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Westminster Daily News Nov 20, 1912

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VOLUME 7, NUMW   218.
NEW WESTMIN8TER, B.C., WEDNESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 20, 1112.
PRICE FIVE CENT*
URKEY AT BAY ROLLS
BACK BULGARIAN ARMS
Nazim Pasha's Artillery Checks Infantry Attack on Tchatalja Lines-Sortie Is Successful���Defenders of Constantinople Reinforced with Fresh Troops from Asia Minor-
Allies Face Serious Conditions-Enormous Spoils.
i
���������������������������������������������a
BULGARIA AGREES
TO DISCUSS PEACE
Constantinople, Nov. 19.���
(11:30 p.m.)���The Porte will
appoint tomorrow plenipotentiaries lo meet the Bulgarian
plenipotentiaries with regard to
an armistice.
An official note issued tonight says that the Bulgarian
government has replied to the
Porte's recent communication
respecting an armistice and
that Bulgaria ts ready to enter
Into relations with the Ottoman
plenipotentiaries with a view of
a conclusion ot an armistice
and to discuss conditions of
peace.
ei
Constantinople, Nov. 19.���Nazlm
Pasha, the Turkish commander-in-
chief, sent the following despatch at
3:SO o'clock this afternoon:
"A desperate artillery engagement
began thia morning and ls being con
tinued with success. The Bulgarian
infantry, operating in front of thc
centre of our line of defence, was repulsed by our artillery flre. Part of
the enemy's batteries were silenced.
"We ordered a detachment of troops
to advance. They attacked the enemy'.;
entrenchments and forced them to
lle<\ We captured a number of rifles, j
machine guns, helmets, shovels and
pickaxes. A number of helmeta bore
a badge Inscribed 'Thirty-flttb Regi
ment Vrania,' showing that there are
Servian troops with the enemy. Th"
battle continues."
Another telegram from Nazlm
Paaha estimates the Bulgarian losses
In Monday's lighting on the Turkish
right wing as 400 killed or wounded.
Two machine guns were captured.
Long Battle Ends.
Constantinople, Nov. 19.���Nazim
Pasha Bent the following telegram tonight:
"The battle, which has been raging
for days throughout the whole extent
ct the Tchatalja lines, ended today;
al3o. In our favor. We repulsed the
enemy's infantry, which attempted to
advance In the centre, and annihilated
several of their batteries. On tbi
right wing we captured two machine
guns and a quantity of ammunition.
"From one of the forts in the centre
we sorthd at sunset and dispersed the
enemy who had occupied a position In ' Younoer
the face of the fort.   The greater part, "
of them were killed. We captured two
hundred rifles and a large quantity of
ammunition."
" Turkey's Fresh Troops.
��� London, Nov. 19.���The Pall Mall
Gazette states that the Bulgarian position before Tchatalja ls regarded in
well Informed quarters here as serious
as the Turkish troopB which ore hold
ing the famous lines are 60 per cent,
of them fresh troops brought up from
Asia Minor and not the demoralized
remnants of the Turkish army which
retreated trom Lule Burgas, ln the
view of the Express correspondent tbe
Bulgarians wlll have to seek help from
the allies, perhaps from- Monastir now
that the latter place has surrendered.
This would meanwhile give Nazlm
Pasha every opportunity for .further!
strengthening the portion of his1
troops as reinforcements oould not be
brought from Monastir to Thrace '"
bss lhan three weeks.
Spoil Worth $10,000,000.
London, Nov. 19.���A Belgrade
spatcb to the Standard says that in
the three days lighting at Monastir
the losses numbered twenty thousand
of whloh five thousand were Turks.
Tbe war spoils are enormous and are
estimated to b�� worth ten million dollars. They Include one hundred thous
and rifles of the latest pattern- eighty-
two wagons of ammunition and sixteen heavy guns. The lack of artillery, the most of which was lost on
the retreat trom Kumanova, greatly
handicapped tbe Turkish resistance.
King Peter, saya the despatch, may
make a triumphant entry Into Monastir, aa the Servians wish to emphasize their occupation. The question
as to whloh state was to possess this
olty waa not Included ln the allies
convention, but Bulgaria may claim it
because-It. Is situated predominately
In tbe Bulgarian dlatrict. '
Tbe Greeks point out that tbe lead
lng part of the population ts ot Greek
nationality. Crown Prince Constantino
with tbe Greek army, will enter the
town.
Allies Peace Terma.   '
Parla, Nov. 19.���The stipulations of
the Balkan allies with respect to
armistice, according to Information received here, include th�� unconditional
surrender ot Important polnta, inch as
Adrlanople, the Tchatalja   lines   and
Durazzo, on the Adriatic sea. Bulgaria
wlll renounce the entry Into Constantinople.
Many persons believe Turkey vylll
-    yield on most of the polnta,   ln   tha
hope that Europe wtll undertake   to
reduce tbe claims ot the allies, wben
peace is concluded. If the pour par-
Iers arc successful, Constantinople
will remain Turkish territory, which
the powers desire.
Numerous difficulties remain, however, including the status of the
Aegean Islands, the matter of a Servian port on the Adriatic, the deHmita
tlon of an autonomous Albania, the.
partition of territories, the claims of'
Roumania and the Servian customs
administration.
For Albanian Independence.
Vienna, Nov. 19.���lsmael Komal
Bey, the Albanian leader, left Trieste
by steamer today for Durazzo, when
Ihe Albanians Intend to proclaim independence and establish a provisional government before the entry of the
Servian troops.
Servia Has Other Views.
Sofia, Nov. 19.���It ls understood
tbat the terms of the allies for an
armistice are moderate, and that Tur
key may retain Constantinople is she
accepts them.
Respecting Albania, it is said ln
well Informed quarters that the Bai
kan league probably will not object to
that country remaining under thc
suzerainty of the sultan and that th:
powers will acquisee ln this.
Albanians Murder Servians.
Belgrade, Nov. 19.���A semi-official
statement denounces as unfounded the
reports of cruelty perpetrated by the
Servian troops on the Albanians,
.vhich, it declares, "are spread for the
purpose of supporting the Albanian
aspersions."
The statement continues:
"During the fighting, measures
which may have been severe wer-?.
idopted, owing to the treacherous attitude of the Albanian combatants,
who in maiiy cases raided the white
lag in token of jj.ujxsn.jer, and then
aiurdcred Servian officers who approached them.
"Moreover the Albanians terrorized
the inhabitants of the villages and
burned the houses. We did not proclaim their misdeeds at the time, because the attention of Europe was
then centred cn the events of the
war.".
CANADA'S BIG ISSUE
IS NAVAL QUESTION
Liberals Assembling at Ottawa Appear
Well Disposed to Emergency
Contribution.
UNITED STATES HAS
t CORRECT INFORMATION
Ottawa, Nov. 19.���Today's trains
brought ln another batch ot senators,
and members and the hotels are fast
filling up with sessional people and
those coming tor the social function*
of the opening.
It is evident from the talk of those
now here that the naval question is
recognized as the big Issue and that
there will be a disposition to put aside
others until it is disposed of. That
the Conservatives will support tho
emergeucy contribution admits of no
doubt.
What the Liberals will do remains
to be seen, but from views expressed
by those of them here now. It Is seen
that they are pirsonally well disposed
to the project, assuming that the government,will be able to present information from the admiralty emphasizing the urgent need of Canadian as'
Bistance.
It was intimated today by a Quebec
member that an nmendment calling
for a referendum is quite likely to be
submitted, possibly by Mr. Monk himself, but it is not thought that' thU
would command much support.
Upon   Port   of   Westminster���Hydro-
graphic Office Sends Thanks to
j
Progressive Association.
HEATING CONTRACT   ,
TOR HIGH SCHOOL
Awarded J. C. Brown   fcr   $13,640���
Night School Classes Dolno
Good  Work.
ENOUGH TO BLOW
UP CITY BLOCK
PEMBERTON MEADOWS
SETTLERS ARE AIDED
Bridges Are   Now   Erected   in   Port
Douglas District���Lillooet River
Is Spanned.
Mr. J. A. Benson, bridge superin
tendent leturued yesterday from a
t'.'ip of flve weeks in the Port Douglas
district.
Mr. Benson aud his gang of four
teen men have almost completed a
Howe truss bridge across the Lillooet
river at Gibraltar cauyon. The bridgo
will have the finishing touches put oc
it by Saturday when Mr. Benson will
return to Port Douglas and bring his |
As a result of the efforts of the
Progressive association and civic committee of control the bydrographic
office of the United States navy ai
Washington, tbe supreme marine authority of the union, ls now ln possession of correct Information concerning
the port of New Westminster and the
approaches thereto.
Announcement to this effect was
made at the meeting of the executive
of the Progressive association last
night %y Secretary Kenneth Myers,
who has received a letter from George
F. Cooper, commander of the U. S. N.
bydrographic office.  ���
The communication follows: "Tha
bydrographic office is in receipt of
your letter of November 4, 1912, together with the enclosed letter from
the district engineer of the depart
ment of public works, Canada, and the
letter from the master of the S.S.
Strathspey and desires to thank you
for the valuable information contained
therein. AU the information contain
ed ln^your letter will be embodied if
the next revision of the H. O. No. 96
lithe Coast of British Columbia. Sucl
Information as that given in your let
ter is of the character that the hydro
graphic office is always eag'Sr to re
ceive. The office again desires to
thank you for your courtesy ln send
ing the three letters and for calling
our attention to the fact that the
edition of H. O. No. 96 Is incorrect
as to facts regarding the port of New
Westminster."
Intimation that the letter has been
received will be sent to the civic committee ot control and the board of
trade.
The president was authorized to ap
point delegates to go to Victoria ln
company   with  a   delegate  from   the
beard of trade to take up the    land
registry office complaints.   Mr. W. J.
Kerr and the secretary were appoint-1
ed delegates to attend the Fraser Vai-'
ley Publicity Bureau on   Friday   at
Coquitlam.
The entertainment committee reported that it had experienced some
difficulty In finding a place in which
to hold the next luncheon and they
advised that lt mlgbt be necessary to
I rent a ball.
The committee was   Instructed   to
The heating and ventilating contracl
for the new Duke of Connaught High
school was let by the school board
last evening to J. C. Brown, his tender
being $13,640. The system to be in
stalled is similar to that ln the other
schools with some improvements.
Mr. Anderson, teacher of the night
school, in a report to the board, stat
ed that his classes were progressing
very satisfactorily and that be was
prepared to accept more advanced
students now. Tbe advanced subjects
are those taught in the High school.
SPRING SHOULD SEE
PAVING COMPLETED
Masked Maniac Holds up Police Station with Infernal Machine.
On Columbia Street to Brunette-
Taylor, M.P., WIIFTake
Matter Up.
Mr.
J. D.
The continuation of paving on Columbia street from Leopold Place to
Brunette street will be one of the
matters to be taken up by Mr. J. D.
Taylor, M.P., who leaves for Ottawa
this evening.
At the present time the city lc
awaiting the consent of tbe Dominion
authorities to pay their share of the
paving work past the penitentiary
building.
The provincial government has kli
ready agreed to share the cost of the
work In front of the hospital for the
Insane, so that if Mr. Taylor's efforts
are successful, it is expected that the
work of beautifying).the street by^pav-
ing, electric light standards, etc., will
be pushed through tp completion early
in the spring.
STORM AT EDMONDS
CLUB ORGANIZATION
People   Think   Twenty-one
Years Too High an Age Limit���
Eldera Win.
in
de-
Edmonds, Nov. 19.���A somewhat
stormy session featured the meeting
ot the Edmonda club mat evening lu
their new quarters In the Edmonds
Development block. The trouble arose
as to what age limit should be fixed
in allowing members to join the
organization.
Several ot the younger people, wbo
had high hopes of being affiliated with
the club, found that If 21 years was
the lowest limit, they would be lett
out In the cold and voiced a strong
protest which was backed up by several of the older members.
The opposition, however, carried the
day and the younger people promptly
lefl the rooms. i
The original motion was afterwards]
rescinded, but pourparlers with    "*
men down.
The bridge opens up a.road to Pem
berton Meadows settlers besides   at
fording facilities to the Indians in the
district, and prospectors and miners
fossicking round the unknown region;
in the interior.
Another matter of importance ls the
accommodation it yields to Messrs.
Foley, Welch & Stewart, the contractors, for bringing up their supplies to
their construction camps.
Messrs. McAdams &. Reid left yesterday for their placer claim at Mile
25 which they will work hydraullcally
until the New Tear.
i-or tne benefit of the Pemberton
Meadows settlers all the bridges on
the 29 mile Btretch between fort
Douglas and Tennasse lake .have been
fixed up. Pemberton Meadows are
well known agriculturally and horticultural^ and will grow anything up
to water m'ious.
I work on the suggestion made by Mr.
IW. J. Kerr that a Fraser valley get-together luncheon be held at aome future date tn order to encourage the
surrounding districts to hold closer
communion with Westminster.
TARS HGHTING SHY
OE CANADIAN NAVY
INDIANS READY FOR
COMING Of WIMTQt
kickers did not result ln them return
'ng and it Is understood that the original motion wlll again oe moved and
carried at tbe next meeting of the
club.
i
COMMISSION  MEETS.
Flsh   and    Potatoes   In    Plenty���Tie
Camps at Talpella Broken Up
* Recently.
.    Tbe Brooks-Scanlon   Lumber   com
the j pany has completed Its contract   tor
*a*t**>l
EVASIVE ANSWERS
IN HINDU TRIAL
Deal
International Board Conaldera Pollution of Waters on Canadian Line.
Washington, Nov, IS.���Tbe International Joint Commission, which dealt;
with boundary and other questions la
dispute between Canada and the
United States, met here today and
probably wlll be ln session tor a week
or more.
furnishing ties to the C. P. R. It has
disbanded Its two camps at Talpella al
the head of Harrison lake, about tour
miles from Port Douglas.
Tbe Indians in the Port Douglas district have had an excellent fishing
season and grown a splendid potato
crop this year, thus furnishing thetr
homes wtth their two staple articles
of food.
The snow Is pretty close to Talpella
flats, but so far only rain has fallen
there;
Light   Shed   on   Copartnery's
ings with Employers���Dharm
Sinrh's Case.
The trial of Isshar Singh II., for perjury, occupied the Assize Court yesterday, during tts entire session, an-1
ta likely to take up the whole of today.
Again the Hindu witnesses, especially Dharm Singh, proved adept
fencers with auch au expert criminal
counsel aa Mr. J. A. Russell, of Vancouver.
Dharm Singh, was the alleged assaulted party in the fracas which resulted hi these perjury charge*. Now
the defence are evidently attempting
to prove that Dharm Singh'had a copartnery with aome other Hindus that
he had swindled out of $21,000, and
that the charges of perjury were on
account ot tbla.
Mr. Kussell made vigorous and Ingenious efforts to extract a straight
categorical answers from Dharm
Slagh and the othera, bnt In vain.
"ia lt true," asked Mr. RueaaH, "that
your partners entered a ault against
you In the Civil Courts  for  monies
British Bluejackets Hoped to Fill Instructors' Positions, But Found
Nothing Prepared.
Captured After Long Subterfuges���Detective Kicks Dynamite and
Ignited Fuse Apart.
Loa Angeles, Nov. 19.���Armed with
an Infernal machine containing enougn
dynamite to destroy an entire city
block, a bottle of nitro-glycerine and
a 43-callbre revolver, a masked maniac
took possession of the central polics
station and beld lt for more than an
bour today, while the hundreds of occupants of the building and those for
blocks around, panic-stricken, sought
the safety of distance.
When Detective James Hosick
knocked the man unconscious with a
leather billy after slipping behind him.
the fuse of the infernal machine waa.
automatically ignited and Without
thinking of tbe consequences. Detective Samuel L. Browne carried the box
outside, tbe fuse spluttering and spitting sparks, and hurled lt into tho
streeL
Dynamite Everywhere.
Sticks of high power, dynamite
scattered over the pavement, while
hundreds ot spectators stood apparently paralyzed by freight, awaiting a
detonation tbat would send them Into
eternity. Tbrough a frea.lt of chance
thero was no explosion and Brown i
continued kicking the sticks of dynamite and lumping on the fuse until
he bad broken the connections and extinguished the flre.
Lying manacled to a cot in the receiving hospital tonight., the would-be
dynamiter, who gave his -name aa
Albert Henry Davis, is suffering from
several acalp wounds, but the polico
surgeons say that hls Injuries are not
serious.
Davia waa later Identified as   Carl
Warr. a German laborer.
Davia entered the outer room of
I Chief of Police Sebastlne's office at 11
1 o'clock thla morning. Hla tace an.l
I head were completely covered with a
I grotesque mask and he carried In hia
��� larms a large box covered with cloth.
f I The box was strapped around hla
I 1 shoulder* and resembled a small hand
t Thounht It Joke
TWENTY INJURED IN
SASKATCHEWAN SMASH
-*���-s^^^^���t3^^^^^^^���-���Jltoo3e Jaw,   Sask.,   Nov. 19.���Wl��<,
Probably tbe most important que* I minors spread throughout   the   el**
���' a*..*... _._, -,_    aa.. , -Mmm.
London, Nov. 19.���The Canadian Associated Press' Portsmouth correspondent says pensioners and fleet reserve men are fighting shy of offers to
Join the Canadian navy. He asserts
(hat they realize the trouble Canada]
fs having in trying to attach a navy'
without proper preparations for men's
training and accommodation.
Tbe Evening News today give? theae
aasertions considerable prominence.
The correspondent says tbe men who
went out on the Nlobe and K.-Jnbow
were picked men-hoping-to till posi
ttona of Instructions, but tbey found
nothing ready for them and recruits
who presented themselves in the bn
lief that they, would receive training
on a man-of-war found themselves
limited to an old fishing schooner.
Tbe Canadian recruits' dlssatisfac
tlon has reached the ears ot the British sailors and consequently they regard the Canadian navy often with
extreme suspicion.    .    '   -
CARIBOO BROTHERHOOD
ORGANIZES AT QUECNEL
The Cariboo Observer, Quesnel. B.C..
of November 9, contains a bright ac
count of the organising of .a Cariboo
Brotherhood lodge at Quesnel. Many
of the old timers were present at the
ed contain* the names of several well
ed contain tbe names of several wall
kuown pioneers of tbe Cariboo.
It Is proposed to locate tbe previa
_ ���   j_��__j.j i cial headquarters of the organisation
they alleged to bave been dalraud*d L���������Weatminater. and Mr. C. H,
.4   Ska*   iiiMlf" 1  __-       - . __   _        ���m   'A��__ *** tat
tlon taken up was that concerning tbe
pollution ot ths water dividing the tVo
countries. These Include more tban
two thousand mllea along the St. Lawrence river aud the Oreat Lakes, and
tbe problem affects numbers of large
cities.
The proposal to construct a dam for
the protection of the Livingston channel In the Detroit River also will be
discussed. Tbe Canadian members,
who reached here todav, are Messrs,
Thomas C. Casgrain, K. C��� of Mon
this morning to the effect that e'nh
teen persons had been kll'.ed In a
wreck on the C. P. R. at Rush Lake.
Officials of the C. P. R. ndOiiM-y
that such Information had been reoelved from Swift Current b't* to
night It'was learned that apirt trim
damage to rolling stock, jlshtaen
Chinamen and two of their guards hid
been Injured otl a Chinese ertra running east, and sti were taken to the
hospital at Swift Current, during tbe
ifternoon on a special  train- which
treal;  H.  A. Howell, K. C. of  New ' left for the scene of the wreck.
Brunswick, and Charles A. Magrath, of
Ottawa.
Hochelaga Election.
Montreal,    Nov,    19.���Hon-    Louis
Coderre was elected today in Hochelaga.
At 8 o'clock tonight officials of the
company state that no on* was killed
but were uns ble to Issue an official
statement. The trains Ih collision
were the eastbound Soo Flyer and ' a
| freight train, the later, It Is   understood, running Into tha rear of   tho
I flyer.
ot by ymtt ,^^^^^_
Witness���Anybody ean sue any other body in Canada for anything tbey
wnnt.
Justice Murphy���Thero Is. real Information for you, Mr. Roaaell���at
which there waa much  laughter   ln
Mr. Russell���Ia tt a tact that your
partners are suing you for a sum ot
|tl,00<>, whieh thay stated yon cheated them of t
Witness���My lawyer haa pot informed me ao.
Theae ara but samples ot ths verbal
duel between defending counsel andj
theae Hindu dialecticians.
Dharm Singh, however, denied point
blank tbat he had bribed a witness to
go to India to avoid hi* telling mat
ters wblcb would maerlally affect the
result of theae and other charges.
Other matters introduced Into the
trial to a -pWpUxed. harness* Jury
wera the dtartSiianele* between the
evidence given by brawn witnesses at
the previous trials and this maa.
So the proceedings drag their wear}'
war and will probably do ao tomor
row.
One Hindu witness aiaarted that he
had never heard of Hindus from his
part of India cutting themselves In or-
(Continued on Page Four.)
Stuart Wade, one of the officers, la
working toward* this plan.
,^>i   m a, .in ii      i    ',     ' '  ���,m
RAILROAD WILL HELP    '
UNTIL CAR ARRIVES
The  resident* .of .the. North road.1
Burquitlam, are not how falling ovwr'
themselves with tspxlStf to get tram
connection over the B. C. E. railway
Una with New Waatmlnator.
' The establishment of freight yards
oloaa to thtfelty limits and a depot ft
tha North road which have been provisionally assured by   the   company,
will enable tha householder* In Bar-
qultlam to fat either to Vancouver or
First startled and then amused by
the strange spectacle, Police Sergeant
B. C. Hilt, who Buspected a practical
joke, aaked the man what he wanted-
"Pve got enough dynamite in hero
to blow us all into eternity," he said,
"and I want you to send for the highest official of the Southern Pacific
railroad."
The masked visitor rested the box
on a filing cabinet and Assistant Dlatrict Attorney R. O. Graham started
Joking with him.
"This Ic no Joke." said Davia. TE
mesa b .��i .ess and if you don't beltea-r
It (rv tc -take tbis away from me. My
hand is fastened in this box and ff I
pull it out��� baug��� we all die:"
The hble had been cut ln   the   box
and the occupants of the room saw
for the flrat time that the man's left:
band waa hidden in tha box.. Tbey began to realise that it was no Joke.
Realized Danger," '-'
A police officer then pretended   fo
hold a conversation over the   phone
with Paul Shoup, general manager oc
the Paciflc Klectric company, and br
subterfuges the man's attention   waa
engaged for an hour and a half, during which   time   two   courts   sitting
above were dispersed and 100 prisoners in the building transferred to   a
place of safety.
Tben while Secretary SUively car-"
ried nn the conversation wtth the -
maniac Detective Hoslck tiptoed trom
Davia' back, and struck htm on the
hend with the "blackjack." The internal machine dropped and Detective
Browne, who was at Hoslck's elbow.
grabbed it
Sixty Half Stick*.
A* Davia had saidxhla lett hand wa*
attached to tbe mechanism of the Infernal machine and its withdrawal
Ignited the fuse, but tbe quick work
of Detective Browne prevented ths.
sparka Iron reaching the exploalve-
There wera sixty halt, sticks of dynamite and aa expert aald It-was SO per
neat and that there was enough to
blow up a dty block.   ,
At ths receiving hospital Davis sal*
toplght hs "guesaed" the fuse Wa* too*
lone, whieh waa the reason there waar
no explosion, i
      ef the JL N. W  M        	
wStoTtattffr; ai ish 4*rtref tor sUojk1 worttag on tte esse all summer.
Oot Him at Laat,
.    Mooes 'Jhw, auk-. Nov. t��,-D. T-
| Fergnaon, an aged farmed, wai aiteat-
}*d as arilaa  south   of   bere   today
charted with the theft of flve range
horae* laat Bprlng.   Hs waa brought
Into, tts olty hy Constable McFhatter,
It W. II. P.. who haa been
ping business or otherwise.
���^��    . ��� hi     w�� asm
La*h��a for Constable.
Montreal, Nov. 18+-Nlne lathes wtth
th* "sat" as soon aa hs enter*   the
penitentiary waa the sentenced   hn
posed la the court of King's Bench to
day on Alfred Beauchamp, a specia
constable, who bad bran found guilt)
of assault   Beauchamp had already
beea sentenced to tour yens tor rob-
beries. In which be had made uae ot
hla constable's badge to vain entrance
to house*. ^^^^^^^
���������������������������������*�����������
���   '   '   iv, ���
DEFEAT OF LIBERALS *
NOW 8ET STRAIGHT   ���-
Nov. .19.���Ths Houae
Pt Commons, by a vote of 319
to SOT. adopted tonight tbe new
financial resolution of the
Hone Rule Wll. This replaces
tte raaolutloa defeated da No-
��� '���
���-
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��*���
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{��� ��������������������������� ��� �����������*�� **********
PAGE TWO
WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1912.
Classified Advertising
ML BROADEN 6. C.
MARKET ON PRAIRliS
ASSASSINATION WAS
ANARCHIST'S SCHEME
RATES.
Classified���One cent per word per
day; 4c per word per week; 15c per
month; 5,000 words, to be used as required within one year from date of
contract, ��25.00.
Birth or Marriage Notices 50c.
Death Notice 50c or with Funeral Notice $1.00. Card ot Thanks 50c per
inch.
WANf ED���MISCELLANEOUS.
TO RENT.
FURNISHED ROOMS BY DAY OR
week,   654 Columbia    street,   over
Hoyal bank. (115)
WANTED ��� BACHELOR'S ROOM;
hot water at all hours essential; coffee and rolls morning desirable.
Within seven-minute walk of post
office.   P. O. Box 401. (102)
WANTED���TO RENT OR BUY, 3 OR
4 amaU cash registers. Lees Limited. (109)
WANTED���ENGLI311MAN, 28, EDU-
cated. business experience, desires
position in otfice or store. Apply
Dally News, Box 1��8. 	
WANTED���YOUNG GIRL WISHES
position to work in store. Address
Box 105, News Office.
WANTED���FIRST CLASS CARPEN-
ter to do alteration work in business
office.   Apply at News office.	
WANTED���MAN AND WIFE TO
l,ook after farm. For particulars
apply to F. Mandeville, Mandevllle
Block, corner of Sixth avenue and
Twelfth street, city. OS)
CALL FOR YOUR ANSWERS
Boxes 28, 41 and 62.
FOR SALE���ONE PEDIGREE COU
lie pup dog. will sacrifice for quica
sale. Enquire Mowbray, Premie;-
IloteL
FOR SALE���IN SAPPERTON, TWO
new houses, fully modern, five
rooms, on lots 45x11!?. Price for
quick sale $2000.00 and $1900.00:
Terms $350.00 cash. Balance $25.0'J
per month, interest tl 7 per cent.,
Payable quarterly. J. J. Johnston
Phone 169, Columbia street.      (107)
FOIt RENT ���TWO STORES ON
Clarkson street, facing Court House.
* Kent of each $35 and $40 per month.
Apply, Johnston's Big Shoe House,
Ltd. (101)
TO RENT���TWO LARGE AND TWO
small rooms over the News office.
Suitable for club or light manufacturing purposes. Will lease for two
or three year term, singly or en bloc.
Apply to Manager tho News.
FOR    RENT ��� FURNISHED    BED-
rooms, 615 Queens avenue.        (100)
TO   RENT ��� FURNISHED   HOUSE-
keeplng rooms at 224 Seventh street.
(61)
TO RENT���FURNISHED HOUSE-
keeping rooms, hot and cold water.
Apply room 1), Knights of Pythias
hall, corner Eighth street and Afc'nes
street. (51
FOUND.
FOUND���A BIRD DOG, LONG CHAIN
attached to collar. Owner can have
same by paying ror this ad. Apply
712 Queens avenue,    F.    Mcintosh.
(114)
TENDERS    FOR    HOUSE    MOVING.
Tenders will be received by the undersigned up to 1 P . M. Wednesday.
Nov. 27, 1912, for moving bridge tender's house on Lulu Island.
Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
The Schaake Machine Works, Heaps
Engineering Co. Ltd.. New Westminster. B. C. (110)
TENDERS   FOR   CLEARING.
FOR SALE���ABOUT 40 DINING
room chairs, leather seated, 10
tables, Beveral stands, mission oak
finish. Apply at Royal cafe, Columbia sireet. (67)
KOR SALE���$13 TO $16 PER ACRE
$50 cash secures a fine 40 acre tarn
three miles from railway now build
tag. Rich deep soil with luxurian
vegetation. Call today for our fre,
booklet, map, etc. National Finance
Co, Ltd., 521 Columbia street, New
Westminster. (83)
Tenders will be received by the undersigned up to 1 P. M. Wednesday
Nov. 27, 1912, for clearing of site of
the proposed New Machine Works on
l.ulu Island.
Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
The Schaake Machine Works, Heap3
Engineering Co. Lid., New Westminster, B.C. (Ill)
FOR SALE���STEEL MALLEABLE
ranges on easy terms; $1.00 down.
$1.00 per week. Canada Range Co-
Market Square. 4
CORPORATION OF BURNABY.
A   NEWS   CLASSIFIED   AD   WILL
sen that lot for you.   Try it.
TEACHER   WANTED.
Wanted���Teachers for all grades ln
Public Schools, also one teacher of
Domestic Science. Applicants are requested to write, stating qualifications
and salary required, and must be prepared to undergo an examination by
the School Medical Officer if required.
Applications to reach the secretary's
office by noon of Monday, Nov. 25.
L. AVORY WHITE,
Secretary. Board of School Trustees,
New Westminster, B.C. (89)
Notice to Holders of Registered Agreements of hale.
Holders of Registered Agreements,
who have not transferred their interest, are requested to make the Statutory Declaration, in order that their
names may be inserted In the Annual
Voters' Lists. Such Declarations
should be in the hands of the Clerk
not later than the 30t.h day of November Instant. The necessary forms
may be obtained on application at the
Municipal Hall.
ARTHUR G. MOORE, Clerk.
Edmonds, B.C., November 6, 1912.
(37)
New Campaign to Dispose of   Okana
gan Fruit to Be Started by Agriculture   Department.
Victoria, Nov. 19.���Upon the return
to-the city of Mr. W. E. Scott, who'lb
at present in Chicago, an encrgeti';
and systematic attempt will be mad"
to Increase the markets for British
Columbia fruits not only in the cltlee
but also In tho smaller towns cf the
prairie provinces.
A considerable part of the energy
of the fruit branch of the department
of agriculture has hitherto been devoted to providing exhibits calculated
to attract attention In the centres ol
the United States and Great Britain
The real object and purpose of these
exhibits has been to bring in settler*
and to sell lands to them, rather than
to sell fruit.
The approaching campaign on the
prairies will be conducted on a differ
ent baBls, its object being simply to
provide an outlet for the ever growing
fruit crop of the Okanagan and othe'
districts. The fruit will be collectcl
by the carload under the auspices of
the department and will be sent forward, accompanied by an agent whosu
business it will be to dispose of il
along the route, and above all, to set
that it is properly advertised.
it is believed that this Bcheme in its-
carrying out will be comparatively in
expensive, as enough fruit should be
sold from the train to cover thc
major portion of the cost.
STUDENTS SENT TO.
OXFORD CRITICIZED
Secretary    of     Rhodes'     Csholarshir
Trust  Says  Americans   Not  AI-'
ways to Standard.
LAND REGISTRY ACT.
INVESTORS' INVESTMENT CO.
Curtis Block, New Westminster, B.C.
Telephone 295. P. O. Box 777.
Here's a snap. $650 cash buys a
tour named house and large lot near
Sixth atreet car fine. Owner leaving
the dty.
Alberta street bargain���Four roomed cottage and good cleared lot. Pries
away down, buyers own terms.
FIRE INSURANCE
Are ynu inBiired ? It costs but little
and makes you feel safer. Insurance
insures sleep.
We represent only strong British
Board Companies, and shall be pleaBed
Pi tell you what it wlll cost' ydu
whether you insure or not.
HIVESTORS'  INVESTMENT CO.
Fire, Accident. Plate Glass, Automobile, Burglary,  Employer's
Liability Insurance.
Re the northwest quarter of Section
35, Township 13, in the District of
New Westminster.
Whereas proof of the loss of Cer.'d
cate of Title Number 10154F, issued
in the name of John Smith, has been
filed in this ofTice.
Notice is hereby given that I shall,
at the expiration of one month from
the date of the first publication hereof
in a daily newspaper published in the
City of New Westminster, Issue a duplicate of the Bald Certificate, unless in
the meantime valid objection be madd
to me tn writing.
C. S. KEITH,
District Registrar of Titles.
Land Registry Office,
New Westmlnater, B.C., November
15, 1912. (95)
Andrew Clausen
Expert repairing of American, English
and Swiss
T. D. COLDICUTT
Must sell half an acre a few yards
from Sixth Street car line, East Bur
naby, fcr $1500; $500 cash, balance 6,
12 and 'it   months.
Modern five roomed bungalow on
T3eren��b avenue, $2250. Electric light
.-and ctty water on premises.
T. D. COLDICUTT
Coldicutt 8lock, Fourth Avenue
mMtaaa 719. Eaat Burnaby, B.C.
WATCHES
All  Work  Guaranteed.
541 Front Street       N'"- City Market
Fall Suits
for Ladies and Men
GALVIN
THE TAILOR
46   Lorne   Street,   New   Westminster.
Washington, D. C, Nov. 19.���A se
vere criticism of the cal.bre of stu
dents sent to Oxford university from
the United States under the Rhodes
scholarships was delivered today bj
Dr. George R. Parkin, of Oxford, executive secratary of the Rhodes' scbol
arship trust, before the International
Association of State Universities
which began its seventeenth annual
session here today.
Dr. Parkin divided the students Bent
to Oxford from the United States into
three classes. The first he said were
high-grade students; the second were
fair, while the other, "well, it is a
mystery to the Oxford faculty how
they ever got there."
Dr. Parkin said that merit should be
the determing factor in awarding the
Rhodes' scholarship. Well-grounded
students were desired, he declared, regardless of financial or social standing. He told the association that Oxford was the centre of the culmre of
the world and that he could uot understand the lack of Interest by Americans in the opportunity opened by
the Rhodes' scheme.
He said Oxford ruled Kngland, and
that one-half of every cabinet formed
in the last hundred years have been
Oxford men.
A report on the plan for a national
university to be erected in Washing
ton and conducted by the federal gov
ernment was made by Dr. E. B. James,
president of the University of Illinois
The association contemplates askin;
the next congress for an appropriation
for a half million dollars. A committee consisting of President JameB W.
O. Thompson, of Ohio State Univer
Bity, and President Brown, University
of Tennessee, was appointed to press
the matter before congress.
Dr. Parkin was formerly principal of
Upper Canada College, Toronto, before
taking charge of the Rhodes scholarship school.
IMPERIAL
COUGH
SYRUP
HOTEL FRASER
E'GHTY ROOMS
NEW AND MODERN
The most comfortable rooms in the
city; hot and cold water and steam
radiator ln each.
Finest wines and spirits dispensed
at the bar, and first class cafe run In
connection.
THOS. WITHYMAN, Prop.
Phone   1H6.
Corner Front and Begbie Streets.
This is the best
Ready Made
Cough Syrup
on the market.
We back up
this statement
with our guarantee to refun 1
the money in
any case when
not satisfactory
Curtis Dm? Store
For
PHOTO GOODS
8PECTACLE8
SEEDS
Phone 43:  L. D. 71;  Res. 72.
New   Wsstmlnstsr,    B. C.
Man    Who   Killed   Spanish   Premier
Should Have Blown Up Ministers-
Arrests Made.
Madrid, Nov. 19.���The police announce that their investigations show
that the assassination of Premier Canalejas was the reBiilt of a plot ar
ranged in Havana during a recent
meeting of international anarchists. It
was intended to throw a bomb at the
ministerial bench during the sitting
of the cortes.
Manuel Pardlnas drew the lot to execute the design, but apparently was
unwilling, and knowing that he wus
watched by other anarchists, he did
his utmost to have himself arrested.
Finding this was vain, he decided to
kill the Spanish Premier ao as not to
be killed by his comrades. Failing to
escape, he committed suicide.
Suspect  Ttaken.
Cebere, France, Nov. 19.���The Spanish police have arrested Villar De
Huergo In the Province of Asturlas, a
man who may have some connection
with Manuel Pardlnas, the assassin
of the Spanish Premier. Canalejas.
The man Is known as Rafael Fernandez, and has In hiB possession letters from Pardlnas and Anarchist
pamphlets. He explained that he be
came acquainted with Pardlnas aboard
the steamer La Champagne while returning from Havana.
Anarchist  Arrested.
Saragossa, Spain, Nov. 19.���The police today arrested the anarchist
'-"ranclsco San Millan, who in 1910 was
charged with being Implicated in u
plot to kill the Spanish Minister of the
'nterior, Senor De La Cierva, but was
not prosecuted.
San Millan is suspected of having
been associated with Pardlnas, whe
shot Canalejas.
SNAP
6 Roomed House on Hamilton St.
below value. Can be handled for
$400 Cash, balance as rent.
Biitish Canadian Securities, Ltd.
602 COLUMBIA STREET, CITY.
������������������������������������������������
��� ���
��� IRISH   NEWS. ���
�� ���
J. Collins, who has just passed away
it Belfast In his ninety-first year, had
been an officer in tha Crescent Church
for the past fifty years.
It is announced that, as far as the
Irish Insurance Commissioners hav
been able to ascertain, the number of
persons is estimated at 825,000, or 79
per cent, of the estimated Insurable
population.
A motor car accident occurred near
Chanelizod. about four miles from
Dublin, as the result of which, two men
were Injured. One of the Injured men
named Shannon, died soon after admission to the hospital.
Two men. named Cosgreave and Allen, were given acetic acid by a ship's
captain at Limerick Docks in mistake
for rum. and although both were
treated in Barrington's Hospital, Cosgreave died. The other man is progressing fairly well.
The County Limerick Hunt had
their first meeting of the season at
the Four Elms, there being a good
muster of sportsmen. They were not
permitted, however, to draw the local
covert, as a crowd of people from the
parishes of Knockea and Dononge-
more assembled and objected to certain members of the Hunt going over
their lands.
The Athlone Guardians marked
"Read" a letter from the Local Government Board Inquiring if the Vaccination Act had been complied with.
J. Kelly said they would not ask the
people to have their children vaccinated against their will. There Is not
compulsory vaccination in England, he
said, because the people there had
principle, which Bome members of that
Board had not.
Passengers who left Roscommon
Station on the Midland Great Western
line for the purpose of taking part In
the Parnell memorial procession ln
Dublin were informed by the guard at
Kockeroghery Station and there
would be a delay of about an hour In
repairing a defect in the boiler, and
that if they wished they might attend
Mass in Knockeroghery. The passengers took advantage of the enforced
stay at Knoceroghery to attend Mass
'here, thus giving tliem more time on
their arrival In Dublin to see the city.
When the chairman (E. Mlirphy) at
i meeting of the Thurles Urban Council refused to make an order evicting
^ottagns tennnts for non-payment of
���ent. Mr. rtnHr,n, one of three mem-
���*���**������ resent. irf| vv-11h the result that
'here was not a quorum. The chair-
-"". ��'nod vo rind sang several verses
f '""'-o Fnjons of Our Lands," and
vas jo'ned by some officials and oth
ts. Cittter songs, Including "To Cork
ince 1 D'd Oo." were sung, and when
*4r. Carroll, another member arrived,
he business was resumed.
BOOK NOW
FOR THE
OLD COUNTRY
Choice of Railroad and Ocean Steamship Lines.
Let us tell you about the Tourist Sleeping
Cars and other facilities for your Accommodation and Pleasure.
H. O. SMITH, C   P. & T. A. W. E. DUPEROW, Q. A. P. D.
Phone Seymour 7100.      VANCOUVER. B.C.     527 Granville Street.
extract the pellet. The Bench flnei
the defendant us, and emphasized tbe
iact that a license was required fcr au
airgun.
A remarkable archaeological discovery haa been made at Bacon Hole,
a tew miles west of the Mumbies, by
two distinguished French professors,
Messieurs Breui) and Sellas. It consists of paintings which have been definitely known to belong to the Aurig-
naoian period���the oldest period ol
eave dwelling. At the level of the
eyes may be seen ten horizontal band3.
vivid red, arranged in a vertical series
of about one yard in height.
Miss N. G. Trigg, engineering department, Alexandra Docks, Newport,
has been presented with a marble
block and pair of bronzes on the occasion of her marriage with W.
Brook3, son of Police Superintendent
Brooks. J. Macaulay, general manager, who made the presentation, said
that MIbb Trigg was one of the flrs*
lady clerks to enter the service. He
had always been glad that he had Introduced lady clerks Into the service
of the company, because he thought
that the association of the gentler sex
had a good effect on the male section
of the staff and helped to tone down
roughness.
Neath, In Glamorganshire, was the
scene of a remarkable Incident in connection with a funeral. The cortege
was proceeding along Old Park road
when It was stopped by the police, and
a conversation ensued hetween Constable Edwards and the Rev. R. O.
Evans, the officiating minister, together with some of the relatives of
the dead man. The result was that
the funeral procession, instead of going on Its journey, returned to the
dead man's residence. The funeral
was stopped by the police acting on
Instructions of Howel Cuthbertson, th?
coroner, who haa ordered a post-mor-
ten examination.
Gardiner & Mercer
M. 8. A.
ARCHITECTS
WESTMINSTER     TRUST     BLOCK.
Phone  661. Box 772.
D. McAulay
ARCHITECT
Tel. 761. Cor. 6th and Columbia
Second Hand Store
J. G. SMITH.
Buy and sell new and    second    hand
goods of all kinds.   Tools especially.
60 Mclnaes StreeL Pbone 1009
It's the Work. Use Your Phone.
NEW METHOD CLEANERS
WE CLEAN CLEAN
LADIES' WORK OUR SPECIALTY.
628 Clarkson Street.
Phone 490.
Phone R524
619 Hamilton Sti
D. McELROY
Chimney Sweeping,
Eavetrough Cleaning,
������wer Connecting,
Cesspools. Septic Tanka, Etc.
FORMER  MAYOR   MORLEY
WILL RUN IN VICTORIA
i    Victoria,  Nov.  19.���Ex-M^yor Morley has announced bia candidature for
I Victoria's   chief   magistracy in   1913.
I and   Aid.   Gleason,   who la   one   of
j his followers, wlll drop from the race,
I leaving the Issue between Morley and
I present Mayor Beckwith.   .
i    Odds should be two to one on Mor-
j ley In an even duel, Beckwith having
! shown fatal weakness and lack of balance and judgment.    The electorate
still has no warm love for Morley, but
Hee'--with has distinctly failed to make
good.
>���������������������������������������������
�� ���
> WELSH   NEWS. ���
��� ���
>������*������������������������������������
Two brothers. Charles and George
'���emon. have been killed In the Rhond
'a VMlfey bv a lionvy fall of roof at
he Glamorgan Colliery, Llwynypla.
Tho bodv of a middle-aged man
lamed Richard Roberts, of Britannia
itreet. Upper Bangor, was found hang
ng from a tree in Cae Coch Wood,
"ear the George Hotel. Roberts
'eaves a wife and four children.
Mrs. 1 loyd. wife of Colonel Lloyd
���hflrman of tbe Pembrokeshire Ter-
���itc'rifi' Association, of Treffgarne Hall,
vaa killed in a carriage accident. Mrs.
Lloyd "-'as thrown from her trap to
'he road and her skull was fractured.
At Ruthin, Wilfr'd Hall, a 15-year-
old boy from Soulhport, was summoned for using an airgun without a
license. A pellet from the gun had
struck a MIbb Felix, who at the time
was a passenger on a motor bus. Mlss
Felix had to undergo an operation to
TWO   CHINAMEN   BURNED.
Vancouver   Fire   Results    Fatally  for
Orientals Who Slept in Buildlnn.
Vancouver, Nov. 19.���Two Chinamen were burned to death, two mor-?
are missing and believed to be burned ln the ruins, and another broke hla
leg jumping from the second story, an
the result cf a flre which destroyed
the large frame building used aa a
laundry at 16;i3 Second avenue west,
shortly after 4 o'clock this morning.
An explosion of some chemicals
used in the laundry Is believed to have
started the fire, which spread with
great rapidity and the whole lower
floor and basement of the laundry was
ablaze before the 86 Chinese lodgers
in the upstairs rooms were awakened
by the crackling of .the flames. A .
scene of Indescribable confusion eu- ���
sued.
The Chinese  stampeded  down  the
stairs, most of them saving only tbe
clothes on their backs. Several of
them were aroused too late to escape
by way of the stairs and were compelled to jump from the second story
windows. It was tn this manner that
Lee broke his leg and sustained contusions on hla head. He waa taken to
the General Hospital.
TEACH   FARMING.
Boya and Girls to Be Educated In Old
Country to Fit Them for Emigration.
London, Nov. 19.���A acheme bas
been put forward by tbe agent general for Victoria, Australia, Sir John
Taverner, for the education of boya
and girls In farming to fit them for
emigration to the colonies.
Tbe scheme consists fn tlie renting
of a farm by the Imperial Government
wltbtn 50 miles of London, at which
one thousand boys and girla could be
taught the entire work of the farm
life. The cost would be at flrat charged
on the poor rate, and tbe boys and
girls would be procured from thoao
who are now under the local government board administration. With two
years practical training, they would
be fit either to stay In England or to
emigrate.
Sir John considers that It is not tho
work of the colonial government to lit
the emigrant out for the new life
which he Is going to lead. The Oversea governments have to aee to the
shipping and the settling of the emigrant when he Is ready to start Even
less la lt a work for philanthropic
agencies, for it is not a question of
charity, but of practical Imperialism
and as such belongs entirely to the
home government.   '
Salves Can't Cure Eczema
���
In regard to skin diseases, medical
authorities are now agreed on this:
Don't Imprison the disease germs ln
your skin by the use of greasy salves,
and thus encourage thesn to multiply.
A true cure of all eczematous diseases
can be brought about only by using
the healing agents ln the form of a
liquid.
WASH THE GERMS OUT.
A. simply wash: A compound of
Oil of Wlntergreen, Thymol, and other
Ingredients as combined tn the D.D.D.
Laboratories. This penetrates to  the
disease germs and destroys them,
tben soothes and heals the skin M
nothing else has ever done.
We have made fast friends of mor*
than    one   family hy recommending;
this D.D.D. Prescription to a skin sufferer here and tbere, and we want yo'l
to try It now.     We can tell ,you all?
ahout D.D.D. Prescription and how tt;
cures eczema, or you can get a fre* :
trial bottlt by writing D.D.D.' Prescript )
tlon, 49 Colborne atreet, Toronto.
Por sale by F. J. McKenzie, Druggist. ^^""
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1912.
WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
PAGE THREE
THOUSANDS CUT OEE   {DECLARE ARMISTICE
WORK IN EASr END;    10 BURY THE DEAD
Aa Result of Dock Strike, Many Are ; Eight   Hours   Only   Allowed���Thous-
Starving In London���Harrowing
Tales.
London, Nov. 19.���A�� a result of the
dock strike, poverty is rife in the poorer quarters of London. Thousands
cf able-bodied worKinen and tneir dependents are Btarvlng. The authorities, with the object of relieving the
distress, are calling on the government to take action to alleviate tu��
sufferings of the men, women and
children.
Meanwhile, politicians are telling
the people they are living in days ot
exceptional prosperity, but the government blue books do not coincide with
the statements. There are thousands
of men ln Loudon, Bkllled artisans and
laborers who are vainly searching fo,-
work that is not there for them to do.
Prom the East End come harrowing
stories of BtarvaUon and misery and
the authorities in West Ham alone, a
district peopled with families of the
laboring classes and quite distinct
from the foreign element that Inhabits
the Whltechapel atjd Mile End quarters���estimate that there are at least
fifty thousand breadwinners out of employment.
The resources of the poor law ration
and charitable organizations ure overtaxed and ln whole blocks of densely
populated bulldinga thero are women
and children on the verge of starva
tion and haggard men filled with de
spair.
Not even In the days when Industrial conditions were at low ebb were
the poverty and the misery In London
greater than they are today, and, on
all hands, it is agreed that this deplorable stale of things Is the direct
outcome of the Industrial upheavals
of the last two years.
The docks and transport strikes
have brought nothing but desolation
for the workers, and It Is a striking
commentary on the modern tendency
to attempt to redress Industrial Inequalities to state that the net result
should be so mpch widespread
poverty.
In the districts referred to It ls a
common experience to see pale-facei
bare-footed children dragging at the
skirts of despairing women. The physicians are working at top pressure
but babies are dying ln alarming numbers in homes of hopeless poverty.
Hundreds of men loaf around the
dock gates hour after hour, day by
day, wearily hoping to get a cnance
job. When the gangers corile through
the gates with jingling little brass
discs, which tell of work for a mere
handful of the hundreds who are clamoring for it, the dejected crowd suddenly becomes alert with a tension of
hope and expectancy. Quickly the
discs are distributed and the lucky
oneq rt'saprpar through the gates.
while the rejected ones turn away,
sad- "veo ana wt>��-begone, the losers
ln thla tragic gamble for work. Scenes
similar to this are enacted daily and
it is said that only tho government
can tackle the problem, which has
gone beyond the power of nil local authorities, organizations and voluntary
helpers.
lt is not a case for soup kitchens or
for public doles," said an alderman of
the municipal council. "The government must do something. The officers
have exhausted their grants and the
workhouses are full."
One man tried to organize relief
work by getting men to clear the
waste around the docks. Five thousand men applied for this employment,
and thousands have their names on
the books of the branch of the government labor exchange.
ands of Corpses���Both Sides
Claim Cuccess.
'Sofia, Nov. 19.���Bulgarian plsnlpo-
tenariea were appointed here today to
arrange a general armistice with Turkey,
Terrible   Slaughter.
Constantinople, Nov. 19.���The first
break ln the short but terrific war by
which the Balkan states have broken
the power of Turkey ln Europe came
today, when the Bulgarians besieging
Constantinople's defense at 1'chatlja,
agreed to an eight-hour armistice to
bury the dead,     m
The slaughter during the Bulgar attack on the Tchaialja defense during
the last few days has been awful.
Corpses lie thick within and without
lhe lines from the Black Sea to the
Sea of Marmora, and a cessation of
hostilities was seen to be absolutely
necessary unless both the contending
armies were to be swept by a pestilence before which the carnage of bullet and bayonet would fade Into insignificance.
No estimate has yet been made public of the number who have fallen ln
the continuous flghting along the
Tchatalja lines, but there ls no doubt
that from 30,000 to 40,000 men are
dead and wounded on both sides, and
it is more than probable that this figure will be far exceeded.
Conflicting reports still continue to
seep Into the cily as to the progres3
made by the Bulgars. Some reports
have It that the Turkish right practically has been pierced. These reports come from unofficial sources. Official reports are that the Bulgars
have met with serious setbacks, and
while most government reports have
hitherto been too rosy, this last account is credited and is given greater
weight by the proclamation of the
brief armistice.
It is now believed here that there is
still a possibility that the Bulgar advance may be checked   by some arrangement before the Servians come
up.    If such an   arrangement   ls not
made the Turks decide to resist to thu
end, little doubt is felt that their de-1
fense can  end only in disaster, and !
tbat the allies, sooner or later, will j
enter Constantinople. I
The Bulgarians are meeting a more
stubborn resistance at the Tchatalja
forts than they had expected. i
Nazlm Pasha, commander-in-chief of
the Turkish defenders, notified his'
government today that Moslem sue-1
cesses continue. Reports from Bul- j
garlan sources, however, insist that
Czar Ferdinand's soldiers drove back j
the right wing of the Turkish army tn
a terrific battle near Derkos.
Some of the military experts here
I do not believe that the. Bulgarians will
be able to advance mucb farther, Fer-1
dinand, they say, haB exhausted every :
j resource, while the Turks have indefl- j
j nite Asiatic reinforcements, and may!
hold out for years.   They think if Con-1
i stantinople holds out that the Sultan j
I vtlll be able to get favorable terms.      !(
RICH MAN APPEALS
IN VAIN EOR MERCY
President of Big Coal Company Muat
Go to Jail for Defrauding Government on Contrasts.
SIX   MEET   DEATH   WHEN
TWO   TRAINS   COLLIDE
Norlina, N. C, Nov. 19.���Six men
were killed and six others badly Injured in a head-on collision between
northbound and southbound Florida-
Cuba specials on the Seaboard Air
Line Railway, one mile south of the
Virgin la-North Carolina state line,
shortly after 4 o'clock this morning.
All those killed or Injured, so far at j
reported were members of the Orewd j
and express messengers.
The cause of the accident has not j
been   determined, but information received here Indicates Engineer Beckham on the southbound train confused
his orders.
Tacoma, Wash., Nov. 19.���"There Is
ln Seattle tonight an honest woman, n
loving woman who has been upon her
knees all day weeping and praying
that the stigma of a prisoner, husband
should not be placed upon her babes���
a stigma they would carry all their
HveB. This woman is hoping with an
aching heart that she, her two babes
and myself are not dlsgraoed forever.
"I ne,ver profited one penny from
any sales to the government. I never
authorized anyone to approach a
juror; furthermore,-1 warned against
It
"I would not make this plea for myself. A man ls supposed to stand anything that comes to him, and what I
aay Is not for myself but tor those
whom I love and are dear to me."
With the foregoing dramatic speech,
tbe first be ever made ln his life, C. E
Houston, manager of the Pacific Coast
Coal Company ot Seattle, the largest
concern of Its kind in the northwest,
convicted ot defrauding the govern
ment of about $50,000 by conspiracy
to obtain contracts on collusive bids,
faced Judge Cushman in the federal
court last ntght for sentence, every resource of expert counsel having been
vainly exhausted to save him from
prison.
The picture he drew brought tears
to the eyes of the little band of spectators and friends who accompanied
him, but It could not save him from
prison.
"It Is' the sentence ot the court that
you pay a flne'Of $2000 and be .imptfs*'
oned in the i^lng county Jail for one
yenr,' sa'd Judge Cushman. ���  .
John H. Bullocki, of Portland ,and
San Franclsoo, who w4a forfaieriy-ptw
ldent of the John J. Seaon Company,
also convicted ot being ln Uie donsplr
PRENCH NEWSPAPER PLANT
* DESTROYED BY FLAME8
Ottawa, Ont., Nov. 19.���The building occupied by Le Temps, the French
newspaper published here, on Sussex
street was completely destroyed by
flre tonight and In addition damage to
���he extent cf $5000 was done to the
plant. The building Is owned by tha
government and waa to have been
tern down next month. The loss Is
covered bv Insurance.
A number of firemen, Including
Chief Graham, were knocked out by
electric, shocks, sustained from the
deni*o overheated wiring about the
building. Le Temps wlll be printed
in a job office until further arrangements can be made for lta lasue.
AT 60 ENJOYING
PERFECT HEALTH
Btuisi Hi Tikis 6IN PILLS
A prominent Consulting Engineer of
New Vork City, thus heartily endorses
GIN PILLS: .  ,        ���     ���   ,
99 Broadway, New York.
"I bought some of your GIN PILLS
at Victoria, M.C., last September. Your
remedy I find, at 6o years of sge, to give
perfect relief from the Kidney and
blsddw Trouble* incident to onie of my
age. I urgently recommend GIN PILLS
to fri-nds as being the one thing that
dots tne goosf:" ���: 8. O. WOODFORD.
By tbe time a man or woman is ai,
the Kidneys and Bladder need a little
belp to keep in good working ordeh
GIN PILLS are what they need.   GIN.
ia sold with a positive guarantee to gli*
prtftftt ~ satisfaction   ot   your  money
50c.abox.6forfj.50.   8smplefreetf
'.���tm write National Drug and Chemt.
Coj Of Canada, Limited. Toronto.     ���
FURNITURE
DRY GOODS
Send Cash with Your Mall
Orders.
LEES LIMITED
THIS WEEK WE ADD
PICTORIAL
REVIEW
PATTERNS
Get your picture framing
orders in early for Christmas delivery. Three expert   framers   busy
Items of Immediate Interest to Every
Woman Within 100 Miles
We find that we must make more room for the magnificent stock of
Christmas Novelties now arriving, and in addition to our November
Home Furnishing Sale we add our entire stock of
Silks and Dress Goods at
*******************************************************nB^n**aBaa***^
Cut Prices
**^m*m*B*B*m**��s***m**M**w**��sm**m*m***BaBBBBaBBBBBBBaaBaBBam
For quick service we have divided our Silks and Dress Goods into lots
piled out so you can conveniently select. Please note the remarkable
reductions.
Our Huge Stock of Silks Divided Into Four Lots, As Follows:
Lot No. 1
Peau de Soie; reg. SOc for
29c
Lot No. 2
Tamallne Taffeta Pongee,
silk Batin finish;
75c tor
regular
53c
Lot No. 3
Beautiful qualities in Satin pf*
Messaline    and Taffetas; JlMf
regular $1.00 for  Vi/V
Lot No. 4
Extra line    qualities   in   Shot
Glace Taffetas, Figured Poulard.
Peau de Soie and Duchess aa
Satin; regular price $1.25 XUf
I
Tremendous Reductions in Dress Goods-3 Big Lots
Lot No. 1���Lustres
In cream,   sky,   pink,   cardinal, ram
navy and   hlack;   regular   45c; /Sf
all at     tov,L
Lot Nd. 2���Serges
40 Inches wide,   Priestley   all   wool;
Copenhagen, cream, brown, navy
and black; regular   price   75c;
for	
45c
Lot No. 3���Panamas
All wool, 50 Inches   wide,   in   cream,
navy and black Serges (Priestley's);
many shades; plaids,   shepherd p����)
check, cashmeres, wool, batistes S jf
and poplin setts; regular 85e tor *��*Hi
VERY SPECIAL PRICES ON EVERY PIECE OF DRESS GOODS IN THE STORE
Miss Taylor, pur New Modiste, Will Make Ycur Dresses for You (4th Floor)
FOR KIMONAS-MELTON
FLANNELS
In choice patterns, good qualities, large variety; make warm morning
gowns; regular up to 35c; all for . 25c
34-Inch   Soft   Colonial   Flanntlette;    good   variety;, regular   price
15c; now �� ..- 12'/aC
Llama Flannelettes; 34 Inches wide, tn pretty check only.   Most suitable for pyjamas, shirts and children's underwear; regular 26c; for 20c
Thick and Cosy Velours In pretty stripes and Boots.   Wonld make   ix
charming kimmona; up to 40e; how \  **T/2o
2000 yards left of English-made loug cloth ln pieces of 6 and 10 yards.
While they last all at, per yard  ' <e
MENS' BARGAINS IN
FURNISHINGS
Men's Heavy Twill Lined Wool-work Jackets; regular $4.50 and $6.00;
sises 38 to 48.   Waterproof���give endless wear; for 53.50
Men's Lamb's Wool Shirts and Dnawers;    regular   $2.50   per   suit
Special per suit    $2.15
Heavy Knit Wool Socks; seamless, used ln town or country; 25c per
pair.   Extra special         5 far $1.00
Not lesa than one dollar's worth sold.
Special consignment of Gents' Waterproof   Coats   direct   from   fhe
.maker; regular $7.00;  for , $5j03
Regular $10.00 for ' $8.50
Regular $15.00 for $1259
BEAUTIFY YOUR HOMES
*    i r
These very low prices in our November Home Furnishing Sale provide
the opportunity at great savings.
Cut Prices iu Tapestry, Art Serges, Repp and Plush
MAKE BEAUTIFUL DRAPERIES, PORTIERS, COUCH COVERS, ETC,
2000 yards beautiful Brocaded Tapestries In brown, green and crimson, 50 Incbea wide; regular $1.00 up; per yard ..   ,7fc
Crimson and Gree^ Art Serge, 60 Inches wide; regular 60c and SOc; for U%e
Bewildering variety ln British and Foreign Tapeatrlea; from, per yird : 7Seta
i
carpets
-The balance of the month we will aelP^
$1.46 Brussel Carpeting at ..,.    ..$1.25
$1.65 Brussel Carpeting at .... ���,. $1.45
$2.00 Brussel Carpeting at ...;        ......  ....*1.75
Very speola) offer on Wilton C|*petlng���We will make and .lay any
$2.60 pattern you may select at the unprecedented low ptAoS ot, per
yard A 12.00
FURNITURE
- *..
All our cut prices on Furniture for our Home Furnishing
tlnue for the balance of tbe mouth.   Buy your Chrlstmaa
now; we hold tbem fbr future delivery. .
  iinini
..    ,-;��     ��� *-'���'     *���;����<   ���'       :*���$,,���'
ive FURNISH Your home complete
���oy,'XeeeUwd**���lUte ��9R^lM��ftw..-��'.-<wi,���wiwj'*.",", uww*r**'Wi*W��^'w*'ws��iR'i'^.2S m+0 j J".  '^r*ftt>..'
T"
MWMHMSW��:
PAGE FOUR
WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1912.
WESTMINSTER DHLT HEWS
Published every morning exoept
Sunday by The National Printing and
Publishing Co., Ltd., at tbeir office,
43 McKenzie Street, New Westmin
���ter, B. C.
ROBB SUTHERLAND, Manager.
TELEPHONES:
Business Office   W9
editorial Office   991
SUBSCRIPTION RATE8.
By carrier $4 per year, $1 for three
months, or 40c per month.
By mall $3 per year, or 25c per
month.
TO CORRESPONDENTS
No letters' will be published in the
Newa. *noept., over the wrjter's signature. The editor reserves the right
to refuse the publication of any letter.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2a 1912.
K./^mT'Sri WORKMEN.
Prospects and conditions for the
British worklngman are not ao roay
aB some would huvo us believe if we
are to credit the recent distressing
stories of women who labor for two
capts'a^ljpiff or of thousands of Len
don's ydrtifcis looking in vain tor employment.,.       ,
This sta&J of things brings again to
our notice the fact that in the oversea
Btate$;9f..,yie empire there is work for
all true workers. It may also revive
our interest.in what is being done towards reducing the congestion in the
homeland apd at the same time adding
desirable citizens to the Britains over
eea.' '���
Emigration has been among the
chief subjects discussed at the Colon
lal qonfdnihce whicii has now developed into, an Imperial conference, and
the most recent deliberations cf this
body resulted in the appointment ot
the Dominions Commission which is
now sitting in London and evolving
some plan for inter imperial emigration. We trust that there will be devised some efficient means of systema-
nuestion," said Edward D. Page in reply to Lewis Nixon, "as a moral and
international one. We can sometimes
get a few votes by saying a thing is
American, but it has got to be proved
to be an American question, exclusively so, before we can expecj a chamber
like thi3 to approve any such Idea."
If a flagrant violation of a solemn
treaty of our seeking is to be excused
by calling it an American question,
then treaties are valueless and tha
United States are not bound by honor
or law to respect any of their written
engagements. If lt ls patriotism to
boast that we are above all considerations or morals in such cases, then we
should prove our superiority as Amerl
cans by destroying all our treaties at
once.
The cant of those "patriots who for
the benefit of a legalized trade monopoly of our own attempt to delude the
public into believing that they alone
are the custodians of the Nation's
rights and conscience is a thoroughly
discreditable form of "Americanism."
It makes this nation's honor a thing pi'
contempt throughout th'6 world.���New
York World.
SPORT   AND   CITIZENSHIP.
Glasgow Sets Example In Municipal
Sagacity to Western Canada.
Glasgow, pioneer in municipal ownership, is well known, and has set the
pace for a number of western Canadian cities.
They may copy, too, the Scottish
metropolis in providing clean sport for
Its citizenship, for tho extent to which
the Glasgow corporation caters for thi
recreation of its citizens is well Illustrated by some figures which are^nade
available by thu parks department 23
to the number of persons who tako
advantage of the opportunities offered.
On the twenty-one bowling greens
whieh we're available this summer
192,000 bowlers played. These figures
constitute a record, and that despite
generally unfavorable weather.
Golfing under corporation auspices
has benefited very materially by th-1
Tuesdav half-hol'dav under the shops
act. The total for the year ended May
31 last was 125,000, nn increase cf 17,-
000 over the preceding year, and the
first four months of the present corporation year showed an increase ol
18,000 as compared with the corres-
sponding period last year.
This has led the parks departmenl
to look around for new courses to add
to tne present links of Blackhill, Bella-
houston and Alexandra park. Football, too. continues to be as popular as
ever. Last season over 1500 games
were played on llie 47 pitches in the
i various parks, and the 50 pitches pro-
tizing and directing emigration so as , vided this year arc almost entirely
to make it of the greatest advantage  booked every Saturday.
tillTE STARj*��'LARGEST STEAMERS." [AM AD A
ROYAL MAIL STEAMERS
CHRISTMAS SAILINGS
PORTLAND,  MAINE���HALIFAX���LIVERPOOL.
_ From  Portland. Halifax.
New S.S. Laurentic   Dec.   7       Dec.   S
S.S. Teutonic  Dec. 14       Dec. 15
S.S. Canada  Dec. 21       Dec. ll
New S.S. Megantic and Laurentic. 15,000 tons, largest from Canada.
All classes carried. S.S. Teutonic, 682 feet, 18,000 h.p., S.S. Canada,
614 feet, 10,000 tons. Carry only second and third class. Baggaga
checked through to steamer In bond.   No hotel or transfei expenses.
WHITE STAR LINE. WHITE STAR LINE.
New York���Queenstown���Liver-    j        New York���Plymouth���Cher-
pool. IK bourg���Southampton.
S.S. Celtic, Dec. 5.                         S 3. New York. Dec. 7.
0 S. Cedrlc, Dec 12.                          S.S. St. Paul, Dec. 14.
S.S. Baltic, Dec. 19.                               *S.S. St. Louis, Nov. 30.
Company's Office, 610 Second Avenue, Seattle, three doors from
Cherry Street, oiftE. A. Goulet, Agent Canadian Pacific Ry., and W. F.
Butcher, Agent G. N. Ry- New Westminster,	
EMERSON, MORRIS  AND WALTON
a live headliner in comedy, singing an d dancing, with   special
scenery at the Royal   theatre   today.
illuminated
BORDEN Will TEU
WHV MONK RESIGNED
Explanation Will Follow Close of Debate on Address���Much  Interest
in Navy Policy.
to the empire as a whole.
The agent general in London for
Victoria, Australia, has a scheme to-
training in England boys and girls in
preparation for placing them on farms
oversea. We believe that the best results will accrue both to the dominions and to the old country if emigrants of an age or a temperameni
that wiil*readily adapt itself to new
conditions are sent out, and this Australian suggestion is therefore to b��.
welcomed, and acted upon.
lt is as hard for us to appreciate
the horrors of starvation and poverty
in the heart of the Empire as it is to
gause. with accuracy the inferno of th-i
Balkans, but it is to be hoped that immediate effort will be directed towards
providing sustenance for the vast army of unemployed in Britain, and towards transporting some of them to
where work in plenty awaits in a new
land.
All tlvs makc3 for stalwart citizen-
shin, and it is particularly pleasing to
find at Glasgow, wllich has a special
name for the size and enthusiasm of
its football crowds, so democratic a
spirit of spcrt in all its branches.
SCHRANK   INSANE.
WHY
s
RUS3IA   IS   PREPARING.
parlous points���she is even ahlp-
igMlrem nearer to the scene of war
UMjCMery plain that Russia learned
hej "JEjoBhian" lessons well. She wa3
taught tliem in the most humiliating
manner that it does not do for a nation,1 whose preparations for war are
al.. lapse, ends, to parley in the gates
with a nation who has a "friend" always "In shining armor" and ready to
strike. ' Russia was compelled to back
down'in the Bosnian affair-���not because she might not have been strong
eppugh to protect her Servian pro-
. t'ege if,she had been given time to get
realty��� tiut because she waa unready
to move at the drop of the hat, ao abe
is now moving before any "hat" is
dropped or flung into the ring.
TH^t'l^-'Jlrobably the meaning of her
open military preparations. She is
keeping Tier time-expired men with the
colors���she Is mobilizing her forces
at
Pimx
But this does not necessarily mean
that 8he intends war to come. It only
-Means that she realizes that her arm-
4ps are a bit slow in getting ready to
march, and so she proposes to start
tliem marching before the actual need
ibas romp. She is in the position of ths
volunteer who told his companions���
"it is clear that we are about to retreat ; and. as I am a little lame 1 will
start now."
If any of her neighbors resent her
too wirly mobilization, Russia is quite
justified in answering with a single
word���"Bosnia." She then suffered
the fate of the unready. She does not
propose to play the role of "Goat" In
another farce. Her military ayatem
' makes it impossible for her to main-
tin the hair-trigger readiness of the
Cermans; and she la merely endeavor
lng to escape from the disadvantage
<?f>tbi*: position by getting ready before it is quite known whether there
���wffi-^ftdw be any need for It
She had rather spend a little money
on preparing and then do nothing,
thiri f\od another "Bosnia" In Albania
of'-Novibazar. "The man ln shining
armor "-taught her a neat lesson a few
i lejirs ajgp; and she is proving how apt
p pupil'she has become.���Montreal
<Stai>. 9
'DISREPUTABLE    "AMERICANISM."
In refusing to indorse Mr. Taft's
statement in defeece of the Panama
Canal !>!I1 remitting tolls to American shins the Chamber of Commerce
, ���siommitt*e was eternally, right.
���Hite is not  so  much an American
Alienists **,iy Roosevelt's Assailant Irresponsible���Will Be Sent  to Asylum.
Milwaukee, Nov. 19.���A commission
of five alienists who examined into
the mental crndit'on of John Schrank.
who shot Colonel Roosevelt, today reported to Judge Backus, finding Schrank insane.
The decision cf the doctors was unanimous and means that Schrank can
not to tried for the attempted murder
of Colonel Roosevelt, but will be committed to the Northern Hospital for
the insane at Oshkosh.
Schrank may remain at Oshkosh for
the rest of his life as he can not be
released unless it is shown that he is
completely cured and will not be subject again to an attack like the one
that caused bim lo attempt the life of
Colonel Roosevelt on the night of Oct.
14.
Ottawa, Nov. 19.���Today saw a
great rush to prepare the stage settings for the opening of parliament
on Thursday. The advance guard, composed of messengers and pa^es knocked down the cobwebs from crannies
and corners today, and regular session
officials will move ln for the winter
���
tomorrow.
Interest and speculation in Premier Borden's naval policy is growing daily. Inquiries are pouring in
from all parts of the country as to the
probable day on which tlle prime minister will announce his proposal and il
is being predicted that when the premier rises to speak on this much-discussed subject tlie sine ot hi3 audienc-;
will be limited only by the seating ca
pacity of the galleries.
lt is expected that the day after the
conclusion of the debate on the ad
dress Premier Borden will make a
formal statement to the house and_t,he
ccuntry as to the change in the "ministry, due to thc resignation of F. D.
Monk as minister of public works.
He will give the oiffcial reason fo;
Mr. Monk's resignation, as well as for
his decision to bring in Hon. Louis-
Coderre and to make a shift In certain
cabinet portfolios. The statement will
be of more than ordinary interest.
ed the case yesterday  in   the  Assize
Court
The learned counsel, who as counsel for Bogh Singh, and Is now defending another Sikh, Isshar Singh, for a
similar charge in connection with th?
same alleged crime, Btated, yester
day, that he would endeavor to bring
the appeal before the Vancouver Appeal Court, presently in session, otherwise it would be grought before the
Victoria sittings in January next.
The principal reason for appeal Is
the admission by Justice Murphy of
Constable Exley's evidence of an alleged confession by Bogh Singh tha'
his evidence in a former trial was un
true.
��  THE
THOMAS A. ED'?.ON TO
CONDUCT OWN  AFFAIRS
New York, Nov. 19.���With the resignation of Frank L. Dyer as president
of the Edison Company-and allied interests, Thomas A. Edison assumed
charge today of his own varied Interests.
Heretofore Edison has allowed othera to direct his many corporations,
but he will not take personal control.
Dyer acted as head of the Edison
enterprises for more than ten years.
Endore R. F. Green, M. P.
Nelson, Nov. Isi.���The British Columbia Mine Owners' Association at a
meeting here hut night passed resolutions urging the appointment of
It. F. Green, M. F.. as minister of
mines. The association also advised
the continuance of the iead bounty, or
an Increase in tho duty on that metat
and its products.
Good Lad ��s* Horse.
Ton told me he wna a u*oA ladles'
borse," angrily snld tbe man wbo bad
' mode tbe purchase.
"He was," replied the dpacon. "My
trlfe owned bira, and slip iw one of the
very best women I ever knew."���Hs-
cbange.
Not Aqiln.
Hlaa (who has been punished several tiroes for malicious mischief,
reading on tbe fire nlarm box. "Break
the glass I")���"No, no! You can't fool
mei"��� tllegende Blotter.
Couldn't Listen Continuously.
"John, you never listen to half the1
things I sny to you." she complained.
"Well, dear," he replied, "1 have to
werk part of the time."���Chicago Record-Herald.
Consolation. -
"Tbey tell me the baby looks exactly
like me."
"But bullies, you know, often out-
trrow these likenesses."���Baltimore
American.
Rather Strong,
rncle   Hllllwil.   i>vlio   tpi*   unwisely
mimnU'il   ttie   xlilp   ili-Ul   of   Roquefort
"ni"'-"!"   Ity irunr  Thrtl butter uln't In
n���� vn hi-el���Judge.
EVASIVE ANSWERS
IN HINDU TRIAL
(Continued from rage one)
der to lay false charges against a fellow Hindu for revenge. He had not
heard of one Dwalla Singh, in Vancouver, sticking bits of glass ln the
side of his room and falling up against
them and cutting himself and then
putting up a job against another Hindu. The first time he had heard cf ii
was when counsel (Mr. Russell) had
put the question to him at the las'
trial of accused. They did not do such
things in his part of India, or tell such
lies.
Herdit Singh, a crown witness, gave
an extraordinary account of the inner
workings of the Hindu community in
New Westminster.   Questioned by Mr.
Russell, for the defence, he  asserted
that the copartnery with Dharm Singh
paid $40 per  fortnight to  Mr.  Burns,
superintendent    of   the   Small    and
Bucklin Mill, on account of the  contract the  copartnery  had   got   from
the company.   Also, that   Mr. Burns i
senior, had been paid $200 by cheque
and his son $100, also by cheque. Th
Hindu   copartnery   were   now   snlng |
Dharm Singh   for   over $21,000   that
should  have  been  accountrd   for- by i
Dharm Singh to his partners. j
Witness had heard that Harry ho' |
an interpreter for Dharm Singh,   hao j
written a letter to Chief Justice Ifnnt j
er in connection with tlie case.    Per
sonally he would not swear to it. \
Witness was hostile in some points
but undoubtedly proved a good witness for accused.
In connection with the apneal bv
Bogh Singh, whicii was allowed by Mr.
Justice Murphy on Nov. 11 last
againBt a conviction for perjury, on
that date, Mr. J. A. < Russell, mention (
VAUDEVILLE AT OPERA HOUSE.
This evening the Rex Vaudeville
company will make Its appearance a*,
the opera house. This clever combination of nine high class artists 'who
according to tlieir press notices
achieved enormous success wherever
they have played, consists of Mr
Harry Lancaster, the well known
Scotch comedian; Miss Edith Wilma
contralto prima donna; Miss Marion
Yale, dramatic soprano; Mr. Dave
Caston, London's most eccentric come
dian; Mackay Sisters, Scotcli singing
and dancing duo; Mr. Harry C. Willis
versatille comedian and evntriloquist
A comedy sketch "Confusion," by
the entire company rounds out an en
joyable evening's amusement.
smna
I'M W%1 nr.UI M��. ��Si*  *�� Si
AL. W. GILLIS, manager.
MON���TUES.���WED.
EMERSON, MORRIS
and WALTON
A lot of Comedy, some Good
Singing, a Little Dancing and
Special Illuminated Scenery.
FRANK COTTER
COMEDY  EQUILIBRIST
THE MUSICAL
AVIATORS
A D'C-'NCT NOVELTY.
PETE MUPPfflf
THE IRISH TENOR.
NEW   PHOTO PLAYS.
Liberal Association
THE ANNUAL MEETING
of   the   Liberal Association   of New
Westminster will be held  in
EAGLES' HALL
ON
FRIDAY EVENING, NOV. 29
' 8 p.m. -
for the purposes of electing officers.
Mr. Id. A. MacDonald, chairman oT
the Provincial Liberal organization,
will address the meeting. AM.Liberals
cordially Invited.
0, KENNEDY, ED. OOni KT,
President.      1U2)      Secretary.
Watch
East Burnaby
Beatltful view corner, cleared, 1
block from Sixth sireet, only
$900.   E.tra good term3.
8 acres, all ln ijarde.i or orchard, an ideal subd'vision, ono
block from King's Highway,
*18G00.
Orchard lot, 45 x 1<N) feet, two
blocks from car. $750; $50
cash, $15 per month,
Warner, Bangs �� Co.
Phone  1024.'
Coldicutt Blk.     East Burnaby.
LUMBER
LATH
 SHINGLES
British Canadian Lumber Corporation, Ltd.
PHONES: SALES DEPT. 904.   MILL OFFICE 808.
Mills at Yancouver, New Westminster and  Crescent  Valley,  B. C.
The Bank of Vancouver
A general banking business transacted, drafts and lettera ot credit
sold payable In all parts of the world. Savings bank department at
all branches.
��� SPECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO ���
BANKING BY MAIL
New Weatminater Branch, Cor. 8th and Columbia Streets
D. D. WIL80N, Manager.
FOR CHOICE
FISH
OYSTERS
CHICKENS
LAMB
MUTTON
GOTO
P.  BURNS' MARKET
FOR THE HIGHEST QUALITY MEATS
K. H. BDCKUN, N. BEARDSLHB, W. F. H. BDCKUN,
Pres. and Qanl Mgr.        Vice-President Sec. aid Treas.
SMALL-BUCKLIN LUMBER CO., Ud.
MANUFACTURERS OF
Fir, Cedar and Spruce
Phones No. 7 and 877.
BURNABY
DOUGLAS ROAD
CHEAP BUY
L
2 Room House and Lot 52 x 109 in
splendid location. Price only $950
One-third cash, balance 6, 12 and
18 months.
ThePeoplesTritetCa,^
451 Columbia Street
PHONE 669
*�� ���
' -4*   t* m *���**'��� ���mt*t****ta******aa
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1912.
WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
PAGE FIVE
i 1*1
HOCKEY LEAGUE IS
LAUNCHED IN CITY
Amateur   Puck, Chasers   Attend   Enthusiastic Meeting���Seven Teams
Represented.
will be one of the sportB indulged In
and the club bas secured the servicer
of Mr. J. Ackert as physical director.
Another meeting wll) be held In th)
Y^ M.. C. .A, on Thursday evening to
perfect all arrangements. ' 8
CITY SOCCER LEAGUE.'
With an attendance that surprised
everybody the Westihtnster Amateur
Hockey league was formally launched
last "venlng at a meeting held ln tbe
Moose club rooms.
Although no officers were elected,
this being deferred until the next
meeting, the spirit Was there with
bells on and if the arena oompany
will only do their part on the program
amateur hockey will be established
on a rock bottom busts ih thc Roya!
City.
Seven teams were represented at
ihe gathering, but tliere will doubtless
be some pruning work ��� before the
league is started and the number of
teams simmered down to either four
or five, probably four.
Experience in other cities haa estab
lished lt that a four team league Is
belter and will he more profitable
both from a playing and linanciat
standpoint, so that lt Is reasonable to
expect that the players wlll take a
tumble to this Idea.
Delegate! were, elected from each
club and these will stir up add it iona'
Interest during the interim from now
until next Tuesday night when per
nianent officers will be elected.
Mr. H. J. Leamy was elected chairman, while the duties of-secretary fell
upon Mr. B. Robb. After considerable
d.MMssion regarding the number of
team 6 entering the league. It was de-
r'ded to appoint Messrs. P. "W. Luce,
J. A. Motherwell, H. J. Leamy and B.
Robb to Interview the management of
��� Westminster rink with a view of
finding out just what amount of time
the local clubs could be provided with
and during what hours. This committee will report at'the next meeting.
A committee on by-laws ana constitution was appointee consisting or
Messrs. P. \V. Luce. E. N. SutturranJ
and V. E. Andrew. The teams who
are considering entering the race are
the Y. M. C. A., Moose. Hankers, City,
Columbian college, Sapperton and
Hardware.
Taken all iu sillvthe gathering was a.
sure criterion of what amateur nockey
wlll be this coming winter and every
player who has mived with the game
back east and on the prairies will tu
asked to join the bunch, thus making
the 1 ague a success from the start.
Moose and Sappertons Is Saturday's
Only Match���Timothy Still Uncut.
Only one game ls scheduled ln the
City soccer league for Saturday afternoon. Thla will take place at Sapperton park between the Moose eleven
and the Sapperton team. The Clt)
and the 104th Regiment were expected
to play at Queens park but the lnabll
Ity of the militiamen to raise a team
'for that date cancelled all arrangements.
So far the efforts of the league officials to secure attention from the
city council with relation to the long
grass on the Sapperton playing field
has yet to materialise and unless th:;
timothy Ib cut by Saturday afternoon
ithe players will be under serious ln
convenience.
; The 104th Regiment Athletic Association will hold a meeting In the ani-
mouriea on Thursday evening at 8
o'clock at which all members are ex-
I pected to attend.
���������������������������������������������������
���        STRIKES AND 8PARE3.        ���
�����������������������������������������������
Is there a Sherlock Holmep with us?
If bo please step forward and make,
an appointment with Manager Macdonald and his bunch of bowlers. At
the present time they are trying to
locate a sleuth who can run to cove;-
the "Jinx" which is pursuing th'-
team.
They lost three straight against
Knight's quintette laBt evening which
the following score list will show:
Scribes��� 12       3   Ttl.
Randall  91    r,6    139 ��� 365
Chaput  119   101    130   350
MacDonald 142    129    136    407
Wells   . 73      76     92    241
Best 133    111    152   2M
D5S
Knights��� 1
Haggman 126
Wallace   158
Knight 110
IMttendiiRh 141
F. Knight 160
SPORTSMEN!
Your attention is drawn to the fact that we have  the largest variety of shooting accessories in the city.
Sterllngworth   Dble.   Bbl.   Hammerless Shotguns, each $35.00
L.  C.  Smith   Shotguns,   each $32.50
Parker 8hotguna, each    $50.00
Pump Guns, all  makea, each $28.00
DOMINION, U.M.C. and WINCHESTER Loaded Shells in all loads
from 75c to $1.25 per box.
COME UP Sixth Street and aee our display,    tt will  Interest you.
M.J. KNIGHT & CO., Ltd.
55 8IXTH STREET. PHONE 237.
minster   people   wbo   attended   thi
games, that he Is a star among stars.
This just about fllfs the roster for
Vancouver, bul Patrick ls by no meana
satisfied and the net Is still set for
another player In order to allow for
any depletion of the ranks through
Injury.
Tlie New Westminster team will bi
no slouch when it comes to hockey
True It Is that Harry Hyland and
Ernie Johnson have failed to read the
handwriting on the wall and will stay
in the East. Jimmy Gardner will heaj
a bunch of puck chaaera which will
make the other two teams step llvel<
If they wish to capture Uie Fatersoi
cup and Incidentally make the trek t:
the East ln quest of the Stanley
trophy.
Dldier Pitre will play at coverpoim
ln place of Hyland and the coast fans
will surely enjoy witnessing the player
who ls most feared by every goalkeeper ln the N. H. A.
Jack Laviolette, the well known la-
crosBe player, Is also slated for the
Royal line-up. Jack ls sure some
player in both the summer and winter
games and the Eastern magnates were
so afraid of him staying out for lacrosse last summer that they refused
Art Ross permission to take him along
with his all-star hockey team.
Taken all In all, things are looking
bright enough fois the coast fans to
settle down and await the whistle. Be
fore the season is over the moguls ot
the N. H. A. will probably see the
light and wish they had voted for a
commission, but that chance has passed, and, try as they will, the Stanley
cup mirage is beginning to show Itself
over thc Pacific seas.
552
649
175.*
2
3
Ttl.
131
123
380
127
144
429
89
129
32S
135
134
410
145
144
44'1
1994
BRIGHT OUTLOOK IE
VICTORIA HAS TEAM
had many a confab alnce then, for no
Eastern man Is posted better than Joe
Lally as to the way lacrosse Is played and patronized out on the Pacific
slope.
Says the Vlcoria Times: "That Victoria wlll support a team there is no
reason to fear. Lacrosse has a strong
hold on the Coast and the Inter-city
rivalry between Vancouver and New
Westminster wil: stir up enough interest ln Victoria to. simply set the
^own cra7y should a professional team
be established here. With a game
every two weeks, Victoria ought to
turn out five to eight thousand for
every contest."
This is what Wells Gray, managei
of the Salmon Bellies, says on the
matter: "I will support any move to
Include Victoria in the league, provides; that Victoria men have control of
the club. I know Jimmy Murphy, and
if he can only be induced to take th3
helm everything will be O. K. In lacrosse next summer."
Charlie Welsh, ex-manager of the
champion New Westminster team,
sneaks in the same vein. He says:
"It ls absolutely necessary for the success of the British Columbia Lacrosse
League that Victoria should place a
team In the coast circuit nxt summer.
A third team would eliminate all
chances of a 'break,' such as marred
the season last summer, and the formation of such a team will not be such
a tremendous task, providing Victoria
responded to the call for support.'
Treasurer Herb Ryall, an old player,
who figured In many a battle between
New Westminster and Victoria in former daya, is of the same opinion, and
a canvass among the leading support
ers of the Salmon Bellies leads one to
believe that lacrosse in the west will
be better than ever during the summer of 1913.
POR RENT
FURNISHED HOUSE S^ftllS-~S
bathroom, all modern conveniences.   Rent $50 per
month.   Will leaae.
CTADF on Begbie Street, near Columbia Street, size
JIVIIL 20 ft by 66 ft.   Possession about December
lst     Will lease.       For full particulars apply to
WESTMINSTER TRUST, LIMITED
Head
J. J. JONES, Managing Director.
Oltlce: 28 Lorne 8treet, New Westmlnater.
House For Rent
New, Modern, Six Rooms, Bath arid Toilet,
Cement Basement and Hot Air Furnace.
One minute to car. $25 per month. Apply to
T. M. McCORMICK
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
Phone 927.     Suit 19, B. C. E. R. Depot,
New Westmlnater B. C.
695
. In tl*B>iyW<ywd of tli" knockou
tm-rhamewP jf tr ChambeXn won
from McGill. The score:
McGill .. ..155 126 165 146 136���72*
Chamberlin .158 181 190 129 200���858
Tonight the Royals go up agairtbt
their old enemies thu Penders in an
inter-City league fixture on the local
alleys. In past 8-anons these were
the only teams In the league and
bowlers, both in and out of the gam>'
will remember many merry evening*
and well contested matches with this
team.
IThe printers bowling team will roll
a match game with the Galbraith &
��ons bunch on Friday evening.   Th-?
typos In their last match were defeat-
n Rugger Team Will   ed by the Dominion Express company
WARATAHS PLAYING
VANCOUVER TODAY
Visiting Austral!
Tour Westminster on Friday-
Play B. C. on Saturday.
Local rugby followers and players
will migrate to Vanoouver tbla afternoon to witness the game between tho
Warataha and the "rep" team of Vancouver. The Australians arrived from
California yesterday morning, feeling
flt to tackle anything pitted agains'
tbem. but from the roster selected by
' tbe Vancouver committee, lt ahould be
a real teet between the game as played ln British Columbia and the land
of the Southern Cross.
So far the Australians have only
tasted defeat twice during their tour
and It will be a feather In the cap*
cf the Vancouver flfteen should they
be able to put one over the visitors.
The game, which will be played on
the Brockton Point grounds, wlll start
*t 3 o'clock. On Saturday afternooi'
the viaitora will meet the combined
Victoria and Vancouver teams on the
same grounds.
On Friday afternoon the Waratahs
will board a special B. C. E. R. car In
Vancouver and visit the big lumber
mill at Fraaer Mills. If It Is possible.
thev will be seen In a practice game
,-rn Queens park that afternoon, but
the arrangements are yet In an. early
stage. Mr.VT. D. Sherriff, one of the
local club'* representatives upon, th��
Vancouver Rugby Union, bas the matter In hand locally.
and :
week-
return game wlll be played nexl
V., M. C. A. Bowlers Ma ten.
> The dormitory team of tbe Y. M.
C. A. will meet tbe bowling quintette
composed of school teachers on Fri
day evening next on the new alleys of
tne Y. M. C. A. This Is the flrst gama
of Its kind rolled at the assoclatlor
and the result wlll ^e watched rltb
Interest by tbe novices at tbe game.
HOCKEY PROSPECTS
DEVELOPING fAST
Murphy Is Expected   to   Run   Capital
City's Lacrosse Club���Project/Welcomed by All.
It is evident that strong efforts are
being made by the   magnates   of thvt,
British Columbia Lacrosse Association 1
to have Victoria enter a team iu the
field at the opening of the season Wi |
spring, making it a three-team organization.
The disastrous results from which
none of the clubs tu the three league*
escaped last summer have not been
forgotten by the moguls on the coa.^t.
and before the winter season has past
and gone and the sunny breezes are
here again, it is likely that the Capital
City will enter a strong pro team In
the race for the Minto Cup.
Unless present negotiations fall flat,
James A. Murphy, president of-tbe National Lacrosse Union, and one of tho
best posted men of the national game
or the Dominion, will be at tbe helm
of a professional club tn Victoria next
summer. Murphy will be ont to the
Coast in February of 1913, add wilt
take a look over* the ground before
making a decision. i
Tbe visit of Joe Lally, while ostensibly tn connection ��wlth the forlorn
trip of the Cornwalls after tbe Minto ,
Cup, was ih connection with tbe placing in the fleld of a third team, and,
truth to tell, Joe and Murphy  have,
I
SAPPERTON ORGANIZES
> CLUB FOR YOUNG MEN
Permit   for    Refrlsera'ing    Building
Taken Out���Vancouver and New
V.'sstmlns'.or Line-up.
-With the taking out of a building
permt for $1200 yesterday morning
the Westminster Arena company ha.
now shown lta hand, and, according t.
the officers connected with the nev*
concern, building operations will be
rushed to completion Vo tbat an early
opening of the skating area In the
new Horse Show building may be announced ip December.
The refrigerating plant, which will
be built on the company's property on
Arbutus' atreet, will be housed ln ��
frame atrueture 52 feet by 60 feet.
The lease between the city and tho
company is expeoted to be completed
hitch
HARRY TIDY, Manager.
Wed. and Thurs.
NOV. 20, 21
The Popular Shoe Store
Open Evenings Till 9 O'clock 641 Front Street
���  OUT OF THE HIGH RENTAL DISTRICT
CHEAPER THAN OTHER FIRM'S SALE PRICES.
WEDNESDAY
The spot for Good Goods, Extraordinary Values��� Westminster's
Snap Specialists.
Sole agents for Westminster for the famous K Boots.   Depot for
Leckie'a Boots and Ahren's School Shoes.
A $20,000 Stock to Select From
Hassam Paving Co., of B. C, Limited
Layers of Hassam Compressed Concrete (Patented)
ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS
ESTIMATES and DESIGNS EU RNISHED
VAUDEVILLE COMPANY
7���ACTS���7
and One Musical Sketch.
Two Shows a NlgM, Commencing at
7:80 and 9 o'clock.
Price* 25 and 80 Cent*.
COMPLETE CHAfJOE OF PROGRAM
BACH EVENING.
NOTICE!
meeting was held in the otd aohooi
bouse and officers were elected forth*
cnm*nti ye*r. The boys ln the eastern
section of tbe city are enthualutln
ever the move #nd are har* at wprn
Things are moving fast ln hookey
circles these days. Following our
their threat made at the annual meet-
Ins of the P. C. H. A. \ta*t Friday
night, the ooast HM��gnat*a ����� 1>��*���
'        . .    �� A.%mm.. %��a��a��.AK*    Im     mtna��al    *\l
r'ne molLwLMr���.tah^firthe SS to reap the-Merest In several of
remain* ��p*robaW* metaberr ��*r tha, ^��cJ^����|gm �� the ^ com[ng
<:lub. 0.      a -���-���...
-   tyr. van Vpinnn.'former president
N*l�� Nelson, 'former prosn
of the B. C. Lacrosse Association,
a well known business
and
���������        man Of Sap-
Sertoli, was '���Wed to the presidency.
Mr. Joseph Cameron, who organised
t**<* tour of the Sarperton Junior i*
rrosee team through the upp�� poofr
trv last 7summer will bold the*vlce-
president's cbalr. Mr. B. HoRg, *re#*
nirer and Mr. B. Saint, secretary, -
The old school house has been leaa-
Pi and will be fitted ttp for ���� �����
cf ths new organic atlon.
Basketball
out here. Yesterday Frank Patrick
reoelved word tbat "Cyclone" Fred
Taylor, the star of the N. H. A., baa
decided to throw In bit lot with tbe
Vancouver steim.
Taylor can be slated aa the mest
spectacular player Id the game today.
He came ont to the ooaat laat April
with an all-star aggregation under Art
Boss and. although out of cond'tion
due to sitting on tbe bench throughout
the N. H. A. season, ho demonstrated
to the Vancouver, Victoria and Weat-
Burnaby Street tigfttm? System
Owing to the large extent of territory covered I hr tha* Burnaby
atreet lighting ayatem, It ls Impracticable to thoroughly maintain a
night patrol to observe the condition of the lamps.      "'���'../
Residents in this municipality are requested to cpppetilp* with
thia oompany in providing tha best possible public service from the
atreet lighting system. Whenever lamps'are noticed to be not lighted
prompt special action will be taken to remedy the conditions upon report being aent to the Light and Power Department of .the Company's
office In New Weatmlnster, Phone ��H, or the Light,and Power Department, Vancouver, Phone Seymour 6000.
BRITISH COLUMBIA ELECTRIC RAILWAY COMPANY.
BOILERS
Riveted Steel Pipes
BURN OIL
;:ip*nks
VULCAN IRON WORKS, LTD.
P. O. BOX 4tt       i TELEPHONE  824
HARR>Y WILLI*
The "Human Scarecrow," appearing with tha Bss VaodsrUUs Ctanpamt M
tbe opera houae tonight.
BUILDERS ANO CONTRACTOR* GET OUR PRICES ON
Lumber Lath and Shingles
^m^immammma.mmmmmmi^m^ammi^*s*****^^****sm**mmm*^****a********msmamaa*s^^*m
BEFORE YOU PLACE YOUR ORDER   .',...
CANADIAN WESTERN LUMBER CO., Ud.
THE FRASER RIVER MILLS"
Fraser Mills, B. C.
title*
nil
m**V'
806
���li
OVa
mm
CITY THEATRE
D. BRAT, Manager.
Program fer Today.
THE RANCHMAN'* AWAKENING
101 Blaon Featnre.
CALEB WEST, MASTER DIVER
Reliance, Tvo Reels.
ORATOR, KNIGHT AND COW
CHARMER
Comedy, Tkanhouaer.
FRUITS AND fLoWERS
Mil With tbeBunch
t.miammiaf ' mtat"
THE KING'S M<tfiK,JPi THR
Ftast Pool Mies lr tte City
All the latent newa tatfrtuOOort Hne.
Kngiish tnpthttn remits   ani   league
Mt1,      standings.   *.,<
John Hotchkles
PROPRIETOR. i.   ,���       ��� "
R3ng-�� Hotri. .<ColmM�� Stmt.
t**ms***m ^MBH^WMHPWHIJI
v
:   ,.,:..���      '.;^7 ��� r.
PAGE  SIX
WESTMINSTER  DAILY  NEWS
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER ��3, 1312.
TRICK MIND READING
IHOW   MARVELLOUS  STAGE   P~\-
F0RMANCE6 ARE  WORKED.
So-called "Thought Transmission" or I
Our Stage Ic Operated by a Seriei |
of Clevar Devices Perfected Aftei j
Years of Practice and V.'hich Rarely ;
Fail to Dupe the Con.lding Publit
���A General Take-In.
"What is tliisr" "Tliat io a walking-
stick."    "What is this?"    "That is sl
handkerchief. '  "And what is this?' j
"A cigarette caae." "And this?" "Thai:
is a program."
No doubt most persons have been
at a performance when an act of this
kind has beeu performed. A lady is
seated in a chair in the centre of the
'stage, with a bandage tied rouud her
head. Perfectly "blindfolded," she describes various articles collected from
:tf.s audience, states Uie numbers writ-
\iep upon a blackboard by a meniboi
of the audience, adds the numbers up,
jftDc! gives Uie total, beiore the gentle-
man himseli can add the lirst row ol
���figures. She may also tell the color ol
'a handkerchief, and name any kind ol
11a', which had been chose i.
' I have performed the second-sight
lact with a lady assistant hundreds of
times, and my methods have never
:been solved. I always found tiiat l
.could gull Uie public with the simplest
trick.
When I was performing the second-
eight act, my lady arsistant would
[name a dozen articles, while sh.e was
llllindfolded. Ol course, we had arranged before the show t.> pick a
walking-stick first, a handkerchief second, a cigarette-case third, and so on,
;until we had picked a dozen, and we
'took particular notice to select com- '*
\moii arlic.es, \jhicn we could always i
'find in an auuieuce. Tl.is wi j our
ofH.-n.ng trick.
Another successful trick was known
as "mental te] .pathy."
1 would cau for a memler of the
audience to cum. tip beside me on the
6tage.*I woud tuen explain to Uie
audience that 1 should come down
among tliem and transmit iny
thoughts to the lady on the stage,
thus enabling her to name any num-
<ber or word the gentleman puts on
.the blackboard. The lady would be
.blindfolded, and 1 undertook not to
,utter a word or sound, or n.ake any
sign whatever that would assist her.
I The gentleman would write numbers
on the board, and she would call them
out as fast as he could put them down,
while sometimes she would even tell
him which number he had crossed
out.
lt was really quite easy for the lady
%o perforin these mysteries. The
chair she sat upon was made w.th a
hollow leg. fitted to a tube, whicii led
to the centre of the chair back, where
the lady could rost her head. A
6peaking-tu.be, which was connected
to the bottom of the hollow leg, ran
under the sta-.-e floor to the wings,
where an assistant was concealed, so
es to be invisible to the audience or
tlie person on the stage. At the same
time he could see all that was going
on, When the gentleman put the iig-
ures on the board, the assistant would
call them softly to the lady through
the speaking-tube.
Of course, the chair was fastened
down to the stage, otherwise, if it
were move^l, it would disconnect the
Speaking-tube, and thus spoil the
whole show.
An interesting trick I used to perform 1 called "thought transmisaian,','
Three pieces of card were handed
round to three members of the audience, also three envelopes, each recipient being requested to write three
figures on his card. He then put it in
the envelope, to prevent me seeing
what the numbers were. After this
was done, the cards, still in tlieir envelopes, were handed to u fouith gentleman.
\ Then 1 stepped on the staje again,
and instructe I thia*gentleman to place
tlie numbers on the carls together
to form a sum, and add it up. When
this was dune, 1 asked the gentleman
to lix a steady gaze at the lady's forehead fur a lew seconds, and think
of the total of the sum. Then "thought
transmission" would take place, and
the lady would read the thoughts that
were working in his mind.
After a reasonable period my assistant called out "1,375." I then asked
the gentleman if this was thu correct
total to his sum, and, to the astonishment of all, it was found to be correct.
This trick was rt ally absurdly sim
pic. 1 ha I concealed under my waist*
coat three envelopes each containing
a card upon which Were written the
numbers 7'J'i, 395, and ,'tj* respectively,
in different handwriting-. After ' I
had handed the plain card- round, and
the figures wen- written upon them,
nnd the cards placed in the envelope.-,
I gathered thein up, snd in the aet of
stepping .a the stage I changed them
for the three I had concealed under
my waistcoat.
It was the latter I then handed to
Ihe fourth gentleman to add up the
sum. Of course, lie thought these
had been written by the other members of the audience, as they were In
different handwtitings; while'the other
three gentlemen, each not knowing
what number., the others had put on
the cards, thought the total was correct. They did not gue<s I 1 ad changed the cards for a sum nt my ewn; but
that, of course, was why the answer
to the 8u.n \V(IS correct.
SOFT SHELL CRABS.    '
They  Don't  Remain  8oft  Vary Lonfl
Aftsr ths Shedding. ,
The supply of soft crabs for market
Is obtained by catching hard crabs and
keeping them uuUt they shed their
shells.
For this purpose large rectangular
floats, made of laths and planking,
tre employed, and three or four times
every day the stock on hand ls carefully luspected, nil the soft crabs being
picked out and packed without delay.
Tliey are put Into shallow boxes of
moist seaweed, from ten to thirty-five
dozen In a hox, according to the size
of the animals.
When the packing Is done carefully
the occupants may tie kept alive from
sixty to seventy hours after leavtng
tiie water.
Crabs have been shipped all the way
from the Chesapeake to Canada, arriving at tbeir destination tn good condition. In summer, of course, Ice Is
used.
Hut where soft crabs are concerned
It Is necessarv that they shall reach
the market quickly, because tlieir new
shells harden with great rapidity.
At the end of twelve hours the shells
are like parchment and In three or
four days the crab Is as hard as ever���'
hence unfit for use ln the form most
highly approved by epicures.���New
York Herald.
DICKENS  AS  HE  WORKED.
During Long Walks He Evolved the
Plots of His Stories.
Every Christmas and every summer
for twenty yenrs Marcus Stone, R. A���
the English painter, used to visit
Charles Dickens at his Tarlous homes,
especially at Gadsbill. near Rochester.
"Dickens," says Stone ln bis reminiscences, "was one of the greatest
and kindest men I ever met He waa
imbued with the true Christian spirit
What particularly struck me at Gads-
hill was the atmosphere of calm and
comfort one felt at once on entering
tbe bouse.
"At 3 o'clock every afternoon we
Used to have a twenty mile walk ln
the country round. Dickens spoke but
little while walking, and this arter a
time led me to discover tbe secret of
his amazing industry. He sat only for
a few houra at bis desk, and I always
wondered bow be could be so prolific
an author.
"Well, owing to his taciturnity tn our
country walks I began to suspect that
It was then he evolved most of the
plots of bis novels. His brain was active all the time and the task of reproducing on paper the things be imagined and thought about became more or
less a mechanical process."
street to 470 feet West.
Knox street. All.
Cedar street, All.
Buchanan avenue from Hospital street
to Sherbrooke street.
Blair avenue from Hospital street  to
Sherbrooke street.
And that said works be carried out
In accordance with the provisions of
the "Local Improvement General Bylaw 1912."
And the City Engineer and City Assessor having reported to the Council
in accordance with the provisions ot
the said Bylaw upon the said works
giving statements showing the
amounts estimated to be chargeable
against the various portions of real
property to be benefited by the said
works and other particulars and the
said reports of the City Engineer and
City Assessor having been adopted by
the Council.
Notice is hereby given that the said
reports are open for inspection at the
Office of the City Assessor, City Hall,
Columbia street, New Westminster,
B. C��� and that unless a petition
against the proposed works abovo
mentioned signed by a majority of tho
owners of the land or real property to
be assessed as ch rged ln respect ot
such works representing at least one-
half In value thereof is presented to
the Council within fifteen days from
the date of the first publication of this
notice the Council will proceed with
the proposed improvements under
such terms and conditions as to the
payment of the cost of such Improvements as the Council may by By-law
ln that behalf regulate and determine
and also to make the said assessment.
Dated this 12th day of November.
A. D., 1912.
W. A. DUNCAN.
City Clerk.
Date   of   flrst   publlcaUon,   Nov.   13,
1912. (681
Russian Discipline.
During tbe review of the army recruits In Vilna some years ago tbe gen-;
eral In command, turning to one of the
new soldiers, asked hlm, "Wbat Is military discipline'*"
"It Is that a soldier has got to do
just what he's told by his superior
offlcer, only nothing against the czar,"
was the answer.
"All right, then. Yon take your cap,
bid your comrades good by and go and
drown yourself in that lake ther*
Look sharp!"
Tears glistened In the soldier's eyes.
He gazed earnestly aud prayerfully at
his commander, turned suddenly about
and rushed off to the lake. He was on
the very brink before he was overtaken nnd stopped by the sergeant
sent to prevent the Involuntary suicide.
Result of Intense Emotion.
A young cat was seen to catch his
first mouse. As he was carrying It in
triumph to the house he suddenly became paralyzed In the hind quarters
and for an hour remained stretched ou
the ground. Then movement returned,
but It was observed from the way he
knocked hlms��lf against the furniture
and made no effort to take food which
was given to him tbat be was blind.
Tor two hours he remained In this condition. Finally the blindness suddenly
vanished, and pussv was himself again.
Ills wus a case of hysterical paralysis,
brought on by tbe intense emotion of
bis brat mouse.
Every Woman
tn Interested and etiouUl know
about tbe wonderful
Marve| WM^Spjs,
A��k yonr <Jrage1��t fbr   .
It lr he cnmiut, supply
the  HARV1X, accept no
other, but send stump fbr 111ns-  .
troted book���nenlod.   It gives full
partlcuUm nnd dirrrttons tnviloabls
to UiUw.WiNl>soitsi:i>i��i,vco..wiiidM>r.Oii��
General AgenU for Canada.
��� IT/    OF    NEW     WESTMINSTER.
CITY     OF     NEW    WESTMINSTER.
Local  Improvement Notice.
The Municipal Council of the City of
New Westminster having by resolution determined and specified that it
is desirable to carry out the following
works, that is to say: To lay Main
Sewers, laterals and Connections and
works contingent thereto in Section 2,
A. District, of the  Sapperton   Sewer
age Scheme, to which the following
area is tributary:
Columbia Btreet, Cumberland street to
Braid street.
Keary street, Columbia street to Brunette street.
Nelson street All..
Spruce street All.
Sherbrooke street, Columbia street to
Fader street.
Major street, Columbia street to Fader
street.
Braid street, Columbia street to Fader
street.
Fader  street,   Sherbrooke   Btreet   to
Braid street.
Kelly   street,   Sherbrooke   street  to
Braid Btreet.
Brunette street,   Columbia   street   to
Keary street.
And that the said works be carried
out ln accordance with the provisions
of the "Local Improvement General
Bylaw, 1912."
And the City Engineer and City As
sessor having reported to the Council
ln accordance with the provisions of
the said Bylaw upon the satd works
giving statements showing the
amounts estimated to be chargeable
against the various portions of real
property to be benefited by the said
works and other particulars and the
said reports of the City Engineer and
City Assessor having been adopted by
the Council.
Notice is hereby given that the aald
reports are open for inspection at th1*
Office of the City Assessor, City Hall.
Columbia Street, New Westmlnater,
B. C, and that unless a petition
against the proposed works abovn
mentioned signed by a majority of the
owners of the land or real property to
be assessed as charged in respect ot
such works representing at least one-
half in value thereof Is presented to
the Council within flfteen days from
the date of the first publication of this
notice the Council will proceed with
the proposed Improvements under
such terms and conditions as to the
payment of the cost of such improvements as the Council may by By-law
ln that behalf regulate and determine
and also to make the said assessment.
Dated this 12th day of November,
A. D��� 1912.
W. A. DUNCAN,
City Clerk.
Date of flrst publication November 13,
1912. (69)
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
Very Unexpected.
The teacher in the infants' school
was explaining the principle of subtraction.
"Now,   Euppose,"    she  said,    "that
rpolher put   seven   cherrie-   on   tlie
table and little  Willie cume in and
;took one.   How did mother know that
:one was gone wben sin- did not see
little Willie take UP"
She paused for an answr. expecting
some  child   to   say,   "Because   there
jwould be six left."
'   But, instead,   little   Ena.'blushing
furiously, answered:
"I 'spect Willie forgot to hide the
sliiai und the stone!"
Local   Improvement Notice.
The Municipal Council of the City of
Mew Westminster having by resolution determined and speolfied that it is
lesirable to carry out the following
works, that ls to say: Te lay Main
���'.ewers, Laterals and Connections and
works contingent thereto In Section 2
'i. District of the Sapperton Sewerage
?cheme, to which the following area is
Tributary:
DeBeck street from  Cemetery street
to Columbia street.
Strand street from Cemetery Btreet to
Columbia street,
Alberta street from  Richmond  street
to Columbia street.
Simpson street from Richmond stree'
to Columbia street.
Keary street from Richmond street to
Columbia street.
Hospital     street   from     Richmond
street to Columbia street.
Sherbrooke    street    from    Columbia
CITY OF NEW WESTMINSTER.
LOCAL IMPROVEMENT NOTICE
The Municipal Council of the City of New Westminster having by resolution determined and specified that it is desirable to carry out the following works, that is to say: To lay Outfall and Trunk Sewers and works contingent thereto in Section 2, of the Sapperton Sewerage Scheme, to whicii
the following area is tributary:
District A.���
Columbia Street from Cumberland Street to Braid Street.
Keary Street from Columbia Street 10 Brunette Street.
Nelson Street, All.
Spruce Street, All.
Sherbrooke Street from Columbia Street to Fader Stieet.
Major Street from Columbia Street to Fader Street.
Braid Stroet from Columbia Street to Fader Street.
Fader Street from Sherbrooke Street to Braid Stieet.
Kelly Street from Sherbrooke street to Braid Street.
Brunette Street from Columbia Street to Keary Street.
District B.���
DeBeck Street from Cemetery Street io Columbia Street.
Strand Street from Cemetery Street to Columbia Street.
Alberta Street from Richmond Street to Columbia Street.
Simpson  Street from  Richmond  Str-et to Columbia Street.
Keary Street from Richmond Street to Columbia Street.
Hospital Street from Richmond Stret to Columbia Street.
Sherbrooke Street from Columbia Stieet to 470 feet West.
Knox Street, All.
Cedar Street, All.
Buchanan Avenue from Hospital Street to Sherbrooke Street.
Blair Avenue from Hospital Street to Sherbrooke Street.
District C���
Eighth Avenue from Richmond Street to 400 feet North of Wlnthrop Street
Richmond Street from Eighth Avenue to Lee Street.
Winthrop Street from Richmond Street to Eighth Avenue.
Elmer Street, All.
Burnaby Street, All. ... *
Surrey Street, All.
Ladner Street, All.
Kent Street, All.
Lee Street, All.
Carnegie Street from Matsqui to 300 'eet North.
Digby Street from Matsqui to 300 feet North.
Coutts Street from Matsqui Street tc Burnaby Street.
Macdougal Street from Matsqui Stre> t to 300 feet North.
Tenth Avenue from Matsqui Street   o Burnaby Street.
District D.���     '
Eighth Avenue from William Street to Richmond Street.
Carnegie Street from Scott Street to Matsqui Street. '
Digby Street from Scott Street to Matsqui Street.
Coutts Street from 300 feet South of Chilliwack Street to Matsqui   Street
Mahoney Street, All.
McDougal Street from Mahoney Street to Matsqui Street.
Tenth Avenue from 300 feet South of Chilliwack Street to Matsqui   Street.
Matsqui Street from Eighth Avenue to Tenth Avenue.
Water Street from William Street to Bcott Street.
Langley Street from William Street to Scott Street.
Cliilliwack Street from William Street to Scott Street.
Scott Street. All.
William Street, All.
District E.���
Richmond Street 150 feet South of Alberta Street to Eighth Avenue.
Archer Street All. ��� ,
Devoy Street All.
Munday Street All.
Alberta Street from Richmond Street, 70�� feet Westward.
Sir les street from McKay Street to Rlohmond Street.
School Street, All.
SV.-brooke Street from Eighth Avenue to Richmond Street.
McKay Street All.
PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER.
Specifications, agreements of Bale,
deeds, business letters, etc; circular
work specialist. All work strhtly con
fldentlal. M. Broten, Room 6, Mer
Chant l��ink Bldg.    Phone 715
FRATERNAL.
L. O. O. M., NO. 854���MEETS ON
first, second and third Wednesdays
in each month ln K. ut P. hall at
8 p.m. H. J. Leatuy, dictator; J. H.
Price, secretary.
The
Royal Bank of Canada
Capital paid up $11,500,000
Reserve   $12,500,000
The Bank has 350 branches,
extending ln Canada from tin
Atlantic to the Pacific, ln Cuba
throughout the island; also in
New Foundland, Porto Rico, Bahamas, BarbadoB, Jamaica, Triu
ldad, Dominican Republic, Ne.v
York and London, Eng.
Drafts Issued withuut delay
on all the principal towns and
cities ln the world. These ex-
oelent connections afford every
banking facility.
New Weatminater Branch,
Lawford  Richardson, Mgr.
1. O. O. F AMITY LODGE NO. 17���
The regular meeting of Amity lodge
No. 27,1. O. O. F., ls held every Mon , =?
day night at 8 o'clock in Odd Fel-' f>        ��� g*    ma ���
lows ball, corner Carnarvon and j Kanlr nf M/intra**!
Eighth atreet. Visiting brethem WOHIV Ui ITlUlllI CCU
cordially invited. C. B. Bryson, N.
O.; R. A. Merrlthew, V. Q.; W. C.
Coatham, P.G.. recording aecretary;
H. W. Sangster, financial secretary.
ESTABLISHED 1817.
PROFESSIONAL.
ADAM SMITH JOHNSTON, Barrister-
at-Law, Solicitor, Etc. 552 Columbia
street, New Westminster, B.C. Telephone 1070. Cable address "Johnston." Code, Western Union. Offices,
Rooms 6 and 7 Ellis block.
J. STILWELL CLUTE. barrlster-at
law, aolicltor, etc; corner Columbia
and McKenzie streeta. New West
minster. B. C. P. O. Box 112. Telo
phone 710.
J. P. HAMPTON BOLE, BARRISTER,
solicitor and notary, 610 Columbia
Btreet.   Over C. P. R. Telegraph.
CAPITAL (Pald-Up) $16,000,000.00-
RESERVE    $16,000,000.00.
Branches throughout Canada an*
Newfoundland, anc In London, England, Lew York, .Chicago and Spokane,
U.S.A., and Mexico City. A general
banking bualneas transacted. Letters of Credit lasued. available wltb
correspondents In all parte of tke
world.
Savings Bank Dipanmeat���Deposit*
-ecel��ed In sums of fl and upward,
snd Interest allows 1 at I par cent, per
annum (prtseit r��te).
Total  Assets over $186,000,000.00
NEW WESTMINSTER BRANCH,
O. D. BRYMNER. Manager.
McQUARRlE, MARTIN & CASSADY,
Barrlaters and Solicitors. Rooms 7
and 8, Guichon block, New Westminster. Geerge E, Martin, W. G.
McQuarrie and George L. Cassady.
WHITESIDE & EDMONDS���Barristers and Solicitors, Westminster
Trust block, Columbia street, New
Westminster, B.C. Cable address
"Whiteside," Western Union. P.O.
Drawer 200. Telephone 69. W. J.
Whiteside. H. L. Edmonds.
AUDITOR AND ACCOUNTANT.
U J. A. BURNETT. AUDITOR AND
Accountant. Tel. R 128. Room
Trapp block.
WE WANT YOUR ORDER
CASH IF YOU CAN.
*     CREDIT IF YOU CANT.
We bave no bot air to peddle;
Just legitimate tailoring.
J. N. AITCH1S0N
MERCHANT TAILOR
38 Begbie Street.
BOARD OF TRADE���NEW WEST-
minster Board ot Trade meets in tbe
board room, City Hall, as follows'
Third Friday of each month; quar
terly meeting on the tlilrd Friday of
February, May, August and November at 8 p.m. Annual meetings on
the third Friday of February. New
members may be proposed and
elected at any monthly or quarterly
meeting. S. H. Stuart Wade, secretary.
LAND  REGISTRY ACT.
Re the southwest quarter of Section
33, Township 10, in the District of
New Westminster.
Whereas proof of the loss of Certificate of Title Number 7338F, issued ln
the name of George Seeley, has b4en
filed in this office.
Notice is hereby given that I shall,
at the expiration of one month from
the date of the first publication hereof, in a daily newspaper published ln
the City of New Westminster, issue a*
duplicate of the said certificate, unless
In tbe meantime valid objection be
made to me tn writing.
C. S. KEITH,
District Registrar of Titles.
Land Registry Office, New Westminster, B.C., October 30, 1912.       (1)
District F	
Richmond Street from Cumberland Street te 159 feet South of Alberta St
Carroll Street. All.
Harvey Street, All.
Dlvon Street, All.
Fisher StrSect. All.
Cumberland Street from Harvey Street to Columbia Street.
And that the said works he carried out In accordance with the provl
slons of the "Local Improvement General Bylaw 1S12."
And the City Engineer and CltyAaaessor havln* reported to the Conn
ell In accordance with the provisions of the said Bylaw upon the said work*
giving statements showing the amounts estimated to be chargeable agalns'
thai various portions of real property to be benefited bv the said works and
other particulars and the said reports of the City Engineer and City Asse3
sor having been adopted by the Council.
Notice ls hereby given that the said reports are open for inspection at
the offices of the City Assessor, City Hall, Columbia Street, New Westminster, B. C. and that unless1 a petition against the proposed works above mentioned signed by a majority of the ov ners of the land or real property to be
assessed as charged In respect of such works representing at least one-half
In value thereof Is presented to the souflcll within fifteen days from the
date of llie first publication of this notice the Councll will proceed with the
proposed Improvements under such terms-and conditions as to the payment
of the cost of Buch Improvements as the Council may by By-law In that behalf regulate and determine and alHo to make the said assessment.
Dated this Twelfth day of November, 1912.
W. A. DUNCAN,
City Clerk.
Date of first publication, November 13h, 1912.' (TO)
CANADIAN PACIFIC
B.C. Coast Service
VANCOUVER-VICTORIASEATTLE
SERVICE.
Leaves Vancouver for Victoria 10
a, m��� S p. tn. and 11:45.
Leaves Vancouver for Seattle lt
a. m. and 11 p. m
Leaves Vancouver for Nanaimo 3
p.m.     '
Leaves Vancouver for Prince Rupert and Northern Points 10 p. in
Wednesdays.
NORTHERN   BOATS   FOR   PRINCE
RUPERT.
Leaves Vancouver every Wednes
day at 10 p.m.
Chilliwack Service
Leaves Westminster 8 a.m. Monday.
Wednesday and Friday.
Leaves Chilliwack 7 a.m. Tuesday
rhursday and Saturday.
���} ED. GOULET,
Atcent, New Weatmlnster.
H. W. BRODIE,
G. P   A.. Vancouver
FALL SUITINGS
ENGLISH    WOR8TED, SCOTCH
TWEED,   IRISH   SERGE, etc.,   Just
Arrived.    Perfect Fit and Workman-
shllp Guaranteed.
Hee Chung
Merchant Tailor
701 Front Street
gftCANADIAN PACIFIC
W RAILWAY CO.
Winter Schedule
7:55 for Toronto and Nicola branch.
14:00 for St. Paul    and   Kootenay
poiuts.
18:20 for Agassiz Local.
19:55 for Imperial   Limited,   Montreal and Okanagan points.
For reservation and other   particulars apply to
ED. GOULET, Agent
New Westminster
OtsH. W. Brodie, G.P.A.. Vancouver
Westminster
Transfer Co*
Office Phone 185.      Barn Phone 137
Begbie Street.
Baggage Delivered Promptly to
any part of tbe city.
light and Heavy Hauling
CITV OF NEW WESTMINSTER. B.C
Sole agent for
Hire's Root Beer
Mineral Waters,   Aerated Water*-
Manufactured by
J. HENLEY
NEW WESTMINSTER, B. C.
Telephone II IIS. Office: Prlncens 8t
WE   HAVE
LOTS
ON
Lulu Island
Rising Sim Realty Co'y
Phone 868. Room 4 Traoo Block,
Subscribers
who do not receive   The Newt before
8 a.m. should
TELEPHONE 999
and make complaint. Only In thla way
may an efficient delivery be main-
talned. ' ���! . ���._ .
���*~^^^**m*mm
j -  . ������   m����   w���
**   p-**m**m*-
mmmk^smmm
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 19*12.
WESTMINSTER DAILY MEWS
PAGE   SEVEN
InmmumutitMmutmvut
Captain
Joe Sturgis
A Man Who Could Pilot
a Boat In a Fog
By F. A. MITCHEL
S��M��imWtMM��tHMM��MMHlS
When 1 was a student at a New Eng-:
land college 1 used to spend my vaca-'
tions on the seacoast I was fond of,
wnter sports-lioatlng. fishing, bathing
���aud In the autumn shooting, though;
since the season for tbe latter came1
when 1 was engaged at my studies I
could only enjoy it for a day or two'
flt a time.
My favorite plnce for enjoying an
outing was a village on tbe coast of:
Maine. There is no coast ln America
so sought during the hot months, for'
there ls none so In-dutiful. Tbere are'
Islands and estuaries without number,
wblle tbe air ls pure nnd bracing. Tbe
only drawback Is tbe fogs, wblcb will
occasionally sweep suddenly ln from
tbe ocean and at times last several
days.
The village of B., which came to be
tbe usual scene of my summer outings,
looked out upon a bay beyond which
was the boundless ocean. Sometimes
I lay ln a hammock bung between
trees, watching ships pass far out on.
tbe horizon, dreaming of tbe people,
walking ahout on tbem, shifting tbeir
sails, at meals, or Idling as 1 was. I
had but to turn my eyes nearer, to an
Island beautiful as a fairyland rising
out of a fairy sea, or. still nearer, to
a strip of ground In tts native Btate,
brown, yellow and green patches leading up to a snow white cottage, behind wblcb was a thicket of cedars.
Captain Joe Sturgis, a man wbo had
acquired his title as master of a fishing smack, was my principal companion. He fished for a living, but ln July
and August, tbe fishing being poor, be
rested, for he had Dindr enough money
at bis vocation to build himself a snug
bome and bave more Invested st Interest
Sturgis wns n plain, quiet, thoughtful, uneducated man, but 1 always
felt that If he anil I were obliged to
float for our lives and there was but
one plank between ns be would leave
me the plank, tie used a single masted boat about twenty feet long fnr
fishing purposes, and during my vacations that liont was my second home.
Tbe captain nnd I mnde cruises tn her
among tbe Islands of tho coast. There
were four bunks In ber, a small rook
stove and mess kit. At night we
would nnchor In some Inlet or little
bay and sfter snpiier be lulled to sleep
by the sound of wavelets beating
against the side of the boat. That
was years agone. but to this duy I can
hear the soothing splash, In the morning we would be np with the aim. anil
I would take a cold water plunge
while the captain was frying the tish
nnd making the coffee for breakfast.
Then up would come tbe anchor nnd
we would be off, we cored not where,
since the whole of these beautiful waters with their green promontories nnd
Islands were ours. 1 Miring these
cruises I was as near heaven as It Is
possible for one on enrth to be.
Storms we had, of course, bnt we
were either scudding before the wind,
racing with tbe wblte caps, or heating
np agnlnst tbem. now and again get
-ting a ducking, bucket* of spray dashing over us.   Bnt whnt did we care,
protected as we were by our oilskins?
Tbe foga. I admit 1 never liked,   'i he
-coast lo that region Is full of reefs,
and If our boat should strike a sunken
point of rock It would go down, leaving na tn struggle wltb tbe waves and
likely to find a sepulcber In the belly
of  some  flsh.    Tbe  roast  within  a
���down or twenty mll����e of B. Xturgls
knew m well tbat be could navigate
tola boat even In a fog.   1 ones asked
blm bow be did It. and be replied In
���tbe same way be walked In his own
bouse at night    A current here, the
-aonnd of water hearing against rocks
there and other Indications were vai
uoble assistants In keeping tbe course
and avoiding tbe rocks.
Sturgis seemed to be a pnrt of the
region he Inhabited and felt tbst aft.-r
death he wonld still be a pnrt of tt.
lie would say to me:
"I've often thought how I'd like to
toe free from my body and go wher*
1 like, to borer als)w tbe ledges over
which tbe wares dash In a storm that
we dare not go near In ��� boat and un
which there la no footing. It would
he fine to skim with Ibe crest of a
wave till It lieglns to enrt on a bench,
watch It break and aestWr In foam on
the sand."
"In a fraction of a second.- I ans*
gested. "yoo might bt a thousand
miles away."
"I wouldn't care for that I'm a
home body and never want to go ,.s��ay
from bum*."
Yon mean not more than fifty miles
from bow."
"This hi all borne to mo I alsep Inst
as well In the Immit o' nights im In my
������iiftnge on the slmro, The cottage Is
well anchored for n storm, hut somehow I feel safer riri the water, especially nn a lee shore. Yoii see, there's
nothing to break the force tf the wind
where my house Is built hut In a
storm If I'm near shore I can run Into
nny snug cote aOd fto th sleep peac*
tui."
"And If ron're out at sear
"Ob. then I take In and close all Mill
and let ber rids.   If I'm to the wlud-
arurd of a shore I drop the anchor."
"Don't need even a Jib for steerage7"
"No; with sails all In she won't go
over.   She's well ballasted."
These conversations with tbe captain led me to think tbat tbose wbo
live near to nature, though uneducated, have a more comprehensive view
of the universe, Including themselves,
not as brief existences, but ns appearing under different forms. Houses and
books tend to destroy thl�� more extended view of ourselves. The bouses
ttclude what Is grand In nnture; the
books lead us to reason. And, exclusive of revelation, what basis have
we for our reasoning? Is not one who
takes hls Inspiration from nature more
free to follow bis higher Instincts?
During the llrst winter ufter I was
graduated from college 1 heurd of the
death of uiy old friend Captain Joe
Sturgis. He died In his bed, and It at
once occurred to me that bis spirit,
freed from the clay ot bis physical
body, went right out over ibe water
aud tbe Islands among which be bad
so often sailed lu bis slower going bout
After his deatb I did not care to go to
B. und did oot see tbe place for ten
years. Tbeu It occurred to me ihnt I
would like to revisit tbe scenes I bad
so much enjoyed duiing my youth. 1
hud long beeu Immersed In business,
und If 1 got an outing it wus seldom
ror more than a fortnight Tbe Intlu-
euce of nature bad long ago passed
from me, and if I thought or tbe skipper wbo had been my companion It was
not Hitting In spiritual form over tbe
waves, but mouldering tn tbe cburcb-
yurd at ll.
i found Ibe place but little changed.
I doubt lf twenty houses had been
added to tbose tbut bud composed the
towu ten years before. I met persons
whom 1 bud ktiorfn, but tbey, as well
as I, bad grown older. Sturgis' old
boat was still ln existence and lu use.
1 had sailed ber lu fair weather both
with the captain and alone, und i remembered the coast for u distance of,
Hay. ten miles from B. sufficiently to
tuke the bout over It So 1 got into ber
one morning Intending to revisit some
of the nearby scenes of former years.
I took no one wltb me. preferring to
go alone.
Tbe morning was bright and beautiful. 1 spent u couple of hours cruising
about noticing old landmarks, or, rather, old sea murks, when, suddenly looking eastward. 1 saw the fog bank.
There was little breeze, und I could
not reach land before 1 was enveloped
in one of tbose fogs so thick tbat tbey
are really tine ruin. I drifted for hours,
hoplug uli tbe wblle that It would lift,
but It did not. It cume upon me at
noon, aud when night fell I was still
enveloped ln lt
Tbnt night Is ever to be remembered
as Ihe most frightful of my life. There
was no wind, und If there bad been 1
would not buve dared avail myself of
It, for 1 had uo compass uud, lu any
event wns beset wltb sunken rocks.
I passed tbe afternoon und the nlgbt
till ueur morning in un agony of suspense, without food or waier. then tell
Into either a stupor or n Bleep.
1 bad tuken position ueur the how
where I could watcb. sitting on tbe
deck wltb my back resting agalnsl lb/
must It must huve beeu ueur dawn
thut looking uft. I saw. or thought t
suwf a dim form at the tiller, while the
sail wus tilled, though the fog bud nol
lifted.
I linve never since been quite sure
whether I wu* uwuke. half asleep or
asleep and dreaming. Nevertheless
some one was si the helm aud tbe bout
was moving. It did uot occur to me lo
get up and go aft to see who my pilot
was, and this has led me to think Unit
I dreamed. I aat where I was. looking
tnlo tbe mist uow ami again, hearing
ibe swish uf waves over protruding
rocks, ut limes sailing ueur enough to
tbem to see their dim. durk bulk.
I knew that tbere wns ar had lieen
but one mau at li. wbo could sail a
bout In those waters In a fog. aud Unit
man waa Captain Sturgis. I was imis-
sessed wltb tbe Idea Hint time bud
been turned back ten yenrs snd I waa
again sailing wltb my old friend.
Yet I knew tbut Captuln Sturgis waa
dead.
How long I sailed thus I don't know,
but when It came light enough for
iue to see. the fog lifted, and I reeog-
nlxed on either side ol me rock*, by
wbich I knew ibut I was emerging
from one of the most tortuous, dangerous channels ou tt>t�� const. There
was a fair breexe. and the thle ws*
witb me. I wus h>U fur Irofli l< ami
���aw persons on tue allow, evidently
looking ont at me.
I spran'g to the tiller, which wss deserted, and Muted my course toward
H. lu bait nu bour I reached ibe lauding arid was welcomed by anxioos
friends, who hail feared for my safe-
ty. They usked ine bow in tbe name
of conscience I had got tbrough tue
channel from wblcb they hurt seen wa
emerge, wrapped In fog. without striking tbe rocks. I told them I dWnt
know; II must bnve been either luck
or Providence. I did not aay whnt I
believed and bnve since oflen partly
believed that I Had been piloted ny
the dlsemlndled spirit ot my twlnvea
friend. Captain Joe sturgis.
I left H tbe name Any, and I hsv��
never cared to go tbere. alnee Ant
only was I unstrung by having been
tossed helpless on an ocean without
being able tn see half a down ynrds.
but tben waa something frightful in
my narrow escape. I did not shudder
at Having been piloted, na I believed,
by my old friend; but taking my experience altogether, I had tio desire to
���all In those waters again.
Time haa taken away the horror of
the altuntloii and strengthened, nr,
, rather,' warmed my soul toward hlm
whom I cannot bnt consider to lie living
a renewed lift among the scenes he so
wfll loved during his physical life and
who, remembering me affectionately,
cam* to oy balp la tbs Past of tar
troubf*   _     ������    ^--r-
SPELLING  IN  ENGLAND.
They 8ay Over Ther* It Is Chaotic,
and Thev S��ek to R��*��rm I*.
A campaign ln fuvor of spelling reform ls to be conducted lu London and
the provinces ln the autumn ami win-
Ter.
Mr. William Archer, nnder the uus-
plces of the Slinplitied Spelling society,
is to conduct a lecturing tour on his return from the east, and lectures wlll
also be delivered by many other well
known meu throughout tbe country.
The lectures will advocate the reform
of what they regard as the present
"chaotic spelling," which they declare
Is so remote from pronunciation Ihnt
It Is uo guide to Ihe Kngiish language
at all nud tends to degrade our speech.
The society desires to fix a standard
of pronunciation of the English language throughout tbe empire.
It has been stated that the English
people overseas, particularly in Australia and South Africa, are deviating so
seriously from the general standard of
speech prevailing ln tbe mother country that the time might come when
visitors from these parts of the empire
might fail to make themselves understood ln Loudon.
Mr. Tate, director of education" ln
Melbourne, bus suggested several spelling reforms to which effect has been
given in tbe official papers issued by
hi* ilcpusiiuent. Discussions buve
taken place, nud the council of public
education iu Melbourne is addressing a
letter to the president of the board of
education in London urging upon bim.
In the interest of education, the necessity of a general adoption of u simplified reform of spelling.���London Chronicle.
A BREAKFAST IN CEYLON
I!
would not bring you a more delicious cup of tea
than you may have at your own table by using
bALAllft
It  ia  the world's choicest tea, at its best���the
finest hill-grown Ceylon���in sealed lead packets.
BLACK, GREEN or MIXED
11
7:80���United Statea via O. N. R.
(dally axcept Sunday).. 9 48
20:40���Chilliwack via B. C. tt. it.
(dally exoept. Sunday). 17:30
11:20���Cloverdal* and Port Kells
via O. N. R. (dally except  Sunday) 14:00
11:20���Abbotsford, Huntingdon,
via B. C. E. R. (dally
exceot Sundav)  17:S0
20:40���Cloverdale   via   B.C.E.R.
(dally excent Sunday). 17:30
2:00���Fraser   Arm    and     Alta
Vista and Oakalla ....23:00
OU
RELIABLE HOUSE MOVERS
All work guaranteed.    Estimates
furnished free.
H. G088E, Manager.
903 Dublin Street. Phone 984.
NEW    WE8TMINOTER    MAIL
vrilval:
0:50���Vancouver  via O.
MONTE   CARLO   PAYS   WELL
Enormous Profits Mads by Monaco's
Gilded Gambling Den.
As an example of bow much money
Is nude lb some of the famous gambling dens of Europe and America the
figures of the earnings of tlie most famous gambling plnce tn the world.
Monte Curio, will prove Interesting.
There are nt least a dozen kings and
princes In Europe who receive a revenue from Monte Carlo.
The four descendants of the original
concessionaire. Edward Rlnnc, receive
each $4,500,000 u year. Two of tbem are
princesses. When Prince Roland Bonaparte married Edward Mane's daughter he received $10,000,000, nnd Prince
tieorge of t5reece received the same
sum when he married tlie daughter of
Roland Bonaparte and Marie Rlanc.
The Prince of Monaco's two divorced
wives, one of whom was Miss Alice
Heine of N'ew Orleans, receive large
annual incomes. The state of Monaco
Is entirely supported by the Institution.
Its 20,000 citizens being free from any
tax.
It also pays the Prince of Monncp
20.000.000 francs a year, supports one
of the tinest opera houses ln the world,
a standing army, flfty detectives, whose
duty It Is to persuade would be suicides
lo csrry out their plans outside of the
state, nnd tl provides free funerals nnd
a cemetery for the unlucky ones who
do take their lives when tbey have
seen the wheel of fortune take tbeir
lust cent
And who Is It tbat supports this
plnce? Men and women In equal numher from every corner or the world.���
Mew York Sun..
Closing
     N.  R.
 ' 23:00
1:45���Burnaby  Lake   and   Van-
couvei via B. C. E. R... 7:45
16:45���Vancouver   via   O. N. R.
(daily except Sunday). 14:20
:40���Vancouver via B   C. E. R.
(dally except Sunday). 11:15
2:00��� Vancouver via. B. C. E. R.
(dally except Sunday). 16;00
:8:00���Vancouver via B. C. B. R.
(dally except Sunday) .2u: 30
10:00���Port Mann  (daily except
Sunday)   9:45
10:80���Barnston Islands arrives
Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday, and leaves
Monday,      Wednesday
and Friday 13:13
I:40-Vlctorta via B. C. B. R.~
(daily except Sunday). 11.lf
10:50���Victoria via O. N. R.
(daily except Sunday).20:30
18:00���Edmonds and Central
Park (dally except Sunday)   16:00
16:16���Crescent, Wblta Rock aad
Blaine tdally except
Snnday) 9:4F
11:20���Tynehead  (Tuesday   and
Fridav)         14:00
18:10���Abbotstord, Upper Sumas,
Mataqui, Huntingdon,
etc. (daily except Sunday)    7:15
16:16���United Statea via G. N. R.
(daily excent Sunday)..16:0c
16:16���Hall's Pralrle, Fern Ridge
and Hazlemere (dally
except Sunday) 9:45
11:50���Sapperton and Fraser
Mills dally except
Sunday)   i 7:15
11:50���All points east and Europe (daily) 7:15
18:10���Sapperton and Fraser
Mills     (dally      except
Sunday)   13:15
9:26���All   points east and   Europe  (dally)    ..[13:13
11:60���Coquitlam   (dally   except
Sunday)   7:15
12:00���Central Park, MeKay and
Edmonds (dally except
Sunday)       11.16
10:00���Ladner, Port Gulchon,
Westham Island, Bun
Villa 13:15
13 00��� Eaat Burnaby (dally except Sunday)   13:00
10:0O���Tlmberland (Tuesday and
t Friday)    13:30
10:00���Annieville  and   Sunbury
(daily except Sunday) .13:15
11:20���Rand,' Majuba   Hill   via
B. C. E. R. (Monday
Wedneaday and Friday        9:00
U: 46���Vancouver, Piper's Siding via G. N. R.
(dally except Sundayi   U:2(.
11:20���Chilliwack, Milner, Mt.
Lehmaa. Mdergrove, Otter. Shortreed, Surrey
Centre.Cloverdale.Lang-
ley Pralrle. Murray vllle.
Strawberry Hill, South
. Westminster, Clover
Valley, Coghlan, Bardie, Sperling Station,
Dennison Station, Brad-
ner,    Bellerose, via B.
C. E. R.  (daily except
Sunday)    9:00
11:20���Clayton  (Tueaday, Thursday.   Friday   and   Sat-
SYNOPSIS  OF  COAL   MINING
GULATIONS.
RE-
day
COAL MINING rights ot the Dominion in Manitoba, Saskatchewan aud
'Alberta, the Yukon Territory, the
Northwest Territories and In a portion of the province of British Columbia, may be leased tor a term of twenty-one years at an annual rental . of
|1 an acre. Not more than 2,560 acres
will be leased to one applicant.
Application for a lease must be
made by the applicant ln person to
the Agent or Sub-Agent of the district
In which the rights applied for are
situated.
In surveyed territory the land must
be described by sections, or legal subdivisions of sections, and in unsurvey-
ed territory the tract applied for shall
be staked out by the applicant himself.
Each application  must be    accompanied by a fee of $6 which will be
refunded if the rights applied for are
not available,  but not otherwise.    A
royalty shall be paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate
of five cents per ton.
I    The person operating the mine shall
I furnish the Agent with sworn returns
j accounting  for the full  quantity    of
' merchantable coal mined and pay the
i royalty  thereon.    If the coal mining
rights are not being operated such returns should be furnished   at   least
; once a year.
I The lease will Include the coal min-
; ing rights only, but the leasee will be
I permitted to purchase whatever avail-
I able surface rights may be considered
I necessary for the working of the mine
I at the rate of $10 an acre.
For    full    information   application
should be made to the Secretary ot
the Department of the Interior, Otta-
| wa, or to any Agent or Sub-Agent of
Dominion Lands.
I W. W. CORT.
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
VN. B.���Unauthorized publication of
this advertisement will not be paid
.14:00  for.
How Vienna Helps Brides.
"Lectures Kor Brides" Is the name
of the latest course started by the
Viennese Institution for popular instruction known as the Urania add
Dow advertised all over the city. Tbe
lectures will cover such subjects as
housekeeping, cooking, hygiene, elementary physiology and tbe cart- of
children. Tbougb mainly Intended ror
those who are about to be or have Just
been married, all girls over seventeen
will lie admitted. Tbe course will last
fur eight months, tbere being lectures
on two evenings a week. A small fee
Is charged for the course, hut the poor
run obtain tickets free.���Vienna Cor.
London Standard.
Italy's First Woman Lawyer.
PlgnorliiH Teresa l.abrlols. the flrat
woman lawyer tn Italy, Is a daughter
Of the late Professor Antonio l.nbrlota.
one nf the most versatile uud encyclopaedic Intelligences nf the last century, Having obtained her degree.
Blgnnrlna Labrluln obtained n position
n�� professor nf law ut the Rome university and has entered ihe ranks of
practicing lawyers through a curious
strategy. The law docs not allow women In Italy to practice law, bnt In
another article It establishes the fact
Hint a professor of law In the unlver
slty hns the right nf Iieing Inscribed
among the practicing lawyers,
Aired Hsr Equality.
Introduction of the new reform bill
In Ureal Britain recalls a story lold by
Lady Dorothy Nevill of tbe passage of
llie great reform bill eighty years sgo
this summer. One morning an elderly
couple peacefully sleeping In their four
poster were rudely nwnkeued by tin
excited maidservant bursting Info Ihe
room antl shouting, "It's passed, it's
passed:" "What's passed, yon foul*"
"The reform bill!" Shouted thc girl.
"We're all equal now." After which
she marched out of the room, leaving
the door open as a' sign nf ber new
equality.-Chicago News.
Studies In Criminology.
A course In penal studies wits recently Instituted by the University of Mont-
pelller. France. Physicians, publicists,
lawyer*, (sillce nud court officials were
among those who enrolled for the
course. American ednfaior* hope thut
tbs Interest In criminology wtll lead to
���onwtblnif similar In tbis country.
A HERMIT POR
FIVE YEARS
WHAT would make, the greatest impression on a
man who had been shut away from human intercourse and denied the use of newspapers for five
years���what would most forcibly attract his attention
���on regaining the society of his fellowmen ?
"Well," you say, "he is fairly certain to be interested
in learning whether there's been a change of Government" /
True, and probably he will show
mild excitement if you can tell bim
there baa been a big war ln Europe.
But it won't be until you get down to
a recital of things that come closer to
him, personally, that you'll bring bim
to hia feet with eager questioning.
Tell him a mighty empire bas fallen,
and���so long as It isn't HIS empire���
a drop curtain of highly embroidered
indifference will mask bis face.
But tell him the automobile has been
so simplified that he can now buy one
for the price of a horae and buggy,
and he'll promptly bombard you with
questions.
A revolution in China may be a
world event, but it wouldn't mean aa
much to him aa the perfecting of a
shaving apparatus that would do away
with the necessity of purchasing new
bladea or honing old ones.
If YOU bad been a hermit for the
paBt five years, the news of an earthquake in San Francisco wouldn't really
mean ao much to you as the Information that you can now hear any famous
opera Singer ln your own home at a
coat of a few cents per hour.
Whloh Is only another way of saying
tbat the phonograph ls ot more
PERSONAL interest than an earth:
quake.
You see how it is;   Newspapers carry a "news of t
merchandise" that is just as interesting, just as vital,
as the "news of events" which the editors gather for
us. f
And, since this "news of merchandise" finds its only
expression in the form of Advertising, must we not
admit that the Advertising columns are quite as worthy of our serious attention as the scariest "scare
head" or the mo^t ponderous editorial ?
Shut your eyes to Advertising���and you'shut out the
frews of commercial progress and development���the
h$W9 of things that make life worth the living.       rf
���4'
Advice regarding your advertising problems ia available through any
recognlwd Canadian .advertising sg��ncy, or th�� SscroUor %���������������*���*;
adlan Prsaa Association. Room 803 Lumsden Building, Toronto,
qulry involves no obligation on your part�����o writ*, If Interested.
En-
��� aamamm
,.
I T   rtc-
WESTMINSTER DAILY NEWS
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1012.
"PAY   C*SH   IT   WILL   PAY
YOU".
L
Haveffou mt^de enough Tomato Tickle'(S'do-you for the #Jn��
terf/IMufSt-this is your laat
chance to get gome. Hot house
produ��(^,ia%d good.
7 poun'dl'fcr 25c
20 pbaaU HftH for Ws
Hunt's No. *1 quality Canned
Fruits. Something extra, as
good as mother used to make.
Per can 40c, 2 cans for 75s
PickleSijBpmr, in 40 oz. bottles,
quality of'the best, each ...25s
Heinz Mince Meat, per lb. . .20c
Chutney, Noels, a real quality
articles, regular 30c, today . .25;
Raisens, regular 2 for 25c, today  3 for 25:
Mix Peel, I.emori   and   Orang3
and Citron, per lb 20s
���   , i ���  i ���
Sardines 3 tins for 25:
Apples, No. L quality, cookers,
per box $1.03
No. 1 Jonathons, per box . .$1.65
DELICATESSEN
Saur Kraut, rielnz, per lb...10c
A few tins   of Hudgon's    Beef
Suet left 19 sell at  25:
i
Try a pound cf our Bpecial line
of CaHe', per lb 25;
Hill Pickles; extra large, per
dozen 30c 2 dozen 75c
Clover Leaf Hutter..3 Iba. $1.00
THE
Public Supply Stores
Y L. ADAMS       S. K. BRIQOS
PHONE 2.
Naming
Your
��� titimaawmti-mSBBBBBm
Executor
COMMON prudence demands
that you choose an
executor, and make
your will.
An executor is
your agent, carefully chosen to carry
out the desires you
expressly stipulate.
This Company,
with its ample capital, wide experience
and trained officers,
is an ideal executor.
Come in and confer with us in confidence.
Dominion Trust
Company, Ltd.
Paid Up Capital and Surplus $2,500,000.00
OBITUARY.
Weather Today.
Victoria, Nov. 19���The feather forecast for the next 24 hours is as follows: Lower Mainland���Light to moil
erate winds, .mostly cloudy with ruin
tonight or Thursday.
Langley, was ln
Mr. Jason Allard,
the city yesterday.
The quarterly board of the Queens
Avenue Methodist church meets this
evening at 9 o'clock. ���
For a square deal in Furniture and
Carpets go to W. E. Fales, corner ol
McKenzie and Agnes streets        (113)
Reeve Sullivan and Councillor MacKenzie, of Surrey, were In the city
yesterday on business.
A. Hardman, the cake man. Get
good bread. Eighth Street Bakery.
Telephone 2S1. (91
The steamer Trader reached porl
yesterday with a cargo of coal from
Vancouver Island. She unloaded at
the C. P. R. wharf.
The .Y. M. C. A. debaters will dismiss the subject of women's suffrage
this evening at their regular gathering. A good attendance is expected
as a great deal of Interest has been
evinced in the topic.
Mrs. Byron Renshaw, Mlss Card's
Hourston, Mr. John Graham. Mr. J. A.
Hamm and Mr. M. J. Knight, Olivet
Baptist Church, Monday, Nov. 25, S
p. m.   Silver collection. (M6)
The northeast corner of McKenzie
and Carnarvon street .with an area of
35 by 50 feet was recently sold by
Mr. Peter Peebles for the sum of
$16,000. It is understood that the pur
shaser is a Revelstoke man.
Why does John Rindal, the tailor,
lell a llrst class $40.00 suit for $30.00'
Because the location of his business ls
Dut of the high rent district. John
Rindal, 612 Carnarvon. (65)
The special meeting of the Political
Equality league advertised for Thurs
day evening Is postponed until further notice. The monthly meeting will
be held as usual at the Royal studio
on Thursday evening at 8 o'clock.
A chorus of forty-five voices will
sing Cooke's "Strike the Lyre" and
choruses from cantata "David," in
Olivet Baptist Church, Monday, Nov.
25. (106)
Mr. E. Martin, sr., farmer, Mission,
was in the city yesterday. Mr. Martin is an old veteran of the brief campaign which ended in the repulse of
the Fenian raiders in 1868. Despite
assurances the old gentleman has not
yet received his well earned medal.
St. Andrews Anniversary. To cela
brate the above occasion the Sons oi
���Scotland will hold a social, danc and
supper in St. George's hall on Friday
November 29, More particulars later
Don't forget the date. (99;
Rev. W. W. Abbott will speak at a
meeting to be held in the Y. M. C. A.
on Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock. Hia
topic will be "The Boy Jesus." The
High school orchestra will be in attendance and a special program of
singing has been prepared. All men
and boys are cordially invited.
Mrs. Byron Renshaw will sine
"With Verdure Clad" from Haydn'.-
"Creation." and Miss Carrie Hourston
will sing Gounod's "Gallia," in Olivei
Baptist Church on Monday evening.
Nov. 25.  - . (106!
Constable Walker, of the city police
force, is .again on duty after being
confined to the hospital and his hom".
for the past five weeks. Mr. Walker
received an Injury to his knee during
the provincial fair and was later re
moved to the Royal Columbian hos
pital.
The city treasury was enriched to
the extent of $50 yesterday morning
when five Orientals failed to answe'
to their names for running or fre-'
quenting an opium joint. Tlie place
was raided by the police who corrall
ed the quintette, together with a full
outfit of snioking utensils, whicii have
since been destroyed.
The younger girls of Holy Trinity
cathedral who form the junior auxiliary recently undertook to support an
orphan girl iu India and are showing
remarkable keenness over it. In ordet
to earn their pledges they are holding
a sale of work on Thursday next
afternoon and evening, In St. George's
hall, when tliey have also arranged
to serve tea. to sell candy and to have
an orchestra. Go around to the hail
on Thursday and give the girls a lTt
(103)
The Queensborough Ratepayers and
Improvement association will hold a
public meeting at lhe Strand hotel this
evening, commencing at 8 o'clock.
Property owners, residents and every-
oii'' interested in the progress of the
island section of the city have been
invited to attend the gathering and
somo lively times are expected if the
storm but breaks.
FraserHoteltAlL
IS MOW OPEN
Meals at all hours.  We serve
the bfelt&fe market supplies
11 BEGBIE Street
WOODS���Mr. E. A. Woods, an ex-
councillor of this city, passed away
at his home in Vancouver on Sunday
afternoon after an Illness of several
months duration. Mr. Woods was very-
well known around Westminster and
was for a time superintendent of the
Royal City Planing Mills.
He was a member of the council for
several years, hls connection terminating in 11)01. He was employed with
the V., V. W. & Y. railway for sonic
time and was one of the prominent
figures In tbe dealings with his com
pany and-the Burrard Inlet Tunnel and
Bridge company over the proposed
Second Narrows bridge.
The funeral will take place in this
city thia afternoon. A special train
will convey the remains from Vancou
ver to the local G. N. depot from
where they will be removed at 2:45
to the Odd Fellows' cemetery for
burial.
BURNABY   CAMPAIGN
Mr. A. 6. V. Macpherson Will Run for
Ward One.
Edmonds, Nov. 18.���"I don't care
whether I gbt ten votes, but you can
oount ine |)i the race for councillor of
ward one," said Mr. A. S. V. Mac
phcrsoh yesterday -a fiernoon.
"My Interests In Edmonds and Eas'
Burnaby are heavy," he went on, "and
while I agree with the majority of the
work passed by the council thc past
two years, I aro of the opinion that a
representative of the people should
devote more time to his constituency
lhan lt Is now practiced by some."
Mr. Macpherson expects opposition
but will lay claim for a clean fight
and if hls opponent beats him, he is
willing to take off his hat.
Mrs. J. Travers, 330 Fourth street, i
will receive on Thursday and after-1
wards on the second Thursday of each
month. |
��� ���    �� !
Mr. and Mrs. W. Bryant and famllv. I
of Nanaimo, are at present on a visit
to Mrs. Bryant's mother, Mrs. Coles,
St.  Mary's vicarage, Sapperton.    Mr. I
and Mrs.   Bryant   intending   making j
their permanent   residence   ln    New
Westminster.
* *    *
Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Haddlngham left
this week for New York where they
board a steamer for Genoa, Italy. Mr.
Haddingham is connected with the
British North America Securities Corporation. Limited, and left this city a
few weeks ago on a trip through the
Pacific states. Mr. and Mrs. Huilding
ham expect lo be away for about a
year.
The Queen's Meat Market
Formerly on Columbia Street, has been
Re-Opened in the Mandeville Block
With a full line of
All Kinds of Fresh and Salt Meats
i
WE ARE HERE TO PLEA3E YOU.    GIVE US   A   TRIAL   ORDER.
Our driver will call for your order.
THE QUEEN'S MEAT MARKET,   F. Ayerst, Prop.
1113 Sixth Avenue. (78) Phone R509
TO INTRODUCE
SURVEYORS AT WORK ON
ROUTE OF NEW MAIN
A gang of surveyors from the city
engineer's office started work yester
day morning ou surveying the proposed route of the new Lulu Island
water main from the reservoir in
Queens park to the foot of Twentietn
street, it" la proposed to Install a
twenty Inch pipe which will be used
to serve the extreme west end of th<?
city in addition to Richmond and
Queensborongh.
Alderman Curtis, chairman of thi
water committee, is arranging a meet
lng with the Richmond municipal
council to dlacuss the new main. It
is proposed to divide the cost between
Westminster and Richmond.
MADAME BEAUCHAMP
MODISTE
A discount of 33 1-3 per cent, will be
given on all orders.   This discount Is
for ten days only.
EVENING GOWNS A SPECIALTY.
Room 6
Collister Block
DELTA MEMBER GOES
TO VICTORIA AGAIN
Mr. Frank J. MacKenzie, M.P.P. for
lhe Delta district, leaves for Victoria
this morning where he will take up
with the governmenl Beveral matters
connected with his constituency. The
proposed ferry hetween Ladner and
Woodwards Landing will be one of the
subjects under consideration.
Mr. MacKenzie is anxious to see a
park reserve made of some propert)
on the Yale-Cariboo Hoad. which i.-
owned by the Dominion government.
The timber leases are held b.v a certain Montreal people, and onc.3 these
are secured, the Dominion authorities
are prepared to turn over the property
for park purposes.
(M nrLADIES'
nDL/ Jta?lored
timv/ suits
CLEANED and PRESSED
Ladies' and   Gents' Suits  dyed
 $3.03
Overcoats Cleaned and Pressed
    ....$1.50
New Velvet Collar 75s
We do repairs at a small additional charge.
ROYAL CITY DYERS
and CLEANERS
345 Columbia St.      Phone R278
WILL ERECT EIGHT STOREY
BLOCK ON COLUMBIA
Though nothing has been definitely
decided the Dominion Trust company
Is proposing to erect an eight storey
building at the corner of Columbia
and Sixth streeta on the property purchased some time ago with this end
In view. The laud, which has a frontage on Columbia street of 44 feet, is
at present covered by the old Ellard
biock. The cost of the proposed new
block is placed at $20(1,000.
The whole proposition ls in a tentative form, however, and will probably not materialise until some time
next year. One or two of the tenants
'of the Ellard block hold long leases
on their premises and negotiations at
present pending with them for the
turnover of Ukbc to the company must
be completed before anything can be
done.
Mr. Hugh Alexander Phillips, of
this city, and Miss Edith Maude New-
by were the contracting parties in <t
nuiet marriage which took place at
the home of Mr. William Newby.
father of the bride, at Sardis, on"-No-
vember 12. The ceremony was performed by Rev. George B. Ridland.
The bride waa assisted by Miss Annie
Newby, while Mr. Phillips was pup-
ported by Mr. Alex. Wallace. The
couple will reside In Westminster.
NOT
TAKE HOME A BOX
���OF OUR���
t
Chocolates and.Bon Bons
Today ? As a toothsome confection there's nothing sweeter
or purer.
They are always fresh, beautifully boxed and come in half
and one pound boxes.
Try them today.
���AT���
RYALL'S
Druggist and Optician
PHONE  57
Westminster Trust Block
RESDfl.CE EOTS
These Are All in Good Locations
and Are Good Investments at the
Prices they can be Bought for Now
1359��� FIFTH 8TREET near Eighth
avenue; 50x132 to lane; a good buy
at $1,066; one-third cash.
1125���SEVENTH AVENUE near 4th
street; two Iota; npper side; 50x130
all cleared aod graded; price $1275
each.
1297���SB FOOT ^LOT ccrner of Sixth
avenue and Ash street; price $4000
on easy terma.
1393���KNOX STREET, SAPPERTON.
66 teet lot in good location; Just ott
Columbia street; price $1200 on
easy terma.
1398���5 LOTS ON TWELFTH AVE.,
near Sixth atreet car line; 50x150
each; some are cleared; atreet ls
graded; price $3000 on good terms
F. J. HART & CO., LTD.
ESTABLISHED 1891.
We writ* Fire, Life, Accident, Employers' Liability,   Automobile
���nd Marina Inaurance.
NEXT YEAR���1913
TME YEAR OF TME BIG RUN
The best way to be prepared for the large catch, Is by Installing
a "YALE" Gasoline Engine tn your fishing boat. This Engine haa
proved to be the best Engine on the Pacific coast for thc Ashing trade.
Ask any one of the many owners of a "VALE" hts opinion of the
"TALE."
We bulld these Engines In two different styles, the Medium and
Heavy Duty sizes.
The Medium Duty Engines are built ln four sizes from 6 h.p. to
20 h.p.
The Heavy Duty Engines are built from 20 h.p. up.
Get your orders in early.   Write for Catalogue.
The Schaake Machine Works
MEAPS ENGINEERING CO. Ltd.
NEW WESTMINSTER, B.C.
YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD.
YOUR CREDIT 18 GOOD.
Our lines comprise Stoves, Ranges, Heaters, Kitchen Utensils ln
Iron, tin and enamelware, Dishes, Glassware, Furniture, Furnishings,
Linoleums, Floor Oil, Etc., Etc. Sewing Machines and Office Furniture.
We will sell you for cash or wlll furnish your house for a small
payment down, balance paid monthly.
C. N. EDMONDSON & CO.
Corner of  12th  Street and  Sixth  Avenue
THE CHEAPEST STORE IN THE CITY.
CMC WATCH FOBS
AT
CHAMBERLIN
Official Time Inspector for C. P. R. and B. C. Electric Railway.
THC
JCWCLCR
Brunette Saw Mills Company, Ltd.
New Westminster, B. C.
Are well stocked up with all kinds and grades of
LUMBER FOR  HOUSE BUILDING
A specially large stock of Laths, Shingles and
No. 2 Common Boards and Dimensions.
Now u the time to build for sals or rent while prices are low
W. R. QILLEY, Phona 122. O. E. OILLEY, Phons 221.
Phones, Office 16 and 12.
Gilley Bros. Ltd.
COLUMBIA STREET WEST.
Wholesale and Retail Dealers In Coal
CEMENT, LIME, SEWER PIPE, DRAIN TILE, CRUSHED ROCK
WA8HED GRAVEL AND CLEAN SAND, PRESSED BRICK ANO
FIRE BRICK. '
FOR SALE
Modern 6-Room House on Hamilton Street;
Modern Conveniences.
PRICE $2850. $500 CASH. BALANCE A9j RENT
DON'T MISS THIS CHANCE
628 and 746 Columbia Street, Phon. 86, New Weatminater, B. C.
ELECTRICAL  FIXTURES,
*mimmammaammmmam*****mmmmss*a***m***********m**m**m*****m*wmms^.^*^^a**mm^mm.**a
Shades, Reading Lamps, etc
WEBER & DAY
Phone 656 . 63 Sixth Street

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