter.
A committee consisting of Mr. Rose
and Mr. Alex. McPherson was appointed to wait upon the finance committee of the municipal council at its
next meeting to obtain informatior
on the situation.
An effort was made to induce Mr
Brown and Mr. S-.vorder to reconsidei
fheir decision of resigning, but al'
to no avail. Mr. Brown Btated that
he waa a resident of Edmond3 and
would alwava be identified with the
progress cf the community, but a3
fcr holding the off ce of president any
tonte.r. he mm.t duollna. ,,U J��M flnaUv
the    attorney    general'
Tb.  Hlma. Willi, "SSSSSir,  XS   Z ��,'"i "    *' ,,?T*���
he  old   country  and   to attend   the I gan city a fev. '
convention.    Seventeen of the teach-'
Great   American   Railroad*
Cast Envious Eyes at
Field In Canada.
[Best  of  East   Comes    West���Taft'*
Stand on Panama Is Generally
Supported.
�������   elmt oDIur.  tt tin     tinsl
���e��T����   Ot   the   UMMUUdh   Which   wlM
be  held  on   the  flrat  Friday  dt October.
PUTTING FINISHING
TOUCHES TO EINE
C. N. R. Will Have Link with    Hope
Ready for Trains in Short
Time.
ers were from British Columbia, flve
from Vancouver, and a Mis3 Smith
oeside the Misses Wilkie from Westminster. The local ladies left the
Royal City on June 3, and traveled
with the party to tha old country ou
the steamer Virginian.
The Misses Wilkie stayed with
friends in London and made tours
from the metropolis of the empire
to many of the beautiful and historical places .of old England. In Lon-
-ion they visited the famous Tower
and Buckingham palace, as well as
;nany other noted places. Trips were
taken to Windsor and Warlck castles
Eton college, Oxford, Stratford-ou
Avon, the birthplace of Shakespeare
Ann Hathaway's cottage, etc., all of
which proved full of interest to the
Canadians.
The travelers also witnessed Cowes
regatta, but though everything attending this famous annual event
was very interesting the day was
spoiled on account of the rough and
boisterous weather. A trip \va3 mad'j
also  to Dublin.
The visitors were very much impressed with the means of transportation in the old country and the underground railroad3 and double decked street cars in London proved novel
and peculiar to them.
"The hospitality of the English people was unbounded," said Miss A. L.
Wilkie last night, "and- though the
weather waa not - of    the    bast    w��,
from tbe  teaohers  -wbo  attended two!
convention from other parts of the
empire. The gathering was a success
in every way and is sure to
strengthen the bondB uniting the
component parts of the empire,"
added  Miss Wilkie.
The teachers voyaged back on the
steamship Scotia and had a rather
rough trip. They reached Halifax
without a mishap, however, and had
a nice journey across the continent
on the C. P. R. They reached the
Junction about 10:30 last night, and
arrived at their home in the city
shortly after 11 o'ciock.
months ago wh.U
traveling with a circus, wliich busi
ness he is alleged to have uued as a
means of passing the bills of the
Bank of Montreal to unstispectin,.
people. A large roll of bills, aggregating $20u0, was found in his possession, whicli were recognized later by
Mr. VV. H. G. Phipps, accountant of
the bank, as the one3 stolen from
here on September 15.
Another man named Davis, alias
Dalrymple, was arrested with Powell,
b'jt he was released a few days after
ward3 after it was found that he had
partnered Powell only a few days
previous to their arrest.
The same stubborn fight against
extradition as that displayed by MacNamara and Charles Dean has been
waged by Powell, who attempted tc
prove an alibi. The decision handed
by the American authorities at Detroit Is not final, however, and Powell
haB a matter of fourteen days to appeal his case to a higher court. Whether he will do this is problematical,
and will, cf course, hinge on the advice of tfc'j solicitor who has been
fighting his cue.
lu the meantime the crown authorities will have the Davis case on then
hands. Davis and the woman allege!
to be his wife will come up for an
other hearing this morning before
Magistrate Edmonds. Davis, who ha>
several aliases, was arrested in Tor-
ontot some weeks ago while passing
bills  said to  have beeu  stolen  from
TEDDY'S REASONS
FOR THIRD PARTY
Makes Three Speeches In    St.    Paul
and Minneapolis
Breat
Ovations.
"In all the towns I visited I have-
not yet seen a town as well lighted
as New Westminster nor a street that
could compare with Columbia street
in this city." was the statement
made by Alderman Fred Lynch on
iiis return yesterday from a tour of
some cf the big cities of Eastern Canada and the middle and eastern United   States.
This assertion is certainly saying
a great deal for the Royal City when
it is taken into consideration tbat included among the cities visited by
the alderman ���were Rochester, N. Y^.
Chicago, Buffalo, Pittsburg, South
Bend, Indiana, and Milwaukee.
Everywhere Mr. Lynch went he-
found ail eyes and a good many feet
turned in the direction of the great
Canadian Northwest, especially towards British Columbia, and be was
literally besieged with enquiries regarding conditions in the Paciflc province of which the people of the East
were continually hearing wonderful
tale3. The old province of Ontario is
being robbed of her best blood to
build up the West and when hes
reached hi3 old home town he found
that his playmates of boyhood had
departed, to take up positions in the
*-ont rank cf the western tre'.:.
Enormous Interest In B. C.
"I heard more comment on British
Columbia, and particularly on the
cities of Westminster and Vancouver
on my trip than I ever heard before
 ir-~-
inR my" travel*, arid motion sotua	
the big firms had representatives out
here information as to the field tor
this industry was demanded on every
hand and you may be sure 1 put the*
advantages bf Westminster before all
and sundry whom 1 met," went on the
alderman.
"In the East business conditions
are nothing to compare wttb what
they are out here, and in some places'
in the states I found things almost
paralyzed by the exceptional heat
from which the country was sufferine-
You have no idea bow warm it was
back there a short time ago," continued   Mr. Lynch,  "and  I must  eay
Port Mann has been linked by steel
rail with Hope, now, for a couple   of
_^^^^^^^^^^^^^_^^^^^^^^, months    and    the    railroad men are
will  be decorated in a most profuso | busily employed In ballasting the list
manner  with   flags and  bunting.    A   stretches of the track. After the com-
[SHOCK Of SIGHT
GAVE HIM SPEECH
royal standard will fly over the
centre of tho stand and the Union
Jack and Canadian flags will be
strung on flag poles at each side of
the pavilion, while bunting and
pennants of all colors will reach from
each corner of the structure. A can-
vus awning will be hung above the
stand and In front will be ranged
beautiful palms and flowers.
The entire structure will cover a
ground proa of 28 by 16 feet and tho
3oats will be erected on a sloping
floor like the seat arrangement of a
theatre. The actual work of construction will begin in a few days
and it is expected to hnve It completed a day or two ahead ot the arrival of tlie royal visitor.
Messrs. Gardiner and Mercer, tbe
architects of the new High school,
are having prepared the foundation
stone ot tho new High school which
the military governor general will
lay. A gorgeously decorated pavilion
or stand will also be erected on Tipperary park for this ceremony,
though plans have not yet been
drawn up.
The stone will be ot polished granite and will contain the following inscription:
Foundation Stone
laid by
Field Marshal
H, R. IT. the Duke ot Connaught
and Strathearn, K.C,
Govern or-Oeneral
of Canada.
September 21, 1912.
His Royal Highness will use a silver trowel and mallet in the laying
of the stone, which wlll also be Inscribed and presented to the governor general after the enactment of
the ceremony, by the architects and
builders of the new school, as a
tremento of the occasion. The tools
are at present being made by Mr.
Thomas Gifford.
With regard to tlie address to be
presented to the governor general
Mr. Blackman has secured the services of an expert lady artist to
evolve the outside cover design. To
Rev. J. 8. Henderson has been en-,
trusted the drawing up of the address. The lettering will be done by
a member of the city engineering
staff.
pietioh of that part of the work comes
tiie government inspection and then
if everything is satisfactory the C. N.
R. will formally take the line over.
Tbls will probably take a fow weeks
yet
The wharf presents at. present a
busy scene, scows unlond'ng coal, the
old Ivy, uow the Donald D.. getting
fur'iished up and the big sl'o Strath-
sp< v unloading her-clanging cargo.
I., the townsite itself large gangs
of men are actively engaged In grad-
ln;- tbe roads, and carpenters are
ha mm'ring away at house construe-
t'tn. Orosvenor street Is being graded to he ne\v Yale road, McBride
street ', graded. King street Is graded to I' iig sireet west, Surrey. Surrey street Is gr:/Ied to Wallace drive
arrl Wallace drive Is in a similar
sui    ns far as Pillath's addition.
i. Cal Inm brothers are building a
(ttori ar.J offices at the corner of
WMIlai ���* and Maun stieet. Mr. J. A.
Pater'uii ls erecting a store and H.
Littlo Is also building stores. A number of other buildings are under way.
Deaf and Dumb Man Gains
Faculties When Viewing
Accident
ADD ANOTHER ENGINE
TO COPE WITH WORK
Due to the rapid increase in
traffic on the Great Northern railway,
the company has Installed an additional Switching engine and crew
which will operate in the local yards.
It has been found that since placing
another car furry on the run between
here and Sidney, Vancouver island,
?reat difficulty was . experienced In
moving the cars with the one engine
they were using here.
Another move of the company Is to
have all apotting and switching of
oars done as much as possible in th-"
night time when the vehicular traffic
on Front street is crt down 'to a
minimum. Up to this time the cars
that were brougM over from the ts��
land were forced to remain on the
elding all night nnd were made up
into trains the' following morning.
Drowned In Tank.
Alvlnetone, Ont.. Sept. ��.���Hugh R
Carruthers. aged 40, manager of the
Brook municipal telephone system.
was drowned in a flve foot tank of
water this afternoon.
Kamloops, Sept. 6.���Deaf and dumb
for fourteen years, Mr. Andrew Forsyth, of this clty, suddenly regained
both speech and hearing last Tuesday'
evening. Mr. Forsyth has served for
some years here as roustabout at the
hotel and general utility man for some
of the citizens of Kamloops. He ls
one of the best known residents of the
city, and has been very popular.
When Mr. John Edmunds sprang
from a moving train last Tuesday afternoon, lost hls footing and fell to a
terrible death under the wheels, Mr.
Forsyth was among tihe bystanders
who-rushed to gaze at the mangled
body. Shocked at the horrible sight,
Mr. Forsyth screamed.
The man is not able to explain how
it all happened, but since that time
he has been able to talk almost as
well aa other people, and to hear and
understand the language of other people.
The only remark he could make ln
elucidation of the mystery was:
"Something snapped in my head."
St. Paul, Minn., Sept. 6.���Minnesota that though I enjoyed my trip tre-
heard lirjt hand from Col. Roosevelt I mendoditiy I longed for the salubrious
his loaaou* foraging support for the jciw ol New Westminster many a.
new Progressive party.     Vhe colonel I time
spent yesterday in St Paul and Mini stM, aBd Ssttlerfc
neapolis,  made    three speeches   and!
was welcomed enthusiastically in both/' "I was speaking to several! of User
cities. At night be resumed his jour- /prominent railroad men of the aMfc.
ney westward with Grand Forks, - N. I states. They seemed to realise the-
D., as his next stopping point. j enormous business being dene tn tke
Natural] Col. Roosevelt's principal addressICanadian Northwest by the railroads-
was delivered at the Minnesota State I there, especially by the C- P: IL, andr
Fair. Standing on a platform built in J they were casting jealous eyes across
a shady spot the colonel looked down I the boundary. Tbey commented oa
over the heads of a throng which ex-1 the great opportunities open to the -
tended on all sides beyond the range I railroads being constructed through
of his  voice.    He declared   that  the | British   Columbia,   and    believed   a .
BUILDING PERMITS KEEP
WELL UP TO AVERAGE
Things are looking up daily at the
huilding inspector's office in the city
hnll and several fair sized permits
tor residences were issued yesterday.
The! total value of the building permits issued for the week up to last
night was J17.020. which is well up
to tbe usual weekly average.'
The week previous to (his one was
a record' breaker of course on accountl
of the faot ti'at the big hospital permit was tal: .m out
Yesterday's contributions were:
Chas. Cioolc, four roomed house on
Fifth street. $1KOO; N. F. Bester, stable on Edinburgh. $176; VV. W. Paling, six roomed house on Edinburgh
atreet $1600; A. H. Soloman. six
roomed house on Durham street, $22-
60.
nomination of Woodrow Wilson at
Baltimore was arranged by the Democratic "bosses."
He expounded tbe Progressive Ideas
upon tariff, Canadian reciprocity, the
courts, co-operation of the government
and the farmers to improve the yield
of farms and measures to better the
condition of wage-workers.
Then he went to Minneapolis, and
after'a luncheon attended by several
hundred members of the Minnesota
Progressive League) he delivered what
he called a "lay sermon," in which he
gave his views upon the significance
of the progressive movement from tho
standpoint of the moralist rather than
the politician. He made a brief address at the fair grounds, where he
attended a "farm dinner."
��� "I am in this movement" said Col.
Roosevelt in his address In Minneapolis after the luncheon, "because it
springs, as every great movement
must, from the conscience of the people. The politicians, have been deaf
and blind because they have Ignored
the fact that in the last .few years
tliere has been a steady growth of discontent with the slipshod inefficiency
in dealing with the great economic, industrial and political problems of tbe
day.
"If I have rendered any service it
has been to bring abcit the movement a little quicker vl an it would
otherwise have pome. When we get
the proper standards It will be lmpos
slble to bave a repetition of such
thefts as were practiced at Chicago.
When we get the proper standards we
wlll eee that any man who profits by
such theft or condones lt is unworthy
of public confidence."
Bryce at Honolulu,
Itonolul, Sept. C.^-James Rrvce
British ambassador to the United
States, arrived here today on his return to Washington from Australia
where he spent the summer.
great future to be ahead of the coast
cities on Canadian soil. ' I also levari
them to be greatly perturbed at   the-
number of people that  were leaving
the Dakotas, Minnesota and Montana,..
and other middle and eastern statm._
The steady outflow waa preanntiiqj a>
serious problem tot them, and aa endeavor  was  being made  to discover
some means of offsetting the attractions of the Canadian Northwest la
order to keep the people at homeC
"Canal Is Oura.''
Referring to the Panama canal
question of tolls, Alderman Lyncb
found the people very reticent on tim
subject, but from observations, he
believed that there was a general ah
tltude of approval toward the actio**
of President Taft and the U. SL
senate. '
"They cay the canal is their en
and that they can do what they Hka
with it" he stated.
Alderman Lynch spent two
at his home In Peterboro, Ont,
another two weeks attending tho
Fraternal Order Of Eagles convention
at Cleveland, Ohio. It was from
Peterboro that he found many of Ma
friends of oid had left for the
of wonderful opportunities, the
West" Until recently the tendency
ot the majority ot settlers from tke
East was to ������ come no further than.
Calgary, but ot late, states Mr. Lyach.
they have been invading the mountains ln hordes.
The alderman, who is secretary ot
tbe B. C. L. A., received the gtortoos
Information that the boys from tke
Eraser's bank had again annexed the
Minto cup. symbolic of the world's
championship, three hours after the
deciding game was over, but he, like
all other ardent supporters of tbe
local boys, knew that the vice-meal'
silverware had only been testing Ike
Vanoouver air, whloh when welgked
ln the balance waa sure to be tbkaaM
| wanting. WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
SATURDAY, 8EPTEMBER 7, 1912.
Classified Advertising
���
���
���
���
���
���
RATES.
Om etas per word (or day.
Four ^aaia ver word per
week.
No adwttoeroent accepted
for ten than 25c
Birth, death and marriage
notices 50e per Insertion.
TO RENT.
TO    RENT  ���   TWO    FURNISHED
rooms, 407 Royal avenue.
FOR RENT���NEWLY FURNISHED
eight roomed modern house. Will
give lease. Apply 415 Twelfth
street between 1 and 3 p.m.
WANTED���MISCELLANEOUS.
WANTED���ttUB*   TO   DO   HOUSE-
work.    Apply CM Hamilton  street.
WANTED���FODR OR FIVE FURN-
ished rooma; would prefer a small
house. Addreas Box 101 News
office.
WANTKD���A SMALL OFFICE ON
principal business street, New
Westminster. Particulars at once
to 310 Richards street, Vancouver.
WANTED-GOOD COOK FOR PRI-
vate family; good wages. Apply 515
Fifth avenue.
WANTED���MARRIED COUPLE RE-
qulre two comfortable furnished
rooms: oMk country family preferred. Apply room 2, B. C. E. R.
depot   Phone 401.
WANTED���AN    IRONER.
City steam laundry.
ROYAL
WANTED���ROOMERS AND BOARD-
ers.   36 Hastings street.
WHAT EDMONTON IS TO ALBER-
ta, Fort Fraser will be to British
Columbia. Tbe greatest opportunities ever offered to men of limited
means. Railroad grade now cleared
through the town. Business houses
now open for business and other
large interests building. See W. A.
Matheson. secretary Fort Kraser Development Club, 102 Winch Building, Vancouver, B. C. Ask for late
copy of Fort Fraser News.
TO RENT���ONE LARGE DOUBLE
bedroom suitable for two gentlemen, and one single bedroom, newly furnished; home comforts. Apply 324 Tenth street, city.
TO RENT���A SUITE OF NICELY
furnished housekeeping rooms, 37
Agnes street, phone L 638.
FOR      RENT   ���   HOUSEKEEPING
Rooms. 828 Royal Avenue.
TO     RENT���FURNISHED    HOUSE-
keeping rooms.    224 Seventh street
FOR RENT���LARGE, AIRY, WELL
lighted room, 30x30 feet, in Hard-
man block, suitable for office or
workroom or may easily be divided
to make a two or three room apartment suite. For terms arply Westminster Dally News.
TO RENT���FURNISHED HOUSE-
kfepinn rooms, hot. and cold water.
Apply room 0, Knights of Pythias
hall, corner Eighth street and Agnes
street.
TO KENT���LARGE AIRY FRONT
bedroom, furnished. Terms reasonable.    720 Agnes street.
TO KENT���FURNISHED HOARDING
house.    Address Box 705 City,
FOR RENT���LARGE FRONT ROOM
suitable for two gentlemen or light
housekeeping.      Apply 213   Seventh
street.
LOST.
LOST���ON THURSDAY MORNING,
a black pocketbook with papers of
no value except to owner, on Sixth
street between Third and Tentli
avenues. Return to 411 Fifth
avenue.   Reward $5.00.
FORESTRY EXPERTS
AND LOW GRADES
Utilization Advocated���Regulation
Settlement in Timber Areas���
Surveys and Protection.
of
LOST���ON SATURDAY AFTER-
neon, between the court house and
Knights hardware store on Sixth
street, a brown paper parcel containing a lady's blouse. The finder will be rewarded by leaving
same at this office.
FOR SALE
FOR SALK���A CANADIAN ROMS
investment contract, with very low
number. For further particulars
write box 91 News Office.
HOUSE BARGAIN���NEW MODERN
eight-roomed bouse, corner of Second and Durham, New Westminster.
Lot 92x120 teet. Concrete basement furnace, stationery washtubs
etc. Mortgage $3500. Value of
property $6500. Will sell for $3000.
Not leas than $&00 cash. Balance
easy terms, or will take property
in trade. Address, Thompson, 310
Dominion Trust Building, Vancouver.   Telephone Seymour 487.
FOR    SALK���14-FOOT    PLEASURE
boat, 1321 Third avenue.
FOR SALK���BIGHT LOTS, ABOUT
1% acres wttb (86 foot road frontage, splendid location, close to new
school and team. Owner, P. O.
Box 977, New Westminster.
LOST���A email leather wallet containing railway transportation and
membership cards made out to G.
S. Whitaker, Calgary; also small
silver card case and memo pocket
book, believed to bo lost between
Westminster and Port Mann. Finder
will be liberally rewarded by leaving; at. Motherwell & Darling's oitice
New  Westminster.
FOUND.
FOUND���A BLACK DOG. OWNER
can have same by proving property
and paying for this advertisement.
Call at News office.
FOUND���COMMERCIAL TELEGRA-
phers Union Card, 1912, made out
in name of Miss B. B. Wass. Owner
may have same by calling at Westminster Daily News office and paying for this advertisement.
FOR SALE���CLOVER HAY ABOUT
three tons, feed oats about two
tons. Beet offer wanted by Robert
Wright, Brunette road, in junction
with Blue Mountain road. i
FOR   SALE   Bight   roomed   modern ,
house, cement Mock foundation, full j
basement,  ftirnacs,   separate   bath I
and toilet, splendid view, one block i
from car line, close to Sixth  avenue.   Price right, good terms. Owner leaving town.    Address  owner,
P.O. box SK, City.
FOR SALE SMALL HOUSE, EIGH-
teen fruit trees full bearing, 75
chicks, coops; lot 50x138 to 20 foot
lane; water and light; $1450. Small
payment, balaaee monthly. Also one
lot wltb 29 trees and some chickens.
Apply Owner, on lot 28 Eighth
avenue, Bast Burnaby, between
Second and Fourth street, one and
one-half blocks from car.
FOR   SALE���A   BBLL   PIANO,
most new.   408 Fifth street.
AL-
FOR SALE���CHEAP, IN GOOD OR-
der, a four bvraer gas piste, with
oven complete. Apply 210 Agnes
street, dty.
Victoria, B. C, Sept. 6.���The forestry convention got down to business
yesterday with a large number of
members in attendance and Mr. John
Hendry, Vancouver, president, in the
chair. On the platform with him were
Hon. W. A. Charlton, Norfolk, Out.,
vice-president; Hon. W. R. Ross, minister of lands, Victoria, and Mr. A. C.
Flumerfelt.
Several forestry problems were discussed during the day, chiefly by the
lumbermen, while the public administration side of the issue was upheld
by Chief Forester MacMillan, Victoria; Mr. White, deputy minister of
lands, forests and mines of Ontario;
Dr. Fernow, of Toronto, and others.
The question of so-called bogus settlement was touched on by the president and Mr. T. F. Paterson, of Vancouver, it being urged that land suit
able for timber growing should be reserved exclusively for timber and
closed Sgalnst all settlement, the object being to shut out the man who
might locate a homestead simply for
the purpose of selling the timber off il
and moving on.
Another topic in whicii the whole
consuming public haa an interest i.s
that of the utilization of low grade.,
of lumber. It was pointed out tha,
some of the blame for the great waste
of these grades rests on the consumer, who demands clear lumber, that
has taken hundreds of years to grow
lor purposes equally well met by tin
use of cheaper grades.
In this connection Mr. Flumerfelt
drew attention to the request of the
lumbermeii for a customs ruling tha
the rough lumber duty applies on the
large importation of this product fron
the States which has been coming ii
duty free. He urged that the conven
tion pass a resolution, asking the fed
eral government either to acceded ti
the request of the lumbermen oi
change the tariff so as to save to this
province its natural market for rough
or common lumber, the prairies.
In the course of his presidential ad
dress Mr. Hendry said:
"To keep "fake' settlers out of areas
suited principally for timber requires
first a knowledge of the country,
whicii will show where such areas are.
and the power in the various governments to resist political pressure
brought to bear upon thein to allow
pretended settlers to locate on what
is chiefly valuable as timber land.
"Surveys should, therefore, be made
as rapidly as possible to ascertain the
areas of absolutely forest land and the
whole forest staff should be free from
any partisan influence, so that lt will
not be alien! when measured antagonistic to the good ot the forest are proposed,    or     when     parties     endeavor
wrongfully to enter upon forest lands.
To obtain the best results the forest
service  should  be placed  under civil
service  regulations, whereby  appoint
ments, promotions and dismissals will
be made solely upon merit.
"It is gratifying to know that British Columbia is taking a forward ste;
in these matters, and that a fores'
service is now being organized, whic!
bids fair to be the flnest in the Dn
minion. This means the expenditun
of a large amount of money, but sc
long as the service carries out thi
Idea of protecting our forests with ai,
eye single to the public Interest, 1 am
sure the government will be sustained
by the people In this work.
"The change in our British Colum
bia forest laws, and also the realb-a
tion by Canadians that British Colum
bia is now the premier province in re
gard to timber wealth, are the chief
reasons for this province being sel
��cted for this meeting of Uie Canadian
Forestry Association. This Is the sec
ond time the province has thus been
honored, the firat being on the peca
sion of the visit of Earl Grey in 1906
"Great progress has been made
since then, and we welcome those ol
our members from the other prov
Inces with the feeling that here the>
will see much to interest them, and al
so because we appreciate their assist
SALVATION ARMY'S
TRAINING COLLEGE
For Officers Wlll Perpetuate Memory
of General  Booth���To Cost
$750,000.
London, Sept. 6.���Bramwell Booth,
the new head of the Salvation Army,
has Issued an appeal for $750,000 with
which to erect, equip and maintain a
new training college for Salvation
Army officers as a memorial to his
father.
Regarding the form of the memorial
he says:
"It Beems clear that we should ask
ourselves, 'What would he himself say
could he speak to us?' 1 know that in
consistence with his noble life he
would warmly repudiate any thought
of a personal tribute, such as could bi'
expressed by stone or iron. He would
say: 'Let it be something that would
benefit the needy, and the needy of all
countries.' And he would say: "Let I
be something, the beneficial effect 0:
whicii will oe felt, if possible, aa long
as the world lasts.'"
In further discussing the project
Bramwell Booth adds that provision
for the better training of officers ha<i
much occupied his father's mind ol
late years, but he hestitated to brlnj:
out the plan, because of the large su...
required.
"But," asks the new officer com
manding, "may not his death havt
siven us just the impetus we need fni
an extraordinary effort? 1 do not In
tend to spend one shilling nn turret!
or marble ornamentation, but to built
in tlle simplest form consistent wltl
up-to-date sanitation and methods, li
ntht r countries the English mod:'
will be largely followed, and complete
union on the general plan will be en
sured. The amoint raised here wil'
determine what shall be done in the
United Sates. Canada, India, Germany
and elsewhere."
lhe Market
V*��^cS*i?V����
}
FOIt SALE���SMALL HOUSE. SHEDS,
coop and chickens, 21 f: nit trees
full bearing; lot 5. 50x132 feet, garden and Timetables, Ninth avenue,
Burnaby, between Second and
Fourth streeta Price $1350; very
easy terms.   Apply on premises.
FOR SALE���CHEAP FOR IMMEDI-
ate sale, six roomed house, hlock
from city tar.   A. L. N��� News office.
FOR SALE-8TEEL MALLEABLE
ranges oa easy terms: $1.00 down,
$1.00 par w-ek. Canada Range Co.,
Market Sqntm.
PERSONAL.
BUILDERS AND PLUMBERS, FOR
cement blocks, chimneys IHrk
laundry lota, drain fllo and fireproof, gertnproof. waterproof, sanitary -plaatie flooring, see .1. W. McCallum. WMtmfntter Trnnt b'ock.
Phones: Office 454; house L885.
INVESTORS' INVESTMENT CO.
8HOE AND HARNESS BUSINESS
for sale���excellent turnover. Rapidly growing agricultural centre. Including three Main street lots. Store
and dwelling. $4200.00 buys tho
property and good will for the bus-
ness. Stock on valuation. This Is
a money maker. Terms to suit purchaser.   Good reason for selling.
OKANAGAN ORCHARD For City property���We have a five-acre orchard
In full bearing, with house and outbuildings. Splendid place for poultry. Owner will either sell or trade
for city property.    Price $4500.
FOUR CHOICE ACRE8 on Lopez Island.   All fenced with small house.
Finest  climate.     Double boat    ser-  anCP in solving what in Canada   Is a
vice daily between Victoria and Bellingham.    PTice $750.00 cash.
CHEAP PRAIRIE FARM���150 acres
near Cayley, Alberta. 80 acrei are
cleared and in crop. House, largs
siable and chicken houses. Two
good wells. Price $40 per acre;
$3000 cash, three years for the balance.
HOUSE AND BIG LOT, Eleventh Ave.
f"d Second street. East Burnabv,
$1200. $400 cash, terms for balance
to suit purchaser.
CHOICE CORNER LOT on Fourth
avenue. 68x110. $3500; one-third
cash; G, 12 and  IS months.
HOUSE AT EDMONDS, Two blocks
from car. Lot 66x111, partly cleared. Dairy stable for several animals.
Price $in.r)0. Cash $300. Easy terma
for balance.
great national problem."
URUGUAY IS AFTER
CANADIAN SEED WHEAT
INVESTORS'  INVESTMENT CO.
Real  Estate and Insurance.
Notary Public.
Curtis Block, New  Westminster.  B.C.
Teleohone 295. P. O. Box 777.
Toronto,  Sept.  6.���With   a view of
securing Canadian wheat   for seedin-
purposes, Hon. Hugo A. Lurraco Cni'
i tera,    minister    of    agriculture    am!
|chairman of the commission of agr:
I culture for the Republic of Uruguay
1 accompanied  by a   party   of   govern
ment officials, is now touring Canad-'
investigating agricultural conditions.
The minister stated that if thf
wheat proved equal to the reputation
lt now holds throughout the world
large quantities would be purchased
bv his government and distributed
throughout the farming districts of
Uruguay as seed.
"The Canadian hard wheat has the
reputation Of being the finest In the
world," salr Mr. Cantera. "We hav��
heard of the excellent crops tbe farmers rf the Dominion raise yearly. We
will try to equal them by importing
larjre quantities and ascertaining if it
wlli thrive equally as well In our
land."
RELIABLE HOUSE MOVERS
All   work  guaranteed.    Estimates
furnished  free.
H. GOSSE,  Manager.
903  Dublin  Stieet. Plione  984.
D. McAulay
Tei. 761.
ARCHITECT
Cor. 8th ami Columblu
En!ar-e   Game   Preserve.
V'r.tor'a, Sept. 6.���An order-inooun
o'l hns been passed considerably en.
larg'ng the boundar'ei of the game
preserve In the Cariboo.
As extended the reserve will include
all nf the country from the junction
r' the Clearwater and the Fraser
rivers, thence following the summit of
ths rannre on the west side of the
Clearwater to the headwaters of tha*
river, thence easterly to the head-
wji'.era of the Little Smoky r*ver
Ihwua southerlv to the R"i'th fork of
the Frnfer and thorce lo tlle point of
commencement.
Business at the local market was-
fair yesterday. The farmers are tak
ing advantage of all the fine weathei
that conies along these days to lool
after their belated crops, and for thi;
reason the attendance yi storday wa:
not up to the usual.
There was a good supply of poultn
on hand with a fair demand for al
kinds of fowls. There was also a fai:
supply of veal and pork, but muttor
and beef were not so plentiful.
The offering of fruit wa3 excellent
especially   of   apples   and    pears.        A
'������*.��� r   number  ot  buyers  were on  hand
tor this line of goods and the   suppl;
proved just equal to the demand.
Large quantities of vegetables ar<
st HI coining in to a somewhat stag
nant market. The arrivals of pota
>oes were particularly heavy with a
very poor demand, and prices suffer
?d another severe slump.
Reports that the blight to the po
tato crop is spreading are reachin;
the city. It is expected that the dis
ease will cause a shortage In the supply of good potatoes this winter.
The florists had a good display or
cut and pot flowers, all of which
found ready purchasers. The fish mer
also had a varied stock with busines-
well up to the average.
Fruit.
Apples, per box  SOc to $1.25
Pears, per box   $1.00 to $1.50
Plums, per crate 60c to 80c
Prunes, per crate   50c to 75c
Crab Apples, per crate 60c to 75c
Vegetables, Wholesale.
Beets     per sack  $1.0P
Carrots, per sack   $1.00
Beets, per sack   $1.25
Carrots,  per sack    75c
Parsnips,  per sack    $1.00
Turnips, per saek  60c
Potatoes, per ton $13 to $14
Vegetables, Retail.
Beets, per bunch  6"
Onions, per lb Sc
Potatoes, per saek, new   90c
Carrots, per bunch  5c
Cabbage, per lb 3c
Turnips, each    5��
Eggs and Butter.
Rgg3, wholesale, per dozen  40c
Eggs, retail, per dozen   45c
Butter, ictail, r*'' lb SOc to 35c
Butter, wholesale, ter lb 27c
Flsli.
rink  Siring Salmon, per lb 20c
White    rip ini;     Salmon,   per  lb.  15c
12 lbs. for 25c).
flounders,  per lh 10c
Sturgeo'', per 'b 15"
Blue cod,  per Ib 10c
Mallhiit.  per  lb     10<-
Steelhead, per lb 15r
Smelts   2 lbs. for 25c
Retail  Meats.
Beef  hest rib rousts   J5c to l*o
Beef, loin   18c to 22c
B*.f round steak 20c
Boiling beef     10c to 14c
Veal   15c to 18c
Pork      18c to 20c
Sugar cureJ bacon  20c
Mutton      12c to20c
Dressed chicken, rer Ib 25c
Wholeta'e Meats.
Veal, large   9c to 10c
Veal,  small    13%c to 14c
Beef, front quarter  9 to 10?
Peef   hind quarter   lie to 12''
Soring lamb   15c
"ntton      10c to 12<Ac
Pork      12%c to 13c
Poultry.
Cee-e. live, each $1.50
Hens, small, por doz fS to $7
'Tens. lar,~e, rer doz SS to $10
Chickens, per doz $< to $5.ro
Prefers, per do-'.      M  to $4
fens, live, "er lb J.7c to 10c
Chickens, live, per lb 19c to 21c
Docks, tier dozen   $8 to $10
Ducks, live, per lb 17c to 20c
T. D. COLDICUTT
Exclusive sale of 9 lots, 52x164,
with 20 foot lane in the rear, on
Newcome Road and Thirteenth Ave.,
East Burnaby. Price $550; $50 down
balance $15 per month.
Four and a half acres in Surrey,
10 miles from New Westminster and
1 mile from Sullivan station, B.C.E.R. I
Price $900; $100 down and balance
$10 per month.
T. D. COLDICUTT
Coldicutt Block, Fourth Avenue
Phone 719. East Burnaby, B.C.
and Sixth Street.
Andrew Clausen
Expert repairing of American, English
and Swiss
WATCHES
All  Work  Guaranteed.
841 Front Street      N'"* City Market.
Sole agent for
Hire's Root Beer
Mineral Waters,   Aerated Waters
Manufactured by
J. HENLEY
NEW  WESTMIN8TER,  B. C.
Telephone R  US- Office:  Princeaa St
EDMONDS
Meat Market
P. BURNS & CO.
TELEPHONE L 883
OWNER will consider
Highest Cash Offer for
the following property
in bulk:
Subdivisions 89 and 90, Lot
3, Suburban Block 14.
Act Quickly.   Address:
BOX 190, DAILY NEWS OFFICE
WE   HAVE
LOTS
ON
Lulu  Island
Rising Sun Realty Co'y
Phone 868.
Room 4 Traoo Block
You can rent that room through the medium of
a classified advertisement in the Westminster
Daily News at the small cost of one cent a word.
Brunette Saw Mills Company, Ltd.
New Westminster, B. C.
Are well stocked up with all kinds and prades of
LUMBER  FOR   MOUSE  BUILDING
A specially large stock of Laths, Shingles and
No. 2 Common Boards and Dimensions.
Now is the time to build for sate or rent while prices are low
CITY OF NEW WESTMINSTER
Nanaimo Street Improvement.
Schedule showing the real property Immediately benefited and tho proportion in which the assessment la m aJe.
Name of Owner.
Resub Subd.
Brenchley, C. D tt, Pt
Purvis.  I'hoebe  	
Molnnla, Edward	
Purvis, Charles 	
Purvis, Charles 	
Purvis, Charles J	
Barrett, Mury C	
Goodwin, Alix	
Halllday, A. P    ,,,..
Halllday, a. p	
Wilkie,   Annie        S
Mllekew, Leon   7 a
McKay, W. J     7 b.
Belanger, Annie  7 c
Wilkie, Peter     ,    g
Allen, Jane      5
Malcolm, M. B NW.pt
Brown. Harriet  N.E'pt
6 A
5
8
9
10
11
12
13
1.2.
3,4
BA
5A
Lot
1
Value for    Annual
Blk. Asseasm't. Payment.
Sli
Sli
Sli
Sli
Sli
811
Sli
SU
SU
SU
SU
SU
su
su
su
su
su
su
City of New Westminster . ..Lot 43.8. 120 created by imp.
$ 2.409.77
1,500.00
1,500.00
1,500.00
1,400.00
1,400.00
1,400.00
1.400.00
1,400.00
1,400.00
2,4*7.02
822.34
822.34
822.34
2.487.42
2,791.80
1,237.60
1,188.00
2,000.00
i 21.75
13.21
13.21
13.21
12.33
12.33
12.3:1
12.53
12.31
12.3!
81.71
7.25
7.35
7.2.">
21.71
24.57
10.90
10.4-J
17.Gl
129,988.12       $264.07
Notice is hereby Riven that the Corporation of the City of New Westminster intends to pass a Local Improvement Assessment By��aw Msesaini
he properties in the schedule above mentioned the s,Z of money annual
for thirty years set opposite each lo,, and a Court of Revision for the t?lal of
complaints and appeals againBt the assess
ment so proposed to be made will
be held on Thursday  the 26th day of B^tTlSU canning a 5TotoS
in the forenoon, at thc Counoil Chamber   In the nit. n.,u   k- ,.,    .   ,
upon the Clerk of tbe Municipal   Council at TSS
ch Court of Revision.
ster, British Columbia
ment must be served
eight days prior to such
W. A
City Hall, September 4th. 1912.
Date of first publication  September 4th
DUNCAN, Cli��  Clerk.
1912.
CITY OF NEW WESTMINSTER
Proposed Lane Between Mowat and Eleventh Streets.
Schedule showing the real property Immediately benefited and tho ���**.
portion in which the assessment is made on per foot frontage1
Re-Sub-
Name of Ownor. division.Subd.   Lot.
Trueman, W. H. and Mary E.. 8 4(5,47
Begge, George     !�� 40,47
Barnard, Frank S  10 40,4?
Duncan, A. Findlay    11 40,47
Corbould, G. B  4 45
Welsh, Daniel (Est.)     5 45
Collier, Samuel  8 45
Wilkie,  Ellen G  7 45
Wilkie,  Eileen     8 45
Woods, Ann  1&N^2    1 27
Howe, William 0 3&S^2   3 27
Dlron. C. H. and Maggie  4 27
Way, Joslah    5 27
Blk.
sr,
S5
S5
S5
S5
S5
S5
S5
S5
S3
S5
S5
S5
Feet
Annual
Front
Payment.
49.50
$ 8.08
49.50
8.08
49.50
8.03
49.50
8.08
42.00
6.8f
42.00
6.87
42.00
6.8/
42.00
6.S7
42.00
6.87
59.40
9.71
59.40
8.71
29.60
6.47
39.60
6.47
606.00
$99.03
Notice Is hereby given that tho Corporation of the City of New Went-
minster Intends to pass a Local Improvement Assessment By-law assessing
the properties in the schedule above mentioned the sums of money annually
for thirty years set opposite each lot, and a Court of Revision for the trial of
complaints and appeals against the assessment so proposed to bo made will
be hold on Thursday, the 26th dav of Sept., 1912, commencing at 10 o'clock
In thc forenoon, at the Council Chamber, In the City Hall, New Westminster, British Columbia, and any notice of appeal from such intended a��se.i8-
ment must be served toon tho Clerk of the Municipal Council at least
eight days prior to such Court of Revision.
W. A. DUNCAN, City Clerk.
��� Hy Hull, September 4Mi  1912. ,
Date of fi-t publication September 4th, 10X2. s
i
1:
, t*.*~ MU.'.     ,
^^Iff^^^ a hi,,,.
8ATURDAY, 8EPTEMBER 7, 1912.
WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
A
Miss Biggs, of Vancouver, is visiting I     Miss Marlon Martin has been vislt-
her sister, Mrs. Haines, Third street,  ing friends on Bowen Island.
*   *    * ( -    �����  -
Bole.
Miss Pope spent the week-end and j
holiday  with  friends   on Pender   Island.
��� ���    ���
Mr. John McNab left on Thursday
evening to visit his old bome ln Nova
Scotia.
��� ���   ���
Miss Dorothy Postill left on Thurs- .  ....
day morning for Toronto, where   she'at her home recently and  broke her
will attend college. arm.    She ls recovering.
��� ���    ��� *    *    *    .
Mr. Motherwell left on Tuesday on. Mr. Napier Smith, cf the Bank of
a business trip to Kamloops, return-1 Montreal, left this week to spend Ills
i ._ t^^^^��� holidays in Calgary and Montreal.
Meredith, Miss Meredith, Mrs.!
Latham, Mrs. II. Major, Mrs. A. P.
Grant, Mrs. Georgo Turner, Mrs. S. B.
Martin, the ilisses Martin, Mrs.
Doherty, Mrs. distance, Mrs. Cambie,
Mrs. Allison, Mrs. Fred. Hill, Mrs.
Houghton, Mrs. C. P. Moss (Vancouver), Miss Tully (Vancouver), and
Mrs. H. P. Col!in3  (Vancouver).
DRY GOODS
FURNITURE
Provincial Appointments.
Victoria, Sept. 6.~The following
provincial appointments are gazetted
this week:
Mr. T. W. Harass, government
agent at South Fort George, to be a
coroner; Mr. T. L. Bancroft, Vancouver, to be a commissioner for taking
Mrs. Coulthard, of Victoria, is the ���-.-- -
guest of her niece, Mrs.    VV. Norman j affidavits   in the   province;   Mr.   An
drew Gray, Auckland,  N. Z.. to be a
Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Edmonds returned to their home in K,amloop�� on
Monday.
���   ��   ���
Mrs. D. H. Miller, of Edmonds, fell
Ing again on Friday
��� ���   ���
Mr. and Mrs. F. C. McDonald have
moved Into their pretty bungalow at
1022 Eighth avenue.
a    a    a
Mrs. F. H. Green, 714 Seventh avenue, owing to ill health, will not receive formally this season.
* ���    ���
Mrs. S. P. Tuck, of Victoria, has
been the guest of Mrs. H. T. Ceper-
ley, Burnaby Lake for several days.
��� ��� ���
Mrs. Neville Smith and her daughter Phyllis left yesterday for the east
where they will spend a couple of
months.
a, a    ��
Mr, and Mrs. J  J. Johnston left on
Thursday for Calgary to attend    the i
"Stampede."' and  from  there  will  go
to   Winnipeg,   where   Mrs.   Johnston
will visit her parents.
Mrs. VV. G. Phipps and her little
daughter arrived home from Victoria
on Saturday, having spent several
weeki with Mrs. Phipps,
Gardens.
Mrs. F. J.-Armstrong entertained at
bridge on Friday aftemoon in honor
of Mrs. Russell, of Windaor, Ontario.
��� *    ���
Miss Darling went over to Vancouver on Tuesday to spend the remainder of the week with Mrs. Swinford.
��� ���    *
I��r. and Mrs. T. S. Annandale arrived home on Tuesday evening, having spent three months in the Oid
Country.
��    ���    ���
Mr. Rand entertained at dinner on
Monday evening, when covers were
laid for twelve. The invited guests
Iieing Mrs. Holt (Kamloops), Miss
Hickey (Vancouver), Mr. and Mrs.!
Marcon, Mr. and Mrs. Diamond, Mlss
Alma Leamy, Mlss Freese, Miss Lorna Fraser and Mr. Napier Smith.
commissioner for taking affidavits for
use In British Columbia;  Elena Stewart to be a stenographer In the government office at Nanaimo, ln place of
Annie Stewart,   resigned;    Mr.   Chas.
Wllderspin  and   Mr.   Frederick   Moss
to be clerks In the Attorney-General's
Department;   Leila A. Burpee   to   b��
assistant mistress   in the   Provincial
Normal School at Vancouver;  Mr. F.
W. Beatton to be mining  recorder at
Fort St. John; Mr. J. E. Hooson to be
government  agent   at    Fort   Fraser
where a government office   is to be
opened Sept. 16; Mr. M. J. Knight J.
P., of Britannia Beach, and Mr. W. S.
J. MacKenzie and Mr. W. T. Shatford
of Penticton, to be commissioners  for
taking affidavits under the   Elections
Act
LEESLIMITED
"We Furnish  Your Home Complete,
IN   PLANNING   YOUR
NEW DRESSES FOR FALL
Bear in Mind That We Handle
Aviator Injured.
Sydney, Sept. C���While flying over
Richmond, New South Wales, last
night, something went wrong with the
mechanism of the machine driven by
Mr. Hart, the Australian aviator. The
machine tore down to the ground at
a terrific rate, and became a total
wreck. Hart's skull was fractured.
He now lies in the local hospital in
an unconscious condition.
Very bright and Jolly \va3 the 1m-
promtu dance which was held in St.
George's  Hall   on    Monday    evening.
Rushton's    Orchestra    supplied     the
Carberry) mu8ic an(j a light supper was served
I about 12 o'clock, dancing being kept
WWWWWWWWW^^^^B^BB^^i I up  until  2 a.  in.    Among  those pres-
Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Davidson went | ent  were:     Mr   amJ  Mrs, Eddyi  Mr.
over to  Victoria last  week  to spend  an(i   Mrs.  Sutherland,  Mr.  and   Mrs.
the holiday  with  Mr.  Davidson's sis-1 Alletli  Mr. and  Mr8. Haines.  Mr. and
ter, Miivs Emily Davidson at her home \ Mrs  Sinclair, Dr. and Mrs. Jone3,  Mr.
on  Vancouver Island,    and    returned j amj  Mrs. Macquarrie, Miss Corbould
again on Wednesday evening. ^^^
Mr. Rand. Mis^ Gertrude Rand. Mr.
Edwin Rand and Miss Minna Walker
left for Toronto on Thursday morning. Miss Rand and Misa Walker will
attend liishop Strachan's school and
Mr. Edwin Rand St. Andrew's college.
Miss  Brown, MIbs G.  Brown,  Miss J.
Martin,   Miss E.   Martin,   Miss   Peele
Miss   Nora   Armstrong,   Miss   Lewis.
| Miss Rand. Miss Lorna  Kraser (Van-
I COUVer),   Miss  Warwick.   Miss   Drew.
; Mr-   Motherwell.    Mr.   Steveis   (Vancouver).   Mr.   Wylie,   Mr.   Pelly.   Mr.
Goldsmith,   Mr.   Harrison.  Mr.   Frank
^^���W Major,  Mr. Sellery,  Mr.  Brown  (Hen-
The Ladies of MncrabPf'S held a ev), Mr. Albert Beattv, Mr. Keith
meeting on Wednesday at the resi-1 Macgowan. Mr. Edwin Rand, Mr. Rail-
dence Of Mrs. Easter, when they en- ton. Mr. Leamy, Mr. Aiber' Leamy,
gaged in making flags to be used in ' Mr. Laurie Johnston. Mr. Lloyd. Mr.
decorating the olty on Sept. 21st on | Slacey, Mr. Darrell Shildrick. Mr. Pit-
the occasion ot the visit of the Duk^ ; cairn.  Mr. Mercer,  Mr. Ford and  Mr.
GOOD OID BRITISH
STOCK POR CANADA
Duke of Sutherland Explains Objects
of Vast Colonization  Ccheme���
Useful   Leaven.
Knight.
Darling of Toronto. The room IB
which the hostess received was a pro
fusion of ;)ink sweet peas, large brass
bowls filled with Mountain Ash ber-
r'es   were  placed   in   the   hall   where
cf Connaught.,	
Mrs. J. K. insley has been confined
to her homo on Twelfth Btreet for Hi*
past two weeks sulTerin* from an accident with an automobile. Sho won
Crosslin? Columbia street when a mo
tor car stn:ck her and she narrowly
escaped fatal injury.
���    *    ���
Mr. and Mrs. Peebles, anrounc-- the ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
engagement of their daughter, Kith-1Rushton's Crehcstra was playing
erlne Grant, to Mr. On? Daniel Cook- While the table In the tea room had
son, cf the Canadian Western Lum- j a beautiful centre of yellow cactus
ber Company, Kraser Mills. Uie mur-, dahlias surrounded by flowering Al-
riage to take place the latter part of j mond.    In the sitting room where the
Ice cream was served    pink    dahlias
were  used  for decoration.    Assisting
Mrs. Corbould to entertain her gnosis
were     MTS.    Swinford     (Vancouver),
Miss   Darling    (Toronto),   Miss   Corbould and Miss Wright.    For the first
hour  Mrs. Charleson  and  Mrs. J. C.
Brown presided at the tea table, Mrs.
R. E. Walker   and    Mrs.   T. 3. Armstrong  pouring  for those  who called
later in the   afternoon.    Tbe    young
ladies who assisted In  the  tea room
were Miss Fre��se, Mlss Alma Lewis,
Mlss Brown. Miss    Nora    Armstrong
and  Miss Minna Walker.    Mrs. J. R.
Grant and Mra. G. B. Corbould served
the  Ice cream and  were assisted by
Miss E. Homer, Miss Raud. Miss Cotton and Miss G. Brown.    Little Miss
Mary Walker opened the door to the
~"pst8.    During the   afternoon    Mrs.
Eddy sang several songs ln her usual
charming manner. , Among those lusted were: Mrs. Dickinson. Mrs. English,   Mrs.   McColl,   Mrs.   Yuengling.
Mrs. J. C. Armstrong.    Mrs.    Lewis.
Mrs.   Burnett,  Mrs.    Ceperley,    Mrs.
Tuck  (Victoria),  Mrs. Neville Smith,
Mrs.    McQuarrie.    Mrs.   Clute,    Mrs.
?ip,.pwright, Mrs. C. G. Major,    Mrs.
Eddy,   Mrs.   Sutherland.   Mrs.   G.   A.
Mlon,    Mlss Fraser.    Mrs. Worsfold,
Mrs. Briggs,   Mrs. W.   F.   Edmonds.
Mrs. Kamsay, Mrs. Haines, Mlss B'g^3
(Vancouver), Mrs.    .lames    Brymner,
Mrs.   Beattv,  Mrs.  J.  E.  Allen.  Mrs.
Hall. Mrs. 0. E. Martin, Miss Martin
Mlss Scott, Miss Gray, Mrs. Shadwell,
Mrs. Drew, Mlss Drew, Mrs. Sinclair,
Mrs.   J.   H.  Jones,  Mrs.   Manchester,
Mlss McColl, Mrs. Macdonald. Mrs. VV.
M.  Russell,  Mrs.   Russell   (Windsor),
Mrs. Ballock.    Mrs.    Homer    Adams,
Mrs. Davis (Sarnia),    Mrs.    Herbert
Wood    (Vancouver),    Mrs.    Drydges,
Mrs. Harvev. Mlss Peele. Mlss- Arm*
strong, Miss Myers-Gray, Mlss Homer,
Mrs.  Oreante.  MrB.  H.  L.  Edmonds,
Mrs. Richardson, Mrs. Harold Leamy,
Mrs. Hill, Mrs. Cotton, Mrs. Fletcher,
Mrs. de Pencier, Mrs. McAllister, Mrs.
Barnet    (Renfrew),    Mrs.    d'Easum,
Madame Gauvreau, Mrs. G. D. Brymner, Mrs. Ladner, the Misses Ladner
(Vancouver), Mrs.   Trlppa    (Vancouver), Mrs. Douglas Armour (Vancouver), Mrs. Wilson (Vancouver), Mrs.
Macrae    (North    Vancouver),     Mrs.
Gordon     (Burnaby).     Miss   DeWolf
Smith. Mrs. Hadlngham, Mrs. Elson,
Mlsa Boyd (Winnipeg),   Mrs.   Keary,
Vancouver, Sept. C.���"The influx of
American settlers to Western Canada
Is assuming such proportions that it is
time steps were taken to meet it by
an organized system of bringing settlers from the Motherland. If this is
not done the day will come when the
Hritish will be in a minority in some
irovlnceB. I am not casting any reflections on the American settlers.
They are a very desirable class and
wanted in this country, but I am in
AND A FULL ASSORTMENT OF HIGH CLASS
CLOTHS AND DRESS SILKS
Three car loads of New Dry Goods are here to
show you in a few days as soon as we can get them
marked and put in stock.
NEW FALL COATS, NEW SUITS, NEW DRESSES
Classy Merchandise at Popular Prices
"WE FURNISH YOUR HOME COMPLETE"
LEES LIMITED
Send Us Your Telephone and Mail Orders
favor cf using uvery eCort to leaven
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^__. '**���   Atnerlc��h  elamcnt  wltb,  (ood.oU
One of  the largest social, events ot 1 British stock."
the   week   waa  the   'at   home"   slvan        ��"   the   above   words    fhe   I>uke   ot
bv Mra.    G. B. Corbould    on Tuesday 1 Sutherland   outlined   the  keynote   of
afternoon in honor of her aiater. Mrs. 1 his  campaign  to  bring   out   a   large
win   x.Tm_m,.\.  mixed  larmuv  toM, tut
ana always. \
"The   company   wltl   extend   Its  operations to British Columbia, probably
SeptomberJ	
*Mrs. C, P. Moss nnd family have returned from Rlaekio Spit, where they
have been spending the summer, anil
are the guests of Mrs. Moss' mother.
Mrs. R. I,. Lewis, prior to their departure to Lytton, where they Intend
making their,home In the future.
��� ���    ���
On Wednesday afternoon Mrs. I,. W.
Rlcha'dson Invited a few of her
friends to a "bridge" to meet Mrs.
Russell, of Windsor. Mre. Cotton and
Mrs. Russell winning the prizes.
Among those noticed wore Mrs. Russell, Mrs. \V. M. Russell, Mrs. Cotton,
Mrs. Yuengling, Mrs. Clute, Mrs. F. I
J. Armstrong nnd Madame Gauvreau. |
��� ���    ���
Mrs. Sherriff. Regina street, entertained a number of her friends on
Wednesday evening at a very enjoyable "progressive rum" party in honor
of her guest. Miss Clarke, who lefl
for her home in England on Thursday. The first prizes were won by
Mrs. Eddv and.Mr. Ramsay, Miss Ken
nedy and Mr. Gardiner winning th.��
consolation prizes. Among those present were: Mr. and Mrs. RumBay.
Mr. and Mrs. Eddy, Mr. and Mrs. II.
1.. Edmonds. Pr. and Mrs. Oreen. Mis-
Scott, Miss Grey, Mlss Peele, MIbs E
Homer. Mr. and Mrs. Rant, Mr. Burnett, Mrs. G. Burnett,    Mr. Rose and
Mr. Gardiner.
��� ���   ���
On Wednesday and Thursday of
this week, Mrs. Peebles, Third street
entertained her many friends ln
honor of her daughter Katherine, who
is one of the oharmlng bride-elects of
this month. The home wa9 prettily
decorated for the occasion with a profusion of sweet peas, dahlias and smllax. On Wednesday Mra. John Tees
(Vancouver), and Mrs. Frank Pearson presided at the tea table, which
was centered wltb a cut-glass bowl of
sweet peas and pale pink asters, and
were relieved later by Mrs. Gordon
Henderson nnd Mrs. W. Lawrence
Johnson, while on Thursday Mrs. William Murray and Mrs. A. Matheson
poured tea and coffee, and were assisted later by Mrs. M. Wilson Grant,
and Mrs. Johnson. The Ices were cut
by Mrs. J. Eugene Brown and Mrs. T.
Gifford on Wednesday, and by Mrs. J.
number ot British settlers and place
thein on selected districts. Recently
a company was organized in Winnipeg, the Britit.li Canadian Colonization Corporation, which will undertake a colonization scheme of Imperial significance. For some years his
grace has carried on colonization
work in Alberta, and the larger enterprise will not differ materially in
its objects from the original experiment.
Referring to the organization of the
company, his grace said  Sir.William
Whyte had accepted the chairmanship
and his associates included such well-
Known Canadians as Sir William Mackenzie, Sir Henry Pellat and Messrs.
A.  M.  Nanton, J.  S. Dennis. Wallace
Nesbitt. J.  A.  M. Alkena,  M.  P.. and
others.    He said  it was proposed to
begin   wih  an  initial  outlay   of  one
million  dollars,  which will  be ra'sed
In London.   In. the charter of the company it  is understood   there   is provision  tor permitting the tenants   to j
acquire their freehold on   easy terms.
"The company   will    be  aided    bv
certain individuals constituting an ad
visory committee in the British Isles
and  co-operating with   the Winnipeg
headquarters.    Next spring, I expect,
will    see   Inaugurated    the   work   of
bringing out selected settlers to Canada.    Our activities will   be   devoted
at the outset to the pralrle provinces,
establishing the immigrants on ready-
made farms.    Experience has taught
that tt is unwise to bring out people
unacquainted with Western conditions
a year later.   Here, owing to the dlv-|
ersified character of the country, will
be presented scope for many subsidiary branches of agriculture, such   as
fruit growing, etc.      I have   already
acquired considerable   areas   of farm
lands in  Northern   British   Columbia
whicii I will be unable to visit  until j
next year, when plans for their colonization will be worked out     Premier
McBride has shown the deepest interest in tbis work by agreeing to aid it
in every way,   b.v   providing   schools
and roads and other requirements for
those communities of the near future.
"Each  succeeding  visit   to   Britisli
Columbia serves to confirm   my first
Impressions  of its  vast - natural   re-,
sources  and  magnificent  future.      It
is  an   exceptionally   desirable   field,
both for immigration and .for tiie exploitation of capital, and like the rest
of the Dominion, Is very much  ln the
eyes of  tbe   people   of  the   British
|Isles."
r
*******ja*m
���I.I   ,.   hijjL
POR CHOICE
FISH
OYSTERS
CHICKENS
LAMB
BEEF
MUTTON
GO TO
P.   BURNS' MARKET
FOR THE HIGHEST QUALITY
Second Hand Store!
J. G. 8MITH.
Buy and sell new and    second    hand
foods of all kinds.   Tools especially.
80 Mclnnes Street. Phone 1009
Hassam Paving Co., of B. CL, Limited
Layers of Hassam Compressed Concrete (frieoted)
ENGINEERING CONTRACTOKS
CSTIMATCS and DESIGNS rURNISHBD
CORPORATION  OF BURNABY.
Notice la hereby   given   that   the
1Wikl     ..   ���.���, , Statutory  Meeting ot the  Board    of
and dump them on the land and leave I LlcenBed commissioners will be held
them to shift for themselves. The I at the Municipal Hall, Wednesday,
company wil also have a certain num- September llth, inst, at 10 o'clock In
ber of training farms;  where   young  tjje forenoon.
men will be taught scientific farming
to enable them later to engage In
farming on their   own account.     It
(Signed)  ARTHUR G. MOORE.
Clerk to the Commissioners.
Edmonds, B.C., August 29th, 1913.
B. Jardine and, Mrs. George Pantel on ' Mlss Keary, Mrs. McBride, Mlss Mc-j
Thursday.    Among the girls who ab- Bride, Mrs.   Gaynor,   Mrs.   Eastman, |
slsted   1n   servfng the   many   guests Mlss Eastipan, Mrs. Davidson.    Mrs.
wert the  Misses  Butters,   Matheson, Hibbert Dart, Mrs. Rand, Mrs. Gracov,;
Green,    Gifford,    Lane,    McGIIIivray,, Mrs.    Macgowan,    Mrs.   D. H.    Mac-.
Smith, Fadden, Grant and the daugh- gowan, Mrs. Pyne, Mrs, Malins, Mrs.!
ters of the house, while   Miss  Anne Role, Mrs. Melville Mallns, Mrs. Wol-
Smlth and Miss Brownie Peebles ush- fenden, Mlss Shildrick, Mrs. Crelghton,
ered In the guests. [Mrs.  Rickman,  Miss Rickman,    Mrs.
WHITE STAR���DOMINION CANADIAN SERVICE
MONTREAL���QUEBEC���LIVERPOOL. .
ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS. SAILING EVERY SATURDAY.
Wireless and Deep Sea Signaling Apparatus.
ONLV FOUR DAYS AT SEA
New SS. "LAURENTIC"       New SS. "MEGANTIC"
_,,; 15,000 Tina Bach.
Electric Elevators, Skilled Orchestra, Electric Heaters, Etc*
Sails Sept. 14, Sept. 28, Oct. 12, Oct. 26j Nov. 9, Nov. 23
First Class $92.60, Second Class $53.76, Third Class $32.50.
ONE CLASS (11.) CABIN SERVICE.
Twin Screw S.S. "TEUTONIC."
582 feet long, 18.000 horsepower.
Sails Oct. 6th, Nov. Snd. Npv.
30th. $53.00 and up; Third Class
$32.50.
Twin   Screw   S.S.   "CANADA."
514 feet long.    8spt. Z'lat, Oct.
19th, Nov. 16th.   $50.00 and up.
 Rilrd Class $31.25.
All steamers sail from Montreal, calling at Quebec.   Embark night before sailing.   No hottl expenses, No transfer charges.
Company's Office: 619 Second Avenue, Near Cherry Street, Seattle.
H. B. GOULET, Can. Pac. Agent.   W. F. BUTCHER, G. N. R. Agent.
New Weetmlneter.
FOR RENT
Large Front Room in Hard-
man . Block, 30 x 30 feet; is
well lighted.
Suitable for office, workroom
or living rooms.
APPLY TO
Westminster Daily News ass*mhpp*ists*aii*as��*ts**t*B*iStPtrs��sas*f��*)m\t n
������~,~
i'tm s^Jii<as"nwimfl
mnn
H^WHiUfMifcB^t,^!
i^_. ����Jit
WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
g����*He
8ATUHDAY, 8EPTEMBER 7, 1912.
���  BBBJSm
WESTHlliSTER DULY NEWS
Published every morning except
Sunday by The National Printing and
Publishing Co., Ltd., at their office,
*3 McKenzie Street, New Westmlnater. B. C.
ROBERT H. BEST, Manager.
TELEPHONES:
Business Office   999
OMitorial Office  991
SUBSCRIPTION RATES.
By carrier |4 per year, tl for three
���ths. or 40c per month.
By mail $3 per   year,   or   25c   per
ith.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1912.
NEED OF  ACTION.
Quite recently we have pointed
-out the inadvlsabillty of either the
governmental or private immigration
agencies of any one of the oversea
^dominions earning on an aggressive
campaign for settlers within the
bounds of another oversea dominion.
The Instance which called forth this
comment was the reported removal
ot a large party of Boer farmers to
.the Peace River country.
Today we would direct attention to
the fact that the last boat whic'i l->f
these shores for Now Zealand carrie.l
���with her at least two settlers who for
the previous two years had beer
farming in thc Praser valley. We do
nol for a moment think that the gov
��� ernment of New Zealand had any
direct hand in their going. On the
contrary we are told that these men
���were dissatisfied with conditions
bere. Tliey possessed some forty
acres and by the time tliey had cleared one-eighth of this thoy appear to
bave had sufficient. Lack of co
operation among the farmers in the
marketing of their produce is among
other reasons assigned for their go-
ins.
However this may be, the province
has lost two settlers from the very
class of men she is most desirous of
increasing. Their departure server
to emphasize the need that exists
bere for a systematic taking in hand
of the whole problem cf land settle
ment and land clearing. In different
parts cf the province public bodle.-,
bave made sporadic moves in this
direction, but it would seem that un
The poorest of us can command tht
companionship of the finest intellects
of th# ages. Books are readily accessible that open great lields of thought
and information, illumining the moralities, elucidating the philosophies
and enriching character und understanding. The means of self-improvement so abound that few men or women can justly say that anybody but
themselves ls to blame if they are exceptionally uninformed.
In   mental calibre   people   do  not
greatly differ.   Early training, educa
tion and   environment are either advantages or the reverse, and   some
times make the less gifted seem tht
superior ot the man of better parts j
Development of personality is the effect cf what we call will���a faith that
superiority and   mastery are   obtain
able    by cultivation    of mental   and
moral character.   There is no time of
life when the power of definite   purpose may not be a shaper and maker
of a career.
Thoreau says that "Youth gets together the materials tor a hridge to
the moon, and maturity uses them to
build a woodshed." Like many pleasing epigrams, this statement ls true,
and yet it misinterprets common facts.
When so placed that its unconsclou.-i
progress fuses' Into the steady glow of
a great purpose, the ambition of youth,
may roar palaces In maturity, rather
than woodsheds.
The effect of an early ambition on
later life ls peculiarly Illustrated by
the bent which Gladstone's youthful
desire to enter the church gave hit
political career. It Is clear, however
that at any time of life a person ap
predating the powers in himself thai
are Latent In moat Individuals, and
-limencing the steady developmen'
of those powers, will be cheered on b-
wise ef progress.���Toronto Mail.and
Empire.
"TOM   BROWN" AGED 88.
Hero of Hughes' Story Has Spent 52
Years as Vicar.
The Rev. Augustus Orlebar, M. A..
vicar of Wllllngton, Bedfordshire, the
Tom Brown of "Tom Brown's School-
day," and the hero ot the light with
Slogger Williams, celebrated his 88th
birthday the other day. In a few weeks
time he will have completed fifty-
three years of his vicariate. Mr. Orlebar not only represented Mr.
Hughes' hero in the one memorable
Incident of the school hall flght, but
he was the Rugby boy who at cover-
point caught out the redoubtable batsman in the Marylebone cricket match
described ln the same story.
CHEAP   POWER   FOR   THE   FARM.
In the minds   of the   farmers win
have been watching and waiting for
the application of hydro-electric  power to the laud, one of the prime dlffl
culties appeared to be the great cost
of   distribution.      How   could   feedei
lines he built to   traverse   areas   a.
large as townships, they asked, and
at the same time, the cost of power In
one and  two   horsepower   blocks   br
kept reasonpbly low?   Would not th'
large   capital   e.cor.nditure   put   sue'.;
systems beyond tlie fiua'ie'ul o.ipacit'.
of  the farming   districts,   nnd    thu
erect  a   stone  vail   between   eliea:
nower ard the farm?   And :f that par
."���f   the   problem   were   solved,  wer
there enough 1130s for power to war
-ant installation of machinery? Thos^
wd other questions arose tjuito   na
turallv in regard to a great eocnom
In which Ontar'o is the ivonecr on th
continent,  b'it  all  doubts have beei
dispelled by the hydro-electric demon
titrations now being conducted under
the supervision  of Hon.  Adam  Beck
The practical utility of electr'c pow
The   majority
is to he regretted. A helping ot the
settler cn to the land, and a helping
of him when he is there are two of
the. excellent features of life in New
Zealand which w<5 might do well to
follow more closely.
BOY   WANTED.
This is the age of the boy. Mechanical invention has lessened   the   need
of skill and .experience.    The tempering of steel'blades once required the
trained eye .that  could   foliow every
change of color   in the   glow of the
coal flame, but now it can be supervised and better done by a boy watch
ing a thermometer.    The rifle ranges
alao show how the boy can crowd the
man off his   pedestal   of superiority.
With the old "V" sight to guide the
slow, heavy bijjlet of high   trajectory
the man of- long experience was su
preme.      There was   no   wind-gauge
that a boy could adjust quite as well
as a man.    The   practiced   eye   and
trained   perception  told  how   far  off
tbe target to windward the aim should
be directed." -The coarse   sight   thai
would stand all kinds cf ill-usage re
quired the familiarity of long practice.
Ita ahadowy ou.tilnes had none of the
���modern deflniteuess  tliat   approaches
the exactness of a surveyor's instruments.    The heavy arm with its vindictive recoil demanded proportionate
weight  and  muscular  strength.      All
this is    now changed, as    the   bays
-scores show.
fia-vention runs almost unconsciously
lowaul mailing things easier for the
boy. Every substitution of a boy for
a man or a woman for a man means
profit for the Inventor, and It is not
surprising that the boy crowds the
man at the rifle ranges. Farming ha."
been described as the only man's job
lett. but the report of Its many opera
tions performed by a current from the
bpiiro-plectrlc wire shows that tin
boy wlll soon ��� be promoted from a
mere gate-opener and cow-driver. Al
age seems approaching when evei
what Bernard Shaw calls tlie shift
cunning of experience will lose it
value, and the boy will take the whee'
in his own hands. -Toronto Clobe.
DEVELOPING    LATENT     POWERS.
In one of hli works, William .Tame?
Says: "Stating the thing broadly, the
human individual usually livos far
within his limits; possesses powers ol
various sorts which he habitually fails
to use. He energizes below the maximum, a.nd he behaves below his op
timum." This ls true of all, practically -without exception. But there
is probably less reason today than at
any time in the history of the world
Tor shortcomings in the development
-of capacity, talent, ability.
The advance of democracy has put
within the reach of the humble most
-of the prizes of life, it has extended
the facilities for making progress. It
bas put within everybody's grasp gold
6M
half. It is on the flnan
cial aspect of the problem that Interest will now settle. After montli3 01
Investigating the hydro-electric engineers have estimated that where 250
farmers in a township co-operate in
taking power, the annual charge up
on them to maintain the system
would be about $5000, or $20 each.
Power cost3 would be about $30 per
horsepower, location and aggregate
load varying the exact price. In anv
event, the total cost of lighting and
power for all uses would not exceei1
$100 a year. There would be the nee
essary equipment to buy, of course
but by co-operat.'on with other farm
ers in threshing -"id lar~e operations
the expense would be infinitely less
than the value obtained by the farmei
and his family in the saving of time
and labor, the introduction of man)
new conveniences, and the Increased
production they would bring about.
As Hon. Mr. Beck told the farmers
assembled on the farm of Mr. Might.
In Toronto Township, the only way
the farmers can share in the hydroelectric service is by co-operation. At=
the cities and towns first united t(
make the hydro-electric system pos
slble, so must the farmers In their re
spectlve districts get together to ex
tend the r.ystem to themselves. Th(
promptness with which the ToronU
Township farmers came forward pro
���nlses well for the success of the com
mission's efforts to interest rural On
tarlo In the public power service, lit
is no visionary who looks forward tn.
electricity effecting an industrial rev
olution in the country districts.���Tor
onto Mail and Empire.
CHARGE S'-JORT WEIGHT
AT PORT OF MONTREA'
Ottawa. Sept. 5.���The commlsslr-
appointed by Hon. Mart'n 13'irrel'
ninlster of agricul! ire, to investigate
1 number cf important matters pc
aining to the cheese and dairy In
'lus'rv of Ontario and Quebec, in
"biding chines rf short weight at thr
ion of Montreal, has already helt"
leveral meetings. ���
The commission is expected tc
'iand in a report to the minister em
bodying its findings and ree.ommenda
tions at an early date, as the depart
ment, realizing the urgency of the
various matters involved, is anxious
to have a decision reached as soor
as pcssible.
Birds Not Frightened.
Topeka. Kan.. Sept. 6.���With a'ton
of fireworks this city laBt night began
a  battle  against   the   thousands   of
blackbirds   that   have   infested    the
great elms and made the Rtreets here
dangerous and unsightly. Professor !,.
L. Dyche, fish and game warden, told
the city officials that Roman candles i
would drive them out.     Tonight four l
men spent several   hours   firing   the |
candles singly and by volleys into the
trees.   A few of the birds took wing
and flew to nearby trees but most of
them held their roostB and  chattered
Miss Cave-Browne-Cave
L. R. A. M.;  A. R. CM.
Teacher  of   Pianoforte,  Violin,  Singing, Theory,   Harmony,  Counterpoint
and  Musical  Form.
TERM BEGINS SEPT. 2nd.
���APPLY���
51  Dufferin  Street Phone  R411
THE
Queensborough
REALTY CO.
LARGEST LIST OF
WATERFRONTAGE
ACREAGE and LOIS
er In threshing, grain and fodder chop
til the government takes up the mat-   pjng      sawln;;,     churning,      raUkjng
ter vigorously no satisfactory results  pumping, as well as in housekeeping
will be achieved J'abors, has   been   ccnvinrnglv   estab
' of   newcomers     are I ��*�������� Once the power is on the farm
.      there is no reason���except that of ex-
aaiisfied v. 1U1    their    lands    in    ttie I pcu3e_vvby   u,e   tarm   ilouse   bhould
Fiuei   -vaHey.   bul   ttoat   any   s'.\ou\d 1 not tie as wett equipped with etectrlc I
���wf.il to' iaunctf "tM  to other parts ot \ conveniences   as   t\ie   city   residence.!
the empire  to ftnd better  conditions 1 and ^hy the toll ot farm work should
.... ...     not he cut ln v"1*    '* '* "*��� "*"* ��*������������-
CHEAP ACREAGE
FIVE ACRES in Section 14, Township 4, Delta, close to Great Northern
railway. $1000. Cash $200, balance
2 years.
RUTLEDGE-SAUNDERS
BROKERAGE CO.
Room 6, Trapp Block Phone 702
TwoBargains
WE   HAVE   FOR   QUICK   8ALE
66 foot lot, cleared, on Kemp street,
near corner of Mary avenue.
50 foot lot on Fifteenth avenue adjoining car line.
EASY  TERMS.
WARNER, BANGS & CO.
PHONE 1024.
Coldicott Blk.   East Burnaby
A Business Education Is The
Surest Path To Success
FALL TERM OPENS SEPT 3rd WITH MANY
ENTHUSIASTIC YOUNG PEOPLE
noisily.   Finally the firing squad gav.
opportunities  for  noble   service, up the effort.
l^IT- REFORM
���*��� has grown great
by doing things in a
better way ��� by
giving you snappier
styles, greater
variety, more satisfactory service, and
far better values
than you can get
anywhere else in
tnis city.
New Fall Styles are
ready.
FIT-
REFORM
ACME CLOTHING CO.
C M. GREEN. Manager.
CANADIAN WESTERN LUMBER CO., Ltd.
'THE FRASER RIVER MILLS"
LUMBER,   LATH;   AMP   SHINGLES
Get our prices on wood: four foot slabs, dry or green; 16 Inch mill-
'     wood and dry planer ends.
Fraser Mills, B. C.
Telephone 890
Why You Should Learn Bookkeeping.
Lack of a thorough knowledge of bookkeeping and accounting
is the cause of many young people not being advanced to better
positions. The bookkeeper ln any business stands In the same
position as the engineer on a locomotive���one controls the pen ana
keeps records���thp other controls the.throttle and makes records.
Our aim is to give the students a clear understanding of the principles of bookkeeping and all business transactions. We lay the
foundation so essential for a successful business career.
Why You Should Learn Shorthand.
A thorough and practical knowledge of shorthand offers unlimited opportunities, as the stenographer is in closest touch with the
heads of business firms. The opportunities for advancement are
unexcelled. Ours ls a practical working system recognized by all
leading business concerns.
WHAT SCHOOL ?
Manv enthusiastic ex-students will say, by all meana attend the
COLUMBIAN COLLEGE���bi pause they get better results and come
in contact with many wideawake-young-working-people.
COLUMBIAN COLLEGE
L
The Popular Shoe Store
Open Evenings Till 9 O'clock
641 Front Street
CHEAPER THAN  OTHER  FIRM'S 3ALE   PRICES.
SPECIAL FOR FRIDAY AND MONDAY
Ladies' U.vford and High Boots. Value to |4.00, for   $1.43
Gents' i'l.50 Dress and Work Boots,  for $195
Girls'  School   Boots,  for $1.35
Boys' School Boots, ror  $1.35
LECKIE'S  BOOTS  FOR  SCHOOL.  RANCH, FARM  AND  LOGGERS.
ALI.  KINDS.
Depot (or the Famous K Boots
A  $20,000  Stock to  Select  Prom
W. R. GILLEY, Phons 122. Q. E. GILLEY, Phons 291.
Phones, Office 15 and 11.
Gilley Bros. Ltd.
COLUMBIA  STREET  WEST.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In Coal
CEMENT, LIME. 8EWER PIPE, DRAIN TILE, CRU8HED ROCK,
WASHED GRAVEL AND CLEAN SAND, PRESSED BRICK ANO
FIRE BRICK.
Builders
Contractors
I^et us flgure with you on
your lumber requirements. We
carry a complete stock of lumber, and lumber products at our
Sapperton yard.
BRITISH CANADIAN LUMBER CO., LTD.
TELEPHONE 904.
Mills at Vancouver, New Westminster and Crescent Valley,  B.  C.
MONEY
TO   LOAN-
���
���
WE HAVE MONEY TO LOAN
ON IMPROVED PROPERTY
No. 52���Two and one-half acrea on Austin road, close to North road.
Price ?240l); $S0U cash, bulance G, 12 ar.d 18 months.
No. 455���Eight roomed house, cement block, basement, furnace, all
complete, in west end, close to car, between Fifth and Sixth avenua.
$5000; $1000 cash.   Terms for balance.
No. 365���Five roomed house, bath and toilet, east end. $2800, $259
cash, balance $25 per month.
No. 192���One lot on London street, s'.r.e 49.6x130. $1000; one-quarter
cash, balance 6, 12 and 18 months.
No. OO���One lot on Eighth avenue, 50x120.    Price $950;    one-quarter
cash, balance 6, 12 and 18 months.
The Peoples Trtss t Cojfr
451 Columbia Street
:. ^..WPHtiiS'iiOnsiinnw.  [m mtsatimm imsissmaaammamaspsmpBIPSBmma**aaayts*as
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1912.
m   WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
WESTMINSTER ROVERS
DON THEIR JERSEYS
Today Sees Opening Match of Soccer
Season���Celtics  at  Moody
Cquare.
The soccer season of 1912-13 wlll be
ushered In this afternoon on Moody
Park, when the Celtics, of Vancouver,
clash with tlie Rovers, of this city. It
should be a good game from a spectator's viewpoint, as both, teams appeared to be ou an equal footing last
season, although Manager Grant 11 a
picked up several promising players,
and hopes to lead tho bunch for all
the silverware that Is lying around
this region of the continent this coming winter.
The Rovers took the Initiative In
staging this game, the proceeds ot
which will go towards thc Dave Pearson Memorial fund.
While the practice game of last
Saturday was only In the nature of a
try-out for both the Rovers and the
Sapperton team, nevertheless lt showed up several strong ioints on both
the forward and defence positions so
tha' a victory of the Rovers can well
be looked for.
The kick-off will be at 3 o'clock
with the old veteran Tlm Mahoney
handling the whistle.
and reserved seats booked, price 50
cents. The general admittance fee
will be 25 cents for adults (standing),
and 15 cents for Juniors. Tickets
may be obtained from members of the
local association and also at the Y.
M. C. A. in Vancouver and New Westminster.
TODAY'S  BA8EBALL
TODAY'S CRICKET
Westminster Meets Mission at Mount
Coquitlam.
The Westminster cricket team for
the iirst time Uii.i Beason will meet
tho Million eleven on the Mount Co
qultlam grounds this afternoon. The
-club has done very well this year and
now Jiands second In the Vancouver
and district league, with the Terminal
( ity  side  heading  the list.
Taking into consideration, however,
the (act that Westminster only lost
ct.1. by two runs In the recent gaim
In Vancouver, the difference between
the two elevens is very slight Indeed.
Wickets will be pitched this afternoon at 3:45 o'clock.
Circle  F Boys  Have Strong  Nine to
Meet Westminster Team.
An Interesting baseball battle will
be staged on the Queens park diamond this afternoon when the Mlll-
t'Ae boys cross bats with the Westminster nine. This wlll be the first
meeting between the two teams and
the result will doubtless mean thc-
clalming of the B. C. amateur cham
pionship by the winning team.
Manager McDonald has selected :i
strong team to meet the Circle P
boys, who will have several well
known players on their line-up Including Horn and  Follman for battery.
The Westminster team will journey
to Maine on Sunday morning wher"
they meet the American team in a
second engagement. Last week th'
nine acrosB the border jtiBt nosed ou
by the odd run, but this success wa:
greatly a'ded by a muff on the pan
uf the Westminster players. The fol
lowing Is the team selected for to
lay's battle which starts at 2:'*h
Vclock: Corbett or Silver, pitchers;
Brown. Dwyer or Handy, catchers;
Chrlsienaon. lb; Chaput, 2b; Jame
son, ss; Wtlngartner, 3b; Curran
Williams, Manson, Silver or Handy,
outfield.
WAIER CHAMPIONS
" Will Bf AT PLAY
Northwestern League.
At Portland��� R. H. E.
Vancouver       2    8    2
Portland   4    8    1
Batteries: Willis. By ram ani!
Lewis;  Glrct, Doty Bnd Burch.
At Seattle��� R. Tl. B
���^aconia     7 10    1
Seattle  3    6   4
Batteries'. B^lford and Lalonge;
James and Whaling.
At Spokane��� R. H.E
Victoria  ....      6    7    2
Spokane   4   7    1
Batteries: Wilson and Meek and
rrochi   Strand  and Ostdiek.
FISHING TACKLE      GUNS AND AMMUNITION
OSCAR  SWANSON
DEALER IN ALL KINDS OF
SPORTING GOODS
GUN and LOCKSMITH
TEN ACRE BLOCKS
NEAR MILNER
IN LANGLEY
13 BEGBIE STREET
NEW WESTMINSTER
and his kindness will long, be remem- of professional race track gambling j
bered. In Kelowna the. hotels were and assuring the Moral and Social Re-
crowded with delegates "to the Irriga- forip Council of enthusiastic support
tlon convention, but the opening of of the Presbyterian Church ln work-
several homes for the entertainment lng out that end, the board also adopt-
of the team prevented any Inconvenl-, ed a strong   resolution   in  favor  of
I
This property Is in Section 8, Township 11, and ls situated about
a mile and a balf from Milner station and tbe B. C. Electric railway. Some of the blocks are wholly or partially cleared, and some
have considerable rough pasture. One block has 16.29 acres, all clear
with buildings and orchard.
This land Is well situated, the soil Ib light loam, especially adapted for fruit and chicken ranches.
FOR FULL PARTICULARS APPLY TO
WESTMINSTER TRUST, LIMITED
J. J. JONES, Managing Director.
Head Office: 28 Lorne Street, New Westminster.
ence.       f~
The following boys made the trip:
Bert Johnson leapt.), Howard Johnston. Elmer Cameron, Guy Atkinson,
more equal provision for the care of
the fe.eble-mlnded.
The   request   of   Dritish   Columbia
that Uev. 0. McGregor, assistant sec-
L. Nelson, R. Coulson, A. Follls, Ar-1 retary to the board In Toronto, make
thur Hume, A. McKenzie, Dewey Huff,
Carmen Little. Jack Chambers, W.
Mitchell,  J.   McDonald,   A.   Brown.
Sid Cameron acted as manager and
the party were accompanied by Mr.
and Mrs. J. Cameron and Mlss Chastey.
The  following games were played:
Town-
Won by   Sc're.
his headquarters in that province, was
sent to the executive committee.
WILD WEST WINNERS
AT CALGARY STAMPEDE
Calgary, Sept. 6.���Mlsi Florence La
Due, of Calgary, last night won the
woman's world championship for
fancy   roping  at  the   Calgary    Stam-
Kamloops      Sapperton.. 6-21 pede, defeating Miss Lucille Mulhall
\rmstrong     Armstrong, 5-6  of Oklahoma,   former world's   cham-
Vernon      Sanperton . 7-4 I pion.    The inclement weather forced
-\rmstrong     Sapperton . 6-2
Revelstoke     Sapperton . 7-4
Salmon Arm      Sapperton . 8-4
Kamloops     Kamloops . 4-6
Financial   Report.
Expenses���
Fares, etc $720.35
$720.35
Receipts.
Gate  receipts    '...'. J152.no
"onc.rts     $1 22.85
Miscellanlous      $ 58.80
Total      $333.65
Deficit     $386.70
n. m.k
3 ��
m
UPPER COUNTRY IS
BEHIND THE ROYAIS
the events to be held   ln the   Horse
Show Building.
The work that won Mlss Ia Due tha
championship consisted of rope twirling and roping running horses. Miss
Mulhall was awarded second and Mlss
Bertha Blanchett third prize.
In the woman's fancy riding event.
Miss Dolly  Mullens, of New Mexico,
was awarded flrst; Miss Bertha Blanchett, of Arizona, second; Mlss Hazel |
Walker, of California, third.
"Tex'' McLeod. of Texas, champion
fancy rop>.* of the world, successfully
defended hi? title; Senor Ramos, of
Mexico, was second, and J. F. Welch,
of Alberta, was third.
Otto Kline, of Montana, was awarded the championship for fancy riding;
Art Accord, of California second, and
Jason Stanley, of California, third.
The Bank of Vancouver
A general banking business transacted, drafts and letters of credit
sold payable In all parta of the world. Savings bank department at
all branches.
��� SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO ���
BANKING BY MAIL
New Westminster Branch, Cor. 8th and Columbia Streets
D. D. WILSON, Manager.
Lindsay Bottling Works
NEW WESTMINSTER
Manufacturers   of CIDERS, MINERAL    WATER,
Brand of GINGER  BEER and GINGER  ALE.
Etc.   Special
Importers of BRITISH   NON-ALCOHOLIC
DONIC ACID GAS.
WINE8    and   CAR-
���
Enthusiastic Crowds at Vernon Watch
for Victories of the Salmon
Bellies.
Sole Agents for Westminster
Health  Drink.
Territory    of    GRAPINE,    "The
COUNTRY  ORDERS  SOLICITED.
MOST MODERN FACTORY ON PACIFIC HIGHWAY
0     4
Three Premier Events to Be Decided
���Water Polo and Varied
i
Feats.
National League.
At Rhiladelpliia--
Philadelphia    .^^^^^^^^^
Batter'ea:     Tesereau   and   Wilson.
I Ubey,  Nicholson,  Nelson    and  Kill!
Mr.
Sesond game���
New York  	
Philadelphia 	
Bntteries:       Marquard.
I Mathewson and Wilson. Hartley; Fin-
1 neran. Mayer, rhalmers and Dooln
At Cincinnati���-
'"hlcago  	
Cincinnati  	
Batteries:      H'chie     and
Kromme and  McLean.
"The Interest shown ,'n ths upper
country over the re3ult3 of the i.f'n-
10 Cup games, and alao the winning
of the silverware by the Salmon Bellies  was a revelation  to   ole,"      -
Acts that will be seen at the Royal
Theatre next week are as follows: i
The Morton-Jewell Troupe, consisting
Of five people, who will present a mil-1
itary singing and juggling turn; Da-j
vey. De Musey and Getsy who are |
comedy entertainers, dancers, singers
and piano players: Jacob and Bardell
are a pair ot acrobatic comlques, tea-
INTERURBAN TRAMS
r.h.f
.. t> v.  '
.. 8 13    4
Crandall
R. H. E
0 9 '<���
5 11 '*
Cotter;
Only a few more days and the entry form Hat closes against any amateur swimmer desirous of entering
hts name for the amateur swimming
championship of I). C., which are
scheduled to take placo In the Y. M.
C, A. nata tori urn of this city on Saturday evening, Sept. 14.
Three B. C. championships are on
the cards together with a special cup
to be donated by Mott Long, president
B.    C.    branch    Canadian    Amateur J Philadelphia
Swimming Association, and known as Uj6W y0T\i	
the Long trophy.   The latter wlll go j    Batteries: Crabb and Lapp; McCon-
American League.
At Roston��� R.H.E
Washington   0   6   <i
Boston   1   5   f
Batteries: Johnson and' AInsmith:
Wood and .Cady.
At New York���
R. H. E.
4 6 2
2 12   4
loathe best all-round swimmer tn four | ne��� ���< tjgmw   mn.ngD-R. H. E.
One of the features of tho  evening  Cleveland  \ X���   ��
will be a water polo match between  Chicago
the team representing the Vancouver      Batteries:
Y. M. C. A. and one selected from the Bern and Kuhn.
Victoria Y. M. C. A. and the   James   .
Bay Athletic Associa'	
r.thletic organization   on   the   Paciflc
coast.
The closing feature will be a three-
man relay race between the polo
teams of Victoria, Vancouver and
New Westminster.
Fer several weeks past the leading
swimmers of the local Institution have
been training faithfully for the coming events, and, while it Is not expect-
i I that they will run away with all
the events, they hope to make a good
showing which will further the
scheme for next year.        v
The following ls a list of events In
the championship classes:
(1)��� 60 Yards Junior (17 and un-
der) championship of British Columbia.
(2)���100 Yards Junior (17 and under) championship ot British Columbia.
C>)���50 yards Senior Championship
of British Columbia.
(41��� Egg and Spoon Race, open to
Y. M. C. A. members only, who must
wear fancy dreia
(5)���President's Cup, presented by
the president for the best all-round
swimmer of 1912-1913. Conditions ot
���competition as follows:
221 Yards, speed race (14 lengths,
tank 46 feet long.i
50 Yards (3   lengths)   back  race,
without use of arms,
1 Length, side stroko (form o��ly).
1   Length, breast   stroke   (form
�����nly).
1 Optional Fancy Dive (low), 2
"S^'ornVflp movement!* In wntfr,
Entry forms may be obtained trom
the Y. H 0, A. buildings. In Vancouver. Victoria and Now Westminster,
���and must be delivered to the secretary
of the Vancouver Swimming Club before 6 p .ro. Thursday. Sept 12.   .
A plan of the seating accommodation may be seen at the local association and tha Vancouver Y. M. C. A.
Baskette and Cariich;
a
Mr.   Harry  McMartin,   who  yestortay i -- -. - -jr- ,  --���-        .   -,
returned 'o hi. position Id th. sher, Vj *ltr Is^mL.o^.^r?.^
fT's office after a solourn ln the ln-1 Le Tellier Is a magician and band
terlor for the past two months Icuff   exPert-   featuring   Wl   novelty,
I.   U.   A.   amt   U1��J    m��**aa.m . _.
Association, the leading   SAPPERTON   LACROSSE TEAM'S
���     RECENT  UP COUNTRY TOUR
The members of the Sapperton Junior Lacrosse Club which recently undertook a most luccessful tour ot the
Interior towni, desire to present a
short account of the trip taken to the
general public together with a financial statement. A similar trip was
taken laat year and was financed almost entirely by friends of the boy��
in the city. This year an attempt was
made by the team to do Its own financing, and while some outside assist
��c> lo t>ri��i<r ^i<-ep and Is be'ng glad
ly receive^ the boys are undertaking
the responsibility ot tt.cotlng their
..<������ *..(...>* We��r'nc the bad*et pt
the New Weitmlmter Progressive Association, and boosting for the cltv a
every point, the value of a trip ot this
kind for advertising purposes cannot
he over estimated.
The tour wss a srVnrt'd r^^rd of
victories. In every Instance the op-
'-oslr" *e��irt* wern he"*- or a"d (Mder
than the locals, nevertheless the team
returned with the proud distinction of
.having defeated every team played
The combined score of the tour stood
43 to 30 ln favor ot home talent Sapperton lost two games on the trip.
Vrmetrong and Kamloops each taking  their , rn��"i.Hiir*.,     ^c���^vec . twr
Mr. McMartin left here on July 2",
on account of 111 health, and speaks
*e!l cf the Invigorating climate of th<>
Okanagan and the Kootc::ays. While
ip there he visited Vernon, Penticton
Revelstoke, Summerland, Kelowna
and West Summerland.
"They have absolutely no use for
the tactics displayed this season by
Con Jones and his Vancouver team
and during my stay in Vernon, where
I spent most of my time while away
���.he crowds gathered arourd the bul
letln board in the hotel and expressed
>tense satisfaction at the succesivc
victories of the Royals.
"in the deciding game an immense,
crowd gathered outside tbe hotel and!
learned the result! by quarters. Wheal
the flnnl result was mad" k"own a'
great cheer went up mixed with various remarks not complimentary to the
Vancouver team and supporters."
Asked about the game played In the
interior, Mr. McMartin Btated that the
lacrosse bug ts working overtime up
tb����rp. and a fairly strong league consisting of Armstrong, Vernon, Kelowna and Revelstoke has been operating to good attendance. Armstrong
seems to have a good lead on the rest
of the teams and excttement is running high in the little town of the
Okanagan.
GERMAN DIRIGIBLE TO
MAKE 50 MILES PER HOUR
Berlin, Sept 6.���The new Zeppelin
d-nfcibie ls to break all records foi
list*, speed and range of action, according to a news agency hero.'
The specifications call for power tc
carry out a sustained flight of at least
sirty hours, and lt Is hoped by thr
Admiralty that the vessel wlll be able
to remain In the air for a longer per-
led. The. speed reoulred by the contract Is well over fifty miles an hour,
and the radius of flight Including the
return voyage la to be trom 1500 to
1800 miles. The new airship ls to be
completed In October.
Tbe latest passenger dirigible, the
Vansa, ts capable of a sustained flight
of forty-three houn and her opeed ls
not quite fifty miles an hour.
TO SUPPRESS RACING
Presbyterian Church Frowns on Parl-
Mutuel at Minoru.
:' Toronto, Sept. ��.���The Board, of Social Servloe and Evangelism of the
Presbyter'an Church at the doling
session ot its annual meeting received
a communication from Pmfesior Pid
"escapes;" Ed and Deda Davis are a
���nan and woman who present an eccentric dancing and singing act and
Rube Strickland is an old New Eng-
lander who can make a violin talk.
CITY THEATRE
D. BRAY,  Manager.
PROGRAM FOB SATURDAY
GARRISON   TRIANGLE '"IOI"
Bison���Drama
A HAPPY  FAMILY
Imp���Comedy
HIS  MOTHEB'8  SON      ^^|
Reliance���Drama
THE RANCHMAN'S REMEDY
Nestor���Comedy
LION-HEAD MUGGINS, V. C. HERO
THE DEFENCE OP THC KHUMA
HOSPITAL
Drama
FOR VANCOUVER.
(Via Central Park) at 5 and 5:45
a.m. and every 15 minutes thereafter
until 9 p.m., with half hourly service
until 11 p.m.. last car at Vi midnight.
Sundays���a*. ��. 1. 1:%',. I ana B-.��0
a.m., regular service thereafter.
VVla Burnaby) at 5.45. 6'46 and ��
a.m., with hourly aervlce until 10 p.m.
and late car at 11:30 p.m. Sundaya���
First car at 8 a.m.
(Via North Arm and Eburne) at 7
a.m., with hourly aervlce until 11 p.m.
Sundays���Fit it car at 8 a.m., regular
aervlce thereafter.
FRASER VALLEY LINE.
For Chilliwack and way points at
9:30 a.m.. 1:20'and 6:10 p.m. For
Huntingdon and way points 4:06 p.m.
WEEK END
EXCURSION.
Reduced rates are ottered
over  the Traeaa  Valley  vine   ,
tec .������������A* ��wA��V1��^i$ffff4Nl**l!';:'
all point* aa tha aisiata*.
Tickets tor these special e*-
cunloni are on tale Saturday and Sunday, good to return on Monday.
MAkbJ   TODR   PLANS   TO
TAK2  THIS   ENJOTABLB
TRIP.
BRITISH COLUMBIA ELECTRIC RAILWAY COMPANY.
BOILERS  Riveted Steel Pipe*
BURN OIL
TANKS
VULCAN IRON WORKS, LTD.
TELEPHONE  324
P. O. BOX 442
iSSMM
AL. W. GILL18. manager.
THREE   DAYS   STARTING
MONDAY, SEPT. 9.
DAVEY, DEMUSEY
and GETSEY
3���REAL���3
ENTERTAINERS
Singing,   Dancing.   Comedy
and Piano Playing.
If IBID
THAT   NOVEL   MAGICIAN
' Featuring the
"CRAZY   DASH"
MINORU
LAST WEEK
geon, of Vancouver, containing a copy
ot a recent judgment to t*e effect tnat
the parlmutue! system ot betting   is
^���o9 were r.lsyed with these teami
and in tho totM score Sawett.on wn*
by a safe margin. Concert! were put
on by the member! ot tho team In
Kamloops, Armstrong, Vernon, Kelowna. Revelstoke  and  Salmon  Arm.  the parlmu _-.-. .
The concert* were under  the  direc-  not prohibited by the criminal coda
tlon   ot   Mlss   Evelyn   Chastey   and  in its present shape.
were much appreciated, proving also      S'-ty days of contlnoous roc lag and
raource of ftvetvue. professional gambling en the Minora
The valloy towns proved to be good Race Track, he saya. hararmtaea tne
i-^-s and tho bevs report a wpl��n- tettpr element In Vanoouver to tne
d'd time. In Vernon much interest need ot Immediate action. Al-**
was taken In the visitors by Mr. Dean, ��� resolution wa* passed affirming that
a prominent business man of the city, the time waa ripe for the suppression
EDDIE AND DEDA
DAWS
The Lady wtth tha Big
Voice and the Maa with tbe
Eccentric Dance.
Special Fcaturt Pkttru
�������������������� I I�����������     ������ -     ���   II������-M������IMMW
PRICES:
' Matinee���10c tntf 20c
Children Half Price
Evening���15c and 25c
Children 10e and 15c
EXCELLENT
UNEXCELLED
RACES
,wUrl^mmflu I
LAST WEEK
MINORU
.-..*.'���-������ '���',.-     _~ "*lW��*te
f   tao* six.
WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1912.
HALDANE'S NEW POST
THE DEA1 CF EDITORS.
THE STAFF OF LIFE.
J. R. Dousall  Has Fought Hard For \ Brsad  Is Not U��ed  In Many Poorer,
FORMER    WAR    MINISTER    NOW
PRESIDES OVER  LORD3.
Hi; Convictions,
So many of our notable Canadian*
Countries
Baked Inave* of bread are unknown
As Lord Chancellor He Will Have a
achieve a combine, that it is a relief
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ to turn to an eminent Canadian who,
Chance to Turn His Great Talents   though now seventy man of age, has
Into Another Channel-It Is Twen-' probabhr  never devoted the energies
._ ���        _.        i_.-ri_iiO'R Slng'�� day either to earning his
ty-Seven Years Since He Took Up   living  or   to   the  making   of  m��JMyi
Parliamentary Work  and  His  La-   says a writer in The Toronto Globe.
bors  Have Been Arduous. "Why, whatever manner of man is
| this?"  it might be asked.    "A  gentle*
"Not   for   any   office   in   the   state   man of leisure in this strenuous Can-
would I lay down tho task I have in   ada,  where   the  rich   men   strive all
hand." j the time to get richer, and the poor
His task completed at the War Of- I men  strive  all  the  time  to get less
flee the father of the "Terriers" has   poor!"
once   more  donned   the   legs!   robes. |    No���not a gentleman of leisure, but
��re men wlio merely make and spend j in many pRrts of the world, such r��
money, and whose proudest contribu- , South Austria nnd Italy and throueh-
tion to social development is to help | out thj aericiilturiil district* of Ron-
Tn the village* of the Ober-
mania. In the vi . ,^^^^^^^__
fteiermark, not very many miles from
Vienna, hr --.d is never ����en.
The staple food <f tlie people is
sterti, a kind of porrldae, mad* from
ground beechnut*, which i- taken tit
breakfast with fresh or curded milk.
at dinner with broth or ftied lard
and with milk agnin for supper. Thi��
sterts also takes the place of bread
in Carpathia and many parts of the
Tyrol.
In the North of Italy many of the
peasant* liv�� on polenta, a porridce
made of boiled maize. The polenta,
however, i* not allowed to eranulnfe
In these  few  emphatic words  is  re- ! one of the busiest and most systema- i ...     _ --. ,   ��� ,-,-       -   ... ...
vealed the dominant note in the stren-   tically hard-working men in the Dom-   ''ke Scotch  porrulee or   like a   solid
uous<��reer of tbis successful ScnU-: inion-John    Redpath    Dougall.   the : P.���d'n*'   'i V      ^   ��    -V.��� ���
man, who has so dramatically fulfill- ! veteran editor and proprietor of The :  L j?."/; " ""*��� W.J *A Vu'YJJJ
ed the early predictions of tliose who j Montreal Witness, and the doyen of I 1VJ i*" ^���Vnn.^�� I Lm I��� m.n��
first heard Vm in the House of Com-   Canadian  journal!^ | Jg^St^Sllff &TZ
mons over a quarter of a century | A life of unremitting toi bis bas | Rom���n rnlnnVi .,,���, ��� writftr itl thp
ago, says Lindsay Crawford in To- . been, and still is, but toil devoted ]{���!<���.> Weekly in ether words to
ronto Saturday Night. H    j not to personal ends or to personal   bp cou.-U]f ���f ,),',, Italian*; and cur
Viscount   Haldane's   intense   devn-    aggrandizement.    Toil   honestly,   sin-
ously enough a vniistion of the pol-
enta called miimnllgn Is ihe national
di��b of  Rouriinnin.
The mamslicn i* like the polenta,
in that it i* made of boiled maize, but
it is unlike the latter in one import-
0IURCH
NEWS
(Changes for this column must be
left at, or telephoned to, this ofiice by
9 a.m. on Fridays. The omission of
any church notice from this column
Indicates that no details have been
supplied.)
tion to duty st the War Ollice. his I cerely and unwaveringly devoted to
amazing capacity for concentrated , a single end. which is to leavo the
and sustained work, his constant de- ] world a little better than he found it.
light in expatiating on the greatness I John Dougall has all his life been
of the Kmpire and t'e l.igh destinies    a   moulder   of   public   opinion.    And
oi the British race, gave John I*"" many a time during his life has he I ant respect, a* the grains are not al-
for the fi;fc'. time since the Boer j ber i like a voice crying in the wil- I lowed to settle into a solid ms**, but
War, a feeling of confidence and se- derness. His ideas huve been laugh-' are kept distinct after the fashion of
curity in a department on whose efH- j ed at, sooffed at, called narrow-mind- | oatmeal porridge,
cioncy, in lhe last resort, rests the ed, bigoted. Such abuse has seldom Tbe possibility of mskine bread
fate  of  the  nation. | ruffled the calm serenity of his mind. I without  (lour   seems   a*   absurd  snd
Viscount Haldane had already won ] He has been content to "fight the impracticable to th" modern hotise-
a reputation in the Law Courts vhen ! good fight" for what he conceived to wife ns dil I'hnrnoh's proposition to
he took hi�� seat in the House of [ be the right, and to leave the issue ' mnke bricks without straw to the
Commons in I8S5.   With a great lesal | in other hands.   Yet I doubt if there    Israelites  of olj.    Yet.  according   to
' is any man in Canada who can look    M.  Paul Combes, a  French scientist,
back over his career with mora gen-   bread can be   made   of   almost   any
uine satisfaction at good accomplish-   vegetable substance,
ed,  and   of  triumphs  achieved,  than       M. Combes describes some forms of
Mr. Dougall. i bread that are in a me��sure familiar
He was one of the lucky indivi- to most people, but some are rather
duals born to distinction. Fate mad- | novelties in the culinary line. Bread
him the  Heir to a  promising estate. ' made of pure oats with the addition
career open to him he plunged instead
into the arena of politics. Fate has
otherwise ruled his destiny and lie
has changed over once more to lliu
side  of  the   law,
Tiie Liberal Cabinet of IMS was
roted fnr its brainy men. and annul:.'
Ministers  of  literary  distinction   Vi
count Haldnpe hnd 'already won fame    It made  hiiii  the"prVp"riet")r'B(ir"wbat   of nnM>fth_ of   !*?   "fjj uLft!
as a philosophical writer.    His I eav.   (was for long the most largely cireu-
build and stolid appearance give the j lated  ami   most  powerful   newspaper
of   a  city  that   ha.s   grown   by   leaps
VIM'ol'XT 1IA1.IIANK.
impression   at   first  sight  of  n   prosperous merchant.   He had a b-illiant
university career in Scotland and studied philosophy at Qottingen, in Germany. He is said to know more
about Kant, Hegel and Schopenhauer
than any other man in Parliament.
HL- writings are marked by great iu-
cii'ty and scholarly erudition. He
is a persuasive speaker rather than
an orator and his contributions to debate smack more of the Law Courts
than the platform. A prodigious worker, if genius means production, then
he has earned the title. He is a
stick'er fir efficiency and merit and
one of liis first jobs was to sweep fhe
War Office clean nf petticoat influence.
He was a favorite in the House of
Commons, for that Hftise knows how-
to cherish those who,add weight and
distinction to it,s ^'liberations. A
close personal friend of Mr. Balfour
���that "acutest advocate of a pious
scepticism"���it has-been well said
that the dividing line between these
two philosophical minds is that "Haldane is all for reason and Balfour
all for faith."
Pre-eminently qualified in point of
mental equipment, knowledge of i.'ie
law, capacity for close reasoning and
sustained argument, ''nd. above all.
gilt.'d with snui.fc common sense, the
new Lord Chancellor brings to his
high ollice a temperament Hist enable.* him to view the problems of
the dny from "above the snow line."
A true philosopher, he appeals neither t* passion i.or to prejudice. He
never over-states his case.
As Lord Chancellor he will scarcely feel impelled to be less independent of party dictation than his predecessor, Lord Loreburn. He is a
conservative force and will influem.e
largely the legislation that has yet
to come touching the reform cf that
Upper Chamber over which he is
now called on to preside.
A  Royal  Pupil.
The Prince of Wales, who is eighteen years of age, has been learning
to drive an automobile. The tuition
took place at Norfolk and for the
present His Royal Highness will not
be seen in the neighborhood of busy
towns. The prince represents the
third generation of the royal patrons
Of the automobile in Britain, although
this means of locomotion has only
bee i in common use about twelve
years. King Kdward was an enthus-
iust but he did not drive his own car,
nor  does   King  George.
The Prince of Wales never from tbe
start experienced the slightest difficulty in connection with steering and
was very quick to pick up the notion
of   handling   the  automobile,
and bounds. It put in his hands
business interest* accumulated by
one of t'ie most astute minds
Canada ever possessed. His father
was nothing less than a business genius, and he left to John K. Dougall
such opportunities as not one man
in Hi thousand has to achieve wealth
or fame, or both.
But his  father also  made  him  the
inheritor    of    a    steadfast    idealism,
Tiie elder Dougaii, as soon as he had
made the nion-ey  to do it,  founded a
newspaper,   the   avowed   purpose   of
which   was   to   occupy   its   ct rner   of
tiie world  "for God."    He nm.e it a
'.'ixrl newspaper;' ke? t it in  the ft re-
front   as   regards   development   and
toterpriae; made it the lirst paper in
the world  to  be set up by  the  linotype machine; made it the first one-
cent  paper  in   its  city;  initiated  the
now Universal practice in Canada ��>l
posting  bulletins   outside    the  office
irt.m hour   to   bour*,   Wit   the   way.   in
IncV.,  In   j'm**iiH'.t-iii   within   tlte   R-;.horo.
ol   influence   ot  hi*  papi'r.
,      Tl.e    you\AC*T    IIouhrII,    mere    ot    R
philosopher,   but   none    the    less    an
laetrliSl,   has    continued    this   news-
Phiht as an or.'im of the higher ci\i-
lizntinn, and  into that organ he has
l.ut all the best thought and all Ihe
best   energy   of   half   a   century   of
har I,   unri milting   labor.
Once his pnpi r was put under tli ���
ban of the Roman Catholic Church,
and nearly ruined thereby, Another
time the whole plant was destroyed
by fire���as a result, it has always
been believed, of incendiarism. Another time the office was partly blown
up bydyniimite. And on another occasion mysterious Black Hand threats
were sent Mr.- Dougall, wilh the object of getting him to call off a campaign against certain crooked
schemes. Not a sinsle one of these
occurrences turned him by as much
as a hair's-breadth from his line of
action. Nor has he'ever allowed expediency to dominate the policy of
his paper. ���
CATHEDRAL OF THE HOLY
TRINITY���Rev. Canon 0. C. d'Easum,
M. A., rector; Rev. George A. Ray, M.
A., assistant curate. 8 a.m., Holy
Communion; 11 a.m., Matins, Litany
and sermon; 2; 30 p.m., Sunday
school; 7 p.m., Evensong and sermon
by Rev. R. A. Hiltz, of Toronto.
ST. BARNABAS CHURCH. 436
Tenth street���Rev. E. R. Bartlett,
M.A., rector. Services: 11 a.m., Matins.
Holy Communion and sermon; 7 p.m..
Evensong and sermon. Friday.
Litany, 7.30 p.m.; choir practice, 8
p.m.
ST. MARY'S CHURCH (Church of
England), Sapperton���Rev. Frank
Plaskett, M.A., vicar. Holy Communion at 8 a.m.; Matins and sermon at
11 a.m.; Evensong and sermon at 7
p.m.; Sunday school at 2:30 p.m.
ST. ALBAN'S CHURCH (Anglican),
East Burnaby���Rev. David Dunlop.
rector. Matins at 11 a.m.; Evensong
at 7:30 p.m.
ST. HELEN'S CHURCH, So'ltb
Westminster���Rev. C. J. 1.00113. d.
rector. Holy Communion, ���* a.m.;
Matins, 8:45; Litany and cbmil teh-
bration cf Holy Communion, 10.30
a.m.; Evensong and sermon, 7 p.m.
The church ls five minutes' walk from
South Westminster station, on B. C.
E  R. Chilliwack line.
ST. ANDREW'S PRESBYTERIAN
���Rev. J. S. Henderson, pastor. Services 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sabbath
school und Bible class at 2:30 p.m.
The pastor will preach at both services. Subjects: 11 a.m., "The Transfigured Christ"; 7:30 p.m., "The Master of the Human Heart."
ST. STEPHEN'S PRESBYTERIAN,
corner of Fourtli Ave. and Seventh St
Rev. M. G. Meivin, B. A., minister
Services at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Sunday school at 12 a.m The minis
ter will preich at both services.
Guild meets Monday at 8 p.m.
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ KNOX PRESBYTERIAN. Sapper-
the admixture of any otlier substance } ton���Rev. E. O. Thompson, M.A.. min-
���nnd it has the Combined advantages ister. Services 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
ff being healthful, palatable and easl-j Bible class, 1:80 p.m.; Sabbath
ly digested, and it will keep pure and schocl. 2::10 p.m.; Y. P. S. C. ED. Montreal for fifteen tlays. I day, S p.m, Subjects: 11 a.m., "Tht
Some historian* give th.> Chinese j Christian Motive"; 7 p.m., "The Man
credi* for hnving first linked leavened j in the Street."
bread,    but    nothing    definite    about
their methods in preparing it has ST. AIDAN'S PRESBYTERIAN,
been discovered a* yet. Suffice it to corner Fourteenth street and Seventh
say that when tlu> Chinese made their: avenue���ltev. I:. Wallace Collins, BA.
l.roHtl  ot   whent H.HOO year*  before  the I paator.   Se\ vlceti,  11     a.m. 'and     ' ��� HO
Chr.aUnn ern. Uny m-rely  ����a\it.rt  ilv I p.m.-   Sunday  school  at  13  o'clock af-
brokeii wheat iti wnter, then heated Itl ter the aervlce. The paator will preach
ovt-r n  Hre. | at  both   services.     SuhJt'Ct.  7:30   p.m..
The   art ol  brotidnuiKitu!   wns trnn*-; "The World's Cry tor Christ."    Lord's
mitted     from      ancient    Egypt     into   Supper at morning service.
<ir>'oce,  nnd  there are   n i   less   thin
sixty-two different verities of bread QUEENS AVENUE METHODIST���
known nmong the ancient Creeks. Rev. W. M. Abbott, R.A., H.D., pastor.
Tiny employed in the ninkini: of 1 Services 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. The
bread a great many kinds of Krain j pastor will preach at both services
besides wheat and barley, such as | Subjects: 11 a.m., "Malting Christ
ry���*, millet, rice, and a soft sort ol Lord": 7:80 p.m.. "Growing a Soul.'
trrain from Kthionin called orindinn. | Young people's meeting Monday at S
n purely Kuyptfnn grain. Strung' toi p.m.; Prayer meeting Wednesday at
say. neither German nor English 18 p.m.
yeast will sufficiently raise Egyptian
flour.
SALVATION ARMY, Ensign Stickles and Lieutenant Manning���Servicea
at 77 a.m., 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., in
the citidel, Eighth street. Open air
services as usual. A hearty Invitation
ls extended to all.
FIRST SWEDISH LUTHERAN
C-HURCH, St. Andrews and Eleventh
streets.���George N. Anderson, pastor.
Services every Sunday at 7:30 p.m.
! CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ��� Services
are held' In the hall, corner Fifth
street and Eighth avenue, at 11 a.m.
every Sunday. Subject, "Man." Testimony meetings Wednesday 8 p.m.
CHURCH   OF   CHRIST,   or   Christiana���at tent, 215 Durham street, be-
1 tween Second and Fourth streets. Ser-
j vices:  Preaching and Communion, 11
a.m.; preaching, 2.30 and 7.30 p.m.
GOSPEL HALlr-<:oiner of Sixth
avenue and Ninth streeL
Tha
Royal Bank of Canada
Capital   paid  up $8,200,000
Reserve   7.200,000
The Bank has over 200
branches, extending In Canada
from the Atlantic to the Pucuic.
In Cuba throughout the Island;
also ln Porto Rico, Bahamas.
Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad,
New York and London,, Eng.
Drafts Issued without delay
on all the principal towns and
cities In the world. These ex-
celent connections afford every
banking facility.
Naw Westminster Branch,
Lawford  Richardson,  Mgr.
has Ihe appearnnce of good bread, but
he snys it i< grny in color and the
odor nnd taste nre not agreeable.
He also tells of bread made of rice,
of maize flour nnd mashed potatoes
that I rn,"',inpd. of rye, benns. lentils, the
root* of bryon ill, iris, sepentaria.
mindraeora Hnd hellebore, snd the
leaves of aconite. All these, however,
with few exception*, afford only imperfect nourishment and are really of
use only in ea*3 of extreme necessity.
Probably tiie most nourishing bread
not made lrom wheat or corn is that
which constitutes the chief food of
fhd Cor*ican mountaineers���that i*.
bread  made  lrom  chestnuts    without
E:irmu(f.i   Bulb   Planters.
It is imt  uncommon for a Bermuda
lily  grower  to. plant  15,^00  bulbs  at
tine time. w tpptpip*mrmputpiii.tfi.
Sea Salmon In Park.
A remarkable fnct has just come
to li.dit in the capture of a specimen
of landlocked salmon in Algonquin
Park. T> ���* fish wa* sent to Ottawa
to be examined by Prof. Prince. Dominion Commissioner of Fisheries, as
unity spirt.-mpn at the perk contended that it was not a salmon hut a
hybrid specimen. Prof. Prince j.ro-
���vru"<���".* the fish a true salmon and
or.e of the finest he has seen. I'.s
weight was nearly two pounds. The
disco', cry is nn important one for
sportsmen in the province. At one
time sea salmon were plentiful in
take Ontario, but they have long
b'.'en practically extinct despite the
fnct that they were pbinted in the
lake and its tributaries, Since 1008
from 65,000 to 40,000 fry have been
planted annually in Algonquin Park
waters at the suggestion of Prof,
Prince, and the result is now seen
for the first time. I'rof. Prince is
of the opinion that the fish just captured is of the fry of IOOI).
A Generous Gift.
A valuable collection of Ontario
plants hns recently been presented to
the department of botany of the University of Toronto by Principal W;l-
.inm Scott of the Normal School, Toronto. There are bbottt 5,000 sheets
in all, thoroughly representative of
the Hora of certain parts of the province, particularly of the east and
pentral south. This collection embodies the work of many years, don��
by Principal Scott during the recreation hours of his busy life. As Principal Scott is known to be a careful
coilect-or and a discriminating botanist, this latest contribution adds
much to the working store of Ontario
plants in the herbarium of the university.
Hans   Christian   Anderson.
A   critic  writes  of   Hans   Christian
Anderson:   "His  vanity  was   perhaps
his   most   salient  character I.-tic.     He
was   photographed   scores    of    time*
In   every   position   and  costlinie,   and
he never wearied of new presentments
of   his   strong   but   unhand* 1119   fen
tures.    His   whims   were   letrioil,    He
had a  morbid horror of Iieing  buried
alive and  always set a slip ol  pxner
by   his   bedside   bearing   the   w rd-,
'Beg es skiudod' ('I am in a tnince )
His hosts often found him  an exact,
ing guest, but his little failim:.- weif
easily   pardoned  fcr  the  sake  ol   In
genius and  his childlike  nature."
A Relic ot Barbarism.
In ancient times it whs the custom of the victors III a battle to deoo-
rata their doorpost* with the skull.*
of the vanquished. With the advance
of civilization of course we 110 Ioiil'-
er continue this bit of bHilmnty. but
the custom has not been allowed I*
drop altogether, a* is seen by the
stone bnlls whicii are oiten set on
gateposts, a relic of a barbarous idea
of lonu ago. In certain pints of
Africa the skulls are still u.-ed a* decorations. Whole villages may Ik
seen with the doorposts ol tho houses
surmounted in tbis gruesome fashion.
Beginning ot the Trouble.
"Yes." said Breezem. who I nppen
ed to be in a i>emini*cent mood, "during my younger days I sowed the
wind,  but later"���
"Well, what happened laterr" questioned  Mrs.  Breezem.
"I married you," continued the alleged head of the matrimonial combine.
Sure Way to Get a Job.
One of the .Unemployed���I wish I
had money enough so I shouldn't
have to work for a living.
Another of Them���80 do I. In that
case, you know, it would lie so easy
to get a job.
Smoky London.
London  suffers  an  average  loss  of
38 per cent of bright sunshine through
the presence of smoke.
A Little Rhino.
The   Mennonitcs.
"   The    Men non ite    denomination    is ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
mimed nfter Menno Simons, a leader' A   bal,y   newly  arrived   in   Kngland
in the reformation. It has 3,000 mem* ,r"''   '"<,',t  '*   P"eed   at  ��5,(J00.    Hr
bers in Ontario.   ��� u au ����laut rhinoceros.
SIXTH AVENUE METHODIST ���
Rev. W. S. A. Crux, B.A.. pastor. Ser
vices at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.; Sunday
school at 2:30 p.m.; prayer and praiss
service Wednesday at 8 p.m. Sunday
is college day. Educational sermons
wll be preached by Uev. E. Staple-
ford. B.A.. at 11 a.m., and Rev. A. E.
'Heatlierington at 7 p.m.
SAPPERTON METHODIST ���Rev
E. D. Braden. pastor. Services at
11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Sun tav s:hool
and Hible class at 2:30. The pastor
will preach at both services.
EAST BURNABY METHODIST
CHURCH���Corner Eighth street and
Third avenue, Rurnaby. Rer. W. C.
Frank, pastor. Services 11 a.m. and
7:30 p.m.; Sunday school and Bible
class at 2:30 p.m.
FREE METHODIST, Eighth St.-C.
S. McKinley, pastor. Love Treat
9:45 a.m.; preaching, 11 a.m. and
7:45 p.m.; Sacrament, 12 noon: Sunday school, 2:30 p.m.; praise service,
7 p.m.
OLIVET BAPTIST CHURCH-Cor-
ner of Seventh street and Queens
avenue. Rev. A. F. Baker, pastor.
Services 11 a.m. and 7.30 p.m.; Sunday school at 2:30 p.m.
SAPPERTON RAPTIST CHURCH |
Hospital street���O. B. Anderson, pastor. Services at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.;
Sunday school and Bible class 12 to 1
p.m. uev. Robert Lennie will conduct
both services.
QUEENSBOROUGH BAPTIST���Ssr-
vice will be held at 3 p.tn. by Rev.
Reid McCullough, li.A. Sunday school
at 2 p.m.
I'DMONDS BAPTIST��� Service wl'l
be cotidi- ted at 7 p.m. by Rev. Reid
McCullough, jI.A.: Sunday school and
Bible class at 2:30 p.m.
ST. PAUL'S REFORMED EPISCOPAL CHURCH, corner of Seventh
street and Royal avenue���Rev. C. E.
Wincott, rector. "The Ix>w Churcn."
Services at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Subjects: 11 a.m., "Our Mother God"; 7
p.m., "Story of a Royal Procession."
Sunday school at 2:30 p.m.; prayer
meeting Thursday at 7:30 p.m.
N1DAROS NORWEGIAN LUTHERAN CHURCH ��� Divine service
every Sunday at 3:30 p.m. In St.
Paul's Reformed Episcopal church,
Royal avenue and Seventh street. Sunday school, 2:30 p.m. O. P.orge, pastor, residence 1654 Eleventh avenue
east, Vancouver.
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER.
Specifications, agreements of sale,
deeds, business letters, etc; circular
work specialist. All work strbtly confidential. M. Broten, Room 6, Merchant Bank Bldg.    Phone 715.
FRATERNAL.
LOYAL ORDER OF MOOSE, NO
854���Meets in K. of P. Hall, Eightb
and Agnes streets, second and
fourth Wednesdays, at 8 o'clock.
Club rooms -over Sinclair's Shoe
Store, Columbia street. Visiting P.
A. P. s welcome. F. C. Cook, Die
tator; J. J. Randolph, Vice-Dictator;  H. L. Christie, Secietary.
I. O. O. F. AMITY LODGE NO. 17-
Tue regular meeting of Amity lodg��
No. 27. I. O. O. F.. is held every Mod
day night at 8 o'clock In Odd Fel
lows ball, corner Carnarvon and
Eighth ' atreet. Visiting bre th err
cordially Invited. C. B. Bryson, N.
G.; R. A. Merrithew, V. G.; W. C���
Coatham, P.G., recording secretary;
H. W. Sangster, financial secretary.
Bank of Montreal
ESTABLISHED 1817.
CAPITAL  (Palcl-Up)
RESERVE  	
..$15,413,000.00
,. 915,000,000.0 1
Branches throughout Canada ��u<J
Newfoundland, anc In London. Eng
Isad, Lew Tork, Chicago and Spokane,
U.S.A., sad Mexico City. A gem^ul
basking business transacted. Letters ef Credit Issued, available wltb
correspondents tn all parts Of tke
world.
Savings Bask D��r��rtmeii���Deposits
eclved In sums of 11 and upward,
and Interest allows 1 at I par cent, per
annum  (prsseat r.ia).
Total   Assets over  tl86.000.000.00
NEW  WESTMINSTER BRANCH,
O. D. BRTMNER. Manager.
PROFESSIONAL.
ADAM SMITH JOHNSTON, Barrister-
at-Law, Solicitor, Etc. 552 Columbia
street, New Westminster, B.C. Telephone 1070. Cable address "Johnston." Code, Western I'nion. Off.cos.
Rooms 6 and 7  hiliis block.
J. STILWELL CLUTE, barrlster-at
law, solicitor, etc: corner Columbl
and MoKensle stieets. New West
minster, B, C. P. O. Box 112. Tele
pbone 710.
. P. HAMPTON HOLE, BARRISTER
solicitor and notary, 611 Columbii
street.   Over C. P. It. Telegraph.
McQUARRlE. MALTIN & CASSADY,
HarrlatorH anil Solicitors. Rooms 7
aud 8, Oulchon block. New Westmlnater. Cleorgo K. Martin, \V. G.
McQuarrie  and  Ueorgo   I..   CaHaady.
WHITESIDE & EDMONDS-Harrls
ters and Soilcltois, Westminstei
Trust block, Columbia street, New
Westminster, B.C. Cable addres.
"Whiteside," Western Union. P.O
Drawer 200. Telephone 69. W. J.
Whiteside. H. L. Edmonds.
AUDITOR ANO ACCOUNTANT.
JOHN GRAHAM, AUDITOR AND AC
countant. P. O. Box 7S4. Phone lOOS
WE WANT YOUR ORDER
CASH IF YOU CAN.
CREDIT IF YOU CAN'T.
We bave no bot air to peddle;
Just legitimate tailoring.
J. N. AITCHIS0N
MERCHANT TAILOR
38 Begbie Street.
J. Newsome & Sons
Painters, Paperhangers
and Decorators
Estlmstsa Qlvsn.
HI  Sixth  Avenue. Phone 567
N��W WESTMINSTER B.C
II J. A. BURNETT. AUDITOR AND
Accountant. Tel. R 128. Room
Trapp block.
BOARD OF TRADE��� NEW WEST
minster Board of Trade meets in tht
board room, City Hull, as follows
Third Friday of eacn month: quar
terly meeting on ihe IJird Friday ol
February, May, August and November at 8 p.m. Anniinl meetings oil
the third Friday of Fehruary. New
members may be proposed and
elected st any monthly or quarterly
meeting. 8. H. Stuart Wade, secro
tary.
Gardiner & Mercer
M. S. A.
ARCHITECTS
WESTMINSTER
Phone  631.
TRUST
BLOCK.
Box  772.
Subscribers
who do not receive   The News before
8 a.m. should
TELEPHONE 999
and make complaint. Only In this way
may an efficient delivery be maintained.
CANADIAN PACIFIC
RAILWAY CO.
Stampede at Calgary
Only a few more dates in September to make your visit east at a re
duced fare.
Three trains dally, Tourist, Dining
Car3.
Toronto Express ...
Imperial Limited ..,
Soo Express 	
S.22 a.m.
8.10 p.m.
~.ij p.m.
ED. GOULET, Agent
New Westminster
Or H. W.  Brodie, G.P.A., Vancouver
&t
���35?
CANADIAN PACIFIC
B. C. Coast Service
FALL SUITINGS
ENGLISH    WORSTED, 8COTCH
TWEED,   IRISH   SERGE, etc.,   Just
Arrived.    Perfect  Fit and Workman-
shllp Guaranteed.
Hee Chung
Merchant Tailor
701 Front Street
VANCOUVER-VICTORIA-SEATTLE
SERVICE.
Leaves Vancouver for Victoria 10
a. m., 2 p. m. and 11:45.
Leaves Vancouver for Seattle 10
a. m. and 11 p. m
Leaves Vancouver for Nanaimo 10
a. m. and 6:30 p. m.
Leaves Vancouver for Prince Rupert and Northern Polnta 10 p. tax,
Wednesdays.
NORTHERN   BOATS   FOR   PRINCE
RUPERT.
Leaves   Vancouver   every Wednesday at 10 p.m.
Chilliwack Service
Leaves Westminster 8 a.m. Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.
Leaves Chilliwack 7 a.m. Tuesday,
Thursday and Saturday.
�� ED. GOULET,
Agent, New Westminster.
H. W. BRODIE,
O. P. A.. Vancouver
Phone R672.
619 Hamilton 8t
D. McELROY
Chimney Sweeping,
Esvetrough Cleaning,
Sewer Connecting,
Cesspools, 8ept|c Tanks, Etc.
Carcte "���* Signs
'PHONE 1123
BROWN r Trapp Block
 .	 SATURDAY, 8EPTEMBER, 7, 1912.
WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
.,.,.).. |.. .|. ...|.. | . \.\.���l , | . | . |,..;^,
By Devious
Ways
How  the  Cat
"Won Out"
..    By  CLARISSA   MACKIE
,,|. !���������;...p. i. i���|,.,| ��� i ��� |. | ,,]������.,
"There's more than one way to kill
a cat!" remarked Hlldretb darkly.
"They aay Vare once killed a cat'"
quoted Mra. Hlldretb flippantly.
"I ran illjjSsk of tbls one wltb a
well a lined ^Wt" Uildreth retorted.
"It's all very well for you to mako
light of tbe matter, Linda. You didn't
lose a night's rest because of tbe yowl-
lugs uf tbat Infernal cat I'm fagged
out this morning."
| "Liave another cup of coffee, dear,"
soothed I.lnda, smoothing away the
'amused smile from ber fnce aa she
'realized that ber usually good temper
c^l husband waa actually grouchy over
tbe matter. "I'm sure I can get lid
of tbe cat before you come bome tonight"
"Howr Frank wae mollified and
accepted a fresh cup of coffee.
"Mra. Bliss wants one."
"Well?"
"Sbe baa often admired Bleaaumi. 1
will give blm to Mu. Bliss."
"She won't want blm after he's serenaded ber Ono or twice," murmured
Mr. nildretb as he kissed bis wife.
clapped on hts but and reached for bis
newspai ������ ��� lu one bresth.
When his flying form hnd disappeared In the direction of lbe statiou Mrs.
Uildreth sighed snd poured herself an
other cup of tea
"I Just hate to give Blesmims awny."
she snld mutinously. "lie has nhvays
been the dearest cat In the world, and
to think Frank objects to blm et this
Inte dny! I can't understnnd It, any-
wuy. wby Itlessums should take It Into
bis blessed old head to yowl under
Frnnk'�� wludow every night I suppose I've got to go over nnd tell Mny
Bliss, lt wlll brenk my heart to give
awny iny 'orely cut but It certainly
wouldn't be rlcht to plnce a mere cut
above m.v husband's comfort!"
Therefore an hour afterward found
ber walking up the pretty suburban
Mreet tti the Queen Anne villa, wbere
llie.! ler mont Intimate friend
"The dnrllim ptIMy enft Purely I'll
take him." cried Ihe dellchted Mrs.
Miss   when  tbe  sins  of  the  luckless
���lumbers of Frank Hlldreth. He start
ed up and turned bis bead toward tbt
dosed soutb window of bis room. Th'
west windows were wide open.
"Me-e-e-e-row!"
Tbere was no mistaking the melllflu
ous voice of Blesuuius, tbe tortoise
sbell cat
Tbe cat bad rome back.
Frank thumped out of bed nnd threw
up the south window. Below, on tbe
moonlit path at tbe foot of the roue
trellis, sat Bleasuuis, gating up at his
erst wblle master.
"Me-e-e-e-row!" be repeated mournfully.
"There will be a row!" yelled Frank
wratbfully, aud, picking up a small
chair, be tossed It through the window
straight at the unsuspecting feline.
Wbeu tbe chair struck tbe piitb
with a thud Bletwums bud vaulsbed-
slmply melted from view. But tha
chair wus there, by some magic of circumstance standing ou Its four legs In
the middle of the path.
Frank went buck to bed and to sleep
dreamlesMly till morning.
"Ob, Prutik. the queerest thing bm
huppened!" fluttered I.lnda when be
sppeured ut tbe breakfast tuble.
"What Is Itf be asked curiously,
"Why. when I looked out of my window Ht 7 o'clock this morning what
should I nee but HIphniiiu* sitting on
one of our bedroom chairs In tbe middle of tbe piitb! He looked loo cute
for anything, Frank, but how do you
suppose the chair ever got out tbere?"
Linda's blue eyes were Innocently
wide.
"Illnnked If I know." lied Frank
crossly.
"Why. Frank Hlldreth! I think It's
perfectly awful for you to swsweur at
uie-e like that!" cried Linda, suddenly
tearfully indignant.
It required a hulf hour to properly
apologies to his wife, mid In tbe end he
felt like n criminal. "1 told you, my
dear, ihut nothing short of sudden
death Would ever terminate his serenades." he said moodily.
"I don't cure how or when he dies
If I don't bave to henr nny of the de-
tails." said I.lnda dejectedly. "It does
seem as though Hlessums wns determined to come back bere and disturb
your peace." /
"Perhaps I can think of some remedy durliii! the day." said frank, and
once more be set forth nn his morning
splint for lbe H1M train.
The result of s whole Any'* enzlta-
tlon <>n tbe part of Mr. Hlldretb wa*
that he brought home that nlcht n
large paper bag tilled with soot- l.lsik
chimney soot secured from some unknown place hy his oltlce Ini.V.
He smuggled Ihe bag up Into his
own room and bid It under Ins lied.
fle did not wish to shock his wlfes
tender sensibilities wilh the details ot
tbe horrible way In which he whs lo
end the nightly serenades of Hlessums.
the tortoise shell eat. How conld bu
tell I.lnda tbat it wns bis Intention to
listen for tbe tlrst signal frooi the um-
mmler nnd then, ��-i����plon ����fttjr tu ih��
window, which hr wniiht tmr. wuw
open, he would decoy th* unsu��|>ecttin5
Hlessums up the rose trellis, and
when the cat whs almost up to Ihe
window he would empty the linn nt
! black, smothering, choking ��"��t full
Into his face. Uesult-s hurried nnd |ht-
ma nent exit on the part of Blessums
SYNOPSIS   OF  COAL   MINING
GULATIONS.
RE
NEW    WE8TMIN8TER    MAIL
arrival:
10:60���Vancouver ?u  Q.
COAL MINING rights of the Dominion In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and
Alberta, ,the Yukon Territory, the
Northwest Territories and in a portion of the province of British Columbia, may be leased :or a term of twenty-one years at an annual rental of
���il an acre. Not more than 2,560 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be
made by the applicant in person to
the Agent or Sub-Agent of the district
ln which the rights applied for are
situated.
In surveyed territory the land must
be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurvev-
ed territory the tract applied for shall
be staked out by the applicant himself.
Each application must bo accompanied by a fee of 15 which will be
refunded lf the rights applied for are
���lot available, but not otherwise. A
royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate
of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shall
furnish the Agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of
merchantable coal mined and pay the
royalty thereon. If the coal mining
rights are not being operated such returns should be furnished at leaBt
once a year.
The lease wlll Include the coal mining rights only, but the leasee will be
permitted to purchase whatever avail-
ible surface rights may be considered
necessary for the working of the mine
at the rate of $10 an acre.
For    full    information    application
should  be  made to the  Secretary of
Me IV'nartment of the Interior, Ottawa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent of
Dominion Lands.
W. W. CORY.
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.���Unauthorized publication of
this advertisement will not be paid
for.
NOTICE   TO   CONTRACTORS.
Industrial School for Girls.
SEALED TENDERS, superscribed
"Tender for Industrial School for
Girls," will be received by the Hon.
the Minister of Public Works up to 12
o'clock noon of Monday, Sth day of
September, 1912, for the erection and
completion of an industrial .-chool for
girls.
Plans,  specifications, contract,  and
forms of tender may be seen at the cf
flees of the Government Agents, Vancouver and New Westminster, and the
Department of Public Works, Victoria I
Intending tenderers   can, by   apply I
In* to the undersigned, obtain a M>t oil
'he drawings and specifications tor the
sum of twenty-flve (25) dollars.
Each proposal must be accompanied
by an accepted bank cheque or certifl
cate ef deposit on a chartered bank of
Canada, made payable to the Hon. the
Minister of Public Works, for a sum
cent, of the
Closing:
N.  R.
 23:00
11:45���Burnaby Lake and   Vancouver via B. C. E. R... 7:45
16:45���Vancouver   via   G. N. R.
(dally except Sunday).14:20
': 40��� Vancouver via B. C. E. H.
(dally except Sunday).11:16
12:00���Vancouver via. B. C. E. R.
(daily except Sunday). 16:00
18:00��� Vancouver via B. C. E. R.
(daily except Sunday).2>/:30
10:00���Port Mann (daily except
Sunday) 9:45
0:80��� aarnston Islands arrives
Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday, and leaves
Monday,      Wednesday
and   Friday    14:00
7:40���Victoria via B. C. B. R.
(dally except Sunday). 11.15
10:60���Victoria via G   N.  R.
(dally except Sunday) .20:30
11:20���Tynehead   (Tuesday   and
"Vldavt           ...     .        ^.o,
18:00���Edmonds     and     Central
Park (dally except Sunday) 16:00
.6:16���Crescent, Whit* Roik and
Hlaine idaily except
Sunday)   9^
18:10���Abbotsford linger Sumas,
Matsqui, Huntingdon,
etc. (dally except Sunday)   23:00
'5:15���Hall's Pralrle. *>rn Rldue
and   Ha/lemere   (daily
except Sunday) 9:45
6:15���United States via Q. N. R.
idallv  evcenr  Sunday). I6:0t
9:26���All   points east and   Europe   (daily)    7:45
22:10���All points east and Europe (dally)   14:15
9:26���Sapperton and Fraser
Mills dally except
Sunday)    7:46
19:30���Sapperton and Fraser
Mills (daily except
Sunday)    14.15
9:26���Coquitlam  (daily   except
Sunday)  7:45
12:00���Central Park, McKay and
Edmonds (dally except
Sunday)       u.15
i0:00���Ladner. Port Gulchon,
Westham Island, Bun
Villa  14:30
13:00���East Burnaby (daily except Sunday)  13:00
PAGB SEVEN   *?
2:00���Fraser   Arm    and    Alta
Vista and Oakalla ....23:00
11:20���Rand, Majuba Hill via
B. C. E. R. (Monday
Wednesday and Fri
day       .'TTT.. 9:00
20:40- -Chilliwack via B. C. E. R,
(daily except Sunday). 17: SO
���
LAND   REGISTRY  ACT.
equivalent    to    10   per
and .KissHdy tbe extermination of t���. I M^* Ifc t-Jg *J��**J%*
whole ulne lives at once. ^^ tQ entfir ,nU) contl-act when call-
&Q��)bKJ
ksobitco th�� rotit. coartmra or tm
sou* aaa
Hlessums wero related to ber unbellev
tag ears. "Poor tUlngl Of course one
expects cats to exercise tbeir voices
and I'd thankful that both Oeorge and
1 are sound sleepers and so shall not
mind bow mucb uolse Hlessums mskes.
Don't you really believe tbst Franks
uerres must be upset lo mind It r
������I don't know." said practical Linda
-He seems to be pretty well, but mil
urally no one likes tu loss bis rest nlgbt
after nlgbt,"
���And hereafter he wlll be known a��
Blessums Bliss." rhlrruped Mrs Bliss
ss she waved a farewell to her friend.
Thus wss aceompllxhed the adoption
of Hlessums. fhe beautiful tortoise shell
cat ibat had been Linda Hlldretbs
pride snd delight
���What did you do ahout the cat?
asked   ber   busbsnd   at   dinner   thst
"-Oove him to May Bliss." said Linda
with affected cheerfulnesa "She was
delighted.- '       ;  .   ,
��� Doesn't know him ss well as I do.
observed Frank resentfully, end then
because he knew thut hla wife had
been fond of the snimal. be launched
forth Into a detailed description of all
the horrors he hsd suffered trough
the vocal clamor of the tortoise shell
cat "I'm sorry. Linda." he ssld siwlo
petlcally when he could l��nd no mere
epithets to bestow upon the absent
Hlessums. "but the cal msy gel over
the habit, snd then I shall be gisd to
see him grace our dreslde once more
���He never will." saW Linda sorrow
fully
���Why notr
���Muy   Buss wnkildn't giro him op
now." . .   ���
���Well I'll get yon Another ,cst~s
I'erslam" promised Hlldreth rfckleasly
f���r l.e wns a kind hesrted fellow snd
naterl to see his pretty wife distressed
������No. thank you. Frank Id rsfher
not nnve any" And tann* Llnds,
believed In tasking heC sacrlllces as
heerfullv ns humsn nutnre would per
mlt she changed tbe subject liy Inquiring wh.it hsd happened during his day
In Ihe city L  ��
li  whs lonu sfter midnlghl when a
familiar   sound   MP**   tbe   peaceful
"That's one way to get rid nf a cat."
he thought gleefully as he went to b^l.
Frank left the window wide o|H-n.
He opened tbe hag of s.s.t snd placed
���t In s convenient plsce. He wenl to
bed determined to remain awake until
Blessums turned up
He went to sleep st once and slept
soundly untll he was swskened by tbe
signal voice of Hlessuuis.
���*Me-e-e-e-row!"
"Aba!" grunted Frank sleepily sud
sltptied out of bed.
He reached for the bag ot snot snd
tiptoed to tbe window. He le.in��t out
noiselessly, the bag poised h,r h'""'
ness. He looked down at the rose
trellis snd for an Instant was paralyzed with surprise
A dsrk. bulky human form wss
stealthily creeping up to the temptingly open window. Frank had s brier
vision of the form of Hlessums sitting
as of yore In the middle of the gsrden
path
Immediate action wss necessary. Mr
the approschlng burglar turned �� mask-
ed fsce upwsrd-and received thn full
contents of the soot bag In nose nn.i
eves and mouth.
Tbere followed a rhoklng growl and
a floundering, crashing descent to the
ground. Frank leaned from tbe win-
dow and ea,w the burglar leap the
fence and daab acrosii an open M tnti��
Mark shadow. He saw tbe frightened
Blessums parched nervously on the
gste post
"Here. Blessums! Here kitty, kitty,
kitty!" coaxed Frank gently.
Just as Blessums lea|ied from the
tottering rose trtllls Into his arms Un-
da's white robed form appeared beside him. ���
"Oh. Frank, what haa happened r
ahe whispered anxiously. "I thought t
heard footsteps outside."
He told her briefly and advised her
to cberlsb lhe astonished Blessums,
whose rolee bsd awakened bim In time
to ront the burglar and thiw save thetr
valuables and perhaps their Uvea.
"He cant go back to Mrs. Bliss." de-
dared Frank firmly.. "I'll buy her a
cat If necessary, but Blef-'ims sball
sleep in" my room every night ao tbat
���erenades will lie out of Ihe question.
Perhaps he's hungry. Linda. I wonder
If there's any of thnt chicken left I
don't believe Nora gives him enough to
eat. anyway."
������Fpink Hlldreth." cried hla wife by*
terically. "'"re hesrd of all aorta of
ways of trying to kill ��� cat. but 1 bo-
ed upon to do so, or lf he fail to com
plete the work contracted for. The
cheques or certificates of deposit of
unsuccessful tenderers will be returned to them upon the execution ot the
contract.
Tenders will not be considered un
less made out on the forms supplied,
signed with the actual signature ofthe
tenderer, and enclosed In the envelopes furftfehed.
The lowest or any tender not neces-
��uy accepted.     - & GRTmm
Publ'c Works Engineer
Department   of   Public   Worka, Victoria, B. C, 15th August. 1912.
NOTICEI
His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor
has received a despatch from the Military Secretary to His Royal Hijhneas
the Duke ot Connaught. Governor-
General of Canada, netting forth the
program of the tour of His Royal
Highness ln British Columbia during
September and October next. The
Tollowlng places will be v'alted:.
Kamloops���S p. m. to 6:15 p. m. on
rhe 17th September. .- ���
Vancouver��� 3 p. m. on the i��m
September to evening of ��>th.
New Weatmlnster���On 21st Septem-
Vlnce Rupert���11 a. m. on 23rd
September to evenlag of 25th (lnclud-
ng a possible visit to Hazelton).
Nanaimo���11 a. m. to 1 p. �����-. on the
27th September. ���
Victoria���Evening ot 27th September, to 3rd October. .
Vernon���Morning ot 4th October to
U a. m. on aame day. ��� '
Penticton���4 p. m. on 4th Oetotmr
to 6 p. m. pn 6th. ..
Robson via Arrowhead���7 p. "����� *>
9 p. m. on 8th October.      .. ;
Nelson���Morning of 7th October till
noon on same day. ���
Kootenay Landing���* p. tn. on 7tn,
leaving early next day. ^jLh^
provincial Secretary'e Offloo, Victoria,
Sth July. 1812-
L.O.O.M.
LABOR BUREAU
Male help oWHed or otherwise eup-
10:00���Timberland (Tuesday and
Friday)   13:30
10:00���Annieville  and   Sunbury
(dally except Sunday). 14:30
16:46���Vancouver, Piper's Siding via G. N. R.
(dally except Sunday)..14:20
11:20���Cloverdale and Port Kells
via O.  N.  R.   (dally ex- |
cept Sunday) 14:00
7:80���United Statea via G. N. R.
(dally except Sunday).. 9.48
11:20���Chilliwack, Milner, ML
I^etuaan, Aldergrove, Otter. Shortreed, Surrey
Centre.Cloverdale.Lang-
ley Pralrle. M array vllle.
Strawberry Hill, South
Westminster, Clover
Valley, Coghlan, Sardis, Sperling Station,
Dennison Station, Brad-
ner, Bellerose, via B.
C. E. R. (daily except
Sunday)    ...9:00
il:20���Clayton (Tuesday, Thursday. Friday aad Sat-
day       14:00
11:20���Abbotsford, Huntingdon,
via B. C. E. R. (dally
except Sunday)  17:30
20:40���Cloverdale   via   B.C.E.R.
(dally except Sunday). 17:30
Re a part (100 feet by 100 feet) of a
portion (six acres more or less) of the
fractional southwest quarter of Section 29, Township 20 ln the district.
Whereas proof of the loss of certificate of Title Number 16442A, Issued
in the name of John Barker, has been
flled in this office.
Title Number 16442A, issued ln the
name of John Barker, has been flled In
this office.
Notice is hereby given that I shall,
at the expiration of one month from
the date of the first publication hereof, in a daily newspaper published In
the City of New Westminster, issue a
duplicate of the eaid certificate, unless In the meantime valid objection
be-nftde .tq me In writing.
C. S. KEITH,
District Registrar of Titles.
Land Registry Office, New Westminster, B. C, Aug. 15, 1912.
Westminster
Transfer Co,
Office Phone 185.     Barn Phone 137
Begbie Street
Baggage Delivered Promptly to
any part of the city.
light and Heavy Hauling
OFFICC���TRAM DEPOT
CITY OF NEW WE8TMIN8TER. B.C
bopbs
Important to Grocers and Consumers!
The absolute purity and healthfulness of
BAKER'S COCOA
and CHOCOLATE
are guaranteed under the pure food laws of
Canada. Made by a perfect mechanical
process, they are unequaled for delicacy of
flavor and food value.
MHU   ariL  MumteMl  a&m.wuans*   iss   npssstViwi   ��nd Ion  t^.viisi��sss��Ww��^|1
Canadian trade *re have eataV>V��hed TPWl IWlrttlUg:"9^t/SuiUS' am
Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver
WALTER BAKER & CO. UMTTED
ESTABLISHED 1780 DORCHESTER. MASS.
Canadian Milb at 1000 ALBERT STREET, MONTREAL
ReKistered
Trade-Mark
Th�� Harm
Try The
Taste Test
^v-!^
��*'-">'���* '
L.W
^
m
?g&
Try Mooney Biscuits with any others. Let the teste of each be
the judKe and decide which you like the best. Mooney Biscuits have
the largest sale in Canada. Their incomparable flavor alone would
command it. Their appetizing crispness and inviting deliciousness is
simply irresistible.
Here in our famous sunlit sanitary factory, with its hundreds of skilled
employes-its 640 windows-its 3 miles of floor space, we create this
perfect soda cracker. J   ,
ion
8&;i
Wi
�����*
IS**:
m
ht)'.
;��:.
Moone;
Cream Sodas
*
m.
&r*
sss^'te'te wn"" "* * 'oSs&'sr- App,ys m.
In six short years Mooney Biscuits have jumped into popular
Urot throughout the entire Dominion.   You will understand why when
you eat them for the first time.
You can get Mooney Biscuits at your i��>cer<#, f��*��b and flaky,
in damp-proof wax paper lined packages. "J^Wki^
T*y sothe today���their taste will please you. -    %      ---^
d&}
^
asjrv.
��#
.sw~
WW
��K
���I/.XR
r<-i
iM
m
News Classified Ads
d
\lMtttW**-Mlm*k  ''���'* - npWMPVI )���"* 'W" ."*��H
PlftB EtOHT
WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1912.
'
I
EVERYBODY LIKES
THt PRINCESS
ELECTRIC IRON
It is Reliable, Superior
in Design and Workmanship.
Price $4.50
and is Guaranteed for 5
years.
SOLD ONLY BY
Anderson & Lusby
Fall Suits
for Ladies and Men
GALVIN
THE TAILOR
46   Lorne  Street,   New  Westminster.
For all calls after 6 p.m. ring 991.
The telephones of the Westminster
Dally News now are:
Editorial Office 991
Business Office  999
Football, Moody sqpare today, Celtics versus RoverB, for the Pearson
Memorial fund.   Klck-cff at 3 p.m. **
The staff of the provincial assessor's office is experiencing a busy
time at the present, preparing foi
the annual sale of land for delinquent
ta?:e3 which will take place in tha
local court house ou Saturday, October 12, at 10 a.m.
MAYOR LEE SAILED O N
WEDNESDAY FOR CANADA
Coquitlam, visited
IF  YOU   ARE     LOOKING     FOR    A
MAN   WHO    KNOW6    INSURANCE
FROM A TO Z.    THAT'S MY BUSINESS.     THIS   IS   THE   ONLY   OFFICE   IN   TOWN   GIVEN     UP     EXCLUSIVELY  TO     THE     BUSINESS
OF   INSURANCE.    YOU   WILL     BE
MAKING   NO   MISTAKE   TO   COME
HERE. j
Alfred W. McLeod
657 Columbia 8t.,
Phone  62. New  Westminste,
Reeve Mars, of
the city yesterday.
Baseball this afternoon, 2:30 at
Queens park.   Admission 25 cents. **
Mr. Watson, of Catherwood & Watson. Mission City, was in town yesterday on business.
Mr. J. D. Taylor, M. P.', accompanied by Mrs. Taylor and family, left
last night for the east
Football, Moody square today, Celtics versus Rovers, fcr the Pearson
Memorial fund, kick-off'ct 3 p. m. **
Rve bread���tike yonr mother us-"-'
to make. Eighth Street Bakery, Tele-
pihone R 281. *"
Sir Richard McDr!de has consented
to open the CoqViHlam Agrlottlturs'
"Society's new hall on the 12th inst.
-������id the municipal council wlll attend
officially.
Westminster and Fraser Mills will
battle for supremacy p.t Queens park
'his afternoon at 2:30. Admission 25
;ents. **
.Ex-Provlnclal Constable Hutchison.
of Sapperton. bas returned from the
Cariboo country, where he has been
for the last few weeks looking after
his mining interests.
Football. Moody square today, Celtics versus Rovers, for the Pearson
Memorial fund.   Kick-off al 3 p.m. �����
The Columbia Plane and Music
House, 522 Columbia street, is hefld
marfers tor Victor Gramaphones nn.i
Records. **
Messrs J. Tyner and P. Bennett
farmers, Langley, left Vancouver on
the 4th inst. for New Zealand per S.
S. "Makura." They intend devoting
themselves to farming in their new
country.
Football. Moody square todav, Celtics versus Rovers, for the Pearson
Memorial fund.    Kick-off at 3 p.m. *"
There will be no evening services
bv the Salvation Army on Monday, as
the officers and soldiers of the local
-!orr>s are poing to Vancouver to take
nart In the farewell services of
Cnl^nel Mapp, of the western division
of the Army.
Hi.<rh grade, medium price and nil
ar.'ides of pianos and player pianos,
low prices, easy payments at the Columbia Piano and Music Hou3e, 52?
Colombia street. **
LIVELY   SCENES AT CITY
HALL���$25,000   IN   WAGES
The city hall was the r.cer'o of life,
animation and pleasure yesterday at- \
terncon  when several  hundred    city j
employees passed in line through the |
city treasurer's office and were doled
out   their   bi-monthly   remunerations
by Mr. J. J. McKay and his staff of;
expert assistants.
The total payroll was $25,000,
rather larger than usual on account
of the fact that the school teachers
drew the'r salaries for an entire
month. $10,000 of the total sum went
to the board of works department,
while the schools received $5,384, engineers $1500,isvater $2500, fire $1000.
light $1200, pAflice $700 with the bal-
divided'';proportionately   among
HOTEL FRASER
FIFTY ROOMS
ALL   MODERN
ftoom.
in the
It ls learned from Mr. C. G. Major
that Mayor suid Mrs. J. A. Lee sailed
from Bristol, England, on Wednesday
evening bound once, more for Canada
and New Westminster. The chief
magistrate of the city and Mrs. Leo
are coming home on board the Royal ance ...
George, oue of the Canadian Northern the remaining departments,
steamers    running   between    Bristol ��E*1T*Zv
and Montreal, aud   should   make   a obituaky
landing at the latter port some time. ���,      :    _ '
on Wednesday next '    McCORD-The  death   occurred  on
Just whether they plan to stop off Thursday evening of William Cam-
at any point while coming across the eron McCord, aged 70 years and a
continent is not known, but before native of Scotland. The deceased j
long Mayor Lee will assume once cape to Canada from the old country
again the reins of office in the Royal; many years ago, but has been a
6 resident of Westminster for about a I
Hot and Cold Water in Each
The most comfortable  rooms
city.
Corner Front and Begbie Streets
THOS. WITHYMAN,  Prop.
Phone   1C6.
City.
NEW   ENTERPRISE.
Dunsmuir Cafe Will Open Its Doors
Tomorrow Morning.
Ti'p Dunsmuir Caie will cpen on
Sunday morning, In the commodious
premises In the Dunsmuir Hotel block,
Eighth streeL The proprietor, Mr. C.
D. Nunn, is a native son of British
Columbia, and one cf the beat known
citizens ln New Westminster. He
was formerly interested in Kenney's
Cafe, where he made many friends
among the patrons of that well-known
establishment.
Mr. Nunn has spared no effort nor
expense to make his new premises at
tractive. They are bright and airy.
and the sanitation arrangements are
of the beat. The kitchen has been
ilpnned and Btted In a thoroughly up-
to-date manner, and the establishment throughout has an appearance
of comfort that Is sure to prove an at
traction.
The location on Eighth street is an
���deal one. being only a few doors
from Columbia street, and thus z
stone's throw from the B. .C E. R. and
C. P. R. stations. Accommodation for
75 people Is provided and this will
doubtless be taxed to the utmost. Mr.
Nunn is fortunate iu having secured
Mr. H. Brunnette, of Victoria, to act
as manager.
BAND  WILL  PLAY  IN
QUEENS  PARK   SUNDAY
year only.
MILLIVOCH���The funeral of Andrew Millivoch. who died in the city on
Thursday, took place yesterday from
the parlors of Murchie & Son. Thi
deceased was a Russian and came
here a short time ago from Victoria.
Nothing Is known of his relatives.
EVANS���The remains of the late
David Grant Evans, who died on
Thursday, were 'shipped to relatives
<n Grand Forks yesterday by Messrs.
Murchie &. Son, undertakers-
pn the Banjo, Zither Banjo,
Mandolin, Mandola, Mando-
Cello and Guitar.
Wi. Lawrence
Leave Instruments for tuning or repairing at J. H. Todd's Music House,
419 Columbia Street.    Tel. 694.
mML
HABIT
The Daily Use of our
CREAM OF WITCH HAZEL
���no other habit will render
the skin so smooth, allay irritation, remove blackheads, pimples, freckles and sunburn ai
quickly. It ls purely made and
possesses wonderful medicinal
properties. Use it daily, It's a
good habit.
Price 25c ��:A SOc.
RYALL'S
Druggist and Optician
PHONE 57
Westminster Trust Block
IHE TALK OF THE TOWN
THE PROVINCIAL FAIR
AND THE
The usual band concert will ho
held at Queens park on Sunday afternoon, at which the Westminster city
band will render the following program :
Chimes���"War March"   Luders
Overture���"Tancredi"       Rnssin*
Baritone Solo���"My  Rosary".. .Nevin
Mr.  Bowyer.
Reminiscences of Scotland.. .Godfrey
(a)���"Moonlight  Bay"   ..Wenrich
(b)���"Spring Song"..Mendelssohn
...I...* "Dnni.lir    Qnnir*;"     	
BRIGHT AND SANITARY.
OPEN   NIGHT  AND   DAY   .
Catering    done    for    Lodges,    Etc.,
Tables arranged for Wedding Parties.
MEAL TICKETS $5.50 FOR $5.00.
Give us a trial and be convinced.
38 Eighth St., Near Columbia
Oiw ot the -best b.'sebe'.l games of   Selection��� Popular Song.
tie scBwn  wMl  be  played at Queans \  Stephen AUaiUo
���narli  tY\W  afternoon   at  2:80   between \ 3��lcctloiv7-"CShocolat�� Soldier
Friaer   Mills   and   Westminster.      Ad-\
mission    25 cents.    Game    called    at
Start That
Savings
Account
Today
4% ALLOWED
ON All DEPOSITS
SAFETY DEPOSIT
BOXES
FOR RENT
DOMINION TRUST CO.
New Westminster, B.C.
TO   REMOVE  THAT
Holidiy Complexion
USE
Seely's Invisable
Peroxide Cream
iS DRUG STORE
Four doors East of Bank of
Montreal.
New Westminster, 8. ('.
2:30. **
St.. Peter's Church Choral dob held
in informal nieetinp; in St. Patrick's
hall Inst evening ut which it waa de-
died lo make an effort to get more
vocalists and persons with musical
accomplishment^ to join the club. In
tbls way it is honed to assist tho
clioir very materially.
A gold locket was lost, last Saturday by a youth either on the 8 o'clock
car to Queens park or at the lacrosse
���mine. Aa the article is a keepsake
from a dead relative the owner is
very anxious to have it returned.
Finder will be liberally rewarded if
'.imt is brought to Dally News office. ������
Mr. Lawrence, immigration officer
it. White Rock, was in tbe city yesterday. He reports continued vigilance in watching and frustrating undesirables from crossing the border
"r>e. Twentv were captured, fined.
Imprisoned and deported during thc
last month.
The Hon. Joseph Martin, one time
premier of British Columbia and at
irosjpn* member of the Hritish mirlia-
ment for Kist St. Pancras. will deliver au address on British politics
it. a public meeting to be held In
New Westminster some time next
week.
.Vof how cheap, but bow por>d. Hear
the great Chlckerlng I'.ios.' player
pianos at. the Columhla Piano House
Opposite City Hall. Made and guar
anteed hy the only living Clilckeiingr
ma kin1.' pianos, truly the wonder of
the age We have other piano playeri
is low as $400 In price. ���*
The Hassan! Paving company started work laying the pavement ou
Twelfth street this morning, and sue
needed In getting down 750 square
feet hefore tho workmen quit at five
O'clock. Other contract work through
out the city lu doing as well as can
be expected under the Inclement weather conditions.
Sheriff's sale. lot. nf electric fittings
and supplies, chandeliers, two sets
taps and dies, lot piping. Oliver typewriters, etc., at No. 11 Sixth, between Front and Columbia. New Westminster, at 10 a.m. Saturday, September 7. *���
Messrs. A. S. Mills & Co., the popular men's furnishers, have had several
alterations   aud    improvements  made
on their premises    during the    past
week.    In    particular,    tbe    windows
have been much   improved, handsome
double windows   have   been   installed
and the plain wooden background ot
| these   show   windows   has   been   re-
j placed    by  attractive   stained    wood
pannelllng,   giving   to   the   windows,
when dressed, a  most attractive   ap-
' pearance.
Property owners are reminded tbat
a rebate of 10,per cent, is allowed on
payment cf land er building tax ���.!���>
to and Including Sent. 15'h \r*��'. / r.
ter that date no rebate is allowed.
J. J. Mackay, City Treaaurer.        ������
Idyll���"Forge In the Forest"
StrauBS
Mlchaelis
Marcil ���"Military   Life"   	
OOD SAVE THE ICING.
FOR SALE
Going at less than Half Price, a lot
of new high class FURNITURE, consisting of quir.ered o?.'.<. Bird's eye
maple and mahogany parlor and bedroom articles and several beautiful !
ort aquarea. Alao a naw QOurloy
Piano. Muat be aold aa the owner la
j leaving city.    Call 527  Fifth street or
���Kingjpnone L841.
AMERICAN   PAYS  TRIBUTE
TO   ENGLISH   LAW   AND   ORDER
A very readable article appears in
September Scribner's, by an Amerl-1
can. It. refers to Khcdesia, and is en- '
titled "The Last Frontier." Among
other interesting detail he refers to
lie lack of excitement and "wboop-er-
\p" conditions naturally associated
with pioneer days, but concludes: "I
night have e.-pected just what I
found, for wherever the flag of England flies, whether over the gold mln-
*ra ot the Yukon, the ivory traders of
Uganda, or the settlers of Rhodesia,
there will be found the deep-seated
respect cf the Englishman for English
order and English law." A truth deep-
rooted indeed, but none the less pleasant for endorsalion from an American
source.���Hamilton Spectator.
EUROPEAN CAPITAL
Furnished Tor attractive enterprises
In all substantial lines of business.
Railroads, Tractions, Water and
Electric Powers, Irrigations, Timber,
Mining. Agricultural and Industrial.
Bond, Debenture and Stock Issues
Underwritten, Purchased or Sold.
Properties purchased for European
exploitation and Investment.
Financial Undertakings of all sorts
handled.
Miscellaneous commissions and
orders of all characters accepted foi
execution In any European country.
Correspondence enclosing full Ao
tails at flrst writing Invited.
The International Bankers Alliance
14-16-18 Bloomsbury St.. London, Eng.
THESE ARE ALL CHOICE Residence lpts in good locations, and
good investments at tbe prices tliey
can be bought for now. Suitable
terms can be arranged.
NO. 900���FOURTH 8TREET, 50x132
to lane. Price $775.00; one-quarter
cash.
NO. 1327���SEVENTH AVENUE, BOx
120 to lane; cleared and fenced.
$1,050; one-third cash.
NO. 1233���FIFTH STREET, TWO
lots, 60x132 each to lane. Price
$1050 each; ono-thlrd cash.
NO. 1280���PRINCESS STREET NEAR
Second Street; 48x132; $1,000; one-
third cash.
NO. 1195 ��� 8EVENTH AVENUE,
near Fourth Street, two choice lots,
cleared; $1,275.00 each; one-third
cash.
NO. 1316���DUBLIN 8TREET, NEAR
Twelfth street, on upper side; good
view lot; cleared; 50x120 to lane.
Price $1500.; one-third cash.
NO. 1288���FIFTH 8TREET, NEAR
Sixth avenue, 50x132; cleared and
graded; $2,000; one-third cash.
NO. 959���5 LOTS ON TURNBULL
Btreet, 50x110; cheapest good lots ln
the city. Price $500 each; one-fifth
cash.
DOUBLE CORNER, TENTH AND
Edinburg street; cleared and ready
to build on. Price $3200; one-third
cash.
NO. 957���DOUBLE     CORNER      ON
Fourth avenue, street on three sides.
$5,000; one-third caBh.
NO. 1143���WISE ROAD, FACING
south, 67x114 to lane; cleared and
in orchard. Prlco for a few daya
only, $1,100; one-third cash.
F. J. HART & CO., LTD.
ESTABLISHED 1G91.
W�� write  Fire, Life, Accident,  Employero' Liability,    Autqmoblle
and Marina Insurance.
HENRY SCHAAKE. Manager.
R. J. EYVELL, Secretary.
THE SCHAAKE MACHINE WORKS
HEAPS ENGINEERING CO. Ltd.
MANUFACTURERS OF
Modern  Saw  Mill   Machinery
JOHNSON SHINGLE MACHINES
PETERMAN   LATH   MILL   MACHINERY.
YALE AND COWIE GASOLINE ENGINES
CANNING  AND CAN-MAKING MACHINERY,
JOBBING WORK OF ALL CLASSES PROMPTLY EXECUTED.
New Westminster, B. C.
E. H. BUCKUN,
Pres. and Geni. Mgr.
. BEARDSLEE,
Vice-President.
W. F. H. BUCKLIN,
Sec. aid Ti-as.
SMALL-BUCKLIN
LUMBER COMPANY, Ltd.
MANUFACTURES ALL KINDS OF FIR, CEDAR AND SPRUCE.
Phones No. 7 and 877.
THIS IS THE LAST MONTH
For Low Rate Eastern Excursions
S.S. "PRINCE  GEORGE"
to Prince Rupert and Stewart,
Mondays midnight, connecting
for Massett.
Grand 5 days'  cruise,  $48.00,
including meals and berth.
S.S. "PRINCE   RUPERT"
to   Prince   Rupert,    Thursdays,
midnight, connecting for Granby   Bay and    Queen   Charlotte
Island points.
To VICTORIA and SEATTLE,   Saturdays and Tuesdays, midnight.
S.S. Prince Albert" leaves 3rd, 13th   and 23rd   of   each   month   for
 Prince Rtipftrt and way ports.   	
Grand Trunk Pacific trains   connect   with
Skeena Crossing, thence steamer to Hazelton.
abovo   steamers   for
Special round trip excursion fares to the East via Grand Trunk
system, variable and optional routes via the Great Lakes and Niagara
Falls.	
General   Agency   Transatlantic Steamship Lines.	
H. G. SMITH. C. P. & T. A. W. E. OUPEKOW, G. A. P. D.
Phone Seymour 7100.      VANCOUVER. B.C.     527 Granville Street.
NO BOG LAND.
FINE WATER 8UPPLY
WHITE ROCK TOWNSITE
THIS PROPERTY IS PIPED WITH WATER
Hae BATHING, BOAT HOUSE and  FLOATJNG PIER
OVER   70 COTTAGES  ALREADY BUILT   IN   THI8  SUBDIVISION.
We run a general store and sell at city prices.   A new four-story
hotel Just completed.
LOTS from $350 up, $50 CASH, $50 every 6 months
Or smaller terms to those building tbls season.   Our Mr. Sands has an
ofllce on lhe property.
WHITE, SMILES & CO.
OFFICIAL TOWNSITE AGENTS.
WATCH FOBS
We have now in stock the largest assortment of Watch Fobs ever exhibited in New
Westminster.   Examination invited.
CHAMBERLIN
Official Time Inspector for C. P. R. and B. C. Electric Railway.
TME
JEWELER
ELECTRIC
Irons, Cookers
and Heaters
ELECTRICAL   WIRING A  SPECIALTY
WEBER & DAY
Phone 656
63 Sixth Street
#

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