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The Daily News 1917-10-10

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 Selection Board Finishes its
Work
HEN CHOSE
i
N IN
PROVINCE STATED
Members Urged to Perform
Duties Fearlessly and
Impartially
1500 MEN ARE FIRST
'QUOTA FROM PROVINCE
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
VICTORIA, • B.C.,   Oct.  9.—Military headquarters in Victoria today stated 1500 men will compriso
British Columbia's first quota for
the training oamps after the enforcement of the Military Service
act.   The remainder will be summoned to the colors at the rate of
600 a month.   Men who qualify for
class 1 and who do not intend to
claim exemption will have up to
tho date set foil the sitting of the
. tribunals to volunteer.   After that
j nil class 1 men will be held for the
j infantry.
(By Pally News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA, Oot. 9\—With a few minor exceptions, exemption tribunals
throughout the country are now1 complete. The board of selection, established under the Military Service act,
to^appolnt one member of each local
tribunal, finished its work today and
adjourned sine die. Should any vacancy occur in the future or should
It be necessary to create a new tribunal the department of justice will communicate with tbe representatives on
the board of the province concerned
and the representatives will submit
recommended names. From these the
minister of .justice will make the appointment, and the expense and delay
of calling the board together again
will be avoided.
Sir John Gibson, chairman of the
board, in closing today's meeting, declared it was apparent that the entire
sentiment of the board was In favor of
securing fairmlnded men who would
discharge their duties on the tribunals
honestly In regard to claims' for exemption coming before them. It had
been.made manifest that the same
feeling obtained throughout the country.
Urges Impartiality.
On the whole, Sir John thought, the
board of selection had reason to congratulate Itself on the satisfactory discharge ot Its duties. He hoped and
believed it would be found that the tribunals would discharge their dutlep
fearlessly and impartially. Different
views might be taken by tribunals as
to the weight which should be attached
to circumstances urged as grounds for
exemption, but he had no doubt that
a commonsense view would be taken
by members of the tribunals.
Charles P. Plaxton, legal officer of
the department of justice, who has
charge of the executive end of the organisation of exemption tribunals
throughout Canada, remarked tonight
on the ready response shown by Judges
tn making their appointments.
"It is, I think," he said, "a splendid
commentary upon the high judicial
quality of those who serve on the bench
in Canada that, despite the depth ot
public sentiment on the military service issue, they should have responded
bo well to the minister's request to
nominate their appointees for the exemption tribunals."
Provincial Tribunals.
The first mentioned name in the list
Is the selection of the county court
judges, and the second that of the
board of selection.
The British Columbia list of tribunals which was released tonight by the
department of justice Is as follows:
Atlln, Prince Rupert—J. H. McMul-
lln, H. R. Grant
Massett—"Charles Harrison, A. R.
Mallory.
. Queen Charlotte City—Capt. Gillatt,
J. L. Barge.
(Continued on Page Two.)
CREEN MENTIONED
fOE CABINET POST
May Be Made Minister of Labor—Ottawa Paper Forecasts Union
Ministry.
(By Dolly News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA, Oct. 9.—Dealing with the
negotiations in connection with the
formation ot: a union government, the
Ottawa Citizen after stating that progress is being made, goes on to say:
"On the assumption of a favorable
culmination, the proposed cabinet slate
at present Is: Sir Robert Borden, prime
minister; Hon. J. D. Hazen, marine
and fisheries; Hon. J. C. Doherty, justice; Hon. C. C. Ballantyne, public
works; Hon. P. E. Blondln, postmaster general; Hon. Albert Sevlgny, inland revenue; Hon. .1. D. Held, railways; Sir Thomas White, finance;
Sir Edward Kemp, overseas militia;
General Mewburn, minister of militia
in Canada; Hon. Arthur Moighen, secretary of state; Hon. J. A. Calder, interior; T, A. Crerar, agriculture; Hon.
A. L. Sifton, customs; Hon. Martin
BUrrell or Ii. F. Green, labor; Sir
James Lougheed, minister of a new
portfolio to look after returned soldiers; Sir George Foster, trade and
commerce; Dr. Clarke and G. H. Murray, without portfolio.
Wil REGULATE
WORK OE MCA.
Four Territorial Committees Instead of
'Three as Formerly to Direct Its
Affairs.
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
WINNIPEG, Oct. 9.—The operation
of the Y.M.C.A. in Canada is now un<
der the direction of four territorial
committees Instead of three as for
merly. The regulation of the work of
the association In the west was effected at a meeting of members of tho
national council of the Y.M.C.A. and
the territorial committee for western
Ontario, Saskatchewan and Manitoba
which was held at the headquarters
here today. Formerly western Ontario.
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and
British Columbia were under the juris,
diction of one committee. This territory has now been cut in two, the border of Saskatchewan and Albertu being taken as the dividing line. Western Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan will now be known as the central
western division of the national council.
At today's meeting the following officers were elected as the first executives of the new territory:
Chairman, Hon. Edward Brown,
Winnipeg; vice-chairman, W. T. (Htaxt.
Winnipeg, (or Manitoba; James Balfour, Regina, for Saskatchewan, and
I. Delamater, Fort William, tor west-
em Ontario; treasurer, H. B. Thompson, Winnipeg.   "
But Result of Conferences
is Still Doubtful
MR NAMES NEW
MEN FOR CABINET
Dr. Roche Chairman Civil
Service Board—McLean
Gets Position
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA, Oct. 9.—Sir Robert Borden and Hon. Arthur Meighen were
again in conference today with western Liberals who are at the capital in
connection with union government
proposals. The premier subsequently
said he had no announcements to make
and the men from the west would not
talk for publication. One of them intimated his belief that the situation
was more hopeful from a union government viewpoint than it was 24
hours ago. A basis of agreement, it is
thought, has been reached in regard to
some matters, but not in regard to
others.
It appears to be practically certain
that Premier Slfton of Alberta will
become a member of the cabinet. N.
W. Rowell, Liberal leader for Ontario,
who saw Sir Wilfrid Laurier in Toronto Monday, arrived iu the capital
today and got into touch with the
western Liberals, but he did not take
part in the conferences this afternoon.
The impression appears to be growing that the Liberal leader will not
retire.
The Evening Journal says that If
.Messrs. Hudson and Crerar do not
come into the cabinet Sir Robert Borden is likely to make selections from
Isaac Pltbiado, K. C, Winnipeg; Dr.
It: A. Muglll, and Dr. Rutherford, Calgary.
Appointments  Made.
OTTAWA, Oct. 9.—Hon. Dr. Roche
was appointed chairman of the civil
service board Monday and A. A. McLean, M. P., Queen's, P. E. I., was appointed controller of the R. N. W. M.
police. Appointment of Hon. Frank
Cochrane, minister of railways, to the
chairmanship of the directorate of the
Canadian Northern railway under government ownership Is expected. Sir
George Perley, who Is slated for the
high commissionershlp, will be officially named to it in a few days.
Whether his position as overseas minister will be filled by Sir Edward
Kemp is still uncertain.
Supreme    Military   Effort
Has Been Made
HAVE DRAWN HEAVILY
ON INACTIVE ARMIES
Decisive   Victory  for the
Allies in 191S is
Predicted
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
WASHINGTON, Oct. 9.—Germany's
military strength now shows a decrease for the first time since the war
began, according to a review based
upon data of the French general staff,
made public here tonight by the
French high commission. Worn down
and driven back by the never-ending
pounding of the allies of the jrvestern
front, the statement says, the Germans have made their supreme military effort, drawing heavily upon
their inactive armies in the east and
calling out their 1918 and part of their
1919 reserves.
"This shows," . concludes the statement, "tbe decisive character that
will attend the operations in 1918,
when three great democracies, England, France and America, will unite
their entire strength In attacking the
enemy, in conformity with the principles of the war."
NET LOSS TO, CANADA'S
FIGHTING FORCE, 42,625
In light Moirtht 49,179 Mtn Enlisted
Whllt Wattigi Fro* All Causes
Totaled 91,804.
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA. Oot. 9.—An interesting
statement giving; figures tor recruiting and wastage in the Canadian expeditionary force during the eight
months from January to August, inclusive, has just heen Issued hy the
militia department, The statement,
-tftilch is a detailed one, shows that In
the eight months a total of 49,119 men
enlisted In the C. B. F. of which number 17,451 Joined the ranks of the Infantry. . During the same period the
wattage of men, from various causes,
totaled 91,804, leaving a net loss to the
C. E. F. for the. eight months of 42,-
625 men. The totals of enlistments
and. wattage by months were as follows:
' .tanuaryEnlistments, 9194; wastage,
4394.' February—enlistments, 6890;
wattage, 91,998. March—Enlistments,
6<40; wastage, .6161. April—Enlistments, 0830; wastage, 19,849. May—
Enlistments, 6407; wastage, 13,347.
June—Enlistments, 6348; wastage,
-7918. July—Enlistments, 3882; wastage, 7908. August—Enlistments, 3117;
>aatage, .«,»>».   	
The number of enlistments In England for the C .13. F. from February 1,
1915, to June 39, 1917, of 1452 Is added
by the militia department to the totals
given, making the grand total of 49,179.
Under the. head of wastage are classified all those men who have been
discharged In /Canada, discharged In
England, havo become casualties overseas, or have been returned to Canada
for .discharge..
Tho statement declares that figures
transmitted by Sir George Perley show
the percentage of infantry casualties
from January 1 to July II, 1917, as
89.24.
During the month of September a
total of 3588 men Joined the ranks of
the various unita classified as infantry,
artillery, railway construction and forestry and miscellaneous, us against a
total wastage of 10,990 men. Of this
number 1272 were recruited. In. the
United States, 2319 in Canada and 26
in England. The net loss during Sep
tember was 7402.
For the period from' the 18th to 30th
of September, 648 men were recruited
tor the C. E. P., while the wattage
totaled 3237, leaving a net loss ot 2589.
Of the 600 men recruited, 445 were enlisted In the United States, 194 In Canada and 9 in England. _
DESTROY BARGES
Capture Turkish Steamer in Boaphorus
—Artillery Duels  Fierce in
Riga  Region.
(By Associated Press.)
There Is still considerable artillery
action between the Russians and Germans in the Riga sector of the Russian
front, but neither side has made any
attempt at on advance.
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
PETROGRAD, Oct. 9.—The official
communication Issued today rends:
"Northern front: The Infantry duels
In the Riga region, In the Hlnnzen-
burg-Spttali sectors, and In the
Dvinsk area continued today.
"On the western, southwestern and
Rumanian fronts there have been
fusillades.
"On the Caucasian front there Is
nothing to report.
"In the Black sea, in the region of
the Bosphorus, our torpedo boats destroyed seven large barges loaded
with coal and made' 21 prisoners.
"Our submarines have brought Into
Sevastopol the Turkish steamship
Sultan, loaded with corn, which wns
captured In the Bosphorus."
COAST SHIPYARDS
HEN TO CONTINUE
Conference With Director of Imperial
Munitions Board Hat Favorable
Result
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
VICTORIA, B. C, Oct. 9.—Follow
Ing a conference with R. P. Butchart,
director of the Imperial munitions
board, here today, and a meeting of
the metal trades council tonight, shipyard workers of Victoria and Vancouvor have decided to continue work
pending the decision to be reached in
the Puget Sound yards. The Imperial
munitions board representative show
ed every disposition to treat tho men
in a fair spirit and they were much
gratified with the results of their in
t terview,       . ______
AUSTRIAN ATTACKS
BROKEN BY ITALIANS
Onslaughts on Advanced Posts Prove
Futile—Lose   100   Men  and
Machine Guns.
ROM 13, Oct. 9.—The following official communication was issued today:
"On the evening of Sunday, after an
Intense bombardment, the enemy renewed his attacks on our advanced
positions on the Massif Costabella. He
was stopped by our garrison, and
shelled by our artillery and forced to
withdraw, leaving killed and wounded on the field. *
"Monday on the whole of the Buin-
sizza plateau front there was artillery
action of considerable proportions. At
some points there were local infantry
engagements, during which we captured about 100 prisoners and five machine guns.
"On the Cargo plateau there have
been violent artillery duels, reaching
their greatest intensity frequently In
tin? Castdgnnvlzsm region."
CANADIAN   SOLDIERS
IMPROVE SHELTERS
Are By No Means "Comfy" Places, But
Compare Favorably With Those
of Huns.
(By
the Canadian Overseas Correspondent.)
CANADIAN HEADQUARTERS IN
FRANCE. Oct. 9—Three days of heavy
rain, accompanied by high winds, have
entirely slopped aerial observations
s^ntt led 'the llnfantrymen to spend
much of their time Improving their
shelter. Happily, many of them havo
a choice between a water-filled trench
and cellars of wrecked houses, which
have at least a room of some sort
against the pitiless pelting of the fall
rains. The enemy are in much worse
circumstances than our own men.
CONFUSION ABOUT
ACE LIMIT CI
EARED
Proclamation Date Governs Regarding
Agt of 20—Age of 34 Fixed
by Jan. 1, 1917.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA, Oct. 9.—To clear up confusion with regard to the age limits
of class one, which is to bo called out
by proclamation for service under tho
Military Service act on Oct. 13, the
following announcement was made by
the Military Service council:
"For convenience, class one is .frequently spoken of us comprising un-
marrlcd men nnd widowers without
children, between the ages of 20 and
34, It Is to he noted,, hjwever, that
under the provisions of the statute the
method of fixing these two limits is
different. As far as concerns tho age
of 20, the date of the proclamation
governs. Any man who on that date
hus reached the age of 20 years is
within the class. With regard to the
limit of 34 years, however, this is fixed by reference to Jan. 1, 1917. Any
man who had not reached the age of
84 before that date Is within the class.
It Is to be noted also that, for the
purpose of the act, any man married
ufter July 0, 10JL7, Is to be deemed
UUUMUTigd,"        ...  „;.„	
BRITISH  WILL BOMB
GERMAN TOWNS SOON
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Oct. 9.—Sir Auckland
Geddes, minister of national service, in a speech delivered at Nottingham tonight, predicted that
grim work of bombing German
towns and villages would be in full
swing "before many moons have
elapsed." He said he wished it had
been possible to avoid inflicting
that last punishment on women
and children in Germany, but that
brutal spirit ruling Germany made
it inevitable.
&-■
■
IRS CON
H lEVATOR HEN
FERS
No Further Trouble Expected at Fort
William—Selling Assurance Wanted  in  Saskatchewan.
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
FORT WILLIAM, Ont.. Oct. 9.—It is
not expected that any final decision
will be arrived at between Hon. T.
W. Crothers, minister of labor, and
the striking elevator employees and
the managers tonight. This afternoon
a long session lasting from 1 o'clock
Until 5 p. m., was held between the
minister and the representatives of
tho men, at which W. J. Jones, vice-
president of the International Longshoremen's union, was present. Every
thing looked favorable for a settlement
without further trouble. Followln:
this conference the minister went into
session with the owners and was closeted with them until after 6 o'clock.
At 8 o'clock he again met the men,
but It Is unlikely that any definite
decision will be reached until Wednesday.
F. W. Riddell Makes Statement.
REGINA, Sask., Oct. 9.—The Saskatchewan Cooperative Elevator company, through its manager, F. W. Riddell, today made the following statement :
"The settlement of the strike at the
lake front terminals Is not a settlement of the whole difficulty in connection (with buying igraija in the
country. While the board of supervisors has fixed the price of wheat at
Fort William, country elevator companies are still in this uncertain position—they have no assurance that
they would be able to sell the wheat at
that price—not having up to the present received assurance from any authority that the wheat which they
are purchasing will be repurchased
at the jprice decided lUpon by the
board. When appealed to to give that
assurance to the grain dealers, the
board of grain supervisors stated that
such assurance was not within their
power and that It could only come directly from Great Britain and her allies, in whose Interests the- price
should be fixed by the board.
Might  Face Financial Disasier.
"Considering the enormous amount
of money that has to be Invested in
the purchase of grain, It Is only natural that those laying out tho money
should be considerably concerned
about Its return. Should It transpire
that in purchasing the grain the allies should I'lxi a lower price, practically all the firms in the grain business In the west and banks who are
financing them, might find themselves
facing financial disaster.
"In the United States tho government has guaranteed the price, but up
to the present our Dominion government has given no similar guarantee.
"Even should this indispensable assurance be given, the elevator companies are still confronted with the additional question—"When will the allies accept delivery of the grain?"
and this question, while not so Important as the former one, Is still very
serious because, with wheat at $2.21
per bushel, a grain firm handling 25,-
000,000 to 40,000,000 bushels and having a large country elevator storage
capacity, such, for instance, as the
Saskatchewan Cooperative Elevator
Company, Limited, with a capacity of
9,000,000 bushels, will possibly find itself with a dead investment totaling
not far short of 120,000,000.
Will Continue Buying.
."Notwithstanding the foregoing
conditions, we have decided to continue our work of purchasing grain at
all our country points, realizing that
in the present crisis of the Empire's
affairs our action should be dictated
by confidence in, rather than suspicion of, the Dominion and Imperial authorities who are cooperating in the
management of the grain question.
Also Want Prices Guaranteed.
CALGARY, Alta., Oct. 9.—C. Rice
Jones, president of the United Grain
Growers, In an interview tonight stated that the United company had not
commenced buying grain since the settlement of the Fort William strike,
and he did not anticipate that it would
do so until such a time as the fixed
prioes on grain are guaranteed to the
company.
British Capture All Objectives in Smash Forward to
Depth of Two Miles Northeast of Ypres-'Over 1000
Prisoners So Far
VILLAGES AND MANY BLOCKHOUSES
TIEN BY TROOPS OF GEN. PETAIN
French Fight Way Through Enemy's Lines to Depth
of 1 1-4 Miles South of Dixmude-Attacks Launched
Simultaneously--Huns Fight Furiously but Prove
Powerless to Stem Allies7 Advance
DAWSON, Y. T., Oct. S.rrThe first
Yukon dredges are shutting down for
the winter. The Atwater dredge on
Upper Forty-Mile stopped operations
Sept. 2\. Manager C. Nessler la now
on bis way to tut cout, ;.
(By Associated Press.)
The big fight is on again in Flanders and^the Germans are being hammered hard. Field Marshal Haig is
battering away on the sector east and
northeast of Ypres, while French
troops have joined up with the British
left wing to the south of Dixmude in
an endeavor to bring that section of
the line even with the sharp wedge
that has been driven into the front by
Gen. Haig east of Broedseinde.
Launching their attacks simultaneously both armies had been rewarded
with goodly gains before nightfall, in
addition to having Inflicted heavy casualties upon the Germans and taking
many of their men prisoners. Prior to
the announcement of the commence.
ment ofMhe atttrek there hftd In en no
Intimation that the Frenchmen were
ready for an advance. In fact, It had
been reported that even the British
commander would delay taking the
aggressive again for several days owing to the terrible condition of the
ground he Is in quest of.
French Capture Villages.
With apparent case the Frenchmen
crossed the flooded Broenbeek and
JansbeeW rivers and captured the villages of St. Jean de Mangelare and
Veidhoek, together with numerous
blockhouses, and made prisoner several hundred Germans. The advance
ol* the French was over a front of more
than a mile and a half, and they penetrated the German line to a depth of
one and  one-quarter miles.
Halg's principal offensive centered
on the portions of the Passchendaele-
Gheluvclt ridge still held by the Germans, being directed eastward from
Poelcapelle, which was captured,
northeastward from Broedseinde toward Passchendaele, the ultimate objective still being the Ostend- Lille
road.
Taken as a whole, the joint operation
makes apparent the crowning desire
of the allies in the region—the forcing
back of the Germans to points where
their evacuation of Ostend and Zeebrugge, naval bases on the North sea,
will become necessary.
Huns Fail to Stem Advance.
Nowhere, however, were the Germans able to stay the advance, except near the Poldorhoek chateau,
where the terrific fire of their machine
guns momentarily forced tho British to
give ground, Later the troops realigned themselves and the successful
push went on again.
Along the Aisne and Champagne
front and in Verdun, intensive artillery
duels are still in progress between the
French and Germans. In the Champagne the French have carried out a
successful raid near the butte of Ta-
hure and taken prisoners.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Oct. 9.—The British
troops have effected the capture oC
Poelcapelle and have advanced nearly
two miles to the northwest of that
village in their drive in Flanders today, according to the report from
Field Marshal Haig tonight. The
British operations were successful, all
objectives having been gained and the
number of prisoners already exceeds
1000.
The text follows:
"A heavy rain fell continuously during the afternoon and evening of
Monday, causing the ground {o become soggy and difficult for, the pas-
■Biigetjf. trdops.     *■       l        '\ ''■
"Notwithstanding the stormy
weather and the waterlogged .condition of the ground, our forces succeeded in launching an attack at 5:20
o'clock Tuesday morning in conjunction with the French on our left, with
good  results.
"The front of the attack extended
from a point southeast of Broedseinde
to St. Jeansbeek. On the extreme
right the Australian troops moved forward over the crest of the ridge east
and northeast of Broedseinde, securing
their objectives,
English  Regiments Gain Objectives
"On the right centre, a third lino
territorial division, comprising Manchester, East Lancashire and Lancashire fusilier regiments, advanced one
mile northward along the ridge In the
direction of Passchendaele, capturing
all Its object Ives under most trying
conditions with great determination
and gallantry.
"In the centre, between the main
ridge and Poelcapelle, a considerable
advance was made, which includes the
capture of many fortified farms and
concentrated  redoubts.
"On the left centre, we have cap-
lured Poelcapelle. On the extreme left
of the British attacks, English, Welsh
and Irish troops and the guards have
taken all their objectives and gained
tbe outskirts of the forest of Houtholst, nearly two miles northwest of
Poelcapelle.
"On our left flank, French forces
crossed the Broenbeek stream, which
is in flood, nnd also gained the outskirts of. the forest of Houtholst, capturing their objectives, including several hamlets and many fortified locations.
Over 1000 Prisoners
"More than 1000 prisoners already
have passed into the collecting stations.
"Aviation:   The weather was   even
(Continued on Page Two.)
POINTS THAT DOMINATE
FLANDERS PLAIN TAKEN
WITH THE FRENCH ARMY IN
FLANDERS, Oct. 9.~(By Associated
Press.)—Amid one of the most terrific
hurricanes of artillery fire, the French
army cooperating with the British
early today won a brilliant victory
which carried the troops forward to
a depth of half a mile along a front of
about a mile. More than 300 prisoners and a number of cannon and machine guns fell Into the hands of the
French, and their advance took them
to a position where they could command the western border of the forest of Houtholst,
The movement was a pivoting one,
and us a result all tho observatories
dominating the Flanders plain aro now
In the hands of the allies. The correspondent passed over the French stdo
of tbe battlefield on the evening preceding the attack. All around, shell
holes were filled with water and the
only protection of the French forces
toward the enemy was the drenched
sandbags piled up. Here the shelterless troops had passed tho day and
night awaiting orders to go over.
At length, soon after 5 o'clock in
the morning, definite orders arrived
and the troops were glad. They went
forward with great rapidity despite
the conditions. When they reached
their first objective points they found
the Germans crowded lu nests o£ cra
ters, which hereabouts form the first
lines, tho building of trenches in this
section of Flanders being impossible
owing to the watery soil.
Good luck had made tho advance coincide with the period when the Germans were changing tho troops occupying their front lines. The French.
with wonderful dash, were upon them
before they realized tho situation and
killed many of them.
There was a 'short respite before the
next forward movement was undertaken in cooperation with the British,
who were advancing on the French
right. Slithering along over tho broken and muddy ground, the French
troops made their way quickly toward
Mangelare, which soon fell. The whole
scheme of operations for the. day had
been carried out long before noon. The
infantry advance was greatly assisted
by tho daring of the aviators, would
would not permit weather conditions
to Interfere with tho work of recording
artillery preparations. The result of
the day's fighting la that tho forest
of Houtholst, which comprises six
miles of thickly wooded ground Is now
flanked on both sides.
For the moment tho French troops
are occupied In consolidating ground
won, which, although small in extent,
represents un Invaluable observation
post,       ' __,
 PACE   TWO
THE. DAILY NEWS
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10, 1917.
Leading Hotels of the West
Where th* Traveling Publio May   Obtain   8up«rior   Accommodation.
TRIBUNALS ARE
NOW COMPLETE
THE   HUME
A la Carts Table d'Hoce
GEORGE BENWELL, Proo.
Special Sunday Dinner, $1.00.
H'UME—H. .McLaren, Salmo, Mr.
nnd Mrs, G. Clement, Spokane;. J. P.
Westman, Calgary; Lewis D. Dinly,
Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Chisholm, Vancouver; C. F. Olson, Ainsworth; A. C.
O'Neill, Vmir; S. N. Boss, Salmo; C.
H. Bird, W. Loresby, Creston; H. A.
Hunter, H. C. Yuill, Medicine Hat; W.
W. McBaln, Orillla; .T. B. Lament,
Creston; Mrs. Agnes May, Miss C. May,
p. H. Anderson, Uossland; John J.
Uyan. Montrenl; H. C. Douglas, Vancouver; .1. G. McDinrmld. Toronto;
Mrs, William Boyd, San Francisco;
J .J. Smith and wife, Nakusp; Mrs. H.
C, Aird, New Westminster.
SPEND YOUR HOLIDAYS AT
Halcyon Hot Springs
Sanitarium
And 8toek up With Health
If you suffer from muscular, Inflammatory, sciatic or any other
form of rheumatism, or fr^m metallic poisoning of any sort don't delay.
Come at once and get cure.l. Most
complete and best arranged bathing
establishment on the continent. All
departments under one roof, steam
heated and electric lighted.
Rates: $3 per day or $17 per week.
DAVIS A DAVIS, Props.
Halcyon, Arrow Lakes, B, C.
BRITISH AND FRENCH
The Strathcona
F. B. WHITING, Prop.
SPECIAL SUNDAY  DINNER
STRATHCONA—.1. Slade, P. Pur-
ton, Silverton; A. ,1. W, Myers, Toronto ; 0; R. Junes, Ymir; E. Hen-
brooke, Victoria; O. Sloan, II. O.. Allen, Chicago; Miss Florence Seott,
Brandon; Randolph E. Ingersoll,1 New
York; J. Hi. Alderson. Winnipeg; S. .1.
Hoskins, Toronto*! P. Randal. Fernie;
S. K. Feare. Ashcroft; P. G. Dobson,
Vancouver.
Queen's Hotel
■ t;     |     r   . ,    ,
European     and    American     PI m
Steam Heat in Every Room.
A. LAPOlNTE, Prep.
QUEENS—W. .1. Mitchell, Murray
Mitchell. Kaslo; Harry McDonald,
Spokane; T. Needham, Bonnington;
W. E. Brough, Marcus; F. T. Hailey,
B. E. Grove, Spokane; R. W. i'ulll,
Lockhart Beach; John Dooley, Calgary; .!. Gitzcrman, Arrowhead; T.
May, Taghum; Mis. Lundie, city;
Susan McKinnon, Princeton; II. Ii.
Holmberg, Princeton.
Madden House
MRS. THOMAS MADDEN,-
Proprietress.
STEAM HEATED
Corner Baker and Ward Sts., Nelaon
Smash   Way   Through   Enemy's   Positions to Considerable Depth— Important Ground Captured.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
LONDON. Oct. <J.—The British attacked on a wide front northeast and
east of Ypres this morning, tbe war
office announced today. Satisfactory
progress is being- made everywhere.
The attack, the statement says, was
made "in conjunction with our ul-
lies."
French   Also  Attack.
PARIS. Oct. D.—French troops on
the Belgian front at r»:30 o'clock this
morning attacked, in conjunction with
the British army, the German positions south of the forest of Houtholst
between Dralbnnk and "Weindcnflrcft.
Allies  Smash  Through   Enemy.
BRITISH FRONT IN FRANCE,
Oct. 0.—The British have pushed back
the Germans through Poelcapelle and
arc fighting in the eastern outskirts
of the city about a large brewery.
At many places 'the French and
British have advanced to a depth of
1200 yards or more.
The British troops on Gravenstafeld
ridge advanced on to Pnschendaele
ridge and rested 1000 yards southwest
of the town of Paschendnele. The
French crossed the .lansbeke nnd
firnwnbokc rivers.
JABEZ B. NELSON DEAD.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
SEATTLE, Oct. it.—Jabez B. Nelson,
correspondent of the Associated Press
:;t Seattle, and widely known throughout tiie Pacific northwest, died here
late today.   He was fi-t years old.
MAN OF EGYPT,
HUSSEIN KEMAL, DEAD
Was   Chosen   by  Great   Britain   When
Country   Was   Proclaimed   British
Protectorate
LONDON, Oct. 0.—The Daily Telegraph says it learns that the Sultan
of Egypt died at noon Tuesday.
Hussein Kemh.1 was chosen by Great
Britain in 191-i to succeed his uncle,
Khedive Abbas Hllmi; as ruler of
Egypt, simultaneously with a pro
cla mat ion nf a British protect orate
Ills father was khedivd from ISfiH to
1870.
MADDEN—Mr. and Mrs. Michael
C. Mbnnghan, Denis Monaghan, Tag-
bum; Mr. and Mrs. Ira Carter, Curlew, Wash.; Miss I, Blackwood, Nelson; John Henry, Sandon; Maurice
Van do Bogarl, Silverton; Mr. and
Mrs. W. A. Haslett. Waneta; A. L.
Wilson, Mrs. Wilson, Robert Wilson.
Nelson; M. Martin, Molly Gibson
mine; S. Crouch, Nelson; M. Glbbs,
Cranbrook:  Ons Quick, Chase,
Nelson House
European Plan.
W. A. WARD, Prop.
CAFE—Open Day and Night—BAH
Merchant!' Lunch, 12 to 2.
Phon. 97 P. O. Box 597
NELSON—U Johnson, E. W'ooley,
Thomas Moore. Marcus; Mrs. H.
Greeley, Spokane; I.. Donnelly, Revelstoke; L. S. Ogllvio, Alex ClOUtlor,
Trail; .lames Ryskin. Columbia Gardens; c. Leightbn, Midway.
New Grand Hotel
8TEAM  HEATED
Hot and Cold Water in Every Room
Amerioan and  European  Plant
NEW GRAND—M. .1. MqNi»h, Hall;
J, E. McKenzfo, Miles city; F. M.
Hugh, Cranbrook; S. HI Burnett and
wife, Nakusp; G. Peterson, Molly Gibson mine;  R.  Brown. Vancouver.
BISHOP 8TRINGER RETURN8
FROM   ARCTIC  COAST  TRIP
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
DAWSON, Y. T„ Oct. 9.—Bishop
Stringer of the Anglican church has
arrived safely at Fort Yukon after a
summer's cruise along the Arctic
coast. He had hoped to make Coronation bay on his trip, but when 200
miles east of Herschel Island he was
forced to turn back by the Ice. He in
accompanied by Archdeacon Whit-
taker on' his way to tho coast with
three native children for the fiarcross
Indian sehool.
LULL OCCURS IN  FIGHTING
ON   MACEDONIAN   FRONT
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
I'AItlS,  Oct.  «.—An   official   report
slates:
"Eastern   theatre, Oct.  S:   The  day
as calm along tho whole front."
NURSE  LANG  KILLED IN
FRANCE—WAS AT VANCOUVER
i By Daily News Leased Wire.)
TOIKINTO. <lot. ii.—Corp. Ernest
F. Lung, who was gassed and wounded In France, received a letter from
France stating that bis sister, Nursing Sister Frances E. Lang, No. 3
general hospital, Boulogne, France,
lias been killed. .Miss Lung wus 24
years old and a native of Scotland.
She came from hospital work in Massachusetts, where she was in training,
nrt enlisted with the C. A..M. C. She'
had previously been employed in hospitals at  Brandon and Vancouver.
WEART  MAKES PLEA  FOR
GOOD ROADS IN PROVINCE
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
VICTORIA. B. C, Oct. 0.—In the absence of Premier Brewster, ,1. W.
Wearst spoke today al. Duncan at the
opening of the Good Roads League of
British Columbia, on the government's
policy relative to road building. There
was nothing, be said, that would develop a country quicker than good
roads, and school accommodations
came   second.
The Easiest Way
To End Dandruff
There Is one sure way that never
fails to remove dandruff completely
ind that 1$ to dissolve It. This destroys it entirely. To do this, just get
about four ounces of plain, ordinary
liquid arvon; apply It at night when
retiring; use enough to moisten the
scalp and rub It In gently with the
finger tips.
By morning most, If not all, of your
dandruff wilt be gone and three or
four more applications will completely
dissolve and entirely destroy every
single sign and trace of It, no matter
how much dandruff you may have.
You will find, too, that all itching
and digging of the scalp will stop instantly, and your hair wilt be fluffy,
lustrous, glossy, silky and soft and
look and feel a hundred times better.
You can get liquid arvon at any drug
store. " It is Inexpensive, and four
ounces 1b all you will need. This
simple remedy has never been known
to fall.
(Continued from Page One.)
Anyox—S. T. Hyde, Harry McCartney.
Terrace—T. J. Marshell, H. M. Mac-
pherfion.
Hazelton—S. H. Hoskins, W. .1. Mo-
Kenzie.
Smithers— Walter     Nowell,     F.     J.
Kenny.
Telkus—T. J. Thorpe, R. E. Gale.
Atlin—K. A. Fraser, J. Eggart.
Telegraph Creek—W. H. Dodd, Robert Gayland.
Swansen Bay—C. E. Borrow, Athol
Fraser.
Surr Inlet—A. E. Ooyley, Harry B,
Blair.
Cariboo, Clinton—Edgar C. Lunn.
C. J, Payne.
Quesne]—W. H. Boyd, F. .1. Tred-
glllis.
Prince George—Thomas E. Hoyne.
(HI A. Carney.
Ashcroft—Melville Bryson, Isaac
Lehman.
Fernie—Robert L. Galbroith, Robert
Duthle.
Cranbrook—Guy F. Pownall, H.
White.
Golden—Harold E. Forster, Charles
A. Warren.
Windermere—Frank Stockdale, .T.
Lake.
Nanaimo, Parksvillc—William Morrison, Major Rickey.
Port Alberni—Arthur Watcrhousc, P.
Chandler.
Hnrdy Bay—A. M. Lyons, R. A. Phillips.
Alert Bay—W. M. Hnlllday, A. M.
Wastell.
Campbell River (not complete)
Cumberland—Joseph Shaw, Wesley
Willard.
Courtnoy—Wm. Arthur, W. IRtnes,
Wm. Duncan.
Quntslno—A. E. Fillings. A. Etur-
berg. •'"
Nanniino—John M. Rudd, C. J. Crawford, C. H. Potts, Capt. A. F. Tntes.
Ladysmith—John Stewart, E. G.
Pannell. ,
Duncan—J. H. Whittoms, .1. W. Evans.
Vancouver, Squamish—W. Mashiter.
Robert Mackenzie.
Powell River—R. M. Banhain. Rev.
Dobbin.
Bella Coola—V. H. Gihson, J.P., Dr.
Sutherland.
Ocean Falls—Dr. Qulnlan, Dr. John
Christie.
North and West Vancouver—Luther
W. Donui, W. L. Irvin.
Point Grey—Thomas W. Fletcher.
Horace W. Buck.
South Vancouver—R. IT. Neehlands.
John T. Stevens.
Vancouver. City—(1) .Ionics D.
Byrne, Alexander Henderson; (2) Margaret L. Griffin, J. U. Seymour; (3)
Henry c. Shaw, A. M. Pound; (4)
Lnchian McLean, F. J. Sehofield; (5)
J. H. Me.Vety, W. A. Blair; (C) Judge
David Grant, Prof. E. Odium.
Esquimau—A. S. Barton, .1. C. Macintosh.
Sydney—Andrew Munro, Capt. L. L.
Adamsou.
Royal Oak—G. McGregor. F. G.
Quach.
Oak Bay—E. C. Senkler, M. P. Gordon.
Ganges (Salt Spring island)—C. c.
Castle, H. W. Bullock.
Port Renfrew—George Perklnson. T.
N. Balrd.
Victoria City—Duncan Campbell, G.
Jay, Dr. HI. L. Eraser, L. A. Genge, H.
J. Scott, W. C. Cameron, R. E. Brett.
Robert A. Dewar, H. B. Andros, Win.
Mablc.
West Kootenay, Nelson—E. C,
Wragge, Newton Wolverton.
toHsland—Nohle Blnns. W. R. Bra-
den.
Creston—W. S. Watson, \V. V. Jackson.
Revelstoke—Robert   Gordon.  A.  Mo-
Rao.
Kaslo—R. J. stenson, Rev, Calvert.
New  Denver—Angus Mclnnes,  Anthony Shilland.
Nakusp—L. J. Edwards, Walter
Scott.
Westminster, New Westminster City
—Judge Howny, G. D. Brymner.
Port Moody—Perry D. Hoe, Hector
McKenzie.
Port Honey—John Laity, G. O. Buchanan.
Agassla—Louis  Agassis,  G.   Nieholl.
Hope—A. E. Raab, A. E. Stewart.
Chllliwack—J. Pelly, F. B. Stacey.
Abbotsfoid—Charles   H.   Hill,   Alex.
Crulckshank.
Cloverdule— R. J. Wnrk,  Harvey T.
Thrift.
Ladner—Harry N. Rich, K. H. Huff.
North Bend—L, A. Dodd, Normnn A.
McPherson.
Grand Forks—W. B. Cochran, Neil
McCallum.
Greenwood—W. tt. Dewdney, J. L.
White.
Pentieton—C.   F.  -Guernsey,   E.   I*.
Michael.
Vernon—L. Norrls, A. Cochrane.
Salmon   Arm—J.   E.  Lacey,   W.   J.
Kew.
Knmloops—A. F. Wood, J. F. Fulton.
Merritt, M. I,. Grimmett. J. S. Morgan.
JUDGMENT RESERVED IN
CASE FROM PROVINCE
' OTTAWA, Oct. 9.—In the supreme
court today the western list of appeals
was taken up. The first case was the
Union Bank of Canada vs. the Ritchie
Contracting & Supply company. A
contract was made between the muni
cipality of Burnaby, B.C., and George
H, AVebster for tho construction of a
reservoir. Afterward Webster assigned
all monies coming to him under this
contract, to the Union bank. Subsequently the Ritchie Contracting &
Supply company took judgment against
Webster for the price of materials used
In the construction of the reservoir
and furnished to the municipality. The
engineer following the provisions of
the contract, demanded evidence that
all claims for material nnd tabor were
paid before he would issue the final
certificate.
Upon a stated case submitted to the
supreme court of British Columbia
Mr. Justice Clement gave judgment
on behalf of the appellant, but the
court appeal reversed this decision and
upheld the power of the engineer to
withhold the certificate. Hamilton
Cassells, K.C., for appellant, R. I*. Reid,
K.C,,. for the respondent. Judgment
was reserved.
HURL BACK GERMANS
(Continued from Page One.)
more unfavorable, for flying on Monday than on previous days. Much
work was done, however, In aerial
reconnaissance^ and some artillery
work was carried on. Two enemy
machines were, driven down nut of
control. Ground targets also were attacked with machine gun fire. Two
or our machines, are missing."
French Capture Two Villages.
PARIS, Oct. 9.—The capture of tho
villages of St. 'jean de Mangelare and
Veldhodk with numerous blockhouses Is reported in tbe French report of .last night, dealing with tbe
operations Tuesday in Flanders. The
total advance of the French reached
to one and one-quarter miles to the
southern outskirts of the Houtholst
wood, and on.a'front of more tlinn a
mile and\tf half.
The text follows:
"In Belgium an attack launched by
us this morning was carried nut with
particular' brilliancy. After having
crossed tho marshy Promaheok brook
our troops^Cftjrtuf'ed. with admirable
spirit, nlohgMa front of two and a half
kilometres'the enemy defenses despite
the difficulties of terrain and the bad
atmospheric' conditions.
"The villages* of St. Jean de Mangelare and Veldhoek, as well as numerous farms, turned into blockhouses,
fell into our hands.
"Our ndvance;i, which reached a
mean depth, of two kilometres, has
brought ua to the outskirts of the
Houtholst forest.
Airplanes Cooperate,
"Our airplanes,' despite the wind,
which blew a tempest, cooperated actively in the attack, using their machine guns at a. low height against the
enemy infantry and assuring communication with the otber arms.
"The number of prisoners so far.
counted exceeds 300, of whom 12 arej
officers.
"Belgian communication: Monday
our artillery shelled several enemy batteries and observation towers, as well
as enemy works1 near Dixmude. During the course of the fight we strongly
shelled tho German batteries .jfwfth
tho object of cooperating in the attacks then hi preparation. The attacks
were launched this morning by our
allies. The reaction of tbe enemy was
feeble. Toduy we shelled the enemy
organizations at Dixinudc and counter
shelled several batteries In action, as
well as the enemy communications.
Our forces cannonaded the Germans
before the French offensive en our
right."
Berlin Says Gains Small.
BERLIN, Oct. 9.—The gains of territory by the entente forces in the latest battle In Flanders have been limited to the stretch of territory between Dre.elbnnl; and Poelcapelle, says
the official communication Issued by
the war office tonight. The entente
attacks elsewhere wore repulsed, says
the report, the text «tl\ which follows:
"In Flanders a fresh battle developed from tho fighting early in the day,
which still continues between Drael-
bank and Gheluvelt.! In spite of repeated assaults the gain of territory, according to the latest reports, is limited
tho stretch of territory between
Draelbahk and Pnolcupclle. For tho
■est, the attacks were" repulsed."
Another Lot of
Choice Fall Coats
Just Arrived
HANDSOME   PLUSHES, SERVICEABLE TWEEDS, ETC.
LET US HELP YOU MAKE A SELECTION THAT WILL SATISFY
Prices $17.50 up to $50.00
Millinery
WE ARE CONSTANTLY  SHOWING   NEW  SHAPES   AND   NEW
FANCIES,   REPRESENTING THE LATEST  IDEAS   AS
THE SEASON ADVANCES
A HAT PURCHASED HERE CARRIES THE APPROVAL. OF THE
LEADING   AUTHORITIES   AS    TO   CORRECTNESS   AND  STYLE
Smillie & Weir
LADIES   WEAR   SPECIALISTS
I
CASUALTY LIST
TO DEFEND LIS
Return    to    Earlier    Tactics—British
Advance Steady in Spite of
Muddy Ground
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)        I
LONDON, (let. ft.—(Via Reuter's
Ottawa Agency.)—Reuter's correspondent at ttritish headquarters In !
France telegraphs today:
"At dawn the British and Australians again attacked along tbe Flanders ridges and pushed buck tbe
enemy to a depth at some places of
about two-thirds of a mile. The battle
extended more northward than the
three previous operations since Sept.
20, the French taking up the fight on
the left. '( * „l
"The weather wns about as bod as
possible. Last night It was blowing
a gale and raining in torrents, but the
clouds broke nbout midnight and the
stars shone, making the small hours
quite clear and enabling the troops
brought into the starting positions to
work belter, although the ground was
poor and the going difficult.
"Our troops found the Huns holding
the front much more heavily than in
any previous battles of this series.
This suggests a return to the earlier
defensive tactics depending upon
man-power rather than concrete.
"The rifle fire was not so heavy as
usual, doubtless because the weapons
were Inrgely mud-clogged. The bayonet nnd bomb were, the principal
weapons in tho close fighting.
"Farly reports, though scrappy and
brief, are of the most satisfactory
nature.
"The advance, though slow, because
of the poor ground and poor light,
seems to have been general. Here and
there at points strong resistance was
encountered. Daisy Wood was found
full of machine guns. These were
dealt with by tactics believed quite
successful. There was stiff fighting
near Rentel, but it has apparently
gone in our favor,
"Another centre of strong resistance Is the brewery on the eastern
outskirts of Poelcapelle.
"Prisoners nre coming in freely and
hundreds have already been caged.
"Our airmen were doing splendid
work throughout the battle, chasing
the German airmen and signalling our
forces."
MANY RETURNED MEN
ON THEIR WAY WEST
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
WINNIPEG, Oct. 9.—Two trains
bearing returned soldiers are on their
way west. The first, with 62 for Winnipeg and district, 27 for Regina, 47
for Calgary and 37 for, Vancouver, Is
traveling ovor the Canadian goveVn-
ment railway nnd Is expected about
11:30. o'clock Wednesday morning. Tho
second train with 152 on board, is duo
in Winnipeg Thursday night.
Nelson    Soldier,    Henry    T.    Smith,
Among  Wounded—C   Shub.'iok,
Cranbrook. Seriously III
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA, Oct. 9.—There were 46
western men in the casualty list
issued by: the militia department tonight out of a total of 101. There
were two killed in action, three died
of wounds, one died, one presumed to
have died, one died in Germany, two
wounded and missing, six seriously
II, one prisoner in Germany 28
wounded and one gassed.
British Columbia casualties are:
KILLED  IN  ACTION
A, J. Theobold.  Vancouver.
PRESUMED TO HAVE DIED
Corp. J. A. Pascoe, Victoria.
SERIOUSLY   ILL
Charles S. Shubrook, Cranbrook.
George M. Morgan, Victoria.
WOUNDED
Corp, Frank H. Minchin, Vancouver.
A. J. McLean,  Knmbops,
Lance-Corp.    E.    McDonald,    Vancouver.
E.  F.  Hayden,  South   Vancouver.
Lance-Corp, R. W. Mawdsley, West
Vancouver.
J. G. Stuart, North  Vancouver.
John      Munro,      warden,      Saanich
Prison, V. |.
GASSED
Armourer Staff-Sergt. G. J.  Brown,
Kamloops.
ENGINEERS
WOUNDED .
Sapper Percy Roworth, Victoria.
MOUNTED  RIFLES
WOUNDED
G.  P.   Brodie,  Vancouver.
Henry T. Smith, Nelson.
SERVICES
SERIOUSLY ILL
George  Fitchett, Vancouver.
ARTILLERY
WOUNDED
J. H. Pritchard, South Vancouver,
other casualties arc:
Killed  in action—Sergt. It.  Waugh,
Winnipeg;   II. Earnshaw, Toronto;   A.
Cotton,  Toronto;   C.  Coutes,  Toronto;
.1. Chaplin, Winnipeg; A. Davies. Winnipeg;   E.   H.  Bill,   Montreal;     C.   D.
Moore,  Bethnnl Green.   London,  Eng.;
Lieut.  D.  Barker.  .Montreal;   .!.   Borts,
Toronto; II. Oroves, Toronto; F. Warner,   Windsor,   Out.;   Sergt,   Major   E.
G.   Mitchell.   Winnipeg;   Major  T.   N.
Elliott, London, Ont.; A. St. Peter, St.
Tohn, N. B.;, Ira McClure, St. John, N.
B.;   l\   Leamnn,  Sussex.   N.B.;   J.   F.
ltankine, St, John, N. B.; H. Thompson,  Calgary;    A.  Croasman,    Moose
Jaw; G. K. B. Herbert, Toronto; W. H.
Littlewood, Yorkton, Snsk.; C. C. Mc-
Pliee, Windsor, Ont.; Thomas O'Brien.
Calgary;   C.  M.  Wasson, St. John,  N.
l:.;  Albert Williams, Toronto.
Died of wounds—Sapper L. If. Sim,
Jnrvls, Ont.; P. Dutkn, Montreal; H.
Dickson, Haileybiiry, Ont.; Rupert Archer, Renfrew, Ont.; Daniel Hull, Sydney, N. S.; A, C. Boyd, Edmonton; A.
Christie, Toronto; II. White, North
Vancouvor;Sergt. A. McMillan, Toronto; K. Clark, St. John, N. B.; S. Bailey,
Gait, Ont.; P. Shengnll. Swift Current,
Sask..
Died—A. J. Kennedy, Ballyhoyland,
County Antrim; W. Reeves, Medicine
Hat; E. Morgan,- Niagara; H. Johnson, Toronto; Sergt. Major Sinclair.
Ottawa; F. Osborne, Halifax, N. S.
Dangerously 11!—Lee. Corp. A. Turn-
bull, Calgary; T. Pearson, Oxford
Mills, Ont.; H. Alexander, Kingston,
Ont.
Gassod-^H, Ayling, Rlmouski, Que.;
E. Taylor, Stratford, Ont.; Gnr. A.
Ward, Winnipeg; B. Preston, Montreal; S. Parker, Montreal; F. Thompson, Medicine Hat; W. Brown, Edmonton; L. Beaky, Sherbrooke, Que.;
J. Merchlson, K. Plnette, P. E. I.; T.
Thompson, Montreal; A. Gallant,
Charlottetown, P. E. I.
Prisoner of war—G. MeCurdy, Tottenham, Ont.; E. Heap, Heglna; P.
Bennett, Brandon; W. Walsh, St, John.
N. B.; T. Byatt, Woodstock, Ont.;) W.
Coomber, Mlllbrook, Ont.; C. McKane,
Kingston, Ont.
Missing—M, Beaton, Stockton-on-
Tees, Eng.; Lance Corp. E. Meads,
New Westminster; M. Richard, Sussex, N. R; G. Brlsson, Rlmouski, Quel;
W. St. Louis, Montreal; J. St. Pierre,
Danville; J, Cutler, Winnipeg.
Shell Hhock—G. Atlin, Winnipeg; G.
Deadman, Windsor, Ont.
Presumed dead—W. Slade, Toronto;
H. Stockdale, Niagara; A. Murdoch,
Brandon, Man.; W. McCaulay, Winnipeg; C. White, Edmonton; S. Scott,
Winnipeg; N. Seott, Niagara, Ont.; C.
Hobday, Winnipeg; N. McMnth, Regina; C. N. Garrett, Ottawa, Ont; W.
Wilson, St. Thomas; Fred Haynes,
Smith Falls, Ont.; C. E. Hubbard,
Welland, Ont; Albert Draker, Niagara,
Ont; W. .T. Cassldy, Ottawa; C. J.
Sharpc, Portage la Prairie; : H. F.
Sharon, Calgary;-A. I. Shaw, Calgary.
Wounded—U   R. ^reonless,   Prince
Albert, B. C; J. J. McCann, Toronto;
John R. Guthrie, Kingston, Ont; Corp;
William Hamilton, Vernon, B. C; R.
P. Evans, London, England; W. A.
Ftirby, Davidson, Sask.; H. W. Johnston, St, John, N. B.; W. C. Jones,
Hailoybury, Ont; T. E. Mantle, St
John, N. B.; J. S. Coffey, Toronto;
F. E. Odium, Toronto; A< E. Wny,
Tweed, Ont; R. IT. Urquhnrt, Truro,
N. S.; George Branton, Edmonton;
Sapper Ira Mason, Stellnrton, N.i S.;
Sapper Denis Evaristo, Sydney, N. S.;
Sapper C. H."KiIeen, Nanaimo, B. C;
F. E. Ward, London, Ont.; Lance
Corp. Hugh J. Tobln, Edmonton; J. L.
Mcunler, Ottawa; Thomas Roy, St.
Amelie, Man.; Gnr. Walter Simon, Gnlt
Ont.; Sapper Albert Morgan, Toronto;
Sapper Dick Southwood, Vancouver,
B. C; Sapper Robert J. Lee, Calgary;
Sapper W. B. Sinclair, Hanna, Alta.;
N. Deslaurlers, Ottawa; S. T. Gale,
Vancouver, B. C; W. T. Page, Detroit,
Mich.; W. R. Truswell, St John, N.
B.; F. 8. Strong, iITiimilton, Ont.; John
McCuish, Montreal; George Brown,
Winnipeg; Theo Bell, Brandon, Man.;
H. T, Bingham, Fort Saskatchewan,
Alta.; Ernest Collinson. Nnshlyn,
Sask.; H.i E. Steeves, North Maltland,
N. S.; Robert Thompson, Fort William, Ont; Sergt. E. D. Spicer, Wharton, N. S.; J. R. Moody, London, Ont.;
T. E. Hell, Reglnn, Sask.; Lieut J. F.
E. Carmen. Edmonton, Altn,; T. A.
Coombes, Ingersooll, Ont.; F. E. Craig,
Charlottetown, P. E. I.; Sergt. William Wilkie, Guolph, Ont; J. A. Todd,
Virdin, Man.; Alesi Abgelo, Winnipeg,
Man.; Corp. R. S. Hicks, St. Mary's,
Ont; Corp. W. J. Roylance, Winnipeg;
Emmanuel Cyr, Thetford Mines, P. Q.;
Eugene Granger, Quebec; Corp. C. E.
.Martin, Montreal.
FATHER SHOT SON,
IS VERDICT GIVEN
Antemortem    Statement    by     Victim
Tells  of Tragedy   in   Port
Arthur Home.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
PORT ARTHUR, Ont, Oct. II.—A
coroner's jury tonight found that Robert McBrady came to his death from
wounds received the night of Oct. 2
from a shotgun in the hands of Tils father, William McBrady, lawyer. Crown
Attorney Langworthy read an unte<
mortem statement by the young man
In which he told that when his father
came home that night, he (Robert)
was asleep in one room and his mother
asleep in another. The father made
considerable noise, demanding admls
sion to his wife's room. Robert, the
son, left his room to Interfere. He then
found his father In,his own room with
a Run at his side. The rather told
him to leave or he would shoot him.
Ho started to leave the room and was
shot. He did not know whether it was
an accident or not The crown attorney
told that after shooting his son, McBrady called him on the telephone,
suggesting that he come ovor and take
"Bob's'1 antemortem statement.
COAST LI ALS
SOPPO T LAURIER
Pass   Resolutions   Reaffirming   Alio*
glance to Sir Wilfrid and Winnipeg Convention Platform.
1 VANCOUVER, B. C, Oot. 9.—The
Progressive 'Liberal association at a
meeting tonight passed a resolution
reaffirming Its allegiance to Sir W'l-
frlect Laurier us leader of the Liberal party and its support of th ■ "Win.
nlpeg platform and disapproving the
suggestion that Premier Brewster 1oln
tho government ot Sir Robert Borden
Joseph Martin characterized the proposed action of Mr. Brewster as an
outrage. Mr. Brewster, he said, hud
been elected by tho' Liberals and he
hoped that If Mr. Brewster sought
the suffrage of Victoria, he would bo
defeated.
PREPA E TO MEET
THE COST OF WAR
Belligerent   Nations   Carefully   Hus
banding   Resources  by   Effective  Organization
OTTAWA, Oct. 3.—The cost of the
war has beebme so great In recent
months that the layman Is at pains
to understand It. Tho allied financial
experts, however, are not frightened
by the prospect in view of the measures that are being* taken to maintain
financial stability in allied countries.
Assuredly one of the most Impor-
SPECIAL FOR PEW DAYS ONLY
Iron Beds
Iron Red, double, same as cut, witj
spring and mattress S12i5l
Iron Bed, double;   regular' price,
•Sio.ii.);   special   .   S7.50
Iron Bed, double;   regular price,
$1-1.00;   special    $10.00
Iron  Bed, double;   regular price,
$20.00;   special  $15.00
Iron Bed, double;   regular price,
$35.00;   special    $20.00
The regular prices of these Beds
are pre-war prices and the special
prices are practically factory prices.
It will pay you to call and see for
yourself the extraordinary values
offered.
L
Agents Pathe Phonograph
n
Standard Furniture Co.
Complete   House   Furnishers
TooJLatejtojClassify
A. 11 communications and donations in
connection with the British Red Cross
day, Oct. 19th, to be addressed to Mrs.
Risk, special secretary-treasurer, box
1173, Nelson. (716-3)
tant of these measures Is that which
provides for the safeguarding of lhe
national prosperity by sending Into
military service only those who do not
happen to be working at essential
tasks. The great basic Industries,
such as agriculture, transportation,
etc, are being carefully protected
against disintegration in all the larger belligerent countries. .As a result,
a very quick recovery is expected to
follow the end of the war.
Canada Is being congratulated upon ,
her wisdom in recognizing the unexpected length of the war by putting (
into operation a Military Service net
of moderate type, yet bound to proyo ;
an efficient help to industry. ,
MADAME TURMEL, WIFE OK ,
FRENCH   DEPUTY, ARRESTED
PARIS, ' Oct.   9.—Madame    Turmel,
wife of Louis  Hurmel,    deputy    for ,
Cotes du   Nord,  was. arrested  today.
The newspapers say she often changed '
Swiss bank notes at a Paris bank.
Turmel recently has been under In- I
vestigatlon by the French chamber be-
couse of n  charge that he has been ]
dealing with the enemy.
Thought Baby.Couid
Not Live
Doctors Said Chances Were Small Because of Severe Stomach Trouble,
But Dr. Cassell's Tablets
Cured Her.
Mr. Corby,  Harriston,    P.O.,    Ont.,
says:  "Our little girl wus weak from
birth, and  though  we tried doctors'
medicine and other things she got no !
better.    She Just lay and cried and >
neighbors all thought we could not
save her.   The doctors said she had
stomach trouble and that her chances '
were small.   Yet Dr. CaBselVs Tablets ,
cured   her.    They   have  been  worth
their weight In  gold to us.    I don't
think thero Is any medicine for chllfU
ren like Dr. Cassell's Tablets.
A fret sample of Or. Cassell's Tablets |
will bs ssnt to you on receipt of 6 oents
for mailing and packing. Address Harold F. Ritohie A Co, Ltd., 10 MoCoul
St., Toronto.
Dr. Cassell's Tablets are the supreme remedy for dyspepsia, Kidney'
Trouble, Sleeplessness, Anaemia, Nervous ailments and nerve paralysis and
for Weakness in. Children. Specially valuable for nursing mothers and
during the critical' periods of life.
Price 50 cents per tube, six tubes tor
the price of five from druggists and
storekeepers throughout Canada. Don't
waste your money on imitations; get
the genuine Sr. Cassell's Tablets.
Proprietors, Or. Cassell's Co., Ltd, ,j'
Manchester, Eng.
 w Wednesday, oct, 10,.»,.>.
fHE "DAILY JSEWSr'
'%?
PAGE THBE*
 * >.»».... ..♦....♦♦♦♦.♦.♦♦,,
Mining and Markets
PRICE OF SILVER AT
NEW MK 89 5-8
Quoted on  London  Market at 49.50—
Spelter Dull—Lead Weak—Cop-
i|: per,frioSs.;,'' ■?   ,.
.   (By Baily News Leased Wire.)
NEW YORK, Oot. $.—Silver, 80%;
at London, 49.50.
Spelter dull; East St. Louis delivery,
spot, 7.87% to 8.1214. At London: Spot,
£54; futures, £50.
At London: Spot copper, £110; futures, £110; electrolytic, £125.
Lead weak, spot, 7.75 bid. At London: Spot,  £30 10s; futures,  £29 10b.
VICTOR  MINE,  FORT STEELE,
IS   IN8PECTED   BY   LANGLEY
'FORT STEELE, B. C, Oct. 9.—Mr.
Langley, M. E., made a careful tnspec
tion of the Victor mine, last week, and
made a report- to the mining department as to the progress of tho road
to the mine, which is now utmost
completed.
ARGUMENT CLOSED IN
BIG YUKON LAW SUIT
DAWSON, Y. T\, Oct. 9.—Argument
ih the quarter of a million dollar law.
suit waged by the Canadian Klondyke
Power company, the Giants Dredging
company.and the Yukon Gold com
pany was concluded here after. 17 days
in taking testimony before the court,
It will be probably 30 days before a
decision is handed down.
MINING STOCKS.
We will ,sell any part of 10,000 Cork-
Province , 3^4c
8T DEN ISA LAWRENCE
Phone 39.     Ward Street.     Box 1102
Nelson B. C.
■   ,:        ■   ■'' h     ■
..   A. D. NASH
''        MINING ENGINEER
Consultation, Exploration, Develop.
-; -      ■    ment, Reports.
Room 1, Royal Bank Bids., Nelson.
LE AT SPOKANE
Utica    Shows    Decline—Star    Yields
Fractionally—Standard Quoted at
Low Figurel
.Recessions were the rule In the caso
of'leading stocks on the Spokane market yesterday. Utica eased off V* to
19V4- Slocan Star at fl showed a fractional decline. Standard was quoted
at 42. Rambler, at 18 asked, was! not
quoted.'
Spokane Closing Quotations.
(Reported by St. Denis ft Lawrence.)
Bid    Asked
Cork-Province   8.02%    $ .03%
Rambler   .18
Standard    :..   .42
Slocan Star 06 .06%
Utica 19%      .20%
Florence  '. 68
Caledonia 65 .68
New York Curb Closing.
Canada Copper, 1%—2.
Ray Hercules, 854—3%
' Standard, 5614—68%.
Utica, 19—21. I
New York Exchange.
High    Low   Close
C. P. R 160%    148%    149%
Chino   47%      46 46li
Granby     78 77 77
Inspiration ..... 49%      48%      48%
Miami     32%     31%     31%
Sales: C. P. R., 4100; Chino, 4200;
Qranby, 200; Inspiration, 9000; Miami,
3000.
MM!
STWpNIIItS
Various. Issues Decline to New Mini-
mums—Promise of Easier M<yiey
Is Fulfilled.
(By Dailyr News Leased Wire.)
NEW YORK, Oct. 9.—Short selling
and liquidation, the latter probably
predominating, again exerted their un-
4lvo.VabIe Influence over the stock
market today, causing various Issues
to decline to new mlnimuihs for the
current -movement. In several noteworthy instances these quotations also
represented lowest levels of recent
years.     .
■. Apart from, the Increasing bearish-'
ness of a large trading element, nothing tangible developed to explain the
further reaction. Vague peace rumors were without effect except owing to the confusion already existing
In conservative circles. Seasoned issues succumbed to pressure. Total
soles amounted to 740,000 shares. The
promise of easier money was fulfilled,
both call and time rates again relaxing, the latter only for the short periods. Bonds were heavy, liberty 3%s
repeating their recent minimum of
99.52, though rising later to 99.74. Total sales, par value, aggregated $4,-
180,000.
Closing Prices.
IAmerican Smelting  91%
Anaconda  s $7%
P.  R 149%
S. Steel'' 106%
j U. S. Steel preferred  115%
Utah  85
Nickel  '. '... • 31
The B. C. Assay and
Chemical Supply
Company, Ltd.
Laboratory Supplies for Assayers,
Chemists, Schools and Colleges
Soientiflo Glassware and Porcelain-
ware, Chemically Pure Acida
and Chemicals.
567 Hornby St,     Vanoouver, B. C.
The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada, Limited
Offices, Smeltlnt, and Refining Department
TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SHELTERS UND REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper, Lead and Zinc. Ores,
V  -TADANAC BRANS FIG LEAD. BMJESTONE AND SPELTER
The Royal Bank of Canada
INCORPORATED   1869
Capital Authorised * 25,000,000
Capital Paid Up  .    12,900,000
Reserve and Undivided Profit    14,300,000
ToUl  Assets 295,000,000
■     HEAD  OFFICE,   MONTREAL
Sir H. S. HOLT, President; E. L. PEASE, Vice-President and Menacing
Director; C. E. NEILL, General Manager.
860   BRANCHES   IN   CANADA   AND   NEWFOUNDLAND
Branches throughout Cuba and In Porto Rico, Dominican Republic,
Costa Rica. Antigua, Bahamas, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Venezuela,
Jamaica, Trinidad, British Guiana, British Honduras, and at London,
England; and New York City.
KOOTENAY  DISTRICT   BRANCHES
Cranbrook— Nelson—
H. C. Seaman, Manager. A. J. McLean, Manager.
Brand Forks— Rossland—
0. A. Spink, Manager. A, W. Sprague, Manager.
BUSINESS ACCOUNTS CARRIED UPON FAVORABLE TERMS
SAVINGS   DEPARTMENT   AT   ALL, BRANCHES
T
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
CANADIAN
PACIFIC
New Time Schedule
Effective Sunday, Sept. 30
Arrive   Nelson
TIME   AT   NELSON
Leave   Nelson
Daily
8:10 p.m.
Nelson, Kootenay Landing steamer,
Crows Nest train, connection Spokane,
Calgary, main line east of Medicine
Hat.
Dally
6:30 a.m.
Monday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Saturday
9:30 a.m.
Kootenay     Lake     local     service:
S.S. Kokanee, Tuesday and Thursday
to Lardo.   Service Lardo to Garrard
and return, Wednesday only, connecting with barge from and to Kaslo.
Ex. Sunday
4:00  p.m.
Tuesday,
Thursday,
1}:00 a.m.
Monday,
Friday
10:80 a.m.
S.S. Moyle, Crawford Bay, making
all landings on flag.
Monday,
Friday,
8:00 p.m.
Daily
10:16 p.m.
Nelson-Vancouver,   through   service
via Kettle   Valley   Railway, through
Hope.    Standard sleeper,   dining  car,
etc.,   via   Grand   Forks,   Greenwood,
Midway, Pentloton.
Dally
7:15 a.m.
Ex. Sunday
6:20 p.m.
Slocan City, Slocan Lake and intermediate points.
Ex. Sunday
8:25  a.m.
Tuesday,
ty Thursday,
*   Saturday,
5:20 p.m.
Sandon,    Kaslo    and    intermediate
points, via Slocan City.
Tuesday,
Thursday,
Saturday,
8:26  a.m.
Dally
9:45   a.m.
Castlegar, Trail, Rossland and intermediate points.
Monday,
Wednesday,
Friday,
Ex. Sunday
10:80 a.m.
9:10 p.m.
Dally
Tuesday,
Thursday,
Saturday,
9:46 p.m.
8:30  p.m.
Tuesday,
Thursday, '_
;  Saturday,
■ 9:46 p.m.
Columbia River and main line, via
Revelstoke.
Tuesday,
Thursday,
Saturday,
8:30  p.m.
.t. s, (lARTrcn, r>. r. a., NpiHotv, b.c.
RUSSELL MOTOR HOLDERS
GET  PLEASANT'SURPRISE
Company Decides to Pay Four Years'
Dividends in Arrears—Moderate
Demand for Stocks,
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
TORONTO, Oct. 9. The declaration by the directors of Russell Motor
company of payment In full of .the four
years' dividends in arrears on the preferred stock came as a pleasant surprise to the holders of this issue today.
The policy just announced involves the
payment of 28 per cent on the preferred
for the last four years, in addition to
1% per cent for the quarter, payable
Nov. 1, to shareholders of record of
Oct. 11. The seven per cent dividend
was also declared on the common
stock. The performance of the Rua*
sell Motor, company's issues on today's local market was rather disappointing in view of the directors' action. The market for these issues was
narrow and little stock came out on
the advices. Investment buying was
meagre in extend. Mackay common
was easier at 74 H.
Buying of war loans exceeded $10.
000, par value, with the 1937 issue
more active, closing at 94% for a gain
of %. and the 3931 loan was off V*
to 95%.
.PRICES SAG ALL THROUGH
THE LIST AT MONTREAL
No Acute Weakness. However—Close,
While Depressed, Not Altogether
Unsatisfactory.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
, MONTREAL, Oct. 9.—The reopening of the Canadian stock exchanges
after the Thanksgiving holiday wns accompanied by conditions in Montreal
not radically different from those of
last week. A fairly steady but quiet
tone in the early dealings in the larger
market was succeeded by a renewal of
weakness in the afternoon and prices
closed substantially below those of the
previous market day. The natural
result was to hold buyers aloof from
Canadian stocks and to bring in a .certain amount of the dribbling liquidation that has characterized recent
trading. Prices sagged pretty well nil
through the list, 'but there was" ho
acute weakness and the close, while
depressed* was not unsatisfactory under the circumstances. In bonds the
chief-activity continued to centre in
tho war loans. The first was considerably more active than recently,
transactions to a par value of $43,300
being reported at 96%. or unchanged.
The third loan was also active, with
dealings footing up to $19,000.
BUTTER  MARKET  FIRM.
.(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
MONTREAL, Oct. 9.—Butter was
firm. Demand for cheese good. The
demand for eggs continued good and
the market firm.
Cheese: Finest westerns and easterns, 21%.
Butter: Choicest creamery, 45% to
4C; seconds, 45.
Eggs: Fresh, 53 to 54; selected, 47
to 48; No. 1 stock, 43 to 44; No. 2
stock, 40j to 41.
Pork: Heavy Canada short mess, 35
to 45; Canada short cut back, 45 to 55.
VINOL MADE
IS NURSE
STRONG
Nothing Like it for Rundown
and Nervous People
Von Ormy, Texas—"I ' suffered
from a general run-down condition—
anaemia, loss of appetite and cough,
so I waa unfit (or my work. I tried
different medicines without help, arid
through my druggist learned of Vinol.
I took it; my appetite increased, my
cough disappeared, I gained in weight
and I am now well and strong, so I
can conscientiously endorse Vinol."—
Viola Salada, 8, N„ Van Ormy, Tex.
We guarantee Vinol to build up
run-down, anlemic folks or return
your money.   We take all the risk.
.nullinrfcinrl  Drwr On., Limited,  Nel-
i.ull.    .w..ii al  the Uwt drugc'lal in »'■•
PrtHsii Coiumiiin towns,
WAVE OF HYSTERIA SEEMS
TO BE SWEEPING AUSTRALIA
SYDNEY, N. S. W.—With a: general strike in New South Wales, seamen and waterside™ idle in Victoria,
a strike on the North Queensland railways and a score o£ similar but smaller disturbances elsewhere, Is it any
wonder Unit it seems as if a wave of;
hysteria is sweeping over the industrial masses of Australia? The trouble hns been making up for a long
time pastt the signs plain to all who.
could read. Now it is. here, and it has
developed precisely as expected—
namely, a short struggle between constituted authority iitnd the organized
strike. And it will run the usual
course-^-industria! chaps, great commercial loss and disorganization, the
determined restoration of order by a
government that must, assert its. authority or be forever flouted, and an
unconditional, return to work.
The really grave danger today is the
danger of bloodshed. The end of the
strike Is only a question of time,, but
the strikers, misled by perverted, gltb-
tonguod, well paid agitators, think
that victory is surely theirs. When
they see—and they will, very soon—
that all their hopes and their sacrifices have been, In vain, they will show
the ugly side of their temper, and the
temper of, a , Sydney, strike crowd is
something that cannot he Ignored. The
situation is not hopeless. A display of
firmness and great strength, combined with restraint and unending tact,
may end this strike^ without a blow
bei..f •'..nic'. 'ir let .*nj man lost *Jw
head, or r. ny fjoz-rnment leader become ra-ahj ir. *he cfY'ical days, wniiih
should airv-' nhoiit ihe end of ■,!..«
week, and blood will flow freely in
Sydney streets. The government has
done splendidly so far, but the real
test Is to come. Credit must be given
to the strikers for maintaining order.
They have vigorously suppressed their
more unruly members, they have picketed the hotels nnd kept their men
away from tho bars, they have organized daily processions to the do-
EUREKA HI TO
~" BUjLD TRAMWAY
Work on "Pony" Line Starts Today-
Will Cut Out Sad  Grades and
Reduce Cost of Hauling.
Construction of an 1150-foot pont
tramway will commence today at the
Eureka mine, on Fortyninc and Eagle
creeks, near Nelson. By means of this
tramway a bad stretch of heavy grade
road will bo cut off and the cost of
transporting ore from thG mine to the
railroad will be"• about cut in half.
Need for passing over an elevation of
400 'feet.will be obviated as a result
of the construction of the tramway.
Shipments arc to be made throughout
the winter, stated J. J, Malono, president of the company operating the
mine, yesterday. [-,
CORN PRICES LOWER
Possibilities of Government Curtailing
Values Have Bearish  Effect on
Market.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
CHICAGO, 111., Oct. 9.—Possibilities
of government action to curtail prices
of corn and hogs in line with measures
already taken to cheapen cotton seed
oil and other food products, had a
bearish effect today on grain and provisions, especially pork and lard. Corn
closed unsettled % to 1% net lower at
$1.1814 to $1.19% for December and
$1.1414 for May. Oats finished H to
% off. Latest quotations on pork, lard
and ribs ranged from 12 cents) to 17
cents down, as compared with Monday.
Downward swings of corn prices began at the opening with Interest centered chiefly on the government crop
report showing a yield much in excess
of what dealers hud expected. Atten-.
tion turned more and more to gossip
of a likelihood of federal efforts bo
bring about a lowering ratio of values,
approximating corn $1 a bushel and
hogs $10 a hundred pounds. Assertions that a new peace, offer would be
made by Germany counted also against
the bulls. A moderate recovery at the
last was ascribed to profit taking by
the shorts. Seaboard demand prevented any radical decline in oats.
CASH WHEAT, $2.21.
WINNIPEG, Oct. 9.—Cash wheat:
No. 1 Northern, $2.21; No. 2 Northern.
$2.18; No. 3 Northern, $2.15; No. 4
Northern, $2.09; No. 5, $1.94; No. 6,
$1.86;   feed,   $1.75.
Oats: May, 07%; October, 67%; November, 66; December, 64%. I
Flax: October, $3; November, $2.89;
December,  $2.84,
LIVESTOCK  MARKETS.
'(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
CHICAGO, III.* Oct. 9.—-The cattle
market, today was steady.
Cattle: Receipts, 10.000. Beeves, 7.10
to 17.50; western steers, 6.15 to( 14.60;
stockers and feeders, fi.15 to 11.50;
cows and heifers, 5 to 12.25; Calves, 9.50
to 16.
Hogs; Receipts, 12,000; weak. Light,
17.50 to 19.10; mixed, 17.70 to 19.60;
heavy, 17.75 to 19.60; rough, 17.75 to
18; pigs, 13.50 to 17.50; bulk, 18.10 to
19.35.   '
Sheep; Receipts, 17,000; steady. Native beef,  13.50 to 18.35.
Winnipeg.
WINNIPEG, Oct. 9.—Livestock receipts ut the Union stockyards today
totaled 2500 cattle and 130 hogs. The
movement of cattle was slow. With a
liberal ma for today's market buyers
wore looking for an easier market but
prices held steady on all quality of
cattle with a slight drop In the poor
stuff. Bulls nnd oxen, sold at steady
prices., Sheep, and lambs sold rather
slow, with top lambs soiling at 14 to
14.50. Hog market was slow and dull,
offerings being light. .Select hogs sold
nt 1,7,25.,
I <i..S'.<!> uarrt uf rattle went east, flyo;
tars wcsi fliM IS sOMtll, ., .:..\
main, whore, fiery gentlemen orate interminably, and in this way the mob
has lot off steam.
No Interference
But so far, no one has luterferedj
with the strikers. Their pickets" ev'-'
erywhere have been very active, and
no one has said them nay. Crowds of
angry men have barked "scab" and
other unpleasant names at the loyalists on the trams and trains and authority has not objected. But very
soon, combined with an attempt to,
carry on all the paralyzed 'services!
with free labor, an attempt will be
made to suppress both picketing and
'opprobrious terms ami then there may
:be trouble.
Tho New South Wales government,
in breaking the strike, is following the
"methods of the New Zealand government in 1913. First, every reasonable
effort was made to get the men to return to work;, then, wherever possible, public services were carried on
by volunteers, protected by police;
then an appeal was made for volunteers through the Farmers and Settlers association (which corresponds
to the New Zealand Farmers union)
today the volunteers from the various
country centres are being mobilized
and a camp for 5000. of them is being
formed at the Royal Show grounds;
voluntary services are being organized
for the railways, the tramways, the
waterfront, the carrying trade and
wherever else required, the registration of the unions on strike is being
cancelled and new unions, formed
from tho volunteers, are to be regis
tered. There is no sign yet of special
mounted police being organized, but
this task may be in hand. Tho gov.
eminent is not advertising Its Inten
tions. If this attempt to break Syd
:ney*s biggeBt strike is to be made
without an overwhelming force of po
lice at call, the government .Is taking
a risk that one does not like to talk
[Hibout, There is nothing more certain
than that the Sydney strike mob will
fight, unjess it is overawed by^a dts^
play of, force.
Changing Situations
The strike situation changes so
from day to day that one cannot here,
attempt to survey its extent or effect.
When I wrote, this time last week, It
was merely a railway and tramway
strike. In danger of collapse. So the
strike committee brought, up reinforce
ments and now the strikers include
wharf laborers and seamen, engineers
dockers and painters and many small
er unions, as well as innumerable or
gunizations the members of which re
main at work, but refuse to handle
anything handled by services supposed
to be parulyzed by the strike, but are
not. For instance, the carters will
touch nothing from the railways or
the wharves, so butchers, millers, bak
ers, grocers—a hundred and one industries, in fact—are either closing
their establishments or resorting to
all sorts of dodges and subterfuges In
order to get supplies. The disturbance
has spread to distant places and ships
.are lying idle at Brisbane and ut Melbourne. The Melbourne wharf laborers are talking strike, first on one pretext and, then another, but they''are
actually awaiting a report from two
of their number who have come to
Sydney. Tho men in the wheat country, engaged in rebooking and cleaning damaged wheat, have also ceased
work. There is evidence that the
strike committee, realizing that a general strike has never been known to
succeed, is seeking to keep the idle
men strictly limited, but the prosperous, wellfed masses of workers, intoxicated with pernicious doctrines and
craving any kind of fight with authority, cannot be kept out of tbe trouble.
As in New Zealand in 1913, the appearance of the volunteer army in the
streets, will probably bring more unions out, but that should be about
the end of it.
Irresponsible Sydney
Sydney, under strike conditions, is
as gay and Irresponsible as ever. On
the surface; there is no sign of the
great industrial upheaval. The cars,
manned by volunteers, run regularly,
there ar;e .sufficient suburban,.,trains
to carry ttje enormous passenger traffic, . and the goods train service Is
steadily increasing. The streets are
full of well dressed people. But the
shops close at 5 now instead of fi
o'clock, so that the employees may be
certuin of getting conveyance home
There is great restriction on the use
of gas, because all the coal mines arc
idle and no coal is coming in. Butter,
meat, fresh vegetables, potatoes, all
kinds of things that come by boat and
train arc becoming dearer and increasingly scarce. Sydney, they say, cannot starve, though some lines will be
scarce; but even if gaunt famine stared the city in the face, Sydney, probably, would just laugh at It. Women
und children somewhere, must lie suffering already, severe privations, for
scores of great factories, in addition
to those whoso employees are on
strike, have been forced to close down
through lack of coal or supplies, and
those workers live practically from
hand to mouth. However, there Is, as
yet, no talk of distress. Some strikers,
notably the engineers, are receiving
strike pay,, but others are getting
practically nothing;. . £3000 or £4000
per week, perhaps, is reaching the
strike committee, but there are already 30,000 or 40,000 strikers.
The men who marched in the processions are well-clothed, well-fed,
prosperous-look Ins, with plenty of to.
'i.xco and, pocket money, apparently.
,'ct it is no idle tear that Jirre, ur;(>-
the bright sunshine and i .aft/, carc-
In&s demeanor, th-jre are elen.onis that
in the next few days will produce
rlotr of a very ( rrtble cbav.ctrr. 'inly statesmanship .if a h!Th order, avid
infinite tact, can prevent in outbreak
that will add a vi»»*y ugly nlot lo Aus-
tu linn  history.
The Queensland railway st.'!ko, by
the way, Is lb no way allied to tho
Now South Wales trouble. The rail-
waymen wanted , their Increased pay
in their recent new. award to be' re-
irosnective. The arbitration court refused. The railway men struck. Tho
government considered their case, refused their claim and ordered them
back to work. They remain on strike.
There,Is an interesting lesson in the
fact that the government involved is
the Queensland state government, tho
most extreme labor legislature in Aus-'
traliaP - which has constantly caused
Sensiitlnns hy ■aanuiuu.'tiiiv \ Ibiontly sH-
clttliatlo selrcmovi >'t ■
The more you know about
coffee—arid the more particular you are about aroma
and flavour—the more you will
appreciate "SEAL BRAND"
COFFEE. Once you have tried/it,
your choice will always be Chase &
Sanborn's "SEAL BRANB$ COFFEE.
In fit > >nd % pound tins.   Whole—ground-pulverized—also
line ground for Percolators.   Never sold in bulk.        isi
CHASE & SANBORN, MONTREAL.
»
iini>z.iim;.ii>n.;.MHi>r- ►r«iiiii«r«iiiii»s.iiing
ACTIVE boys require a bite
a. between meals.   Give them
Dominion Toasted Com Flakes.
There is nothing more refreshing for
children at breakfast or any other
time, than a bowlful of these crisp,
appetizing flakes.
Always Packed
WAXTITE
TOASTED
CORN
FLAKES
MAB£IH CANADA
Th... tfoldan fl.k..
■r. always pact..
lUWTlBTBftSSTlAffiG.
W.eHTO,CAHAaA      	
Made by
KELLOGG TOASTED CORN
, FLAKE COMPANY
Toronto and Battle Creek
"sin.-r.nimoiiii'ri.'-'.<icir'iia.t-r-B7^tT-^.»»fn-;iint'|
Millions
ot Packages
of this famous War-time Sweetmeat are
sent to the soldiers, sailors and aviators
at the front.
If you have a friend there, see that every
parcel or letter contains a few bars or a
package of WRIGLEV'S, the great chewing confection that is used around the
world.
Keep it always on hand.     It
belps teeth, appetite, digestion.,
Sealed tight
Kept right
The Flavour Lasts I
PUT WRIGLEY'S IN YOUR FIGHTER'S CHRIST-
iMAS BOX. It costs little but gives a lot ofjeomfort and
refreshment. Not only a long-lasting confection, but a
nerve-steadier, a thirst-quencher, a pick-me-up. Every
Christmas parcel should contain some WRIGLEY'S GUM
FOR   ALL   PEOPLE.   POR   ALL   TIMES   AND   FOR   ALL   PURPOSES
Daily News Display Ads
agd
 Map FOUR   T
THE DAILY NEWS
WEDNESE.V.', C.".T. W, 1317.   ,>
^HE DAILY NEWS
Published every morning except
Sunday by The News Publishing Company, Limited, Nelson, B. C, Canada.
ROBB SUTHERLAND,
General Manager.
' Business letters should be addressed
and checks and money orders made
payable to the News Publishing Company. Limited, and In no case to individual members of the staff.
Advertising rate cards and sworn
detailed statements '• of " circulation
mailed on request, or may be seen at
the office of any advertising agency
recognized by the Canadian Press
Association. ...,. .*.
Subscription Rates—By mail 50 cents
per month, $2.50 for six months, $5.00
per year. Delivered: 60 cents per
month, $3.00 for six months, $ti.00 per
year, payable in advance.
| will be but a step to her real object—the crushing of England.
Some months after we finish our
work in Europe wo will take No'V
York, and probably Washington,
and hold them for some time. Wc
will put your country In its place
with reference to Germany. Wo
do not purpose to take any of your
territory, but we do intend to ta'to
a billion or so of your dollars from
New York and other places. The
Monroe Doctrine will be taken
cliargc of by us, and we will dispose of South America as we wish.
DonH forget this, about fifteen
years from now.
This report was made to the United
States government more than 17
years ago and has been on record ever
sinco In the naval department. How
near Germany eaine to realizing its
plans is now a matter of history.
. . WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10, 1917.
ttf&RMANY'S    tiKfcA.cSI     UANGhK
NOT LOSS OF COAST.
War correspondents when discussing
the' effect of the advances which Gen-
craVHaig and the French are making
in Prance and Flanders locus attention on the probability of soon forcing
the Germans to retreat from Us submarine bases on" the Belgian coast.
The German general staff is probably
giving consideration to a toss imminent, but far greater danger.
A glance at the map will show that
the.German army in Belgium lies in a
bottle, with the neck at its rear.
Through this neck, caused by the jutting out of a section of Dutch territory
which divides a part of Belgium from
Germany, the Germans must retreat
when they are finally forced to evacuate Belgium. If they havo plenty of
time in which to withdraw the situation would cause them little difficulty.
They could retire as easily as they entered, as far as space in which to move
is concerned. But supposing a hurried retreat were forced? The congestion would be so great that the German goneral staff would have to choose
between risking heavy and possibly
disastrous losses from entente attacks
and invasion of the Dutch province of
Llmburg, in order to get more elbow
room. The German general staff knows
what would happen if Prussian armies
stepped on Dutch soil.
WORK  FOR THE YMIR  ROAD.
•The public spirited action of tho
Nelson business men who last week
wont over the route of tho Nelson-
Yinir road with a view to securing
data as to the work needed t,o complete
it deserves commendation. It is now
too late in the season to hope for the
building this year of the short stretch
of road required to give Nelson direct
means of communication with the
south,. but now is the time to secure
tho information and take the other
steps preparatory to obtaining the necessary appropriation at the BUS session .of the legislature.
■Completion of the Ymir road would
be of enormous benefit to the city and
district: It ban become evident that
if the road were built scores of Spokane people would travel by automobile to Nelson. It is reasonable to expect that many of them would soon
have summer hemes on tho west arm.
Mining men would find tbe road of the
greatest advantage. Not only could
they drive through from the state of
Washington, but it would give easy
access to the mineral properties in Iho
Salrhoj Ymir and Erie districts. Tho
people living throughout those sections would hu placed wil bin easy
reach of Nelson. Lumber companies
along the Great Northern line would
find tho road of great benefit.
There, should be no cessation of the
efforts to secure the completion of this
road which means so much to the city
and district.
CANADA'S DENTAL CORPS ONLY
ONE IN ENTENTE FORCES.
' „ .
One respect in which the Canadian
army leudH is that it possesses the
only army dental corps in the entente
aijnles. ■ ...
Establishment of this corps was carried out in -11'lJi when it was found
thnt dental defects were responsible
for tho rejection of more recruits than
tony other single cause. At one time
or another 10 per cent of the average
army is rendered unfit for service be-
c&uae .oi dental troubles, which trench
31W'Mends" to accentuate.
'■■ Statistics show that over 75,000 men
of .Canada's army of more than 400,000
.have owed their eligibility to the work
bf^tlie C'anudlan dental corps, which
lias-performed oyer 1,000,000 operations upon recruits and casualties.
The corps has a personnel of 500 in
Canada and 1000 overseas.
-WHAT   GOETZ  TOLD; DEWEY   AT
" ■' ■'■"" MANILA.
Senator Lewis has secured publication of" an Interesting .report which
wus made to the United States naval
department, in 1898, when he repeated
a conversation he had with the Ger-
ma.il Admiral Goetz at Manila. It 11*
.lustrates the length of time during
iWjUch the Germans prepared for "Der
Tag" and the Object they had in view,
Alt extract from Goetz' statement
'reads:
j- AbOjUt .fifteen years from now
"' my^'-OOTntn'' will start a great war.
. -She will be in Paris about twn
v' months after, tho commencement
\;.- of hoRtlUtles,   Her move ou I'ari-*
Prepare to subscribe to Canada's
Victory loan. Help to make it as big
X relative success as the American
Liberty loan.
it. would be interesting to know
whether the Berliriese are still hammering nails In that Hindenburg
statue or whether Ihey have started
to throw mud at it.
"Goats' cheese is tasty and nourishing. It is more easily made than butter, and In winter time the humblest
sheds will suffice for its sleeping
place." says an English paper.
According to military headquarters
at Victoria, British Columbia drafted
men are to be called out to the number of 1500 at tho first call and then
at the rate of 000 a month. By drafting the men in this way it will make
the work of readjustment, of filling
their places, easier than If the full
5000 or so were called out at once.
The Vancouver Progressive Liberal
association has again gone on record
as endorsing Sir Wilfrid Laurier and
the Winnipeg convention resolutions.
It also orders Premier Brewster to refuse to support the Borden union
cabinet. It is consistent, anyway, in
its opposition to the Borden program
of a vigorous war policy and a union
nonpartisan government to carry it
out.
During tho eight months ending on
Aug. SI the wastage in tiie Canadian
army totaled 91,804, enlistments numbered only -10,179 and of these recruits
not much more than one-third were
for the fighting battalions. Only
17,451 men enlisted for tho Infantry to
make good a wastage of .U.804, which
was naturally nearly all in the infantry. AVaslage, of course, includes
wounded.
Men in the first class, bachelors and
childless widowers who aro 20 years
of age or who hud not reached the
age of 34 before Jan. 1 last, will bo
1 advised if thoy go before a medical board at tho earliest possible moment. They will then know where
thoy .stand as far as physical classification goes. Many will learn thai
they aro rejects, others will learn that
they arc in tbe non-combatant elasses
and nut Included in the first call,
while those who are in Class "A" will
havo more time in which to decide to
Sk e.xempliun or to prepare to leave
civilian life.
Archbishop Worrell of Nova Scotia
had this lo say of the efforts of "political profiteers" tu defeat tho union
government plans: "There has been
profiteering, of which Canadians are
ashamed, but. I can see very little difference between the men who take advantage of w'nt! conditions to lino their
pockets and the, men who use Iho
same conditions to advance their party
Interests. All honor to those who have
fearlessly and patriotically cast their
party allegiance to the winds, and
have sought to give the country a national government composed of patriotic men whu can put liar war first
and unite in working out the best
plans for winning it."
-$
WHAT THE PRESS IS SAYING J
The Bitter Cry of the Farmer.
The embattled farmers of Dakota
who. aro rallying to the cry of conscript all wealth except agricultural
wealth will got very little sympathy
from the average American. If there
is any class In tho world whose lot is
prosperous and secure it is the American farmers of the middle west.—
Chicago Tribune.
The Last Lap in Prance.
The two - o'clock - in - tbe - morning
courage which Napoleon implanted in
the hearts of his soldiers even if they
did not possess it' before, is now a
quality of the whole French nation.
No weakening of France's grip is indicated. The sacrifices of France in the
past three years have been almost inconceivable. Thoy have been cheerfully and unitedly made and the nation now declares its purpose to enter
upon new sacrifices. Tho French nation, for that matter, is always doing
more, and better than oven its warmest friends expect of It.—Boston Transcript.
I THE WEATHER
\> . 4,
Min. Max.)
Nation     38 62
Vancouver — —.....    44 62
Edmonton     32 72
Regina     28 65
London       29 51
Ottawa   ...•     28 48
Quebec       30 46
Halifax    36 66
Kamloops      38 68
Moose Jaw     29 60
Winnipeg    36 50   i
Toronto     32 »\
Montreal  '...    34 42
St, John     44 50
I  Germany and the War of Machinery \
(By W. D. Newton.)
It in noticeable that, in order to disparage the allies, German military
writers have adopted the habit of
dwelling upon what Major Moraht
calls "the superior technical re.
sourcos"of their enemies. Every effort is made to show that it Is machinery alone that gives the allies their
supremacy. Britain has been accumulating munitions and laying railways for the lust six months; "preparations (were) made on an enormous scale during the winter of 1916-7"
(Baron von Ardenne), and in the attacks themselves "masses of iron,
steel and explosives were hurled
against our line." if the commentator
particularises, he states, as Major
Moraht states, that "the other English
weapons, the very numerous machine
guns, tanks and aeroplanes, wore
(also) used in masses,** and he is
likely to bring in an inevitable reference to the output of the united "shell
factories of the wholo of the entente,
including America." No commentary
at all evades the mention of "mines,
for the mines of Messines have given
the Germans a blessed opportunity of
obscuring and belittling their defeat,
and also obscuring the way the British generals, gunners, aviators and
infantrymen brought about that defeat.
The reason why the Germans are
adopting this "machinery versus military science" pose is, of course, perfectly obvious. It serves, they think,
the double purpose of depreciating the
success of tho allies and winning sympathy from tho neutrals.
It gives to the world a picture of
enemies, incapable of success by
ordinary moans, calling to their aid
all the cold and inhuman arts of the
mechanician. It also gives to the
world (so the German hopes) a picture of tho German "Michael," unconquerable before men, at length being
battered to earth by machinery!
Ordinary moans will not prevail to
beat Germany, therefore the "devilish
English" have resolved ruthlessly tn
use every engine and every mechanical device they can turn out from
their factories to attain their end.
It is astonishing that the Germans,
of all people, should make use of this
form of propaganda, but it must be
remembered thai Germany has a. very
short memory for her own actions.
Moreover. Germany has a curious capacity for being infuriated when an
enemy uses against Germany any weapon that Germany has already used.
One can recall the angry "This is not
war, it is butchery," that greeted the
British when at Neuve Chapelle and
Loos, they showed that they could
employ artillery as powerfully as the
Germans, And one can remembor
with what disgust the inventors of
"gas" and the "flammonworfor," described the tanks as "unfair." ,
Whon therefore, Major Moraht says;
aceiisinsXv of tho ulliet', than "'the
usages of war have become much
crueller," one tools that probably he
iw speaking out of the Gorman heart.
But one is not impressed. And it is
doubtful if neutrals are impressed. for
tiie neutral memory is not so short as
tho German memory. The neutral can
ask from whence did this cruelty
spring? And ho can ask, If cruelty
has sprung from tho uso of machin-
|        WHEN   FRIGHTFULNESS |
| BEGAN. 1
$ . vj>
•When Ambassador Cumbon loft
Berlin to return to France at the outbreak of the war ho was, according
to ex-ambassador Gerard, bundled off
with no ceremony to Denmark and
left to get home as best he could. Tho
train which was furnished him was of
the ordinary kind, and he was compelled to pay for it in gold,
This speeding the pan ing guests
contrasts strikingly with the ei.vnm-
stances attending the departure of the
Gorman ambassador from Parin, Ho
was escorted to a train of great < ":<•-
gtfucc belonging lo the French gov-
crnmenl and taken in comfort across
the border, whore tho Germans confiscated the engine and coaches. :>
Thirt. violation of the rules uf co.u.-
tesy Was the prelude to the violation
of various other rules, including those
of law and humanity,—St. Louis Ite-
puhllc.
WOODEN   CROSSES.
_*>
"Go live the  wide    world    over—but
when you come, to die,
A quiet English churchyard Is the only
place lo lie!" —
I hold it half a lifetime, until through
war's mischance
f saw iho wooden crosses that fret lhe
fields of France,
A l brush slugs in. an oak .tree, "-nd
from, the old square lower
A chime as sweet and mellow salutes
tho idle hour;
Stone crosses Luke no notice, but. tho
little wooden ones
Aro Ihrllling every minute- to the music
of tho guns!
Upstanding at attention, they face the
cannonade,
In apple tree alignment like guardsmen on parade;
But tcmbstonos are civilians who lull
or sprawl or sway
At every crazy angle and stage of slow
decay.
For them the broken column—In Us
plot of unkept grass—
The tawdry tinsel garland safeguarded under glass;
And the squire's emblazoned virtues,
that would overweight a saint.
On the vault empaled in iron—scaling
rod for want of paint!
The men who die for England don't
need It rubbing In;
An autocratic stamper and u narrow
strip of tin
Record tholr date and regiment, their
number and their name
And the squire who dies for England
Is treated JiiHt the same.
So  stand  the  still  battalions;   alert.
austere,  serone,
En eh with his just allowance of brown
earth Hhot with greon;
None better then his neighbor in pomp
or circumstance—
All bonds upon the rosary thnt turned1
the fate uf FranceI
cry, which of the opposing sides went
into the war boasting of its mechanism to such a degree that It actually
talked of Its army as a "great machine" that would sweep aside all resistance?
It is Germany who has turned war
into an affair of machinery rather
than .an affair of men. Apart, even,
from her 'most notorious 'contributions to the mechanical inventions of
war, the gas-cylinder, the flammeri-
worfer. gas shells, the incendiary disc,
zeppelins and the rest. Germany had
planned this war to be a war of machinery since before the beginning. ,
Her strategic > railways built years !
before the war (railways that formed;
the fulcrum of such campaigns as
those she undertook against Russia,
for instance) together wilh her ready
supply of motor vehicles, wore to carry her troops well into the heart of
enemy countries before the less mobile
defending forces could hope to resist.
It was her heavy pieces from the
foundries of Skoda und Krupp (pieces
made easy of transport by ingenious
mechanical devices) that were to
bin st her entry into France through
the barrier forts of Liege and Namur.
II was Germany's overwhelming readiness in airplanes that was to give her
her advantage over her less well
equipped foes, and her unexpected
strength in howitzers and heavy artillery was to secure her tho victorious results of this aerial domination.
All along tho line Germany's reliance upon machinery as the main
moans to victory is observable. It was
Germany who turned war into an affair of heavy guns and high explosive
shells, and it was Germany's use of
machine guns that set the allies working hard to draw level with her and
ultimately beat her in this arm. It
was Germany who first started firing
shells from long range guns into Dunkirk and Belfort. It was Germany
who made use of machinery to bring
the horrors of war to civilian communities—her zeppelin and airplane
raids, indeed, stand along. In this, as
mechanical "triumphs." It was the
Gorman who made unrestricted uso of
the submarine machine. Finally when
she went to earth at the Alsnc, it was
Germany who brought Into war the intricate machinery of trench fighting,
with its wire entanglements, its trench
mortars, its mlnnenwerfers, its bombs,
armored snipers-posts, concrete emplacements, elaborate dugouts and the
rest. And having inaugurated this mechanical condition of war, it was Germany who gave to tho world tho weapons for use in it, gas, the flame projector,, the petrol thrower, and the
like, "indeed it wns Germany's mechanical warfare of trenches that
challenged the wits of her enemies and
brought Into being the tank, tho weapon that deals effectively with the
trenches. .
If this has become a war of machinery, then Germany has no right to
disparage her enemies' use of machinery, for she It was who led the way.
Hut ii is perhaps not tholr use of machinery that angers Germany, so much
as tiie fact that they use it too well.
The pupils have proved too efficient
for their teacher. Thoy have beaten
him at every point, in the use of his
own engines of war.
servo to cover a multitude of faults Hi
the way of knoclc knees and bowlegs,
the accompaniments of industrial and
commercial-,endeavor.—Southern Lumberman.
<*v_
-®
Who says their war is  over?    While
others "carry  on,"
The tittle wooden crosses spell but tho
dead and gone!
Not   while  they  deck  a  skyline,  not
while thoy crown n view
Or a living soldier sees them, and sets
his teeth anew!
The tenants of tho churchyard where
the singing thrushes build
Were not, perhaps, all paragons uf
promise well fulfilled;
Sumo failed—through love or liquor-
while the parish looked akauco,
Uut you cannot die a failure if you
win a. cross in France.
The  brightest   gems  of  valor  in   the
army's diadem
Arc the V.C. and the D.S.O., M.C. and
D.C.M.;
Hut those, who live  to wear I hem  will
tell you Ihey are dross
Ilcsido the final    honor   pf a simple
Wopdon  cross.
HOOT MON!
Recent despatches from London are
to the effect that kilts may replace
trousers Tor civilian dress in England
as a "result or the governmenf's advice that men should wear material of
one hue in ardor to economi/.e in dye-
stuffs."
In support <if kilts, "a government
Fashion expert" is alleged to have said
that they dispense with the, bother, of
pressing, and that the proof of tholr
durability is the fuct that Scottish
families havo passed one kilt down
from generation to generation. Another argument advanced in favor of
tho kilt is the "advice of physicians,"
who say that the kilt is the ideal dress
for boys, because It gives them the
greatest warmth about the stomach.
The Liverpool Post says: "Certainly
something should be done to abolish
tho hideous cylindrical bags in which
wo. hide our legs today. Whoever saw
a statue that looked dignified in trou
surs?" But the real kernel of all this
news is In the final paragraph of Asso
elated Press correspondence on the
subject:
•   "The presence of thousands of Scot
tlsh troops In all parts of the country
has made tho kilt popular with many
civilians."
So it is nut on account of the advici
of physiclanB nor for the Hake of economy that civilians look with favor on
the kilts, hut because of the presence
of kilted troops. Age-long yearning
of tho human heart—to look like
fighter instead of a worker! It is not
to be, however. Trousers are hore to
stay because democracy Is hore. Democracy and Industry go along togeth
or. Democracy is founded on an Industrial instead of a militaristic or
predatory "culture." And even as the
knight In shining armor has pnssed
away, so the Highlander In his kilt
must go, loo. For one thing, there are
coming to be a great many wire fences
In Scotland. The clans no longer roam
free and wild, over hill and dale. In
lime of pctujo. the Highlander must hie
In the fields or to the factory or shop,
and eventually'the'kilt will belialrl
nwav-^superseded by the "e>'llnnrle..l
baks,"   which,   though   "hideous/   yet
UNCLE   SAM'S  -LITTLE
! PURCHASE    ' |
® j—: _J ®
There are really ovor 50 islands in
the Virgin Island group, although only three of them are large enough to
show on an ordinary map. Since Columbus ran into them in 1493 they
have been successively under the rule
of Spain, Great Britain, France, Holland, Denmark and now the United
States.
Uncle Sam paid $25,000,000 for these
new members of his fnmily. This Is
about $29ii ail ,acre. Alaska cost him
only two cents an acre, but he wanted
these islands more. The strategic value of the harbor of St. Thomas has
been recognized ever since the days
of the Spanish buccaneers.—World
Outlook.
COLD STORAGE
"Is Miss Howies an obliging singer?"
"Oh, yes; half the time she refuses
to sing."
"Did you enjoy the performance,
dear " asked Hetty's mother.
"Oh m-m-mammn," replied the child
breathlessly, 'if you'd only been there,
you'd be so sorry you didn't go along."
Wyse4—My dear, there's no use for
you lo look at those hats, for I have
only two dollars  in  my pocket.
Mrs. Wyse—You might have known
when we came out that I would want
lo buy a few things.
Wyse—I did.
"Did I understand you to say that
this lad voluntarily confessed to playing truant?" asked a school attendance
officer, addressing the mother of a
small and dirty hoy.
'Yes, sir, he did," the woman responded. "I Just had to persuade him
a little and then he told me lhe whole
thing voluntarily."
"How did yon  persuade tiim?v"
"Well, first, I gave him a good hiding," said'the parent,, 'and then I put
him to bed without any supper and
took his clothes away and told him
he'd stay In bed till he'confessed what |
he'd done and that I should punish !
him In the morning. And in less than
half an hour he told mo the whole I
story of his own accord." I
AUSTRALIA IN WAR
TO THE  LAST  MAN
TORONTO—"Australia is dctermln-,
ed to carry out her promises to Ihe
last man and the last shilling," said
Hon. J. D. Connolly of Perth, West
Australia, who is on his way to take
over the post of a gent-general for
West Australia in England. "Prime
minister Hughes has promised that
mother referendum on conscription
will bo taken, If necessity, bul there is
it present no necessity for it. Australia has been asked tu contribute
root) men a month lor reinforcements,
md we aro able at present to secure
those by voluntary recruiting. There
is no need to enforce conscription until recruiting falls below thnt figure.
Colony's Splendid Record
Australia is heart and sotd In tho
task of winning the war, and "West
Australia, and indeed all Australia, is
in favor of introducing conscription if
necessary. Conscription wus carried by
a majority of 70,000 In West Australia
10 months ago. The common wealth
has contributed eight and a half per
cent of tho entire population to tho
army. West Australia has given even
better than  this, having given nearly
11 per cent of her population. Nearly
380,000 men have enlisted In the whole
of the commonwealth, the .total population of which Is 4,750,000.
The question of conscription was
complicated in Australia by many side
issues, said Mr. Connollj'. The government, had the1 Socialists and the I.
W. W. to fight. These were being vigorously suppressed, however.- They do
not belong oflcially to the Labor party.
In the official Labor party sentiment
was about evenly divided on the question of conscription,
"Tho country is as enthusiastic In
Winning the war as in tbe beginning,"
said Mi-. Connolly. "Western Australia
has contributed £600,000 out of a population of less than 350,000 to the Red
Cross, Patriotic, Soldiers' Comforts
and other funds." ,
Willie in Canada, Mr. Connolly is
making rcquirics with regard to settlement ot immigrants after the war.
Each state controls its own Immigration policy. West Australia has framed a vigorous policy,.and has a complete scheme of settlement for soldiers
from any part of tho empire or allied
countries. A very liberal provision has
been made as an inducement to settle
In a good climate and on good agricultural land, the government being prepared to give generous nssistance, The
country can take as-many as come;
there is room for tens of thousands,
says Mr. Connolly.	
Day
Saturday
October  13th
FOR
CHRISTMAS PARCELS
FOR     .
HIGH   SCHOOL   BOYS
OVERSEAS
Plenty of Shoes
but not a good pair in the lot.
That's many a man's condition.
But If 'he will bring them here
and have us repair them In the
modern way the situation will be
reversed. He will have plenty of
.shoes and all new and serviceable.
Hunt up your old shoes and send
thorn along.
The Dji-to-Date Shoe Shop
520 Ward St.
DAVE  WADE,  Prop.
"Wade   Right in" '
PIANOS
VICTROLAS
VICTOR RECORDS
MUSICAL   MERCHANDISE
VIOLINS—GUITARS—BANJOS—ACCORDEONS
AND
SHEET MUSIC
THE   LATEST   AND   MOST   POPULAR   ONES
Call fn—Let Us Play Some of Them for You
MAIL ORDERS GIVEN  CAREFUL  ATTENTION
PHONE—NELSON  97
MASON & RISCH, Limited
537  WARD STREET NELSON,  B.C.
Hunting Clothing
NOW   18   THE   TIME   TO   BUY   YOUR    HUNTING    CLOTHING
WE  HAVE A FULL AS ORTMENT, CONSISTING OF:
Hats    Coats    Vests    Pants
TEN   PER   CENT   DISCOUNT   TO   CLEAR ,
We Also Have a  Full Assortment of
RIFLES,  SHOT  GUNS  AND  AMMUNITION
PRICES   RIGHT—BUY   EARLY
Nelson Hardware Co.
BAKER  STREET
NELSON, B. C.
John Burns & Sons '"SSSST
8ASH AND DOOR FACTORY. NELSON PLANING MILLS.
VERNON, 8TREET, NEL80N, B. 0.
Every Description of Building Material Kept in Stock
Estimates Givan on Stone, Brisk, Concrete and Frame Buildings.
MAIL ORDER8 PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
,,P.O.BOJU3. PHONE 17»
Birks'
Bracelet Watches
You may know of the newest ideas and styles in
Bracelet Watches simply
by writing for particulars.
We have some exceptionally fine Bracelet Watches
that are most suitable for
gift purposes. Full particulars of these are gladly
sent on receipt of some
ideas as to "what is required.
Tho latest presentation watches are In
[beautiful   now   styles.
Henry Birks & Sons Ltd.
Vancouver, B. C.
PURS.
Guaranteed liiBh class lurs, nice selection kept In stock or made to order
from selected skins. Customers' furs
made up, remodelled and repaired.
Skins dressed and mounted at moderate prices. Best price paid for raw
skins,
G. GLASER, Manufacturing Furrlar
116 Ward St., Nelson. B. C.  Phone 106
500 CORDS
Wood
Wanted
Quote your best price f. o. b.
your station.
West Transfer  Co.
P. O. Box 116
Phone 33
NOTICE.
Land Registry Act.
In lhe matter of an application for
tbe issue of a duplicate Certificate of
Title to Lot 23, Block 6, Town of
Salmo, Province of British Columbia,
Map U22A.
Notice Is hereby given that it is my
intention to issue at tbe expiration of
one month after the first publication
hereof a duplicate of the Certificate
of Tit 1« to the above mentioned lot, in
the name of Ida Schwinlce, which Certificate is dated the 6th day of December, 11)02 and numbered 1992A.
Dated at the Land Registry Office at
Nelson, B.C., this 18th day of September, 1917.
K. S. STOKES,
District Registrar,
Date of first publication, Sept, 22,
1917.
TENDERS FOR COAL.
Tenders arc culled fur r>00 tons lump
coal, f.o.b. Balfour wharf, to be dcliv-
c'red as required.
The lowest or any tender nol neeus-
sarity accepted. Tenders to he suli-
mlttcd to O. C. .1. Unit, EsuuiinaU,
net later than 15th Oct,
SYNOPSIS OF COAL
MINING REGULATIONS
Coal mining rights of the Dominion
in Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, tbe Yukon Territory, tho Northwest Territories, and in a portion of
iho province of British Columbia, may
be leased for a term of twonty-one
years at an annual rental of $1 per
acre. No more than 2560 acres will
be leased to one applicant.
Application for lease must he
made by the applicant in person to
tho agent or sub-agent of the district
of which the rights applied for are situated.
In surveyed territory the land must
be described by sections or legal subdivisions of sections and in unsurvey-
od territory the tract applied for shall
be staler d out by the applicant himself.
Each application must be accompanied by a fee of $5 which will be re- "
funded if the rights applied for aro
not available, but not otherwise. A
royalty shall be .paid on the merchantable output of the mine at the rate
of five cents per ton.
Tho person operating the mine shall
furnish the agent with sworn returns
accounting for the full quantity of
merchantable coal mined and pay the
royalty thereon. If the coal mining
rights arc hot being operated, such
returns shall he rurnished at least onco
a year.
The lease will include the eoal mjn-.
ing rights only, but the lessee may be
permitted to purchase whatever available surface rights may be considered
necessary for the working of the mine
at the rate of $10 ah acre.
For full information application
should bo made to the Secretary of the
Department of the Interior, Ottawa, or
to any agent or sub-agent of Dominion
lands. W. W CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication oC
this advertisement will not be paid for.
 „       . . ♦•♦*-♦-*♦♦♦
THE   DAILY   NEW*. WANT   ApS
ANTICIPATE Y6UR WANT*
 r?   WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10, 191T.
IJObDEr DAILY NEWS
PAGE FIVB
9&>
t
At the Star
GOLDEN   BANTAM  CORN
Dozen .......30c
HUBBARD SQUASH
Found   4c
FRESH  PUMPKINS
Pound .....3c
Another- Shipment of
CHOICE   ELBERTA   REACHES
Crate ,..,.. .'',..,',,M.. SI .50
RED PEPPERS
Found  25c
GREEN PEPPERS
Found
Pound
GARLIC
a-5C
35C
BRADSHAW PLUMS 1
5-pound basket   20c I
.^.MaaBB—aaajaa-ja—_——..^——aw-aaaaaa*^
Star Grocery
PHONE 10
I6533
is the winning number In our
we.ekly drawing for a pair of
$5 Shoes. Ask for a ticket with
your purchase.
R. Andrew & Co.
LEADERS IN FOOT FASHION
Fruit Growers—Attention
We shall load our next car of fruit
at the
Freight Sheds on Friday, Oct. 12th
Clean  up all  fall  varieties of  Apples, Pears and Plums.   Special demand for Hyslop    Crabs.     Whiter
Pears should bo picked now.
KOOTENAY    FRUIT   GROWERS'
UNION
Phone 180 508 Ward St.
CASE OF MISTAKEN
Ii
VERNON   PREPARATORY  SCHOOL
Coldstream, B. C.
Boys 7-14 New Buildings 17 Acres
Numbers Quintupled Since War Began
Trained Nurse and'Matron. Prospectus
Rev. AUGUSTINE C. MACKIE,
B.D. M.A.   (Cantab)
Headmaster.
Tired, Aching Feet
and Limbs
are. promptly relieved by applying Absorbine, Jr., the antiseptic liniment. It
in soothing, Healing anil Invigorating—
puts vim and energy Into jaded
muscles, One of the many cnthusi-
nstjfc iKers writes: "1 received tho trial
battle of Absorbine, Jr. all right and
at that time was unable to walk with-
out'a cane, just around the house. I
used it freely and inside of two days
could walk without limping, something
1 had not done in two montbs. I went
to the drug'store and procured a $1.00
bottle and today can walk as good as
ever. I'll never be without It. 1 am
recommending it to everyone I can
for f am a living witness."
Absorbine. Jr. should always be kept
at. hand   for emergencies.
At druggists $1.00 and $2.00 a bottle
or sent  postpaid.    Liberal trial bottle
for 10c  in  stamps.    \V.    p.    Young,
R: P.D.F.,   44.-)   Lymans   lildg.,   Montreal,
Can.
Kootenay and Boundary
Maccauley  Discharged After Spending
Health and  Fortune in  Fight to
Show   Innocence.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
NEW YORK, Oct. 9.—A case of mistaken identity that cost Its victim
$50,000 and shattered bis health in a;
nine months' fight to set himself right,;
was brought to light here today when,
al. the request of the district attorney,
an indictment charging forgery against
Alexander P, Maccauley, a wealthy
mining engineer of Toronto, wns ordered dismissed by the court. It was
brought out that Maccauley bad been
erroneously arrested in St. Louis, Dec.
31, 190B, in the belief that he was
"Christinas Keough," known to the police as an alleged forger of travelers'
chocks. It wan Keough's practise, according to the police, to pass these
checks on jewelery dealers in Ih'l
Christmas shopping season, and r. was
the positive way in which sh'opk< ->p-
ers here Identified Maccauley when
he was brought here as the m in who
Victimized them in that way thai led
to his protracted tight to clear himself.1
Kobiigli, the police say, is still at
large, having eluded all efforts to
catch him for several years, and it
'was his resumption of swindling operation while Mr. Maccauley lay hero
ill from his experiences that brought
about the investigation resulting In
today's action.
In moving* for his dismissal, the
district attorney's representative expressed regret, which, be said, "could
not equal the humiliation and suffering of Mr. Maccauley," while the .n-.dge
also expressed his regret.
FORT ML FARMERS
HAVE HAD GOOD YEAR
High Price of Wool Has Made Sheep
Raising  Most Profitable—Potatoes   of   Good   Quality.     "—1"
(Special to The Daily News.)
PORT STEELKi B. C., Oct. St.—This
season has been favorable to fui'mers
In the district. , Some of the finest
hay, grain, potatoes and vegetables
have been raised. Although very dry
in the foothills, cattle and hogs have
had a normal year. This year has
been decidedly the most profitable in
sheep raising, owing to the high price
of wool. Sheep owners find ,more
profit in raising sheep for wool only,
than in raising to sell for table use.
There has been rather a. scarcity in
eggs during the last month, though
hens and chickens arc plentiful in the
vicinity. During early summer butter
was plentiful, but it is now soaring
in price, and there is not much on the
,m.irket at the present time. It Is ex
,pected. that in the course of a month
or two butter w.lll again come to Its
normal price. ,
H. H. McVIttie. who was postmas^
ter at Hazelton, B. C, an old timer
of Port Steele, died Oct. |.   He was a
brother of T. T. McVIttie of Fort
Steele.
Capt Flemyng, whose ship, tbe Middlesex, was torpedoed in the Irish sea,
is paying a visit to his sister, Mrs.
R. U T. Gulbralth, at the agency.
Sister Justinian of the" industrial
school is recovering from illness.
Mrs. .1. T. Galbraltb has returned lo
Portland, Ore., where she will spend
the winter.
The Rev. Lampont, who Is ia the
St. Eugene hospital, Cranbrook, Is
rapidly recovering.
Miss M. Similiter and Miss 13. Wil-
licome spent the weekend and Thanksgiving day with Mr. and Mrs. A. J.
Gl'OK.
SLOCAN   CITY   NOTES
SLOCAN CITY; B. C, Oct. 9.—Miss
M. J. Holt of Nelson, who has been
here for a week, the guest of Mrs. J.
M.  Rae,   returned   to  Nelson   Monday.
lJte. H. Parker left Monday for
Vancouver.
Miss M. B. Carson, teacher of the
junior grades here, spent the week-
end in Nelson.
Mrs, Muirhurt of Three Forks Is
here, the guest of Mrs. .1. H, Pinchbeck.
Mrs. William Kirby has gone lo the
coast for a month.
The Anzac chapter, I. o. D. E„ has
just forwarded $15 to the St. Duns-
tans home for the blind at Halifax.
j ANOTHER   AUSTRO-GERMAN     |
I PEACE  OFFER   COMING |
| (By  Associated   Press.) |
Another Austro-German peace |
I offer, which is to be based on the j
j principles of no territorial aggran- I
! dtzement, the surrender of Bel- ]
I gian and French territory, the re- j
I nunciation of territorial acquis!-' |<
j tlons for money payment, and no j
) indemnity by either side is soon, |
| to be put forward, according fo |
j a  prominent Berlin  newspaper.      |
MISS   CIDORA   FOWLER,
Who Is Appearing Every Afternoon and Evening .All This Woek in
the Window of Kandyland, Demonstrating the
Merits of FOWLER'S CIDERS
NELSON   JOBBERS,   LTD,, .DISTRIBUTORS
There's the Beat in Everything
The   Best   in  Flour   Is
Taylor Made
Brands:
PRIDE OF ALBERTA
and
MOTHER'S FAVORITE
WINNER  OF  VICTORIA
CROSS  SERIOUSLY   ILL
Major Macdowell, Hero of Sensational
Episode  of  War,   in   Critical
State at Brockvllle
(By Dully News Leased Wire.)
IJROCKVILLR, Ont., Oct, ft.—Major
T. W. Macdowell, V.C., D.S.O., M.C.,
hero of one of the most sensational
single-handed episodes of the war, Is
in a serious condition at the general
hospital here, trench fever and shell
shock having developed since his arrival on furlough at his home ut Malt-
land, a Brockvllle suburb. Since
Thursday last he had not slept until
today, when he secured a few fitful
snatches of broken sleep. Two other
brothers, now overseas, have also
good records, each having won the
Military Cross and one the D.S.O,
also..
Major Macdowell won the Victoria
Cross by storming a Hun trench, supported solely by two N.C.O.'s, whom
he left lo cover a withdrawal if
necessary. He, alone, with a bomb
and an automatic revolver, forced the
surrender of 30 odd Hosches, whom
he made prisoner.
OVER 50 PER CENT GO INTO
CLASS A AT SASKATOON
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
SASKATOON, Sask., Oct. 9.—Nin<*
ty-nhie men were examined here today
by the medical board;"* more than half
of whom were passed into class A. The
figures are:
(Mass A,  S4;   claws   II, 7;   class C,   4;
elass D,  1;  class  B,  33.
VETERANS WOULD MAKE ALIEN
ENEMIES DO USEFUL WORK
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
REGINA, Sask., Oct. p.—Thoijrmy
and uaVy veterans tonight passed u
rfesolutipn calling ou the Dominion
government to conscript "alien enemies and others not friendly to; the
cause for which our soldiers tire
fighting" for necessary productive pursuits.
MORE MEN PUT THROUGH
MEDICAL TEST AT WINNIPEG
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
WINNIPEG, Oct. I).—There was a
slight revival in the number of medical examinations under the Military
Service act today, the five boards
handling 145 men. Seventy-four of
these graded class .\; 17 class B; 22
class C; one class D, and 31 were rejected as unlit.
PORTUGUESE PRESIDENT
i GOES TO FRENCH FRONT
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
SALAMANCA. Spain,.Oct. U—President Machado of Portugal, accompanied by the Portuguese prime minister, passed through here toduy"On his
way to visit the Portuguese army In
France. King Alfonso sent the president a message of greetings and good
will.
TORONTO   AVIATOR   IS
PRISONER IN GERMANY
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
TORONTO, Oct. 0.—Flight Lieut. E.
W. Desbarats, royal naval air service,
recently reported missing, is a prisoner
In Karlsruhe, Germany, according to a
cablegram today^ to his father, IS, C.
Desbarats of the Desbarats Advertising   agency,   Montreal.
Nffl*
[ JUST ONE APPLICATION
| AND THE HAIRS VANISH
(Toilet Talks.)
Any woman can keep her skill free
from unsightly hair or fttssfc if she will
follow these simple Instructions: When
hairy growths appeal', apply a simple
pnste, made by mixing some water
with powdered delatone. Apply this
tn hairy surface and after 2 or 3 minutes rub off, wash tbe skin and the
hairs are gone. This is a harmless
treatment, but be sure you get the real
delatone, ^
NAVIGATION  TO  DAWSON
WILL  BE  CLOSED  SOON
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
-.'DAWSON, Y. T., Oct. 9.—The last
'.steamer for Dawson from White
Horse leaves in a day or two. Two
more vessels will sail from Dawson
for White Horse with passengers.
Several more which are coming from
the Yukon will winter at White Horse
WARS   BRING   NEW   WORDS
War brings words Into the language. Sometimes the words exist
in another language and are trans
ferred; sometimes they had fallen Into
disuse, are revived and given a twisted meaning: sometimes they are coined. In the United States Civil War
"skedaddle,'.' "bummer," and "contra -
ban" came Into general use. There
was an attempt to derive "skedaddle"
from the Greek. This word and
"bummer" were undoubtedly known
before the war, but they were not then
In everyday speech. The Boer \
added to tbe dictionary of English
conversations. Witness the words
"trek" and "mafficking," as the Peninsular war gave England "vamposli,"
our "vamoose."
The present war has already en
riched or debased the English Ian
guage. "Strafing," "strafed" and
"zoppellned" may well be included
among the horrors of war. Will
"pnilu" stick V The present use uf
"unit" is not clear .at all. There is
"barrage." one of the latest arrivals
In England is "jusquaboutlst," from
the French motto, "jusqu a bout"
("to the end"). A "jusquaboutlst" is
one that is for fighting the war to a
finish. Who knows If this term will
not In time be added to tbe vocabulary
of the prize ring?—Manchester Guardian.
CANADIANS   MUST   ELIMINATE
MORE LUXURIOUS EXPENSES
(By   P.   a. ■ McKenzie.)
BRIGHTON—Eminent British authorities assure me the real inwardness of the recent marked reduction of
imperial purchases of Canadian products, especially munitions. Is solely
financial. Britain requires vast quantities more urgently than ever, but is
forced to make purchases from countries like the United States, when the
cost can be met by local loans and advances. Cunuda has been unable lo
do'this. Her inability is largely dub,
say authorities, to the fact that she
continues to permit large sums tu
leave the Dominion to pay for imported luxuries. It became necessary this
summer to send gold to Canada to
meet the balance on imperial purchases there. It is urged that Canada
should ud(opt the same severe self-denying financial measures against imported luxuries, which Britain is enforcing  so  successfully.
What England  Has Done
"England has, by strict regulations,
stopped the importation of almost everything save absolute necessaries for
civil population," said one high authority. "This compels the prosperous
classes to limit their purchases, thus
giving them nn unsponduble surplus,
available for government loans. Canada, by arresting importation'tin one
article alone, automobiles, preventing
the use of all autos for pleasure riding,
as England has done, would automatically make many millions of dollars
available for war use.
"You cannot spend upon Imported
luxuries and also have the same money available for war use. Every thousand dollars spent outside the Dominion for unnecessities, Is a thousand
dollars less for beating the Huns. The
money thus saved, subscribed In Dominion loans or bank advances, can
he used by imperial authorities to pay
Canadian products and munitions.
"This war Is becoming more an issue between financial resources. We
have many months ahead and n vast
expenditure lo make. Will Canada use
the same financial sacrifice, corresponding to her magnificent military
powers " 'H'o supplements this statement from an authority whose name,
were I allowed to give It, would com-
iniiml universal respect.
End   is  Not   Near
Every day now strengthens the belief that the war Is not yet approaching'an end. I recently made a thorough investigation of the food position. Pacts show that the German
bread supply Is materially improving.
They have exploited prisoner labor lo
raise enormous crops from Serbia, Rumania and Poland.
Forty-three per cent more Serbian
land Is under cultivation this year than
during lhe best peace days. Germany
linn suffered very severely Indeed from
lack of food, but internal supplies now
seem boj-ter.
The elimUmlum of Russia us a ser-
Exhibit of
New Fall Dresses
ONLY THE CHOICEST OP SURGE, SATIN, SILK AND CREPE-DE-
CHENE USED IN THE MANUFACTURE OF THESE DRESSES.
STYLES, MATERIALS AND TRIMMINGS ARE VARIED AND PLEASING AND WE FEEL SURE YOU CAN FIND JUST WHAT YOU WANT
IN THIS COLLECTION.
Serge Dresses
At $18.50 to $45.00 Each
Showing Coat Styles, Long-Line Pleated Effects, Draped Skirts, etc.,
iii, combinations of Serge-and-Satin, Silk-and-Serge, etc. Colors shown
are Navy, Green, Brown, Taupe, Burgundy ami _liluck. All__ sb.es
up Bi .12.
Special Values, Each   ...'.	
$18.501 to $45.0C
Another Lot, in
Satin and Crepe-de-Chene Dresses
At'$27.50 to $50.00 Each
EXCLUSIVE MODELS FOR AFTERNOON WEAR—All copies ot French models and different from
the general run of dresses. Materials are Messaltne, Taffeta, Satin, Crepe-de-Chene, etc., in colors Navy.
Saxe, Copenhagen, Green, Taupe, Purple and Burgundy. Fifty different QQ7 Eft QCH (\fi
styles to select from.    Special Values at      $4- I nil) TO $ JUiUU
New Neckwear Just Arrived
Amongst the new arrivals in our Neckwear Section are many
pretty models of Net, Silk. Crepe-de-Chene and Georgette, with
the high collar and jabot effect, as well as many new-shaped
large flat collars.
Prices Reasonable 	
65oto$2.5G
NewFrench Kid Gloves at $2.50 the Pair
We arc amongst the fortunate few who got these Gloves this
season. As must be expected, prices are higher than formerly,
but even at that, these prices are much lower than real present
day values. We have good Kid Gloves in such makes as Perrin's.
Dent's and Trbfousae, iu Black, Whit.*, Tan, .Mud
Grey.    Special  Values,  Per Pair 	
:::i::::;:;:$2.5C
MEAGHER & CO.
THE   STORE   FOR   STYLE
THE   STORE   FOR   QUALITY
lous fighting faciei' has enabled ti j fepsiv.e of tin- Preach, und the heavy
law concentration of troops in l-'lan- [August ami September rains checking
dets, and these young sturdy men lire J our Plunders advance. Our maximum
well supported with munitions. Wc to- advance cannoi come until next sp
day are face to face wilh lhe ehem.
still enormously strong, still uncon
Uttered.    Our summer campaign, di
pile many brilliant  victories, has failed to realize our hopes.    This is dm
to   two   main   causes;      Ni veil's   custl>
summer attack, which arrested the of-
when the American army will enable
Krancu to renew the offensive in cooperation with ourselves.
All   Resources   Required
During  tliis  time of  waiting every
financial ami  man-power resource of
the allies must  be accumulated.    Bril-
IhIi losses in September alone totalled
2.ISH   officers   and   109,20 n.     Tho*
enemy army and civilian population is
weakening under the strain. Their
racial discipline will almost certainly,
howi ver, carry them over until next
spring. We are rnced now by n situation   demanding   sacrifices     Horn     all
parts
npi
rnrptu
ideals  a)
im any yet
tu   l>e  oik-
THE  BATTLE  OF  FLANDERS
Just out ol th* trenches.—Some  sleep whilst others play cards.
. j       .       "~" — Photo hy courtesy of C. P. R.
•Artillery orossuiR' the Yser.   —Photo by courtesy ol c. r.
II I
 »AGB «X
TM daily news
WEDNESDAY; OCT. 10, 191»' 1
WORLD'S SERIES GAME
POSTPONED BY RAIN
15,000  in   Polo   Stands  When   Match
Called Off Till Today—Probable
Batting Order
.r" (By Daily ^w-foLeased Wire.)
- NEW Y'OHKlJ ty*. .9.—Heavy rain,
which- began shortly before noon today, dattsed a postponement until
'.tvVdnesday of the third world's series
game scheduled for today between the
Chicago White Sox and the Giants.
Ham fell during the night and early
morning, but there was every prospect that the game would be played
until the beginning of the heavy
"downpour which lasted all afternoon.
The forecast for Wednesday is fair'
and warmer.; The rain today was accompanied by a decided drop in temperature.
■, There was evidence that the game
would have been attended by a capacity crowd, for fully 15,000 spectators
were in the Polo ground stands when
the official announcement of the
postponement  was made.
The consensus of opinion tonight
was that Cicotte would pitch for the
White Sox Wednesday and that he
would be opposed by Sallee. The
probable batting order follows:
Chicago—J. Collins, l.f.; McMuIleu.
3b.;' E. Collins, 2b.; .lackson. r.f.;
Felsch. cf.; Gnndil, lb.; Weaver, s.s.;
Schalk, a;   Cicotte,  p.
New York—Burns, l.f.; Herzog. '2b.;
Kauff, cf.; Zimmerman, 3b.; Fletcher,
s.s.; Robertson, r.f.; Holke, lb.; Rariden, ei;   Sallee, p.
DUNDEE   IS  OUTFOUGHT   IN
FAST FIGHTING BY KLINE
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
NTOV YORK, Oct. !).—Patsy Kline
outfought Johnny Dundee in a. 10-
round match here tonight. Dundee
weighed 130Hr pounds and Kline 187,
The fight was fast all the way through
but Kline had the better \x\ seven of
tbe 10 rounds.
S. 'GOVERNMENT   TO
CONTROL ALL STAPLES
(By' Daily News Leased Wire.)
WASHINGTON. *">ct. l9.—Virtually
all the staples in the United Slates
will be put under government control
on Nov. 1. It was announced toduy by
federal, officials.
ADMIRALTY   WILL   TAKE
OVER   RUM   IN   BRITAIN
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
.   LONDON.   Ocl.    !).—Beginning    tomorrow, the admiralty announces that
It   will   commandeer   all   rum   in   the
United 'Kingdom.
ENDS LIFE  BY  LEAPING
;"FROM   DECK   OF  STEAMER
(IJfrD.cHy News Leased Wire.)
DAWSON. Y. T.. Oct. H,—R J.
Fouling for 14 years a resident of lhe
Yukon, ended his lii'e by leaping from
the deck of the ste.imer White Horse
when near Big Solmon en route for
Dawson. Efforts to recover the body
were   unavailing.
William Murphy, who conducts a
news stand on a downtown corner in
Chicago, and who asked exemption
from war service on the grounds of
dependent parents, wns refused exemption when investigators for the
government reported to the appeal
board that tho newsboy Was worth
more than J100.000.
CARIBOU MAKES GOOD
—     EATING™ AND MS-ABUNDANT]
During all this war time of falling
food supplies and rising prices, I never
see any reference to an enormous but
entirely neglected ment supply, that
can be secured at no cost of upkeep,
but only that of -securing and transportation, says Henry -'* Woodsed, in
the Toronto Dally News.
1 refer to the mighty herds of caribou, or reindeer, which roam the territories of northern Canada. The existence of these herds and the value
to our country has been of much interest to me for over 20 years; and
especially after J. B. Tyrrell, the Canadian explorer, has brought back the
first photographs of the great sea of
antlered bands is the barren grounds.
Many wise people lament the criminal slaughter of millions of splendid
wild cattle for their hides, and the
consequent waste of good meat of the
buffalo period. But we have herds almost as great of a valuable large animal, and we aro receiving no value
from them.
Each year hundreds of thousands of
calves are born, and  eacli  year hundreds of thousnnds of calves and adult
arlbou are killed  by wild animals or
by accident and some die of old age.
Reckoning each adult animal at 200
pounds of clean meat, and a wastage
of 100,000 animals in a year, we have
a loss of 10,000 tons,^"or 20,000,000
pounds of fine fresh ment. which Is
raised and fattened at no cost to us
of pasturage or foruge. And this does
not. mention the value of the valuable
hides, the hooves, horns and other byproducts;
The chief cost to us would be the
.selection, killing and transportation,
but provision should be made for special herders to accompany, the herds,
to report movements and conditions,
to destroy wild enemies, and lame
ones too. and to protect the animals'
in every way possible. Also to accustom them to human companionship,
which would not be difficult.
It is not alone on the barren ground
that our wild herds range, but also
in tbe Canadian Yukon territory, and
where, in tbe early days, the Canadian
pathfinder, William Ogllvie', saw
herds of caribou by the tens of thousands, crossing the Yukon river.
For a number of winters, and probably to this day. the chief meat supply
of Dawson and the gold creeks was
caribou and moose meat, and I s
great trains' of tholr frozen carcases
brought down the Klondike river from
the Rockies.
Other gold hunters saw vast herds
on the mountains west of the McKen-
Kle river. In the Yukon tho R. N, W.
M; P. enforce the game laws to protect
these big animals, but in Alaska there
Is no such protection. But in spite
of the unrestrained and constant
slaughter of the animals on the Uni
ted States side of the boundary, the
ureal herds still exist, as is proved by
the recent .report of a steamer arriving at Dawson from the lower river,
which passed through thousands of
them swimming across in their annual
migration, southward into our territory.
There Is some place on the. hew
Hudson Bay railway, where the hunters of the H. B. Co. obtained their
yearly supply of caribou meat, at a
strait on. crossing, where, the great
herds moving from their summer pus-
turo on the barren ground to the forest wintering place, and marching on
a wide front, took days to pass a given
point.
In any event, it is a meal supply
that ought to have been taken in
charge long ago by a government commission, or of a corporation overseen
and controlled by the government of
Canada  for tbe benefit  of the people.
Naval expert who signed a note
station that England will be brought
to her knees in three months expects
the customary renewals.—Wall Street
journal;
Copenhagen
Chewing
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Why Worry About
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FAMOUS EXPERT ON
.^iv'-"--FRENCH AVIATION?
' t-(By Paul Rousseau.)        ,
(Haul Rousseau is the berit known of.
the many French experts..in .Flying.)
PARIS—It Is particularly'difficult at
the present moment in the midst of
war to give a Very precise and exact
idea of French aviation, because its
situation, wc might say its superiority,
Is made up of a totaj of progress realized chiefly during the war and accomplished under the control of military
authorities. Consequently many improvements are not known, innny are
secret, but many others have been rc-
vculed to the eyes of the public In consequence of cfcftain patent facts which
it has been possible to announce, and
It is interesting to set them forth and
remark on them.
Before considering to what point or
to what degree of advancement French
aviation has attained at this moment,
we must first return to the beginning
of tho war and see what was lhe position of French aviation then. .
To Dispute Trials
Towards the end of July, 1914. all
motor .constructors and engineers were
preparing to dispute the trials of the
great aviation meeting of Reims, that
was to be organized by. the Aero Club
de France in August, 1914. The
French constructors were working
once again to conquer the Gordon-
Bennett cup which was to be run on
the plains now occupied'by the Germans. There had been no great aviation meeting in France and this ono
was to bo the great event of the year.
Needless to say, it did not take place,
and all that had been hoped from it
In the way of Increased speed, altitude
and endurance records remained unrealized.
Nevertheless, and with regard to the
point of speed, the swift machines, of
that time—we speak only of tho racing machines competing for the Gordon-Bennett cup—already flew more
thnn 200 kilometres per hour. <■
Then came the Invasion of Belgium
and -aviation for sport disappeared before; )var aviation.
TJiflni was recalled what Wilbur
Wright said, and repeated when ln-
stiiljmg himself in France at Mans, In
Aufiftst. 1908: "Aviation-will bc< military or will be not at all."- Even then
this fact since so fully demonstrated,
had   Impressed  him.
Service Organized
War overtook France with an organised aviation service, but with a
small number.of machines. Naturally,
at the beginning, we had to grope' in
the darkness. Airplanes were used
which often served for reconnoitering,
for artillery and for bombardment, although military theories had always
worked out the different special types
of machines which tn the future wore
to be constructed for the various special purposes.
To be more precise, although we
started the war with a few squadrons
of airplanes devised primarily for
sport. It was quickly perceived that It
would be necessary to realize for
fighting purposes:
1. Swifter machines.
2. Armored machines.
3. Armed machines.
4. Machines easily managed.
Our constructors took  up the  task.
Motor builders forced, .up. their produc-
tionwmd progress was realized.
Then there was a. great quarrel between the adherents of the rotating
motor and those of the fixed motor. At
a given moment—it is now no secret—
tho army authorities decided to suppress the use of the rotating motor in
the French army, but the good points
of this motor were soon more fully recognized, without abandonment of admiration for some of the qualities of
the fixed  motor.
Biplanes Replaced
The rather slow biplanes were . replaced by swift monoplanes, or by
small biplanes which were much more
easy manugeabtc than the great machines of 1914. and while all this progress was being realized there was behind the lines same anxiety as to tho
creation of pilots.
Hundreds of pilots were turned out
each month, and at tho present moment there aro thousands of soldiers In
the French army capable of performing in airplane exercises which'before
the war would have been called almost acrobatic, all trained,'forExample. to;loop the loop, descend in spirals,
glide on the wing, etc. All aro really
veritable acrobats, read>* for the fray,
and expert shots.
Furthermore, it Is known that very
strong physical tests have been' imposed on the pilots, by which tbe stjitc
of the heart, resistance to vertigo,
nervous or ueoutlc sensibility' have
been  verified.
Remarkable Organization.
.AM this organization is now an ac
complislied fact, and today in French
aviation is seen a remarkably organized, homogeneous who!,*1. Sv/lftness
for ascent us well as horizontal speed
are the first qualities which can be
demanded from ;i flying machine, and
to this end all French constructors
have been devoting especial effort.
It may be said that pur present machines attain a height of 3000 metres,
fly at a Hpeed of'180 kilometres per
hour and mount 3000 metres In eight
or nine Minutes. -. New maehln.es. are
In construction'which will fly higher
and faster.
Hundreds of muchlnes make up army corps squadrons; other squadrons
are attached to the artillery, In all,
an immense number of hunting and
reconnolteilng airplanes are utilized
by tHo French army. Not counting
the fighting machines for the defense
of the towns.
Bombing Squadron*
Momblng squadron*,' recently1 Vniy
strongly reinforced. now Include
stronger machines. They citn each
carry more than 200 kilos of exploit m
if necessary. Nutuntlly the pown- nf
the motors has been Increased. ktid it
Is quite pcrmlHHuhle to say Hit *tt.the
present moment motors of 200 horse*
power and more nh» in pretty general
use. Wc must pay this compliment
to the skill of French aviation sfliflfito
that many simplifications have ;Wcnn
j-made atid that there no longer exist
more than four motors In general employment: Hispuno-SuiKD, Rhone,
Clerget  and  Renault. ' ■■
As for the machines tuemnelvps, u
good many old ones luivt* beeu ahfth1-
doned. W> are now 'eft wl~h only
three or, four Interacting makes, namely: Nleuport, Sopwltlb Kpiul, Movant,
and Renault fttlP.K1) ure llic modelz
at present In-use In tly French army.
... We Hhallj'itot.iieii! \mm in an artf-.
(cle which Is only an explanation of
lhe gepernl way In wUlett French uvl«
tion has evolved during the war, with
Ittfe1- result*1' *fhic~h- hhVe bee*ti obfalh-
eii. , These c*n bo read of every day
In tiie' Vf-Hcmllcdmmunlques, and at
this momtjnt,' iiv consequence of the
progress actually accomplished, It Is
possible, to conjecture what the aviation of tomorttow. will be. Now the
statement df/Wilbur Wright, which
at the heglpplng-. of the war seemed
so startling, no longer seems even prophetic, for it can safely be said that
the aviation ofir- tomorrow .will be a
■utilitarian;- science grown out of
military avlaH^n..j
The'employment of flying machines
will be v«ry extensive after the war.
and tttt'r usefulness hi Europe can bo
summed .ur   thus.:
in Frui te. they will be used for light
transport of .letters and small packages from town' to town; they will
do Ihe'saiVe duty across small arms of
tbe sea.
In the French colonies special airplane routes, will bo created for interior postal services, carrying letters
and light articles, and penetrating Into the interior of tho country pending
the construction' of serviceable roads
or railways. ;
This is the Impression one gets at
tho present: moment of the state of
French aviation.
FOREIGN BORN-BULK
LARGE IN THE WEST
New Census. Figures Reveal  Need for
War Time Election Act.
'MOUSE JAW, Sask.—The 1910 quinquennial censusretunis Just published
which give particulars relating to nationalities of people in pnilrle provinces, contain ' .conclusive argument
for the war-times election act. They
bring out' rathe.' startling facts that
the pcrsonBofBritish origin constitute
only f>7 per. cent of the population of
Manitoba, 154.5 per cent in Saskatchewan and 60.18; per cent In Alberta.
From these figures it Is evident that
Saskatchewan baa the lowest percent-
nge of persons qP Brlttsh origin, indeed the former exceed the "latter by
only 9.5 per cent. These returns con-,
firm In a most striking manner the
opinions of those who have long held
that In the prairie provinces the racial
problem is one of utmost importance.
That' pcrs>jnh> uf 'jVntonie origin
form a very large proportion of tho
population of the prairie country is
well known to those familiar with activity of such organizations ns the
Canadian-German alliance; but tho
best pi'oof of this is to lie seen In'
census .returns. These show that persons of German origin.'form 11.9 per
cent of the "population of Saskatchewan, 6.S5 per cent In Alberta and 4.0?
per cent of population in Manitoba.
Austro-Hungarians.
As a racial factor the Austro- Hungarians also hulk largely, constituting 9.15 per cent of population in Saskatchewan, 8.1S .nor cent in Manitoba
nnd (i.3tl in AliieVta. These .figures
mean that in Saskatchewan 21.4 per
cent of population traces its origin
to peoples living under either the German or Austro-Hungarian governments. In alberta this is true of 13.21
per cent of population. It is ulso true
of 12 per cent 6f the population of
Manitoba.
1 One of the most setious aspects of
Jie situation Is that the male populn
tion of other than British origin is
so large In comparison with that of the
native born. In the three prairie provinces, of the males between the ages
of 20 and 34 there are 169,085 of Canadian and British origin and 111,304 of
origin other than British. In other
words the males of British origin exceed those of foreign origin by only
58,381. At best this looks like a rather
undesirable situation.
Serious Situation.
Considered politically, the situation
is even more serious. When one takes
Into account that/ fully 105.000 men
have gone from these three provinces
to. the war, of whom possibly 90 per
cent are between the ages of 20 and 34,
or say 73,000 men; with this number
being absent it can be readily realized what the effect of some thousands
of enemy alien voters would be. In
the light of these figures recent
sweeping Liberal victories tn Alberta
and Saskatchewan are readily explained. With 70,000 soldiers absent in
these provinces (and restricted to a
representation of only five members).
it Is no Wonder with nil the foreign
women voting, that a large number of
Conservative candidates lost their deposits and tlds would have been repented in the coming Dominion election had the war-time election act not
been passed, its Justification is writ-
ton large In latest census returns.—
Toronto New*.      ••-
AIRPLANES 800N
"V";:  ,to cross ocean
NEW YORK.—The Herald says:
Airplanes, are soon to cross the Atlantic ocean.'
The great Italian Cdpronf triplane
probably will make' the flight early
next spring.
American manufacturers stand
ready to make, 1000 battleplanes that
will cross the Atlantic and then destroy the German fleet at Kiel before
they have to be overhauled.
; These developments In tho science
triplane In this country, with the discovery by American scientists of- a
method of telling aerial direction by
radio waves, makes the smashing of
the kaiser's navy possible and probable.        .';•,.' '   .
Th,ose developments in the science
of aerial navigation .also guarantee
to the allies an, endless stream of
American battleplanes to wreck the
Gorman artillery, blow, up their munition depots, demoralize their transportation lines which feed the front
and destroy their reserve bases.
The allies have said they could win
the war quickly If they could have
limitless battleplanes; Getting the
machines from the United States to
France and England has been the
obstacles to overcome.
Experts Support Program
Investigation by lhe Herald shows
that the aerial navigation of the Atlantic is, now possible, a statement
supported by Major Perfetti, head of
the special Italian commission for
aeronautics in the'United States; by
Rodman Wunnmakcr, builder of the
great American triplane now in the
service of the allies; Alan R. Hawley,
^.president of the Aero: Club of America, and, with Mr. Wanomaker, leader
in solving the trans-Atlantic aerial
transportation problem; by Glenn H.
Curtiss and other American, inventors
and manufacturers; and by numerous
English, French and Italian aviation
experts;
The Italian commission and the
Aero 'Club of America uirder Mr.
Hawloj* already have worked out details, of crossing the ocean by airplane, and Mr. Hawley has gone so
far that the route for a modern armada of battleplanes has been estab-
li8hed!i with a time schedule that included a bomb-dropping expedition
above the German naval base.
In the-meantime-the United Slates
aircraft production board, of which
Howard Coffin is the head, is making
hydro-airplanes of great size, and in
Washington it Is confidently expected
that among the first machines to be
started for Europe some will try and
make the transrAtlantic flight instead of. going on the deck of a
steamship.
Seven additional colliers and tankers have been commandeered to sup-
lily the needs of the United States
navy.    '    :   •■■	
TWO HISTORIC FAMILIES
j*,   "      "JOINED- BY1 MARRIAGE
LONDON.-r-In these days of the
aristocracy of the commercially successful, It is Interesting to hear of an
engagement Wjhicb will unite two of
ihe really old families of England, and]
the records of the Rodneys and the
Lowthers vie with one another in historic details.
The present Lord Rodney is in the
Scots Greys, but Is nov attached to
tho machine gun corps, and both he
and his fiancee, Miss-Marjorle Low-
jher, are in the twenties.
; It must be an impressed feeling to
look back, as Lord Rodney cab, and
know that one's ancestors were1 intimate with long-dead folk like the Empress Maude and Richard Coettr do
Lion, and had a connection with the
merry monarch, Henry VIII. through
one of his wives, .lane Seymour.   The
title of baron, too, came In a splendid
a famous naval Vtotoryy . -
Tho Lowthers, i£ they' don't go bjacW*
quite so far. can run this pretty close,;
for they wore important folk In Ed- j
ward I.'s .time, apt}.. an , ancestor of*
theirs .was high sheriff' of Cumbeirlundl'
in Queen Bess' reign, and •gofc'^ltttb*
that sovereign's bad hooky .through*
letting poor Mary, Queen of Scots,'
have a visit from the' Duke' of Nor*
folk when she was in Carlisle castle;*
According to a statement just conn1
pleted, St. Catharines h£s. now;'a pop-*
ulatlon of 19,078. an increase of 1161
over last y^afejwj^pj
. The three-year-okl daughter of Pte.!
Michael Finnegan, now in- France, fell; j
Into a. pail* of--boiling   water-  at* -'8t,«
John, N. B., and died.   !
■♦Jfi?' JUST LIKE A
Every room needs an occasional "Cleaning
up", no matter how carefully the regular
sweeping and dusting is done. Especially is
this true after any unusual event, a party, a
wedding or a quilting bee.
So it is with your body. No matter how.:
regular your habits or well cooked your food,
there comes a time when you don't feel just:
right. You may recall an unusually hearty
meal or two, irregular hours, or eating some- • j
thing that "didn't agree with you", or it may
be just the "dust-gathering".
In any case a few doses of a really good
carthartio is all you need to put you right.
For this purpose nothing is quite so suitable as
Chamberlain's Tablets
Two or three alter .upper the flrtt night, and on. each night for two or three
daya, and your di Jeitive apparatus Is juit like the well-cleaned room. Every part ot
: your body la more vlgorou,, you go about your work with a new feeling and begin
; again to enjoy life. Are these benefits not worth getting P You know they era.
j t And you need havo ns hesitation about beginning them forftar yon must "keep
< it up".   The effect is Just the opposite.
lie at .11 dtolm tr dind fnm
CHAMBERLAIN  MEDICINE CO.,  TORONTO
li,V-':.\
CHAMBERLAINS 6p
TABLETS-   zs^Bl
FINE  NEW  Y. M. C. A. FOR
CANADIANS  IN   LONDON
LONDON—Canadian soldiers are
now to bav« club and sleeping quar
ters on London's famous thoroughfare
the Strand. Major flen. Hirks. Y.M.C.
A., Infor-lis 1110 that the Canadian Y.M,
A. is spending $75,000 Irt erecting a
two story building on tho site of London's former music hall, the Tivoli,
SThifl- social centre for- Canadian soldiers wilt bavp 250 beds, billiard and
concert room, information and officers
sight-seeing bureau, for trips around
England, in ruet everything soldiers
on leave can desire. The facilities
have been obtained after much negotiation, upon Sir Kohert Rorden's Initiative.
; .Captain Hummers, one of the most
experienced Y.M.C.A. officers, will return from France .to take charge of
the ,head(iu(i 1'l.ers, which will be ready
In two months time.—Windermere, in
Calgary Hornld.
WOOD'S
PILLS
True Economy
Lies in Wise Spending
TRUE economy is not in denying ourselves the necessaries of life or
•van some of the so-called luxuries. The housewife who sets a too
skimpy table runs the risk of impairing the health of her family- and
retarding the growth ,of her children. This means doctors' bills and an
underdeveloped citizenry, which is in itself the worst kind of waste. If the
family attempts to cut down on shoes and clothing below their legitimate
needs the-result is loss of self-esteem and often results in sickness. This
means Ibis of time, doctors' bills again, and lowered efficiency. Just now
tho world demands that tvwy one shall produce something and produce
the maximum of whatever useful thing they are doing. The husband or
provider who thinks it wise to ask his family to live in poor quarters,
without modern comforts and conveniences; who refuses to buy a piano
for his daughter's musical instruction and entertainment; who denies his
son the opportunity to go to high school or college and who attempts to
put the entire family on what he terms, a ''war time basis" is making the
most serious mistake, possible. He is actually guilty of what might be
termed a moral crime, because he is driving the young folks away from
home for entertainment and lowering the living standards of his family.
He thoreby helps to lower the living standards of the entire country, and
you cannot lower a country's living standards without giving that country
a serious setback and placing it under a great handicap in the world
struggle. Nol This is no time for hoarding. Economy does not mean
penury. Neither does patriotism mean "panic-stricken." Keep your heads
Live decently. Don't talk in a nervous strain. Work hard and learn how
to spend wisely by reading The Daily News Want Ads every day.
The Wise Economist Reads The
Daily News Want Ads Regularly
.. For the buyer, renter, homeseeker or Any one else The Daily News
Want Ads will prove an invaluable guide to intelligent spending and true
economy. The practise of reading them regularly will bring to light-
countless opportunities for securing the things you want at the greatest
possible saving of time and money. Because of the well recognized fact
that results from. The Daily News Want Ads are prootioally certain, the
vast majority of folks when they have something to sell, a house, room or
apartment to rent, or desire to communicate in any way with the permanent, taming classes of Kootenay and Boundary, use The daily New* Want •
Ads. It therefore is important that you include in your plans for truly
patriotlo economy a tegular reading of The Daily News Want Ads in
order that you may be able to do your part intelligently,
Bg THRIFTY, BUT DON'T PINCH. BE ECONOMICAL, BUT NOT
STINGY. BE PRUDENT, BUT NOT TIMID, IN SHORT, BE 8ENSIBLE
AND READ THE DAILY NEWS WANT ADS EVERY DAY.
 457
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 10, 1917.
THE DAILY NEWS
Page seven
Little Ads that Bring Big Returns
COtOENSED  AVERTISING  RATES
On* Insertion, per word     lc
Minimum charge   2So
Six consecutive Insertions, per
word  .'     <o
Twenty-six consecutive Insertions
(one mqnth), per word   *5o
Births, one Insertion   60c
Marriages, one Insertion  50o
Deaths, one Insertion   60c
Card of Thanks    60c
Each subsequent Insertion   25c
Death and Funeral Notice 11.00
All condensed advertisement* are
cash In advance.
In computing the number ot words
In a classified advertisement count
each word, dollar mark, abbreviation,
Initial letter and figure as one word.
Advertisers are reminded that It Is
contrary to the provision of the postal laws to have letters addressed to
Initials only; therefore any advertiser
desirous of concealing his or ber Identity may use a box at this office without any extra charge If replies are
called for; If replies are to be mailed
to advertisers allow 10 cents extra In
addition to price of advertisement, to
pay postage.
lhe News reserves the right to reject any copy submitted for publication.
Ki£s6Tir^M?I3YWEryr^
W. Parker, 309 Baker St, Phone 283.
WANTED—Machine miners; muckers; all kinds of woodsmen, $3.75 and
hotter; good pole and time making
contract; men with teams to contract
for delivering logs; filer, rotary nnd
fcomliinatlon band; nirpentevs, long
Joh, IB.OO.
WANTED — Competent   miners   for
Bollevue mine; good wages.   Apply
Superintendent, Bollevue. Alta.   (7160)
WANTED—At once, reliable man for
hotel.     Apply   Prop.,   King  George
hotel, Creston. (7161)
iff
WANTED—Lumberjacks,  sawmill laborers andj,, engineer.   Top wages to
good men.   C. E. Severus, Slocan City
(7123)
WHEN HEPI.YING TO ADVERTISE-
ments In Condensed Columns, kindly
mention you saw It In The News—It
will help you.
SITUATION VACANT—FEMALE.
BRIGHT,    reliable
Kandyland.
girl
wanted   at
(7131)
WANTED—Girl   for  housework.   Apply 804' Hoover street. (7124)
WHEN REPLYING TO ADVERTISE-
ments In Condensed Columns, kindly
mention you saw It In The News—it
will help you.
FEMALE HELP WANTED.
WOULD YOU LIKE |1 or »2 daily at
home, knitting war sox on Auto
Knitters? Experience unnecessary.
Send 3c stamp, Dept. S2-C, Auto Knitter company, College street, Toronto.
ARTICLES l-OR SALE.
COR SALE—Mentges newspaper folder; folds 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 pages; In
first class condition.   Snap for cash.
The Dally News, Nelson. (078)
SHOTGUN,   double   barreled,   twelve
bore; pump gun almost new, 12 hore;
tent (canvas) 12x17 in good order. Box
7126, Dolly NeWB. (7126)
FOR SALE—Edison Dictograph complete; electrlo power. Apply to Dally
. Newa business office. (664)
FOR SALE—Shaving machine for Edison records.   Box 686. Dally News.
LIVESTOCK.
FOR SALE—Choice young pigs; price
16. W. H. Anderson, Perry Siding,
B.C. (7128)
i FOR SALE—4 henvy horses, harnosH,
' and one wagon. Apply to William
' English, Kaslo. (7134)
[ FOR SALE—Five year old cow. Mrs.
(    Lee, Upper Bonnington. (7150)
i HEAVY draft horse, 12 years old, »200.
with harness.   John Grahnm, Perry
| Biding.  (7142)
j FOR   SALE—Few   seven   weeks'   old
J    pigs.   A. Kerunh, Rosemont, Nelson.
(7143)
Ii
WANTED—Good butter cow, state age,
breed, time of freshening, Jas. Cook,
Creston. (7127)
FOR SALE—Shetland pony. Apply
James Skinner, Silverton, B.C. (7108)
GOATS FOR SALE—One milking;
cheap   for   cash.   Box 7121, Daily
News. (7121)
If
FOR SALE—Shorthorn-Ayrshire cow,
freshened 4th August last. Also
good saddle horse, quiet and handsome,
has been ridden hy a lady; matched
with a tall chestnut would help mnko
a first class driving team. J. T. Bealby,
box 897, Nelson, B.C. (7106)
FOR SALE without reserve, the whole
of my dairy cows, heifers and heifer calvoB, horses, buggy, ,hay, threshing outfit and pigs, including two
choice registered Duroc Jersey sows
and boar, Shetland pony outfit. Particulars, Kennedy, Harrop. (7074)
FOR SALE — Two heavy teams of
horses, weighing 2900 and 8400 lbs.
Seven to nine years old. price reasonable.   Can be seen In Nelson.   A. G,
Lambert Co., Ltd. COSTS)
BELGIAN  HARES—M.  B.  Edwards,
Nelson, (6927)
WHEN REPLYING TO ADVERTISE
ments In Condensed Columns, kindly
mention you saw It In The News—It
will help you.
JFOHRtNT.
JoiTrENT—Six roomed house, close
In.   Apply J. W. Gallagher's store.
(6J08)
(FOR RENT—6-room house In good
' order. Apply Mrs. James Dancy, 411
Cedar street. (7086)
u
FOR RENT—For six months; furn-
' Ished cottage; possession on 18th.
M Hall street. . (TIM)
FURNI8HED ROOMS TO RENT.
FOR RENT—Suites of furnished house
keeping  rooms   In   Anaable   block.
Enquire room 32. (7109)
KERR APARTMENTS.
((6873)
FOR EXCHANGE.
WILL EXCHANGE five room cottage,
Tenth avenue, near Main street,
Vancouver, and 112 acres Pemberton
Meadows, clear title, for improved
acreage   Apply box 7080, Daily News.
WHEN REPLYING TO ADVERTISE-
ments in Condensed Columns, kindly
mention you saw it In The News—It
will help you.
JWANTEa
WANTED—Six room furnished house.
Box 462, Nelson. (7155)
WANTED—Shingle bolts  In large or
small quantities.   Will pay big price.
Western Box &  Shingle Mills,  Ltd.,
Nelson. (7111)
WANTED — Searchlight   for   small
launch.    Box 7158, Dally News.
WANTED—SPLIT  CEDAR  POSTS—
Kootenay   Lakes   Cedar   Company,
Nelson, B.C. (7112)
WHEN REPLYING TO ADVERTISB-
ments In Condensed Columns, kindly
mention you saw It In The News—It
will help you.
WANTED—PlumH; apples, crabappleB,
greengages   and   penrs.     McDonald
Jam Company. (7165)
LOST  AND  FOUND
FOUND—Lady's silk  handbag.    Call
at Daily News. (7161)
Will perBon who took in error from
Eagles' hall dark Stetson hat, Initials
M.C.M., in band, please return to Daily
News nnd receive own hat.       (7153)
WHEN REPLYING TO ADVERTISE-
ments In Condensed Columns, kindly
mention you saw It lu The News—It
will help you.
A. MACDONALD & CO, WHOLE-
sale Grocers and provision Merchants. Importers of Teas, Coffees,
Spices, Dried Fruits, Staples and
Fancy Groceries, Tobaccos, Cigars,
Butter, Eggs, Cheese and Packing
House Products. Office and warehouse, corner of Front and Hall Sts.
P.O. box 1095; telephones 38 and 28.
ENGINEER8.
GREEN BROS., BURDEN A CO,
Civil Engineers, Dominion and B. C,
Land Surveyors.
Surveys of Lands, Mines, Towneltee,
Timber Limits, etc.
Nelaon, 616 Ward street, A. H. Green,
Ugr.;  victoria, 114 Pemberton Bldg.,
F. C. Green; Fort George, Hammond
street, F. P. Burden.
A. l, Mcculloch,
Hydraulic Engineer.
Provincial Land Surveyor.
Baker St., Nelson. B.C.
CHAS. MOORE, C. 4 M. E„
Provincial   Land  Surveyor,  Architect.
Baker St., Nelson, B.C.
AUCTIONEERS.
O. A. WATERMAN & CO., Opera blk.
WM.   CUTLER,  AUCT-ONEISR,  BOX
474; phone 18.
8ARRISTERS   A   SOLICITORS
DONAGHY & DONAGHY, BarrlBters.
Solicitors, etc., McCulloch block, Nelson, B.C., Flack bloak. Vancouver.
ACCOUNTANTS.
W. H. FALDINQ,
Public Accountant, Bank of Montreal
Chambers. Rossland, B.C
SHORTHAND, Typewriting, Penmanship.    Day and nlgbt olasses;   820
Victoria St    Box 746. ((819)
_AMAYER8^
a W. WIDDOWSON, box A-1108, Nelson, B.C. Standard western charges
JN^yjbANC^ANr^EAL^ESTAT£
SACRIFICE SALE—Seven loomod
modern house, heated with hot air.
Stone basement and foundation. Also
well built four roomed house on roar
of lota. In good neighborhood; two
blocks from Baker street; one lot and
a half; this house was built by a leading contractor for himself, was sold
for $6500. Owner has instructed us to
sell the property to clean up the mortgage, $2500.00; $1000.00 cash, balance
same as rent.
RANCH ON ARROW LAKES—Waterfront, Cine sand beach, one of, the
finest locations in B.C.; 12% acres; 10
acres planted in five-year old trees,
commercial varieties; tho wholo place
is cleared and plowed, In first class
shape.    Good  modern   bungalow und
outbuildings.     Water   right.     Price,
$4500.00.   This is less than it cost to
put tho work In the place.  Busy terms.
McQUARRIE A ROBERTSON.
Nelson, B.C.
H. E. DILL,
General Insurance Agent.
Fire, Life and Health policies Issued
In tho oldest and strongest companies
on the most liberal terms to the assured.
Phone 180, K.W.C. Block. 608 Ward St.
TAXIDERMISTS—TANNERS
WHERRY & TOW, 029 Pandora avenue, Victoria, B. C.   Western Cana-
ada's tried firm.    Big game   heads,
rugs, specialty.   Trial solicited.   (7113)
.^^JUNJJWLJJinBCTOM^^
D. J. ROBERTSON, F. D. D. ft B, 101
Victoria street Phon Ml; night
phone, 117-k,
8ECOND  HAND DEALER8.
THE ARK pays cash for second hand
furniture, stoves; BOO Vernon.
THE    NEAL    INSTITUTE,    CRANBROOK, B.C. •
Where you can get rid of the drink
habit in three days. Write for further
particulars.
MISCELLANEOUS.
DIVORCES—Easy, confidential   Address Lawyer, box 1202. Boise, Idaho,
(6979)
NELSON NEWS OF THE DAY
Queen City Rebekah lodge will hold
a special meeting and practise to-
nlRbt. (7157)
The sewing circles of St. Paul's will
meet Friday afternoons' in future instead of Mondays, at 3 o'clock.     (7156)
The local branch of the Red Cross
wish to extend their thanks to all
those who helped to make their bazaar
so great a sxiccess. (7164)
The Annual General meeting of the
Ymir Waterworks  Co.,   Ltd.,  will be
held at the company's office at Ymir
on Oct. VI at 7:30 p.m.
(7089) S. F. ROSS, Sec.
To those whom it may concern: On
and after Nov. 1. 1917, the Carpenters'
union wilt demand $5 for eight hour
day, owing to the high cost of living
nnd the advance in price of tools.
(7129)
The Young People's club will hold n
dance at the public hall, South Slocan,
on Friday, Oct. 12th. Proceeds for St.
Dunstan's home for' blind soldiers.
Dancing nt 8:30 p.m. Admission, tiO
cents.. (7159)
Tho annual meeting of the Nelson
Red Cross Society will he held in the
city hall on Friday at 3 p.m. Full reports of tho work for the past year will
be read and election of officers for ensuing year. All Interested in the Red
Cross are invited to attend.       (7163)
BACON PROFITS PROBE
WILL BE ENDED SOON
Commission Will  Report on  Main  Issue—Reduction in Prices Is Question for Government,
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
TORONTO, Oct. 9.—G. F. Henderson, K. C, chairman of the commission
on war profits in bacon and other food
products, in an interview on the progress of tho Inquiry tonight, said:
"We intend to renew the Investigation on Thursday and we hope to complete it at least by next Monday night
but the nature of the process Is such
that wc may find ourselves facing
questions which would require further
investigation. We' are determined
that the investigation shall he just
as thorough as it is impartial.
"We  are   dealing  with   the  Davids
company first, but we expect that.'.be
principles will be so fur settled in tho
course of that inquiry that the Mn*.
thews lilackwell pnrt of It will be ai
tended with less difficulty.    1 st.juld
like to say that both companies lav
furnished every facility for ;i thorough
investigation."
Probable  Results  Indicated.
Asked as to whether any general
piactical result would follow from
the Investigation, or whether the p loo
of bacon, for Instance, would bo ai-
fected, Mr. Henderson said:
"We are instructed by the government to recommend a standard system
of keeping accounts for cold storage
companies, but our present duty is to
mnke a report on the main issuo and
and not to delay this report till we arc
prepared to make further recommendations,
"As to the possible reduction In the
price of bacon, that is a matter with
which this commission has no concern. If It should appear that the profit has been excessive, ono would ex-
pod 'he tendency would be to a reduction of prices.
'•The report, however, will speak
for Itself and any business man will
be able to judge for himself whether
the summary which the commission
will make is accurate."
! HAVE WtYY,
TH, GLOSSY HAIR
FREE FROM DANDRUFF
Save your hair! Double its
beauty in a few moments-try this!
If you care for heavy hair that glistens with beauty nnd is radiant with
life; has an incomparable softness and
is fluffy and lustrous, try Danderlne.
Just one application doubles the
beauty of your hair, besides it immediately dissolves every particle of dandruff; you cannot have nice, heavy,
healthy hair if you have dandruff. This
destructive scurf robs the hair of its
lustre,' its strength and its very life
and if not overcome it produces a fev-
erlshness and itching of the scalp; tho
hair roots famish, loosen and die; then
the hair falls out fast.
If your hair has been neglected and
is thin, faded, dry, scraggy or too
oily, get a 25-cent bottle of Knowlton's
Danderlne at any drug store or toilet
counter, apply a little as directed and
ten minutes after you will say this
was the best investment you ever
made. .
We sincerely believe, regardless of
everything else advertised, that if you
desire soft, lustrous, beautiful hair and
lots of it—no dandruff—no Itching
scalp and no more falling hair—you
must use Knowlton's Danderlne, If
eventually—why not now?
ToGoOnTaking"Fruit-a-tines"
Because They Did Her Good
Rochoii, P. Q., Jax. 14th, 1915.
"I suffered for many years with terrible Indigestion and Constipation! j I
had frequent dizzy spells and became
greatly run down. A neighbor advised
me to try "Fruit-a-tives". I did so and
to th'e surprise of my doctor, I began
to improve, and he advised me to go on
with "Fruit-a-tives".
I consider that I owe my life to "Fruit-
a-tives" and I want to say to those who
su ffer from Indigestion, Constipation or
Headaches—'try Fruit-a-tives' and you
willgetwcll". CORINE GAUDREAU.
50c. a box, 6 for $2.60, trial size, 25c.
At all dealers or sent postpaid by Fruit*.
a-tives Limited, Ottawa.
Private  Hospital
LICENSED BY PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENT
We give particular attention, to all
female trouble—home-like apartment,
(or ladles awaiting accouchment. Certified nurses sent out on private cases
town or country. Highest references;
reasonable terms;   inspection Invited.
Mrs. Moor*. Superintendent.
THE   HOME   PRIVATE   HOSPITAL
Falls and Bauer Sts, Nelson, B. C,
P. O. Box 772.
Phone 372 for Appointment
TO
CANADIAN DRAMA
Montreal   Men  Will  Give Cash  Prize
and Share of Profits For
New Play
An ambitious attempt to encourage
Canadian drama and Canadian play
writing has been Inaugurated In Montreal, where a Canadian prize Play
play contest has been announced.
George F. Driscoll, manager of HiB
Majesty's theatre, Montreal, has de-,
elded to offer a prize of $500 and 2%
per cent of the gross receipts on the
production for the best play written
under the following conditions, also a
consolation prize of 1100 for the second
best play, and 2% per cent of the gross
receipts:
1. All intending competitors must
address to Mr. Driscoll, Ills Majesty's
theatre, Montreal, a stamped and addressed envelope for the conditions of
the contest, which they must return
signed and witnessed when, they submit plays for reading.
2. Six hundred dollars has been deposited with the Bank of Toronto In
Montreal for prize payments.
3. The contest shall be open to any
Canadian citizen or British subject resident in Canada of either sex without restriction as to age or profession,
also to all Canadians serving abroad.
4. The contest opened on Oct. 1 and
will close on May 30, 1918.
G. Every play submitted will be
read by competent dramatic critics,
none of whom will be aware of the
identity of the author of any pluy so
read.
6. Competitors wishing to submit
plays must send them direct to Mr,
Driscoll by registered mall. Each play
submitted must be accompanied by a
check or money order for ?12 to cover
cost of reading and other necessary
expenses.
7. One* play reader has been appointed foi* Quebec and the Maritime
provinces, another for Ontario, a third
for Manitoba and Alberta and the
fourth for Saskatchewani British Columbia and the Yukon.
8.'; Marks will be awarded as follows: General construction, 25 per
cent; suitability for stage production,
2ii per cent; human Interest, 50 per
cent,"
it.fflTbe plays selected finally will be
produced b>\ Mr. Driscoll and sent on
tour. The prize winning play will be
the first production at His Majesty's
theatre in August, 1918, and will afterwards be sent on tour.
AT THE THEATRES.
Most Forward Step in Motion Pictures
"The Barrier," which will be seen
today and tomorrow at the Gem theatre, the photodrama of Itex Beach's
most powerful Alaskan romance, Is
unanimously declared by motion picture experts to be "the most revolutionary forward step yet taken In motion pictures." In this sincere Interpretation of a great epic of primitive
life the motion picture comes into Its
own as a medium of dramatic expression, and at last stands side by side
with the spoken drama—an art and
not a plaything—a living, breathing
entity nnd not a shadowy imitation.
In "Tho Barrier" you see life as It-Is
—you forget that a picture Is passing
before you—you lose all consciousness
of its unreality—you experience the
same emotions, arc stirred to the same
depths, and lifted to the same heights
as If you stood in person among the
scenes   it  so  faithfully  reproduces.
GERMANS IN ARGENTINE
BUY  UP DRY HIDES
Aot on German Government Orders—
Express Confidence War Will.
End by •January,
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
BUENOS AYRES, Oct, 9.—Coincident with the American demand for
Argentine dry hides to meet military
orders, and renewed British buying as
a result of the lifting of the leather
embargo, the Germans here are buying heavily and their competition: In
the market Is helping to increase
prices. u
German brokers say tlttey are buying on German government orders.
They express confidence that the war
will end in January or' February.
Trices of hides have risen 12 per cent
in tho last 10 days.
CAMPAIGN FOR FOOD
SAVING EFFtCTlVE
Big Stocks Conserved   for Allies   At
- Result of Beefless and Bacon-
less Days
' MONCTON, N. B.—As a result of
regulations providing for "beefless
feUd bacontess days" and other restrictions Imposed on public eating places
at the instance of the food controller,
a' great saving has been. effected in
supplies needed for export to the
allied armies and nations. The first
announcement of the reductions in
the consumption of beef, bacon and
wheat flour brought about by the
order in council, effective Aug. 17,
regulating the serving of these commodities in hotels and restaurants,
Wilts made here by Mrs, Jean Muhlrew,
director of domestic economy in the
office of the food controller. Mrs.
Muldrew addressed the convention of
Women's Institutes for the province
of.New Brunswick on the subject of
food conservation.
:. :The following are the percentage
reductions in the consumption of beef
and bacon reported for the month of
Aug. 17 to Sept. 17, as compared with
the consumption In the. same eating
places during the preceding month:
Percentage Saving
Or Beef.   Of Bacon.
Quebec     29.82 29.61
Montreal      25.30 26.12
Montreal        49.48 79.84
Toronto       47.03 30.87
Toronto        63.04  ,       75.62
Toronto       28.35 65.00
Toronto        28.47 84.86
Winnipeg     44.81 34.10
Calgary        52.67 40.93
Beports nre not complete for the
entire Dominion, but those already re
ceived indicate that the saving in all
parts of the country has been large
as measured In percentages and
enormous when considered in the
aggregate of pounds. I™ur. establishments in one city reported that the
consumption.of the previous month
has been reduced by the following
amounts:
Beef. Bacon.
1  1.5   tons      1      ton
2  0.68 tons       0.93 ton
3  1.64 tons       0.12 ton
4  5.66 tons       1.58 ton
The combined saving for the month
In these four establishments alone
amounted to 9% tons of beef and
3 and 3-5 tons of bacon. "These
amounts," said Mrs. Muldrew, "represent but a frnctlon of the saving of
one city, onlv a fraction indeed of the
saving in the public eating places of
that city alone. Yet these totals are
sufficient to ration a whole division
with beef for one day, and a division
and a half with bacon, using In both
cases the liberal Canadian allowance.
What Canada's united effort will
amount to is but dimly foreshadowed
by the performance of these four establishments. Add these to the num
ber of other places in the same city
and then add all from other Canadian
cities and you can easily see how
great has been the saving in consump
tjon of these two commodities."
The lecturer stated that reports al
ready received by the food controller's
office showed a reduction of 20 per
cent in the consumption of white
bread us a result of the provision of
substitutes.
(Mrs, Muldrew explained that in tbe
present critical situation as regards
the food supplies of the world, those
who were responsible for the feeding
of the family had an especial oppnr
Utility for effective patriotic service
In order that Canada might send to
the allied countries its share of tho
enormous amount of wheat required,
the normal consumption here would
have to be reduced from C to 4%
bushels per capita. This meant that
where we were accustomed to eat four
;>Ilces of white bread wo must now
ent only three, and for that other slice
ent a, bread made from some other
cereal, such as rye, barley, corn, or
eat its equivalent of barley, rice, oatmeal or other cereal food.
Moreover, the present consumption
of beef and bacon in Canada must be
reduced by-one-third.
Object of Food Pledge Stated
Mrs. Muldrew explained the purpose
of the Household . Food Fledge: "In
order," she said, "to carry out to (he
full the requests of tho controller no
privation is exacted of anyone; there
is nothing that anyone with an intelligent understanding of food values
and of simple methods of cooking
canhot carry out and do much more
and still have her family well nourished." She estimated that $50,000,000
worth of food which is now wasted
could he saved annually. This situation could be remedied by the housekeeper if she would study tho scientific food requirements of the different members of the household. The
speaker, also declared that much food
was still being wasted in hotels and
restaurants because too large portions were served.
'The services rendered by the
housekeeper though very real Is not
dramatic as is the work of the nurse
with her attractive uniform," said
Mrs. Muldrew, "hut the kitchen soldier in her uniform is necessary to
win the war. Will you teach others
the value of small things? One slice
of bread wasted weekly hy every
Canadian family means 71,280 one-
pound loaves tost, enough to feed three
and a half divisions 21,500 men) for
ton meals. (By guarding against small
losses the habit will grow and it may
be wo shall be fortunate enough to
lose our reputation for wastefulness
and extravagance,"
AMERICAN PRIVATE
WINS FRENCH CROSS
PAItlS—The first American soldier
to win the war cross with tho palm Is
Pte. John McClaln of Dayton, Ohio,
says the Paris Herald. On tho night
of Sept. 18 a German airplane flew
ovor the village In which, he was and
dropped several bombs. One fell within 15 feet of a building around which
some 50 villagers had gathered.
Notwithstanding the warning expostulations of those near him, the newspaper continues, Pte. McClaln dashed
out into the road nnd, discovering the
bomb with the aid of a pocket electric
lamp, picked it up and hurled it Into
tho river. The projectile exploded as
it struck the water. It sent up a
column of water and no one was hurt.
Pte. McClaln Is of Scotch, origin. He
was born In a ship wrecked boat off
the coast of New Jersey In February,
Proper Clothes for Wen
OUR WEN'S NEW FALL SUITS ARE PROPER CLOTHES.
THEY HAVE THE STYLE AND FIT, FOR THE YOUNG MAN OR
THE YOUNG MAN'S FATHER, GIVING THAT WELL DRESSED
APPEARANCE AS MUCH DESIRED BY ALL.
MEN'S TWEED SUITS IN BROWNS, GREYS AND FANCY
MIXTURES—Well made and tailored, giving that decided effect of
being built for the body, to bring out the best lines of the figure.
Suits that will keep their shape and be a_source_ ot pr(de^ to the
wearer; all sizes nnd priced low. " ~
Per Suit  	
ALL-WOOL SERGE SUITS IN NAVY AND BLACK—Made of the i
quality of cloth that will soon he history in thetextlle trade; jiure dyes,
and tailored lo perfection; will give excep-  ~
tlonal wear.   Per Suit 	
$15.00 to $25.00
$23.50 to $26.50
SHIRTS   OF   DISTINCTION
FOR   MEN
A large variety of many
different styles to select
from. Some have the soft
turned cuff with separate
lounge collars; others have
laundered neck band and
cuffs; all come rn the very
latest stripes, in such materials as Madias, Corded
Dimities, Percale, Silk and
Cotton, also All Silk; the
new prevailing colors and all
sizes, 14 to 17.   Priced from:
$1.00 to $4.50
Also a groat variety of Working   shirts,   in   Drill,  Flannel,   Mackinaw, etc., all colors.   Priced from $1.25 to $3.50.
Casks and Barrels
AT  A   FRACTION   OF   THEIR   WORTH
These   Are Scarce Now—What Will  It Be   Like a Year   From   Now,
When ^here's No More Coming  Into the Province
THREE HEAVY OAK CASKS—
70-Gallon Size.    Each   	
FOUR HEAVY OAK CASKS—
Go-Gallon Size.   Each 	
THREE CLARET BARRELS—
47-GalIon Size.   Each 	
FIVE OAK CASKS—
43-Gallon Size.    Each  	
TWO OAK CASKS—
36-Gallon Size.   Each  	
TWO OAK CASKS—
28-Gallon Size.   Each 	
FIVE WINE BARRELS—
29-Gallon Size.    Euch   	
TWO OAK CASKS—
Hi-Gallon Size.   Each 	
TWO OAK KEGS—
10-Gallon Size.    Each  	
$5.00
$3.50
$1.00
$2.00
$2.50
$1.50
$1.00
$1.50
$1.50
Bottles and Flasks
AT    HALF    PRICE
There's a hundred nnd one uses in the home for good bottles, and
they are mighty scarce.    You will regret it  if you do not buy now.
Shipments into tbe province havo stopped entirely.   Grasp the opportunity now.
I    IMPERIAL PINTS, 20 ounces-
I        Per Dozen   	
REPUTED QUARTS,  l>7 ounces-
I'er  Dozen   	
LARGE BOTTLES, 32 ounces—
Per Dozen   	
FLASKS, 8 and 10 ounces—
Per Dozen   	
60c
60c
60c
SO
J
ilk Butte; Bag (Tropnp M
mepmhi tut**'",! ■■ v■.-...,.-.■,-rfo     \^*e*^/
l S03, the sou ot" a Glasgow father and
a Dundee mother.
McClaln has served four years in
tbe American army, and be made a
record in Young Men's christian association work in Portland, Me., and in
Boston, While stationed in Columbus,
N. M., with tbe American troops, he
showed aptitude in purveying comforts lo soldiers ami established a
thriving canteen that serves aa a sort
of model for tho Y.M.C.A. work now
being done around the American camp
In France.
McClaln was in the confectionery
business in Peeksklll, X. Y., when the
United States declnred war on Germany. Ik' immediately rejoined the
army an a private, cam'e with the first
contingent lo France, and while doing
soldier duty resumed his old Y.M.C.A.
work on tbe side.
"Women ef
Middktye
Many distressing Ailments experienced
by them are Alleviated by Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound.
Here is Proof by Women who Know.
Lowell, Mass.—"For the last three years I hare
been troubled with the Change of Life and the bad
feelings common at that time. I was in a very nervous condition, with headaches and pain a good..
deal of the time so I was unfit to do my work. AI
friend asked mo to try Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound, which I did, and it has helped me in
every way. I am not nearly so nervous, no headache or pain. I must say that Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound is the best remedy any sick
woman can take."—Mi's. Margaret Quinn, Rear
259 Worthen St., Lowell, Mass.
She Tells Her Friends to Take Lydia E. Plnkliam|s Remedies.
North Haven, Conn.—" When I was 45 I had the Change of Life
which is a trouble all women have. At first it didn't bother me
but after a while I got bearing down pains.   I called in doctors who
feel myself regaining my health. I also used Lydia E. Pinkham's
Sanative Wash and it has done me a great deal of good. Any one
coming to my house who suffers from female troubles or Change of
Life, Jtell tliem to lake the Pinkham remedies. There are about 20
of us here who think the world of them." — Mrs. Florence Isklla,
Box 197, North llavon, Conn.
You are Invited to Write for Free Advice.
No other medicine lias been ho successful In relieving: woman's
suffering ns has Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound.
Women may receive free and helpful advice by writing the Lydia
E. Pinkhnm Medicine Co., Lynn, Mass. Such letters are received
and answed by women only and held in strict confidence.
 PAGE EIGHT
THE JDA1LY* NEWS
WEDNESDAY, OCT.. 10, 1417.
UNEQUALLED FOR GENERAL U»E
W. P. TIERNEV, General Sale, Agent,
Nelson, B. G.
Cars supplied to all railway points.
Hot Water
Bottles
If your Hot Water Bottle is not
giving satisfaction throw it away
and  procure one of,our
GUARANTEED   HOT   WATER
BOTTLES.
We will uphold our reputation of
having the best.
Canada Drug & Book Co.
Willard Chocolates.
Eastman Kodak Supplies.
Place Tour Orders Now for
GREENHILL COAL
Tbe most economical coal on the
Market
0. A. MoFARLAND, Agent.
Insurance, Real Estate.    Room 6, K.
W. C. Block.
Telephone 49. P. 0. Box 24
Strike
NOTICE
on at Skyline
AIN8W0RTH, B. C.
Nine
All men working or going; to work
will tie placed on unfair list.
NELSON MINERS' UNION
MARCUS MARTIN, Secy.
THE ARK
Ladles' Vests, good weight....360
Curtain Scrim, yard 150
Curtain Cretonne, yd. .25C to 30c
Portieres, pair    .84.75
Window Shades, each  60c
Crockery Cups, % dozen 75c
Flannelette Blankets 13-4 pr.S2.7B
Men's Shoes, old prices $2.76 to SB
New  and   Seoond-hand   Furniture,
Steves and  Ranges  Bought
and Sold.
J, W .HOLMES,
Phone 65L. 606 Vernon St.
A Ring
THE MOST APPRECIATED OF
GIFTS
We have just received a beautiful selection of singe stone Diamond Rings—also combination
Diamond and. Sapphire Rings <n
fine carved settings. These rings
are exceptionally, fine values at
S23. S25 and S27
COME IN AND INSPECT OUR
RING STOCK
J.O.Patenaude
Designer  and. Manufacturer   of
Artistic Rings.
I Beg to Announce
to my present mid prospective customers that 1 urn moving: into larger
quarters nt 411% Wnrd street and
that 1 will meet their demands more
efficiently in Jewelery, Watchmaking and Optical Work.
A. D. PAPAZIAN
411  Ward  Street, two  doors from
^ Post Office.
FIRST Ml 19 YEARS THAT
' CITY HAS NOT HAD TO BORROW
ALL CIVIC DEPARTMENTS SHOW INCREASE IN TAKING8 OVER
LA8T YEAR—NO FINANCING NECCESSARY ON OUTSTANDING
TAXES AND CITY HAS STILL $10,000 CREDIT BALANCE—SCHOOL
ATTENDANCE LARGER.'
ThlB year Is the first In 19 that It
has not been necessary to borrow from
the bank for mUnclpal purposes, the
city clerk stated at Inst night's meeting
of the council.
He said that the street railway had
taken in over $1000 more than last
year and  the  population  was appar
ently greater as all departments had
taken In more revenue and the school
attendance was larger. It has not
been -necessary to flnnnce on outstanding taxes and there Ib still $10,000
•credit' balance.
Last year the city had to borrow
$10,000 and" the year before that '$20,-
000.
ALDERMAN FAVORS HEATING CITY
WINGS WITH ELECTRICITY
That an immense saving in fuel bills
could be made if the city hall, fire hall
and schools were heated by electricity
was the statement of Alderman Austin
al the city council meeting Inst night.
There was only a 25 per cent load on
the plant, he said, and the requisite
current  was .therefore  available.
Mayor Annable said that if the suggestion proved good $2000 could be
saved on schools alone.
"There would be no (lust, ushes or
fires to start," stated Alderman Austin.
'All you would have to do would be to
LIGHT AT  HEAD
OF HOOVER STREET
A petition for an electric light at
the head of Hoover street was granted
by the city council last night. The
petitioners offered to dig the hole and
supply the pole. The cost to the city
wilt bo about $55,
Matinee
Matinee
2:30
WE PAY THE WAR TAX
PROF.   JENSEN   OF   TRAIL   WILL   RENDER   SPECIAL   MU8IC
FOR   THE   OCCASION
PRICES: MATINEE, 10c and 16c; EVENING, 15c and 25c.
WOVALOID
WE   HAVE   EXCLUSIVE  SALE  OF  THIS
BEST  QUALITY, RUBBER  ROOFING
We Guarantee Every Square ef it and the Price le Lower than any other
High Class Roofing
SAMPLES AND  PRICES'ON  REQUEST
Wood-Vallance Hardware Co., Ltd.
BENS TRAIN IN
TO
Mils Louise Horswill, 20 Minutes After Train Leaves, Asks George
Kurtz to Beat It—He Does So.
Under a 20-mlnute handicap In favor of the train, D. G. Kurtz yesterday morning raced the Slocan train
to South Slocan and beat It.
Miss Louise Horswill, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Horswill, started
the race. She teaches school at Silverton and had to return yesterday
from the Thanksgiving holidays. She
missed the train, walked back up
town, saw the Kurtz machine standing
outside the barn on Vernon street and
urged Mr. Kurtz to make the attempt
to catch the train.
The trip was made ns unusual speed
but 'without itmuBlng Miss) Ho-swill
to wet ken In her purpose of catching
the train.
WILL PLACE STANDPIPE
OR  HYDRANT ON  CORNER
In order that fuller information
might be gained regarding the advisability of placing a standpipe instead
of a hydrant at Hendrix and Hoover
streets, in response to a petition by a
number of citizens of that vicinity for
a hydrant, the city council last night
deferred action in the matter till the
next meeting. Alderman Johnstone
favored a standpipe as it would serve
the purpose just as well as a hydrant
at the end of a pipe line and would
cost only about half as much, he
slated. Alderman McDonald favored
a hydrant. He said the city might as
well make a good job of it while it
was at It.
Fire. Chief Guthrie, in response to a
question from the council, stated that
the nearest hydrant to Hendrix and
Hoover was 700 feet, and the maximum ordinarily was 600, he said.
WANT REIMBURSEMENT
A request from the local firemen for
reimbursement of $35 each in view of
the fact that they had not been supplied with uniforms was<nreferred to
the fire, water and light committee by
the city council last night, ^
turn the switch. Of course it's quite
an expense installing the plant."
"The whole thing was taken up with
the school board six years ago," stated
p. P. Thomas, city electrician. "It
was found that the initial cost would
be $6000 and that put the cap on yie
whole thing."
"That shouldn't put the cap on anything," rejoined Alderman Austin.
"The coal bills would soon run up to
that."
Mr. Thomas stated that considerable
electric energy had been already spoken for by commercial enterprises,,
HAWLEY TO FURN SH
ROOM AT HOS
ITAL
Spokane Mining  Man  Makes Offer to
Show Gratitude' for Treatment
Given His Nephew.
W. S. Hawley of Spokane, manager
of the Silver Hoard mine at Ainsworth,
has offered to furnish one of the private rooms in the new Kootenay Lake
General hospital. His offer Ib the third
of the kind that has been received by
the   hospital.
Mr. Hawley stated that the treatment which his nephew, a son of J. B.
Hawley of Ainsworth, received In the
hospital here several months ago was
one of the reasons he decided to furnish a room in £.e new building. He
desired, he said, to express the gratitude he felt for the efficiency and
kindness shown by the staff of the
hospital to the boy.
t Social and Personal j
HAVE YOUR brtS EXAMINED
TODAY
J. J. WALKER
GRADUATE  OPTICIAN
the Canadian Press association at Toronto, has resigned to become managing director of the Stratford Herald,
according to news received in Kelson
last night. He is a brother of Mrs. C.
P. McHardy of Nelson.
E. W. Brasch, son of Mrs, W. A.
Ward, has been notified to report for
active service with the 816th field
battalion signal corps at American
Lake, Wash. He is a reserve member
of the corps. The notice states that
he will probably be called upon to
report on or before Oct. 19. Mr,
Brasch Is a former Nelson high school
student.
With King George and President
Woodrow Wilson as the candidates tho
Nelson Political Nonpartisan Educational league held a mock election
Monday night. King George won by
one vote and the supporters of the
president entered a protest. They alleged personation. Mrs. George H.
Keys was deputy returning officer;
Miss R. E. McClure, scrutineer for King
George; Miss Viola.McCoy, scrutineer
for -President.Wilson;/ Mrs. E. N. Mc-
Beth, poll clerk. Ahout 20 were present.
TEAMSTER KURT.
A teamster named Eldridge of Salmo
fell during a fit from a wagon, fractured his nose and sustained other injuries to the head yesterday. He was
employed on government roadwork. At
the Kootenay Lake General hospital
last night be was reported to be making good progress toward recovery.
WANTS PROPORTIONAL
REPRESENTATION PLAN
Alderman Austin gave notice of motion that he would introduce a resolution at the meeting of the city council on Nov. 5 to authorize the council
to Introduce the proportional representation system of voting at the next
municipal elections. A request for
the Introduction of the system was
forwarded from the Nelson Liberal
association. The proportional representation system does away with
wards.
THREE  FIRE ALARM8
There were three fire alarms last
month, Fire Chief Guthrie reported to
the city council last night. There
was no damage.
JQIVE DONATION TO
BRITISH  RED CROSS
The city council las.t night vote$ a
grant of $50 to the British Red Cross.
The mayor stated that throughout the
Empire, Oct. 18. Trafalgar Day, was'
being observed as British Red Cross
day and tag days were being held to
raise funds.
O. R. Inites, ^Tmir, is a guest at the
Strathcona^
Mrs. K. Riddle has returned from an
extended visit to coast cities.
Harry McDonald, Spokane, is a guest
at the Queens.
R. Brown, Vancouver, is a guest at
tho New Grand.
M. Gibbs, Cranbrook, is a guest at
the Madden.
Mrs. H. Greeley, Spokane, is registered at the Nelson.
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Wright of Trail
are visiting In Nelson.
Mr, and Mrs, G. Clement, Spokane,
are registered at the Hume.
Mrs. Holmes, Longbeach, leaves tomorrow for Medford, Ore, via Spokane,
on the Canadian Pacific.
Mrs. Alfred Lee, Brooks, AltaJgjjs
visiting her sister,* Mrs. J. S. Mttekay,
822 Victoria street.
WHOLESALE AND  RETAIL
NELSON, .M.
NO. 1
Gravenstein Apples
Per box    82.00
4 pounds for  25c
NO. 2 GRAVENSTEIN APPLES
Per box  SI.65
ELBERTA FREESTONE
PEACHES
Per box  SI.SO
J.A. IRVING &Co.
PHONE 161
Mrs. Thomas Freeborn and children
of Northport are spending a few days
with Mrs. A. E. Kirby, Falls street.
Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Logan and Harry
Morris, who have been visiting Mr. and
Mrs, C. F. McHardy, left for their home
In Vancouver last night    via   Arrow
lakes.
Rev. J. P. Westman of Calgary and
Rev, Dr. Myer of Toronto held a conference last night at St. Paul's church
with Sunday school and young people's
society workers.
Rev. John Storey of Calgary, organizer for the Canadian standard efficiency test work, is visiting Nelson
and will hold a conference with the local heads of the movement.
Ira Carter, manager of the Curlew
Creamery company, Curlew, Wash., Is
in the city on his way to Chicago,
New York and other points. (He will
attend the national dairy show at Columbus, O.
The following gifts have been re
celved by the Balfour sanitarium;
From the Women's institute, Cranbrook, box quilts and cushions; from
Miss Stevens, Nelson, magazines and.
papers.
A, R. Alloway, assistant manager of
For Rent
1.—Furniihod Houte, modern, hot water heating, on Mlnee Road,
corner of Kootenay Stmt.
2—Small Houeo on Cedar Street|furhlthed if requaeted."
•.—Five. Roomed Houee on Water Street, eorner of Willow.
4.—Offlott in Alan Hook, eorner ef Ward and Baker Street,.
(.—Five-Roomed Houee an Latlmar Street.
Charles F. McHardy V
INSURANCE |     PEAL ESTATE1' ,:  FUEL
GET  SECOND-HAND  LICEN6ES
Secondhand licenses were granted
J. P. Morgan, J. W. Holmes and" W.
Cutler by the city council last night.
CONTRIBUTE  TO  RED  CROSS
In response to an appeal by the
British Bed Cross the New Denver
Patriotic club has contributed $150.
The donation has been received by the
local Red Cross.
RUSSIAN  PREMIER  GOES
TO ARMY HEADQUARTERS
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
PETROGRAD, Oct. 9. — Premier
Kerensky, Minister of War Verkohov-
sky and Minister of Marine Verdervz-
ski, have gone to general headquarters
for a scries of conferences, Including
one with'the militia attaches of the allied powers.
BRAN,  SHORTS,  OILCAKE   MEAL
CRU8HED OATS, PINE OAT CHOP
OAT   FEED   (MILL   RUN)   STOCK
TONICS   AND   REMEDIES
8HARPLES SUCTION FEED CREAMS)
SEPARATORS J   >
The Brackman Ker
Milling Co., Limited
"Eat What You Can and
Can What YouICan't"
le good advice at any. time;
Sllverskin Pickling Onions, per
pound  12'/ic
Crab Apples, 8 pounds for .. 250
A few boxes of Wealthy Apples,
per box SI .26
Sound Yellow Onions, 6 pounds
for •••■25C
JOY BROS.' STORE
P. O. Box 637
Tel. 149
Drugs by Mail
Try us when you need goods in a
hurry.
Try us when you want Intelligent
service..
Pure Drugs and Medicines, Films
and Camera Supplies, Gramophone
Recorda and Needles, 8praya for
Rosea, Fruit Trees or Poultry
Houses, etc.
Rutherford Drug Co.
NEL80N, B. C.
many cases among the men already
returned and reeducated in the various schools for vocational work established In connection with the military convalescent hospitals.
. "As the problem becomes greater
with each transport of returned men,
experience and accommodations keep
apace. I believe that Canada la
abreast, if not ahead of most of the
allies in this work, and on the way to
solving the greatest problem of the
war successfully.1'
MARSHALL RENOMINATED
FOR EAST ELGIN  RIDING
(By Doily News Leased Wire.)
AYLMBR, Ont., Oct. 9.—At a convention of Bast Elgin Conservatives
held here today, David Marshall, M.P..
was renominated as standard bearer
in the coming federal elections.
FITTING CANADA
TOGETHER  AGAIN
Vocational Training Present. Problem
Which Grows in  Complication
With Each Shipload of   >
Veterans
OTTAWA—"Canada's rehabilitation
problem is a picture puzzle of 500,-
000 pieces," declared Secretary E. H.
Scammell ot the Military Hospitals
commission In discussing the vocational training which the government
is offering every returned soldier who
is so disabled through service as to
be unable to follow his previous occupation.
"In whatever shape a man returns
from the war, a place must be found
where he can be fitted again into our
national life," he explained, "and only when you review the hundreds of
occupations from which' they came
does the problem present itself in 'full
^ force.
Hundreds of Trades  Represented
"We have listed mora than 360 oo.
cupations from which' the Canadian
army was drawn. There are clergymen and bartenders, taxidermists,
Turkish bath attendants, butchers,
boxers, candters, shepherds, actors, de-.
tectives, bushmen, fishmongers, foot-'
then, policemen, spinners, steeplejacks,
tentmakers, stage managers, tailors,
valets, veterinary surgeons, Janitors,
jewelers, and scores of other occupations are represented.
"Just as choice and circumstance figured in the determination of their
life work before the war, it figures
again when they must learn a new
trade; hut the Increased opportunity
which Is coming to many men' who had1
small chance In their youth, and the
expert advice of men closely In touch
with the' labor market, through the
agency of the vocational training department bK'the Military Hospitals
commission will put many men Into
better' paying--position's'with brighter-
futures than they enjoyed before they
went Into the army.
Canada Leads
"Wa have found this to be true in
SHEDS LIGHT ON HOW
ALL THE TROUBLE BEGAN
SYDNEY, N. S. W„—Here is a
story, told the other day in a Melbourne police court, which is typical
of the intense bitterness which the
conscription referendum of last October aroused among all sections of the
Australian public.
Philip Walsh and David Marriage
were neighbors in Mount Pleasant
Grove, Armldale, and their relationship wee as cordial as the name of
their street. ^Then came the conscription isBue. Walsh advocated compulsory service. Marriage stoutly opposed it. Their arguments were furious
and Interminable, Each man expressed confidence In the result of the vote.
When the result of the referendum
was published, Marriage was over-
Joyed and would forego no atom of
his triumph over the hated Walsh. He
went out in front of Walsh's house
whooped, exultantly and flung his
newspaper on to Walsh's* veranda,
Walsh was not crushed. He barked
defiance at Marriage, and found consolation In a loud and ostentatious
way, In directing the attention of the
resentful Marriage to the Victorian
figures and the small commonwealth
majority against conscription.
Then Towser Died
Then Walsh's dog died of poison.
Marriage was under a black cloud of
suspicion thereat, and he added nothing to the surging hatred of Walsh,
when, as the animal was being burled,
he leaned over the fence and jeered.
Each following the lead of father, the
two famillies displayed toward each
other an enmity that wns Immeasurable and Implacable. The climax
came on July 24. Walsh oalled formally, but belligerently, upon Marriage and requested him to stop the
"unbearable din" going on In his house
as his (Walsh's) children could not
sleep. The outraged Marriage ordered him Off the premises.
Walsh was not conciliatory, tand
Marriage also did not appear averse to
a fight. The fight occurred promptly.
The confidence of Walsh was not unjustified. But Marriage' was vigorously assisted by his wife and his sister-in-law. The sequel was the appearance of both parties before a
magistrate. Each accused the other
of assault, and Marriage, in addition,
claimed (60 in respect of a lost tooth,
Walsh, being only human, could not
be expected to disclaim responsibility
for the tooth, and that fact maybe
counted against him, for he was fined
iOs and ordered to pay. 20b damages
for the tooth.—Vancouver World.
TOO MUCH FOR DEWEY
A curious coincidence surrounds the
entering of George Dewey as a cadet
at the American naval academy, from
which he graduated with great honor
In 1858, His appointment was that as
alternate to that of another Montpe-
Fatty Ia at hie best—better than
his beet. There's not a quiet
minute from the moment his
-beaming countenance flashos before you until you get it—sad,
but true ''The End,"
COME   TONIGHT   AND   SEE
"The Rough House"
A vast, fast and Melting two-
reel Arbuckle comedy.
We are also ahowing
Charlie Chaplin
...       -In-*    .    .   /
"AMBITION"
A 3-reel Chaplin revue—fast and
furious.
Alto a alda-aplltting cartoon,
"COL. HEEZA LIAR AND THE
PIRATES"
NO   ADVANCE    IN    PRICES.
Saturday—Pauline  Frederick  in
"HER BETTER SELF"
Her boy, son of a Vermont physician,
also named George. They had played
together and fought many sham bat-
ties side by aide In the little old red :
schoolhouse. George I. received the
naval appointment, but for family
reasons decided to enter the ministry,
and the vacancy was taken by George
Dewey, who was ready for any fight
on land and sea, as. he many timed :
proved in the Montpelier schoolhouse.
A notable demonstration was held
in Boston, Oot, 14, 1899, when Admiral Dewey was the hero of the hour.
Congratulations were telegraphed by
the old playmate, George of the Montpelier days: "Bully for you George,
have you ceased swearing as you did .
in the old boyhood days. I could not
have fought that battle ot Manila, but
1 am sending you a sermon. I preached -
it last Sunday- in my Syracuse church, j
The reply came:
"George, I may have taught like a
bulldog and I may still swear at times,
but I could not have preached that
sermon."
WATER NOTICE.
Diversion and Uae.
Take notloa that the Island Mill
Lumber Co., of Alpena, Michigan.'
U.S.A., through their agent, Geo. Male-
Inson, whose address la Arrow Park,
B.C., will apply for a license to clear
and improve Mosquito creek, which
flows southerly and drains Into th*'
Columbia river about 1 milk north ot
Arrow Park.
The clearing and Improving will be) I
from the mouth of said creek to a point
about where It crosses the N. and 8.
line of Lot 8717 CO., which la about"
M mile from the S. E. corner of lot'!
8717, a total distance of about eight
miles. . The clearing and Improving of
this stream Is for the purpose of float-,
Ing logs, shingle bolts, poles, piling;
ties, etc., to the Columbia river.
This notice waa potted on the ground
on. the 11th day qf August, 1917. A.
copy of this notice and an application'
pursuant thereto and to the "Wat*je
Act, 1914" will be fifed in the office of
the Water Recorder at Nelson, BAV
Objections to the application may b*
filed with the said Water Recorder orj
with the Comptroller ot Water Rights.
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.Cj
within 80 day) otter the flrtt appear,
ance of thla notica in a local newtpa«<
per. The date of the tint publication;
of thla notice la Aug. 17, 1117.
ISLAND MILL LUMBER OOMVAMTJ
Applicant, . 1
By Geo. Maklnson. ASMt.
Th# Boys
in Khaki
Willi
IN FRANCE OR ENGLAND WILL APPRECIATE THAT CHRISTMAS GIFT ALL THE)
MORE IF IT REACHES HIM BEFORE
CHRISTMAS. WE ARE SHOWING KHAKI
WOOL GLOVES, $1.00; KHAKI SCARVES IN
PURE WOOL, FROM 11.26 to SUM) KHAKI
HELMETS AT f1J0| KHAKI HANDKERCHIEFS, SUSPENDERS, BOOKS.    ,
SEND  THEM   NOW
&   Waliey

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