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The Daily News 1917-11-02

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 >oZl
J '■■ The bally News has the largest clr-.
dilation of any dally newspaper ln!',
Canada in proportion to the population \
\ i of its homo town *
MiiiiinHimniiiiiii'il
The Daily News carries the tall night]
leased wire news service of Canadian j
Press   Limited,   which   Includes   the}
'. \ Associated Press service,
VQh 16 No. 173
NELSON, B. 0., FRIDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 2, 1917
50c PER MONTH
ITALIAN LEADER SAYS FOE'S
SUCCESS WILL BE NULLIFIED
Reports the .Morale of His
Troops Splendid
GfifAl BATTL
PLAINS
|j Berlin Claims 60,000 More
Prisoners Taken in
MMItW
Further Drive
i
(By Associated Press.)
The greater portion of Gen. Cadorna's forces apparently has crossed the
Tagllamento river and probably now
5] Mtands on the western bank In a new
liJ.liue of defense waiting to give bat-
tic there to the Teutonic allies.
The advance of tbe enemy, although
it has been fast, was not quick enough
to carry out the purpose of the mlll-
•Jtary commanders of enveloping the
■j Italians and putting them out of the
j, wattle from the Carnia Alps to the
.1 head of the Adriatic sea.
I The Italians lost .heavily in men
and guns captured—the latest German
unofficial communication asserting that
[( more than 180,000 men and 1500 guns
Jwere taken -by the Teutonic allies—
^tahdV'nlso suffered terribly from hord-
Jjt ships due to Inclement weather and
, lack of food ftB they made their way
,! .across the country to the Tagllamento
I river, with their rearguards harassing
tho enemy.
^Gen, Cadorna declares that with tho
morale of his men still splendid, the
Mitccesj of the invaders soon will be
i made nil.
; -Bridgehead Positions Captured
On the eastern side of tbe Taglia-
mento the Teutonic allies have captured all along tho waterway from
Pbsano to Latlsanu, valuable bridgehead positions from .which to operate
oguliuit thV Italians on the' oUicr",sido
of the si ream. No mention has yet
been made, of any attempts by the
enemy to bridge the stream with
Jpontflons, but doubtless strong efforts
'[In this direction will be made as soon
las sufficient artillery has been mobll-
niaZcd to give effect to this operation.
; JHhould Gen. Cadorna, however, decide
y*to stand and give battle along tho
jTngliamcnto river, choosing the Piave
Jfor the big battle that is to come,
loubtlcss the plains of Frluli soon
will resound with tbe hoof beats of
.avnlry and the clash of the sabre
nd witness the greatest scenes of
ipen warfare that have taken place
luring the present hostilities. Already Italian cayalry has been in action To the enst of the Tagllamento
ind has done notable work In harassing the" Teutonic advance.
Berlin Report
BERLIN,    Nov.    1.—The    Austro-
 [jcrpmn   forces   invading  Italy   have
§^.tatt'il that the number of prisoners
.ukeu by thorn totaled lst.,000.-
The report is as follows:
"The bridgehead positions of Dig-
fiano and Codrolpo were taken by
torn, fciy Prussian Jaeger und llavar-
un and Wurttemburg Infantry.
"Throughout the area of operations
■be tried Brandenburg and Silesian
11 visions' Irresistible assault penctra-
.ed from the north the rearguard
Kisitlous of the Italians east of the
invor A'agllaincnt,o and drove back
ho enemy, while tho Austro-llun-
farifin corps pressed forward from
lie isunao against the last of the
irosslngs held by the enemy.
"Cut  off hy  our  thrust  from  the
Wth and outflanked on both sides,
moro than 60,000  Italians laid  down
'heir arms.   Several hundred guns foil
nto  the bands of the victors.    The
umber of prisoners captured during
He week on the successfully conduct-
id isonzo-front Is Increased to More
ihan   180,000  and  the  total ,of guns
ken ts increasing to more than 1500,
ho other booty taken Is proportlon-
tti "with the prisoners."
Further Successes Claimed
BERLIN, Via London, Nov. 1.—Tho
iUpplcmcntary   statement  from   gen-
Jl> tral -headquarters' tonight says:
; "On tho -Tagllamento Austro-Ital-
i an front, the troops "Of tho enemy
,iio were maintaining themselves on
he eastern bank of tho river near
Inazano and Latlzana have cither
teen driven hack or, taken prisoner.'1
**+**+♦♦♦*♦**+**♦
* CABINET DEAL3 WITH *
+                         C08T OF LIVING *
+   *
* OTTAWA, Nov. 1.—Cold stor- ♦
* age and the whoje question of the ♦
* cost of living is now under con- *
+ slderation, it is understood, by a *
+ subcommittee of the cabinet. Im- *
* portant. ^recommendations <prob- *
* ahly will bo made shortly.    In ♦
* its statement of policy, issued a ♦
* couple of weeks ago, the Union *
* government declared its belief in ♦
* the necessity of "effective metis- *
* urea to prevent excessive prof- ♦
* Its, to prohibit hoarding and to +
* prevent combinations for the in- *
* crease of prices and thus to re- *
* duce the cost of living." *
NimjBKUIE
Italian     Army    Consists    of     Over
3,000,000 Men-It  Declared
Practically Intact
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 1.—The following is the summarization of a
cable received here today by Washington officials regarding the Italian
situation:
"The military situation on the Italian front is serious, but it is far from
being desperate. At the present moment, having recovered from the first
surprise, it may be stated that our
allies are preparing to oppose a furious resistance to the enemy at the
point which without doubt Gen. Cadorna had selected. It ts probable
that if the retreat should continue a
few days longer, the Italian resistance will develop along the Tagllamento, quite an Important river,
which descends from the Carnia Alps!
or, perhaps, If the Austro-Germans
attack in Cernla, it will be on the
Piave river, which flows westward.
"Whatever the number of Italians
taken prisoner, the strength of Gen.
Cadorna's army has not been weakened. It must not be forgotten that
Italy has under the colors more than
3,000,000 men. As for the guns that
the Austrians clalin to have captured,
they only report the production of a
few weeks of the munition factories
of our allies.
"The Italian army Is practically intact. Besides, the French and British
are coming to our rescue. It has already been announced that at the beginning of the council Sunday evening the French ministers were busy
determining the extent and nature of
the cooperation of the allies on the
Italian front. This same question was
further considered* by the council
Monday and by the war committee
which was held at the Elysec, INI.
Polncare presiding. The British government has taken measures to rush
aid to the Italians, and all indications are that this French and British
aid will come at the hour when, the
enemy invades tho plain of Fruill.
"Meanwhile, awaiting developments,
Italian public opinion realizes thoroughly the gravity of the hour and Is
bearing the shock with firmness.
"The Italian press declares that the
battle which is about to take placo
may be the last,great battle of the
war."
HON.  FRANK OLIVER TO  BE
OPPOSED BY GEN. GRIE8BACH
(By Dally News Leused Wiro.)
•EDMONTON, Alta., Nov. 1.—Brlg.-
Gen. W. A. Griesbach, D.S.O., was
nominated here tonight as Unionist
candidate in the West Edmonton constituency, by a convention composed
largely of city Conservatives and Liberals. Gen. Griesbach Is at present In
Franco. He was the Conservative candidate against Hon. Flunk Oliver at
tho last, federal election.
Mr. Oliver is running us a. Laurier
Liberal.
GERMAN   DESTROYER
STRIKE8  MINE  AND  SINK3
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
COPENHAGEN, New 1.—■A German
warship has*been sunk in the Sound,
according to a despatch to the Tld-
ende from Malmo, Sweden. It is reported that the vessel struck a mine.
This report is considered to confirm
a despatch from Malmo somo time
ago, saying that a torpedo boat destroyer had run Into a mine at the
southern end ..of the sound and that
the bodies or German sailors had
been washed ashore.
WEWSTER SUPPORTS
UNION GOVERNMENT
>nly CnaliUan   Ministry  Can   Solve
Praising   Problems  Before   •
Country, 8ay. Premier
(Dy Daily News Leased Wire.)
VICTORIA, B. O.I Nov. 1.—Making
; understood that he was giving his
tvn personal attitude, Premier
rewater this afternoon gave out a
latemcirt announcing his support of
le Union federal government. Ho
Ud ho thought the people of Canada
ere disposed Ho give the now nri-
ilnlstration a trial for the period of
le war and subject to the honest,
indent direction of Canada's war
florin." This, he said, ,vas his own
Ultude. .Tharo were pressing prob-
inn which only a union government
Mild solve, and the.people wonld exec, the  government   ii,   f:urt\   out
"far-reaching emergent measures In
accordance with the demands of thcuo
urgent times."
Premier Brewster added that tho
Union government would bo more
cordially welcomed hy the people of
BritiBh Columbia If it carried out tho
"real spirit of national unionism here
as fully as lt Is boing carried out elsewhere." '
By this, ho said, he meant "that tho
Union government should .absolutely
•and resolutely divorce tho direction of
Its interests here from tho partisan
agonol.es which brought tho previous
administration and provincial affiliations into .disrepute."
Tho premier closed with an expression of regret that he had boon
obliged, on the conscription issue, to
,llffeiv ff|t|, • Hk- Wilfrid- Laurier,   i
HUNS RETREAT
IN RIGA REGION
Russian ^Troops Close On
Their Heels
RETIREMENT NOT
A STRATEGIC ONE
Little   Chance of   Force?
Being Thrown On
Other Fronts
(By Associated Press.)
The Petrograd war office reports
another withdrawal of the German
troops In the Riga region of the north
Russian front. The Russians are in
contact with ihe enemy rearguards as
they retire to prepare positions and the
significant statement is made by the
Russians that there are no grounds
for supposing tnat it will be possible
for the retreating elements to be
thrown upon any other front. This
possibly may indicate that the Russians are carrying out an operation so
strong that the Germans will be unable
to deplete their forces by sending reinforcements to the Italian and western
fronts.
(By Dully News Leased Wire.)
PETROGRAD, Nov. 1.—An official
report on the retirement of the enemy
In the Riga region states:
"The retreat is taking place with
the enemy's rearguards in contact with
our reeonnoitering detachments and
there are no possible grounds for supposing that this retreat will permit the
possibility of his throwing his troops
on to any other front."
Wants Allies to Take  Burden.
PETROGRAD, Nov. 1.—Russia entered the war early and she is now
worn out by the strain, Premier Kerensky -today .told the Associated Press.
He said that Russia claims as her right
that the other allies now should shoulder the burden of the war. He declared
that Russian public opinion was agitated by the question "Where is the
British fleet now that the German fleet
is out in the Baltic?
VON HIRELING NEW
BRITISH TOOK
9125 GERMANS
This is Number Captured
in France in October
ARTHUR! FIRE
SMASHES DEEENSES
Hun Airmen Kaid  Calais
and Dunkirk-Damage
is Small
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
LONDON, NoV. 1.—The (following
official communication was issued
here this evening;
"The hostile^, artillery has shown
considerable activity during the day
east and north of Ypres. Our own ar
tillery has carried out a number of
bombardments of enemy positions in
the battle area. There ■ is nothing
further of special interest to report
"The number of German prisoners
captured by the British armies in
France during October is 9125, Including 242 officers. We also have taken
during the same period 15 guns, 431
machine guns and 42 trench mortars."
PARIS, Nov. 1.—The official communication issued by the war office
tonight reads as follows:
"There is nothing to report except
artillery actions of some violence In
several sectors north of the Aisne, In
the region of Les Mafsons de Cham
pagne, and on the right bank of the
Meuse river, north of Bezonvaux.
"Enemy airplanes bombarded Calais
on the night of Oct. 29 and Dunkirk
last night. The material damage was
of small Importance and there were
no civilian casualties.
"Belgian communication: There has
been intense artillery fighting along
the Belgian front ;it was particularly
violent before' Dixmude, especially for
trench artillery."^ We carried our fires
of destruction against enemy batter-
ies and works. Airplanes have dropped numerous bombs on our cantonments."
Vice-Chancellor and President of Food
Regulation  Board  Resign—
Capelle Cleared Out.
(By Daily Nows Leased Wire.)
AMSTERDAM, Nov. 1.—According
to despatches received here from Berlin, Emperor William received Count
von Hertllng this afternoon, and Von
Hertling has accepted tho Imperial
chancellorship and the office of premier of Russia,
Dr. Carl Helfferlch, secretary of the
interior and vice-chancellor, and Herr
von Waldow, president of the German
food regulation board, havo resigned.
Frledrich von Payer, Progressive
member of the relchstag, says the de-
spatch, is to be appointed vice-chancellor, and Herr I-Yidbcrg, leader of
the National party, will bo given the
post of vice-president of the Prussian ministry.
Tho Cologne Gazette says the roslg
nation of Vice-Admiral von Capelle,
as minister of the navy, has been accepted.
Accepts Demands.
AMSTERDAM, Nov. 1.—Count von
Hertllng has accepted- the following
demands of the relchstag majority, aa
cording to the Vossische Zeitung.
First, that Prussian electoral reform
be carried out.
Second, that political censorship and
the state of siege bo abolished or mitigated.
Third, that the foreign policy be
conducted on tho basis of the German
reply to the pope's peace note.
BEERSHEBA TAKEN
BY THE BRITISH
1800 Oil-man. and  Arabs Captured—
Lone. Su.tained In Attack Art
Slltjbt.
(By Dally Nows Loosed Wiro.),
LONDON, Nov. 1.—In Palostlno tho
British havo captured the town of
Boersheba, a short distance southwost
of Jerusalem and made prisoners of
1800 Germans and Arabs. Thoy also
took ntno guns, suffering slight losses
themselves ln the operation.
*****************
* FORCE ALMOST WIPED OUT +
* WHEN TRAPPED BY INDIANS *
♦   •
♦ (By Daily News Leased Wire.   *
♦ EL PASO, Texas, Nov. 1.—Col. ♦
4- Anoheta was killed and his com- *
* mand of 200 federal troops al- ♦
♦ most wiped out when trapped in *
* a   mountain   pass   near   Suagi *
♦ Crane, by Yaqul Indians, a mon- *
* sage, received hero from Sonora, ♦
+ Texas, today stated, *
*****************
*****************
* HON. MARTIN  BURRELL *
MAY GET WALKOVER *
PENTICTON, Nov. 1.—Unless *
labor or Socialism enters the *
field against, him Hon. Martin *
Burrell, minister of mines and +
secretary of state*, probably will *
bo elected by acclamation for
Yale riding. At the Conserva- ♦
tire-Unionist nominating conven- •+
tion Wednesday night he was *
chosen unanimously, and the +
Liberals of tho constituency, +
who also held a convention Wed- +
neBday night, decided not to en- +
ter the contest. +
*****************
RUSSIAN SHIPS Si
TURKISH DESTROYER
Also   Bends   to Bottom Two Steamers
and   Destroy  Naval   Battery-
Surprise Enemy,
(By Daily News .teased Wire.)
P15TROGJRAD, Nov. Is—In an attack
on Turkish vessels at Inada Bay on
the Black sea, near tho Bosphorus,
Russian torpedo boats sunk a Turkish
torpedo boat and destroyed two Turkish steamers and a naval -battery in
tho bay, the war office announced today.   The statement reads;
"Black sea: Two of our torpedo
boats, despatched to destroy a Turkish
steamer damaged by one' of our submarines, discovered an enemy torpedo
boat and two steamers in Inada bay.
The cnemV torpedo boat Was sunk and
the two steamers burned and a naval
battery destroyed."
HALF GERMAN SUB. HfET SUNK
* PLANS FOR WIN-WAR *
4*                    CANDIDATES  MADE *
*  _ *
* (By Dally News Leased Wire.)   +
* VICTORIA,   B.C.,  Nov.  1.—Ne- +
+ gotlatlons to decide upon action +
* to nominate Unionist candidates *
+ in  British   Columbia  are   under *
* way on the basis that of the 13 +
+ federal seats nine should be as- *
* signed    to     the    Conservative- *
* Unionists  and four to Liberal- +
* Unionists.    This Is the proposal *
+ made by Messrs. Calder and Bur- +
* rell during1 their visit in Victoria *
+ and apparently acceptable to the +
* Unionist government *
4** + ****** + + * + + * +
fACIORIES RAIDED
Works   in   Bavaria Succusfully   At
tacked by British Airmen in
Two Groups
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Nov. 1.—Another successful air raid, carried out by 12
British machines, has been made on
German munition factories-in Bavaria,
according to an official communication issued tonight. The communica
tion says:
"Today another successful raid was
carried out Into Germany. Munition
factories at Katserlauten, Bavaria,
were attacked by two group's of six
machines each."
One Person Killed
AMSTERDAM, Nov. 1.—Despatches
received from Pirmaisons, Bavaria,
reporting an entente air raid, say
bombs were dropped on the town and
Its environs. One person was kilted
and four wounded and some material
damage was done.
NEW YORK ALLOWED TO
DEAL IN FOOD AND FUEL
(By Daily Nows Leased Wire.)
NEW YORK, Nov. 1.—John Mitchell, state food commissioner, lute
today granted permission to New
York, city authorities to buy and sell
food and fuel.
WAR
TORE
SERVCEACT
THRESHED OUT
Counsel   States   That   if   Prohibition
Writ Is Sustained Meaiure
Will   Be   Invalid.
(By Daily Nows Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA. Nov. l.-rEvcry phase of
tho   Military   Service   act   will     bo
thrshed out In  tho courts when the
writ of prohibition issued by Mr. Justice Bruneau  'yesterday    suspending
the operation of the act so far as the
cases   against   certain   antlconscrip
tionlst orators here for alleged scdl
tlous utterances arc concerned, comes
up for trial on its merits.   The state
ment was made today by G. Desaut
nlers, K. C.,- who, as one of  tho coun!
sel for P. E. Mongeau, an antlconsorip
tionlst, presented the petition tn the
practise court.
"Should tho trial Judge, whon the
case cornea up on its merits, -probably
this month, decide that the law is unconstitutional, that judgment will havo
a wider application," stated Mr. De-
saulnlers. "It would mean that tho
Military Service act has beon pronounced invalid by tho court and its
operation would bo suspended through
out Canada,"
The writ will bo returnable ln six
days, when a date will be set for the
arguments. Hon. C. J. Doherty, as
minister of justice, will be called upon
in his capacity as attorney-general of
tbe Dominion, to defend the act.
WILLIAM BROCK DEAD—WAS
PIONEER OF DRYOOODS TRADE
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
TORONTO, Nov. 1.—William B.
Brock, president of tho largo drygoods
company thi t bears his name, and one
of tho pioneers of the trade in Canada, died tonight at 6 o'clock. He
was 82 years old, and 'had been In
falling health for somo time.
WANTS DECLARATION
OF WAR! AUS
Defense Seoiety Urges Aotion by Wilson— Despatch of Troops to
Italy Advocated.
(Uy Daily Nows Loosed frlro.)
NEW YORK, Nov. 1.—President
Wilson was urged to-call a special session of congress at an early dato to
declare war on Austria ln a, resolution adopted by tho board of trustees
of the American Defense society at a
speciul meeting here today.   .
Tho resolution further urges the
transportation to Italy of a contingent
of American troops and war material,
using all ships possible, Including
seised Austrian vessels for the pur-
.»•&   .'_J ; .-'•■■•■ "..-
EBBETT IS NOMINATED
FOR ALBERTA  LEGISLATURE
VERMILLION, Alta., Nov. 1.—A. W.
Bbbett, barrister of this place, was
nominated today for the provincial
leglslatui-o by the Liberals, to fill the
vacancy caused by tho resignation of
Hon, A. L. Sifton. Resolutions endorsing tho late administration ot Mr.
Slfton and expressing confidence in
the Stewart government were unanimously passed.
The election is on Nov. 19.
125,000 PASS
MEDICAL BOARDS
High Percentage of "A" -Men Coming
Within Clasi 1 Is Revealod
by   Returns.
(Uy Dally News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA, Nov. 1.—Medical examinations under the Military Service act
to date reveal a high percentage of
A men coming within Class 1. One
hundred and twenty-five thousand
men have In all now passed tho medical boards, divided Into the following
medical classes:
A mon, 62,063; B. O. D. and E men,
63,738.    Total  examined,   125,862.
There wore in all 36,012 men examined Inst week.
"The Defense of Canada," a -pamphlet outlining the part ot Canada in
the war, will shortly/ be available 'at
all postoffices In the Dominion. It is
now being translated into Frenoh for
circulation in the  provlnoe  of Que-
New First Lord of Admiralty Raises ,Veil on Havoc
Caused Among U-Boats-Are Now Eeing Sent
to Bottom Faster Than Ever
BUILDING OF BRITISH TONNAGE 123
PER CENT HIGHER IN Ni MONTHS
\fore Than Million Tons of Shipping Arranged for, and
Over One Half Is Already Under Construction-
Important Changes in Work of Admiralty
Board Are Outlined
(By Associated Press,)
Between forty and fifty per
cent of the German submarines
operating in —e North sea, the
Arctic and the Atlantic since the be-
gining of the war have been sunk, according to Sir Eric Geddes. the new
first lord of the admiralty, in a statement to the house of commons today.
The building of new British tonnage,
he added, for the first nine months
of the present year was 123 per cent
higher than for the corresponding pe»
rlod last year. One million tons of
shipping had been arranged for, he
said, and more than half of it already
was under construction.
The net reduction in British tonnage
since the beginning of the war was
given at 2,500,000 tons.
Sir Eric concluded by saying that
plans must be made for a long war, as
he could sec no signs of it being a
short one.
(By Daily News I-eased Wire.)
LONDON, Nov. 1.—Sir Eric Geddes,
who recently succeeded Sir Edward
Carson as first lord of the admiralty,
made his firsf address in .parliament
today and gave some interesting und
anxiously awaited figures on the work
of the navy and shipping in general.
His declaration that between -10 and
50 per cent of the German submarines
operating in the North sea, the Atlantic and Arctic oceans had been sunk,
was not tho least interesting of his
announcements, and there was an indication 'Of ithe unceasing wur tbe
British and American patrols are making on the submarine, in his statement that during the last quarter the
enemy had lost as many submarines
as during the whole of 1916.
The first sea lord, speaking directly of his department, said that in
accordance with thu Increase of the
personnel the services of the younger
officers had been requisitioned, to add
strength to the experience of the older
officers on the naval staff.
Will Keep Information from Foe,
Referring to tho question of publish
Ing the tonnage of the Britisl# merchantmen lost through submarines, he
said he had made a most careful Investigation and had approached the
subject with the idea that it was desirable and it ought to be posted to
give tho public figures, because, he
added, "it is hardly conceivable that
the enemy does not know what lie Is
sinking."
He regretted to say, however, that
he had not found it possible to arrive
at any form of publication which
would not convoy most valuable information to the enemy which he did
not now possess, if information were
glvon in regular sequence for specific
periods.
lI have studied from a variety of
sources," said the first lord, "the
statements mado from time to time by
tho enemy as to tonnage and position
and have come' to the definite conclusion that not only docs he nut
know what is being sunk, but that he
would like very much Indeed to know
what is being sunk regularly monthly,
or week by week, or oven exactly for
any period."
Progress  Reasonably  Good.
Sir Eric, supplementing the recent
statement by Premier Lloyd George
in Albert hall, said that ho could give
certain information which would show
that "we are making reasonably satisfactory progress in overcoming tho
menace of tho enemy's submarine activity."
He added that the house would realize
that "however great the loss of merchant tonnage, we cannot at this stage
of the war pick any ono item to deduce therefrom that the war, even
any phase of the war, is going well or
badly."
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Nov. I.—Via .Reuter's OU
tawa Agency.—In the course of an important and much anticipated speech
in the house of commons today, Sir
Erie Geddes, first lord of tne admiralty.
said that the present board of the ad*
miralty consists of eight naval offlc*
ers and three civilians, including himself.
"I am, however," said Sir Eric,
"finding that the administrative work
is growing in complexity and difficulty
of detail to such an extent that the
appointment of an additional civil lord
is still necessary, and I expect to revive the post which lapsed when Lord
Southborough took up his apopintment
as secretary to the Irish convention,
and I hope to make an appointment to
It shortly. The board will then consist
of eight naval officers and four civilians, including myself."
He proceeded to state that a change
of some importance had been made it)
the arms for dealing with admiralty,
business.
Grouped in Two Committees,
"Members of the board," he said, "io
addition to dealing individually with
work allotted them under the table
of distribution of business ln the admiralty, have been grouped into two
committees, namely, operations committee and maintenance committee,
eaeh of which meets once a week, or
moro if necessary. The first lord is
ex-officlo chairman of both committees and personally I make a point of
presiding at them as often as possible.
The operations committee, which consists of the first sea lord, the deputy
first sea lord, the deputy chief of the
naval stuff and the assistant chief ot
the naval staff, with the fifth sea lord
attending when necessary, deals with
large questions of naval strategy, with
plans of operations, with the Bcale of
provision and equipment of the navy
as a fighting force and with its efficiency, organization and utilization.
The maintenance committee, which
consists of six members of the board
is concerned with personnel, material,
supplies, works, production and finance-
and deals with questions affecting
these matters and with the fulfilment
of the demands of the operations conn
mittee and the naval staff.
Link Is Formed.
"The deputy first soa lord, representing tho operatiops committee and
the fifth sea lord, attending whoa necessary, form a link between the operations side of the board and tho maintenance side of the board. The board
itself also meets weekly and more
often if necessary. Matters cominff
within the administration spheres of
the different members of the board are.
If they fall within certain defined categories of importance, referred for,
consideration to the appropriate committee of the board, which cither arrives at a definite conclusion or refers thcin for decision or confirmation
to a full mooting of the board, as the
nature of the subject may require.
Replying to criticism regarding tho
recent loss of a Scandinavian convoy
in tho North Sea, Sir Erie said that
had the British navy been Informed
of the attack, which it was not, ItH
position was such that lt could not
have wished a better opportunity of
Intercepting the  ruidors.
' (Continued on Page Two.)
AIR RAID ELABORATE
BUT FAILED DISMALLY
Only Throe German Machines Able to
Get Over London—Eight Killed,
21 Injured
(By Daily Nows Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Nov. 1.—In the ulr raid
on London lost night, eight persons
wero killed and 21 Injured.
The heavy barrago which was put
up to protect tho metropolis seemed to
disconcert the raiders, who dropped
bombs Indiscriminately as they approached. Several ot these fell upon
open spaces, severely Rhaklng little
suburban settlements.
Bombs were dropped In the southwestern dlstriot of London, apparently
by a Gotha, which had become separated from the other enemy aircraft.
The sir raid apparently wan tl)« must
cluborato attempt to "lay London In
ruins" ovor mado by tbo Germans.
Thut it was a failure was duo to ths
now air defenses, which, with tho gunfire of tho alrplanoB harassed the enemy so that, at most, three machines
were able to cross the metropolis,
whero thoy dropped a few bombs,'
24 Planes Took P»rt
A SOUTHEAST COAST TOWN,
England, Nov. 1.—A fleet of hostllo
airplanes, appeared ovor this region
last night. It consisted of six relays
of four machines each. Despite repeated attempts, only a few machines
succeeded in crossing tho coast and
only one machine had any success In
dropping bombs ln this district. A
great majority of the bombs from the
SU.ec machines foil late JBJ aca,
 PAGE TWO
.THE DAILY NEWS
FRIDAY,     NOV.     2,     1917.
Leading Hotels of the West
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HUME—William Simpson, Howser;
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Forks; T, C. Peck, Midway; R. H. Battey, Ferguson'; Julius LeRoy, Vancou-
viM-; ,\. Blair, Silverton; M. Deitzer,
Silverton; Mrs. G. W. Loekhart, Sancton; T. J. Lloyd, New Denver; Mr.
and Airs. w. J. Crulckshank, Salmo;
Otis Hawkln, Hall; M. W. Davidson.
Vancouver; Mrs. Harry While, Cranbrook; G. E. W. Hesters and wife,
Minneapolis; Alan S. Horsfleld, Klttos
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Mrs. Hugh Bruce, Revelstoke; F. K.
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William Boyd, Benion; T. B. Cochrane,
Revelstoke; Miss N. M. -Graham. Montreal; B. K. Higrann, P. Clement, .!.
Major. G. Black, Vancouver; W. G.
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NEW GRAND—U. J. Pulpes, city;
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Mcintosh. Silverton; P, Rountrrc,
Brantford, Ont.; Mr. nnd Mrs. A. F.
Lea, Miss R. Leu, Miss L, Lea, Roblin;
Aobert Gordon, Revelstoke; W. H,
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Tjiindmark, Rcvel.stoke; C. J. Retley,
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Shore and wife, Regina; .1. L, Stakes,
Seattle; II. Creed. L, Vaughn, Seattle.
Queen's Hotel
European     and     American     PI tn.
Steam Heat in Every Room.
A. LAPOINTE, Prep.
• QUEEN'S—Mr. ami Mrs. A. 13. Jef-
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Tyler, Sandon; Fmil Vialo, Salmo;
Mrs. G. H. Lett and children, Newgate; William Johnson, Cranbrook; C.
freckles, .Teheca McBelck, A. A. Burton, Bu.sla; Emll LeVegue, Nakusp;
U. G. Brown, .1. Ii. Loughy, T. 0,
Bacon, Kdgcwood; V. Surtccs, Cranbrook.
Madden House
MRS, THOMAS MADDEN,
Proprietress,
STEAM HEATED
Corner Baker and Ward Sts., Nelson
Grand Central Hotel
J. A.  ERICKSON, Prop.
Opposite  Postoffice.
Room  and   Board,  $35  per  Month.
European Plan, Rooms 50c up.
Meals, 35c.
GRAND CENTRAL— s, E. Lund,
Ymir; Mike Dorvanuk, Sandon; John
Comeroh, Salmo; E. L. Seiden, G. E.
Bnsch, Vancouver; Ignaee Sangola,
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Nelson House
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CAFE—Open Day and Night—BAR
Merchants' Lunch, 12 to 2.
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NELSON—W. Connor, W. Connor,
Peter Cdnnor, Miss B. Connor, Miss A.
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York; P. B. McDougall, A. 8. Pattor-
son, Midway.
Seizable German property in the
United States is valued at a billion
dollars.
INQUEST JURY FINDS
YOUTH WAS MURDERED
Story  cf  Woman  That Shooting  Was
Accidental, Believed at First, Is
Now  Discredited.
(Hy Dally News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA, Nov. 1.—Ba'plistc Lavoi,
only son nf Mrs. L. Lavoi, who was
reported accidentally shot at Green
lake, US miles from Port Cologne, (inc.,
on Tuesday of last week, was initrdei>
ed, according to the conclusion of a
coroner's jury at lhe Inquest held at
Port Cologne yesterday. The verdict
was arrived al after Coroner T. B.
Davies of Hull had told of exhuming
the body which was found buried in
a field adjacent lo his home, and finding a. bullet wound which could not
have been self-inflicted.
Lavoi, who was 17 years old, was
shot while out hunting. At the time
of his death Lavoi was accompanied
by a woman named Chausse, whose
Ijusband was on the other side. Her
story to the authorities claimed thai
Lavoi wns playing with the rifle when
it went off, the bullet lodging in his
chest. This story was accepted by
Coroner Davies in his preliminary investigation last Friday, as when he
got to Port Cologne the body had been
buried and there were no other witnesses to thi> tragedy. Monday he
received a telephone messane from
Sheriff Sloan of Itryson to the effect
that relatives of the dead boy Were
suspicious that he had met with foul
play. He accordingly went to Green
lake and exhumed the body. The department at Quebec has been communicated, with and detyctives will l>e
placed in charge of the cane.
DUTCH   DESERTERS  SUFFER
AT HANDS OF GERMANS
(By Daily News Leased Win.)
ROTTERDAM, Nov. 1.—The. German-'! have established a special camp
for deserters [rom The Netherlands
army. About 7t> Netherlands Koldlerr
are at present Inmates of the camp,
and are suffering the greatest misery. .Most of these deserters are men
who had Ijocn on sentry duty on lhe
front iff and, having participated in
HmuggHng affairs, fled over the border
fur fear of discovery.
SAY DUTCH WAR BUDGET
WILL HAVE TO BE DOUBLED
fBy Daiiy News Leased Wire.)
Till-: HAGUE, Nov. 1.—Much comment has been caused In Holland by
a. speech of the new civilian war minister. Bernard Cornells do Jonge, in
which he said thai, if the country were
to he properly defended after the war,
Hollanders would hav.: to reconcile
themselves tu a war budgol of something like ?.M,u0u..J0O, instead of $12„-
oiio.ooi) as formerly. He is criticized
for the lack of faith in the attainment
of the general reduction of armaments at tho '-nd of Llio war. Critics
argue that, as Holland could never at
the end of the war hope to successfully
resist an attack by ono of her big
neighbors, she must confine herself to
adequate preparation to defend her
neutrality.
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hair health.
Get a small bottle of Knowl ton's
Danderlne from any drug store or toilet counter and provo that your hair
is as pretty and soft as any—that It
has been neglected or Injured by careless treatment. A small trial bottle
will double the beauty of your hair.
HAlffSLFlttT
SUNK DURING WAR
(Continued from Pnge One.)
Tho Scandinavian convoy system had
been   going  on   since   April,   ho  said,
and  thla  was  tho   first  occasion  on
which any  ships  had  been   lost,
Sir Eric announced that. It had been
decided that Vice-Admiral Wtjnyss,
as deputy first sea lord, will give his
whole attention to naval staff matters.
Further additions had been made to
the naval staff with the object of
strengthening its control over operations. ,
"A new section," said'the first lord,
"consists of younger offjeers, who, It
is hoped, will add strength to the valued experience of the older officers.
I look with confidence to the great advantages of this new arrangement."
Method in What Is Done.
Kaleidoscopic change which goes on
in actual warfare, he' said, is continually occurring In the workshops and
shipyards. To the ^uninformed observer it must appear sometimes that
there is no method in the madness oi
thoae who control these matters.
"But," ho said, "I would appeal lo
the country for eonfidencc. There is a
method In what we do.
"The generol situation regarding
submarine warfare can best be demonstrated by tho following figures:
Since tiie beginning of lhe war between 40 and 50 per cent of tho German submarines operating in the North
sea, tho Atlantic and the Arctic oceans
have been sunk. During the last quarter the enemy has lost as many submarines as during the whole of 1016.
"As regards the sinkings of British
merchant tonnage by submarines, tho
German officiol figures for August are
808,000 tons of all nations.
"They sank a little more than one-
third of that amount of Britie-.t tonnage and a little more than half of ail
nationalities.
For September the official figures
are 079,000 tons. They sank far less
than one-third of that amount of British tonnage and less than one-half of
that amount of all nationalities.
"Tho Germans claim that our tonnage Is falling so low that there are
not enough ships on the seas to enable their submarines to maintain their
bag. Let mo give you facts. In April
last, tho heaviest month of British
losses by enemy submarines since the
war began, our trade flowed presumably in satisfactory volume for the
1'ncmy submarines. In September last,
his lowest month of sinkings, our overseas sailings of all shtpa over 1600
tons were 1!0 per cent in number and
30 per cent in tonnage higher than In
April. The enemy must, therefore, find
another and bettor excuse for his kick
of sinkings. I can supply It.
Number Sunk Increases,
"The explanation is that the long
arm of the British navy forced down
Into tho depths and thus the harvest
reaped la poorer and the number ol
German submarines which do not return  is increasing.
"Since April, the highest month for
Uritish losses, they havo steadily decreased, and latterly to a marked degree. September was- the most satisfactory montn; October was only
slightly worse and hotter by 30 per
cent, than other montns since unrestricted submarine warfare began. The
net reduction in tonnage in the last
four months is 30 per cent less than
anticipated in the estimates prepared
for  tho cabinet  early  in July.
"The total nel reduction since the
beginning of the war from all causes
in British tonnage on tho official register in ships over 1600 tons is under
two and a half million tons gross, or
I per cent and that after a period whon
our great armies and their magnificent
equipment received priority and tho
grent growth of our navy was simultaneously achieved to tho detriment
of merchant shipbuilding. Now that
the submarine is for the present doing le.su damage and the resources of
the country are. again being devoted to
a far greater and increasing extent to
iho upbuilding of the merchant marine, 1 look for net results still mure
formidable.
Fewer Ships Sunk.
"Summarized, the submarine warfare amounts to this: our defensive
measures have, during the last seven
months, proved so efficient -hat in
spite of increased number of shipping
through the danger zone, there has
beon a steady reduction in the dumuge
done by the. enemy submarines. In
the meantime, wc aro sinking enemy
submarines to an Increasing extent.
Our offensive measures are improving
and  will continue  to  improve.
"On the other liund, ihe Germans
are building submarines fuslcr than
they havo hitherto dono and Ihey huve
not yet attained their maximum.' It
appears to tne, therefore, that In the
submarine warfare, as elsewhere, it I:
becoming :t test of determination and
ingenuity between the two contending
forces.
"For the present I have coine tu the
conclusion that, submarine warfare Is
going well for us. Tho enemy has
done less damage than ho hoped and
less than we estimated. Ho has done
It with a serious and heavy loss to
himself. At present wo may be justl
fled In feeling that his attack on our
trade is held and Ih being mustered,
and we aro justified in looking to the
future with courago a nd determination, confident that he will fall."
Tho first lord suld It was interesting to recall the position of the German merchant marine, continuing:
"At tho outbreak of the war Germany possessed moro than 5,000,000
tons of shipping. Today nenrly half
of It has been wink or Is In the hands
of ourselves or our allies, She has a
B0 per cent reduction to our 14 por
cent. It is well that tho British public should bo. told what they are up
against. Wo must not consider ourselves alone, but the alliance ns a
wholo."
Economy Needed to Save Tonnage.
He pointed out that while Greot
Britain has -plenty of coal for victory.
Its ally, France, has not, and It was
essential that thero should be the
greatest possible economy In food and
ln all imports In order that tonnage
should be saved so that it may bo dl-v
verted to other vital needs of tho alliance. He declared, "we> rouajk^liW
our plans for a long war.'  I see no'
aigns onts:'being a short, one; a.Vtnffi"
your economy-can help the navies of
the allien defeat the submarine"
Sir Eric-urged Britons to do their
utmost as there were great calls upon
the shipping world;
"Tho huge army of tho Cnitod
States," he said, "is preparing and has
to bo transported and maintained. The
French, Italian and other allies require help. That help can only be
given if the nation is prepared strictly
and rigorously to curtail its needs, develop home resources and conserve its
present   potential  maritime  strength."
It had been asked whether Britain
was building merchant tonnage at a
sufficient rate to replace the sinkings.
It was unsound and inconclusive to
take any one factor of output as
against losses to bo a vital Indication of Great Britain's situation. Britain, he said, was now equipped on a
scale .never dreamed of before,
Will Equal Best Record.
"May the country not justly take
credit for the fact that in 1017, with
our military and munitions effort at
the maximum, and when the call upon
manpower had reduced our available
resources to a minimum," he continued,
"we shall have produced naval and
mercantile tonnage practically equal
to tho beat year record in our history.
And In 191S it will certainly be much
greater."
The speaker expressed confidence
that the skilled workers would stand
by the nation ln carrying out tho great
shipbuilding program, just as they had
done in the munitions and other need;)
of the country.
"For," he added, "they may rest assured that the parliament and the
country will nol. permit any action
calculated to lower the standard of
comfort they have won lor their families and themselves."
123 Per Cent Higher.
Sir Eric said the new national yards
now being built would be ready within
six montliB and continued:
"The output or tho merchant tonnage for th« first nine months of
1917 ia 123 per cent higher than in the
corresponding period last year, and
considerably higher than the total for
the whole of 1915. Standard vessels
had boon ordered representing nearly
1,000,000 gross tons. More than half
of these were -under construction."
According to the first lord there are
now 235 largo drydoeks in the British
isles, where merchantmen can be repaired. He then dealt with the criticisms agnlnst the admiralty.
Convoy System tosses Small.
Referring to the success of tho convoy system in general, he said:
"In September 00 per cent uf the
total vessels sailing tho Atlantic ocean
trades were convoyed and since the
convoy system started the total percentage of losses per convoyed vessel
through the danger zone was one in
two hundred.
'"I wish to acknowledge fully the
valuable contribution made .by the
United States navy in this convoy
work since thoy jo'lned us, under Commander Vice-Admiral Sims, from
whom we havo received the heartiest
cooperation and whoso counsel has
boon of great value to us..
"The;  contribution   of   the    .United
States navy wns given promptly and
freely upon their entry into the con
flict and Is gradually being extended
in tills and other ways.
"As is known, wo have had imoat
valuable conversations with Admiral
Mayo and on the occasion of bis visit
took counsel with him as to the role
the  American  navy  was  to  play."
Defending the navy, the first lord
reviewed its ueeumpHshmenls In this
war, declaring that, unlike tho enemy
forces, its role was an offensive one.
"During a recent month," be continued, "tho mileage steamed by our
battleships, cruisers and destroyers
alone amounted to 1,000,000 ship miles
fn homo waters. In addition to thla.
naval auxiliary forces patrolled more
than 6,000,000 miles In the. same period and territory. The displacement
of the navy is 71 per cent greater
than in Bill, when it was 2,400,000
tons. At tho outbreak of the. war wo
had IS mine sweepers; today there ar
3346. The personnel of the fleet before
the war was 116,000; today it is 390.
000."
HORACE WILCOX DEAD.
(By Dally News Leaned Wire.)
TORONTO, No 1.—Horace S. Wilcox, 56, vice-president and managing
director of tin- North American Chem
leal company, died unexpectedly after
an acute illness of uracmic posonlng of
only a few hours. Mr. Witeox was
once in business in Winipcg.
DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE
WILL   VISIT  WINNIPEG
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA, Nov. 1.—His Excellency
tho Duke of Devonshire, governor-
general of Canada, will arrive in
Winnipeg Deo. S and leave Dec. 10,
staying over Sunday.
GEN. MEWBURN
IS NOMINATED
Named for East Hamilton—Major T.
J. Stewart Chosen by Liberals
for West
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
HAMILTON, Ont., Nov. 1.—Expressing approval of the action of
James Chisholm in withdrawing as
Liberal candidate in East Hamilton in
favor of Major-Gen. Mewburn, a resolution was passed at a meeting of
East Hamilton Liberals tonight. . The
meeting, however, decided not to endorse Gen. Mewburn's candidature at
the present time. At another meeting
Major-Gen. Mewburn was nominated
for East Hamilton and Major T. J,
Stewart for West Hamilton. Tho
meeting was attended by 2500 persona and on the platform were six
Liberals and eight  Conservatives.
SASKATCHEWAN   LAWYERS
TO   SUPPORT   VICTORY   LOAN
Resolution  Passed  Establishing  Code
of Ethics for Members of
Association
MOOSE .TAW, Sask., Nov. 1.—The
Bar association of Saskatchewan tonight pledged its Influence and support to the successful flotation of the
Canadian Victory loan. A resolution
was also passed establishing a code
of ethics for the members of the association, which will como up for final
itpproval at the next meeting. Officers elected were:
President, G. E. Taylor, Moose Jaw;
vice-president, A. M. Mclntyre, Saskatoon; secretary-treasurer, W. A.
Gilchrist,   Saskatoon. ■
Traccy E. Bangs, Grand Forks,
N. D., was the speaker of the evening
it the banquet. Ho responded to the
toast of "The Allies," proposed by Attorney-General Turgeon.
EDMONTON  PASTOR 18
CONVICTED  <fr  SLANDER
Verdict,   However,   Only   for  $1   and
Costs—$23,000 Claimed by Ex*
Alderman Clarke.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
EDMONTON, Alta.. Nov. 1.—In the
slander case of ex-Alderman .loseph
A. Clarke against Rev. B. G. Stewart,
pastor of tho Robertson Presbyterian
church, the jury tonight, after seven
hours' deliberation, brought in a verdict of $1 and costs. The case hus
been In progress for the laat two days'.
Tho words on which tho jury found
the defendant guilty wore: "1 know
men this inoruing in the city who occupy places of prominence that ought
to occupy cells in the penitentiary."
The case, which was for damages of
$23,000, arose over certain statements
alleged to havo been made In a ser
mon by Rev. R. G. Stewart iu Novem
ber, 11)11. The municipal election
campaign was in progress, and the
ministers wero taking an active part
against the McNamara administration,
of whloh Clarke wus ono of the representatives. It was charged that Clarke,
■who wtis chairman of the police commission, was largely •responsible for
conditions Hint prevailed at tho. time.
Stewart's sermon was extensively advertised, and it. was on a report of it
In tho local newspaper that. Clarke
based  his action.
Other remarks, in addition to the
one quoted, were found to have been
justified by the jury.
WANT APPOINTMENT OF
OFFICER CANCELED
Great War Veterans Pass  Resolution
Rpgardinfg Col.  McVean of
Depot   Battalion.
(Uy Duilv News Leased Wire.)
REGINA, Sask., Nov. 1.—Mr. Justice Elwood at the afternoon session
of the Great War Veterans' nssoeiiilon
addressed tho delegates on the work
of the hospital commisalon, particularly the work of reeducating the returned veterans, training thorn to take
their proper place  in civil life.
G. Harmon Jones explained the
methods employed by tbo Saskatcho
wau employment commission in securing work for the returned men.
a result of tho discussion following
tho afternoon addresses, several recommendations will ho made by tho
veterans to tho hospital commission In
the mutter of coordinating the work of
the various departments with uther
bodies looking after returned men.
A resolution introduced by 13. Swain
of Moose Jaw, and seconded by D.
Hart of Swift Current, was passed
unanimously. It asks the cancellation of tho appointment of Lieut.-Col
McVean as officer commanding the
first Saskatchewan depot battalion.
Palpitation of the Heart and
Nerve Tronbles
WERE CURED BY
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When the heart begins to beat, ir
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alarm and tho least oxcitcment or exertion   seems  to affect  it.
Many people are kept in a state of
morbid fear of death, bocomo weak,
worn and miserable through this unnatural action of tho heart.
To all sufferers from heart troubles
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regulating the beat remove all tho distressing conditions and impart vigor
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Mrs. Thomas Davidson, Mount
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troubles and palpitation of tho heart.
I tried several remedies, but without
any good results. My son came in
one day and advised mo to take Mll-
burn's Heart nnd Nervtf Pills. After
using ono and a half boxes, 1 am fully
recovered and am in a perfect stato
of health, thanks to your valuable
medicine."
. :l.'rlce ,M'c a box at all dealers' or
■mjUqfri.ojy,f receipt of price by The -,'I\
Mffijirvn. Co.,. Limited, Toronto, Ont,' ■
D0N7 DIET YOURSELF
TO CURE
DYSPEPSIA
IT ISN'T NECESSARY.
The sufferer from dyspepsia and in
digestion who has to pick and choose
his food, is the most miserable of all
mankind.
Even the little ho does eat causes
such torture, and is dlgoated so imperfectly tha- it does him little good,
What dyspeptics need la not dlotlng
or artificial digestants, but something
that wil! put thoir stomach right so it
will manufacture its own' digestive
forments.
For forty ycarV now Burdock Blood
Bitters has been making weak stomachs strong und curing sevcro cases of
dyspepsia und indigestion that other
remedies were powerless to reach.
It restores the stomach to a normal
healthy condition so thut the food no
longer causes distress, but is thoroughly digested and assimilated and goes
on its way making rich, rod btood.
Mrs. Henry Shaw, Campbollton, n.b.
writes: "I was for five years troubled
with a weak stomach and could not
cat any food-that would agree with me,
I tried different medicines but could
not get cured. A friend advised me to
take Burdock Blood Bitters. I took
four bottles and now I am in perfect
health."
JUJitlS. is manufactured only by The
T,">Mlmurn £o.', Limited, Toronto, Ont.
New Coatings
FOR LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S WEAR
THESE   REPRESENT   THE   LATEST   THE   MARKET   AFFORDS
Flannelette
A   LARGE   ASSORTMENT—STRIPED   AND   WHITE
SOFT   AND   WARM
Prices, Per Yard, 20c, 25c, 30c and 35c.
Cosy Comforters and Wool Blankets
OF EXTRA QUALITY
"NOTHING   CHEAP   ABOUT   THEM   BUT   THE   PRICE"
BE SURE TO SEE THESE TODAY
Our Ready-to-Wear and Millinery
ARE   PROVING   CENTRES   OF   ATTRACTION   IN   THE   STORE
THESE   DAYS
| MAKE   YOUR   MONEY   WORK   FOR   YOU—TEN   PER   CENT 1
I DISCOUNT ON ALL CASH  PURCHASE8 OF $2.00 AND OVER I
Smillie & Weir
LADIES' WEAR   SPECIALISTS
CHNL1Y LIST
{Uy Dully Nows Leused Wiro.)
OTTAWA, Nov. 1—There were eight
western soldiers and officers in the
casualty list issued tonight out of a
total of 35. Two were gassed, one seriously ill and two wounded.
British Columbia casualties are:
ARTILLERY.
GA88ED.
Gunner C. B. Henderson, Victoria.
SERIOUSLY ILL.
Gunner A. S. Cartwright, Victoria.
ENGINEERS.
WOUNDED.
a Sapper  James  Bossley,  Vancouver.
Lieut. W. Raymond, St. John. N. B„
uIho appears on tho list as gassed.
Other casualties arc:
Killed in action—Act. Corp. A. Abides, Winnipeg; T. Dunwoody, Winnipeg; Sapper .1. Harrocks, Sydney, N.
s.; Sapper W. Armstrong, Regina,
SasK.; Gnr. II. Davies, Vancouver; A.
Enderby, Vancouver; C. Hawkins,
Calgary; D. Middleton. Lo Ross, Sask;
Lieut. G. Ewehs. Owen 'Sound. Ont.;
Lieut. J. Beckett, Winnipeg; C.
Wriisht, Winnipeg;: ,15. Hills, Lethbridge, Alta.; Corp. Is. Douglas, Winnipeg.
Died — T. Vaicoc, St. Catherines,
Ont.; .1. Wilson, Windsor, Ont.; D.
Hell. Winnipeg; W. Donaldson, St.
John;  Corp. A. Uorden, Calgary.
Accidentally Killed—Corp. W. Scott,
Edmonton;   Mill Zotuv, Edmonton.
Died of wounds—Corp. G. Luck,
Lethbrldgo; Gnr. B, King, Winnipeg;
.1. Grant, Knglcbart. (int.; E. Belfry,
Toronto; Gnr. P. McKlnnon, Saskatoon; .T. Romanskl, Edmonton: D. Howell. Vancouver; II. Davies. New
Westminster; H. Roche, Lindsay,
Ont.; ,T. Moore, London. Ont.: D. Irwin. , Hunbury, Out.; W. McFal'lano,
Ited Deer, Alts.
Missing—Gnr. R. Leonard, Brant-
fold. Ont.
Prisoner—A. Haley, Fort Francis,
Ont.
Reported killed, now prisoner—R.
Caldwell, Vancouver.
Seriously ill—13. Osland. Winnipeg:
IO. Bertrand, Ottawa: 15. Brown. Winnipeg; G. Sonnet', Calgary; J. Crawford. Everett, ont.; J. Currie, Toronto; S. Main, Montreal; II. Golder, Fort
Fronds; Dvr. A. Huffman. Peterboro.
Gas poisoning—J. Held, Halleybury,
Ont.: .!. Maybcrry, Montreal; C. Player, Stratford, Ont.
Wounded—A. K. White New Westminster; John Nimenko, Calgary;
Benjamin Muir, Winnipeg; Gnr. 'Percy Gregg. Sewell; Robert Cooper,
Thessulon, Out.; F. F. Wallace, Sussex. N. B.; T. T. Shore, Valcartler:
Alfred Arnault. Battleford, Sask.; W.
Inch, Winnipeg; George Nuplsho, Eagle Lake Reserve, Out.; Act. Q. M. S.
R. F. Douglas, New Westminster; F.
W. Boll, Simcoe, Ont.; J. S. Holland,
Toronto; A. W. D. Pledger, Toronto;
Capt! C. B. McGrnth. Lethbridge; R.
T. Petric, Montreal: Bomb, D. R.
Townloy. Toronto; Gnr. T. C. Paxton,
l'ort Dalhousie, Ont.; J. R. Gardlnor,
McAdnm Junction, N. B.; Gnr. S. G.
Kulp, Toronto; Spr. Oscar John Morley. Kirkton, Ont.; Spr. Frederick
Burton. Hamilton; Spr. William Williams, Tllsonburg, Ont.; H, O. Miller, Nortl) Yaklmu, WaBh.; Bert
Jennens, St. Catherines; Sapper Jos
eph Appleby, Nanaimo, B. C; George
McDonald, Sudbury, Ont.; C. V. Norton, Vernon. 11. C; Gilford Convey,
Mcdicino Hat, Alta.; Edward Bclan-
gor, Warren, Ont.; F. W. Stevens,
Brantford, Ont.; W. H. Tomlln, To-
ront; T. E. Ncilunds, Crosswood,
Sask.; Lanoo Corp. C. A. Firman, Nia-
gara-on-tho-luko, Ont.; Frank Clark,
Winnipeg; S. J. Smith, Valcartler: R.
Jobson, Port Credit, Ont.; Edwin Car-
O. Churchill, Winnipeg; Sapper. Bert
Starkoy, Montreal; Supper Robert
Gordon, Nanaimo, B. C; Sapper O. K.
Nason, Victoria; Sapper H. W. Daw,
penter, Benmsvtlle, Ont.; Sapper P.
Vancouver; Sapnor W. H. Williams,
Toronto; Sapper William Pollock,
Vancouvor; James Clark, New Westminster; Lunce Corp. Joseph Robinson Routledgc, Colhorne, Ont.; H. S,
Williamson, Kenora, Ont.: .Joseph
Harold Tooth, Shaunavon; S. C. Williams, Regina; 13. B. Goodwyn, Vancouver; Sappoi; W White. Coleman,
Alta.: 'Sapper I. Burr, Fort FraBer,
B. C; Sergt. Thomas Toon, Halifax;
Gnr. John L.. Kelso, Winnipeg; Corp.
E. G. Clements, Regina, Snsk.; Gnr.
T. E. Armstrong, Toronto; Gnr. T, G.
Norcott, Toronto; Dvr. E. S. Pusbic.
•New Glasgow. N  s.: Thomas Slater,
Fish
Fresh Today
SALMON        HALIBUT
COD
OYSTERS—EASTERN AND
OLYMPIA
AND ALL KINDS OF SMOKED
FISH
t                          —
Don't forget to ask
for
SHAMROCK      BRAND
when ordering
Bacon, Ham,  Butter or
Lard
P. Burns & Co., Ltd.
Phone 32
Montreal; Gnr. W. I!. Shilllngton.
Kingston; Gnr. William Murphy. Cobourg, Cut.; Gnr. A. Fullerton, Hamilton; Gnr. A. R. Manzer. Frederick-
ton, N. B.; Gnr. II. J. Bridget-, Bnn-
nerman, Man.; Dvr. W. G. Barker,
Glenboro, Man.; Gnr, J. Sclullick.
Montreal: Sergt. L. 11. Smith, Regina; A. J. Holmes, Winnipeg; . Andrew Liddle, Edmonton; W. D. Davies, Edmonton; Sorgt, Frank Kendall.
Montreal;   Albert  McMullcii,   tornon,
B. (,'.; Thomas Sclwyn Victoria; Dvr.
Joseph Alcorn. Fredccicton, N. B.;
Gnr. Andrew Mills, Valcartler: Gnr!
S. H. Penny. St. John, N. Ii.; Gnr. J
Rlngrose, Ottawa; Gnr. Arthur Coons.
SI. Catherines. Out.; Gnr. N. M. McLeod, Sydney. C. B.: -Edward Besliara
Sussex, N. B.; John A. Barry, Sussex
N. B.; Sergt. Warren Bears. Winnipeg: Arthur Arrowsmlth Marshall
Susk.;  F. L. Dale, Rapid City; Spr. F
C. Burtlctt, Kamloops, B. C; Suppe:
W. Gun; Spr. A. R. Jones, Winnipeg;
Spr. Pit tarda, Hlllcrost, Alta.: Spr
Walter Lawrence, Edmonton; W. G
Dominoy, Winnipeg.
Nervous Breakdown Avertet
No Appetite, No Energy, Sleepless and
Weak, But Soon Cured by  Dr,
Cassell's Tablets.
Mr. G. S, Inman, 330 Hurcourt atreot
Sturgeon   Creek,   Winnipeg,   says:   "1
was In a very weuli, run down con
dttlon.    I ate little, frequently missed
meals because I ,had no appetite and
suffered it I forced myself to eat. My
nerves were  In a bad way and  my
sleep very disturbed.   Evcrthing point
ed to nervous breakdown.   Thon I got
Dr, Cassell's Tablets and it wan aston
lshlng how my strength came back,
Mr,   luman   is   now   in   England   ns
manager of A. W. Inman & Son, prhv
ters, Leeds.
A free simple of Dr. Casiell'e Tablets
will J>e sent to you on receipt of S cents
for mailing and packing. Address Har
old F. Ritchie A Co., Ltd.! 10 McCeul
8t.f Toronto.
Dr. Cassell's Tablets are the su
prome -romedy for Dyspepsia, Kidney
Trouble, Sleeplessness, Anaemia, Nervous ailments and nerve paralysis and
for Weakness In Children. Specially valuable (or nursing mothers and
during the critical periods of life.
Price 60 cents per tube, six tubes (or
the price of five from druggists and
storekeepers throughout Canada, Don't
waste your money on Imitations; gat
the genuine Dr. Cassell's Tablets.
Proprietors, Or, Cassell's Co., Ltd
Manchester, Eng.
 '036.
m :
FRIDAY,. NOV.,     2, . .1917.
•V«t«,THAR| **!
PRICE Of SILVER AT
|MEW YORKJ 89 3-8
Oustid on  London  Market at 45%—
')       Spelter Dull—Lead at New
York 6.60.
ji    (By Daily News Leased Wire.)
;.;;NEW YORK, Nov. 1.—Silver, 89%;
London 45%. ,
|Spelter dull; East St, Louis delivery,
1^60 to 7.76. At London, holiday.
kvead: St Louis, 5.42%; New York,
' SCO; Montreal, 6.84; London, .630' 10s.
Average for October New York, fi.84;
Montreal, 8.39.
UTICA SUFFERS
SEVERE SETBACK
price Shows Drop of V/z al'Spokane—
Rambler also Down—Star Gains
Fractionally.
■a, Utica suffered a severe setback on
the Spokane market  yesterday when
lithe price fell l>j. to 13.   Rambler was
' also down, giving way 14 to 8.   Slocan
Star showed a fractional Improvement,
K helng quoted at 2%.       • -•     -
Spokane Closing Quotations.
(Reported by SL Dents & Lawrence.)
Bid    Asked
I Cork-Province    ? .02      $.02%
1 ftambler   08 .08%
(Slocan Star   ..02%       .03%
ICUtlca      .13 .18
'Caledonia    ■...    .50- .5.r»
New York Curb Closing,
Bid    Asked
LCanada Copper   $1.6211   R87H
j Ray Hercules  :.. 3.00        3.12ft
'Standard    37%     - .42'i
jUtica   14 .10
New York Exchange.
High    Low   Close
JC. P. R 134%    132%    133%
JNjChino 1   41 38%      38%
|o,'Qranby     70        08%     68%
"'inspiration   42%     40%     40%
JPjMlami     28 27 27
Mulmi sold cx-dlvldond $1..",0.
; Sales: C. P. R., 21,700; Chino, 3800;
jGranby,     COO;      Inspiration,     17,600;
JlMiami, 2300.
il
IONTARIO GETS BIG SUM
FROM NICKEL CORPORATION
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
TORONTO, Nov. L—Ontario has rc-
Jeelved the substantial first fruits of
jiho vigorous agitation in the provin-
i,clal legislature last- scsntoa eonecrn-
,ling tho taxation of the nickel corporation. The province has Just received
fa check for the sum of $1,366,892 from
1- lhe Canadian Copper company, being
its taxes under the legislation of last
session on the profits of the past two
years. .
?NEW COALFIELDS TO BE
.      DEVELOPED IN ENGLAND
(By Daily'News Leased Wire.)
LONDON,   Nov.  1.—After  14  years
!df preliminary work costing over $2,
000,000,   coal   mining  operations    are
iilbout to begin on a deposit of coal at
Keresley, England.   The output is ex
'pected  to reach  more  than  1,000,000
tons a year and to last 80 years,
DODDS ■''',
?KIDNEY;
k PILLS 4
Standard Furniture
=Company=
a J. CARLSON, Undertaker,
Undertakers,    Embalmore   and
Funeral Directors.
The finest and most up to date
undertaking parlors and chapel in
interior of B. C.. Lady attendant for
women and children,
Day Phone 81,
Night Phone 282 and 64.
MARKET CONVULSED
NUN
Extreme Recessions of 3 to 10 Points'
Made— U. 3. Steel Shows  Drop   "
of T/z.
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
NEW YORK, isov. 1.—The stock
market was in the throes of another
convulsion today, liquidation • encompassing the entire list at extreme recessions of 3 to io points. Lowest
prices were made in the final hour, no
support being: offered even at marked
concessions.
Selling was of a wider and more urgent character and was frequently accelerated by bear drives. Recent efforts of officials of the exchange to
minimize or restrict such speculative
operations culminated In official action by the exchange requiring members to report their borrowings of
stock to the committee on business
conditions. No new factors presented
themselves, but the discouragenifent
created by recent developments was
increased by predictions that war taxes
are likely to become more onerous.
Financial statements issued during the
day by various industrial corporations
uore pertinently upon the government's
policy of taxation. (
.In keeping with all active marketH
the greater, part of today's upheaval
centered around United States Steel.
That stock was offered to the extent
of 500,000 shares or more than S3 per
cent of the whole, at an extreme decline of V& points. Rails were liquidated in greater quantity, many investment issues of that group, notably the
Pacifies and coalers, declining 2 to 5
points, where tney registered new low
records.
Sales.amounted to 1,400,000 shares,
tho largest single session since the inception of the decline.
Increased weakness was shown by
bonds of al! grades, especially 'internationals. Liberty 4s were inactive at
par and the 3'yfcs and fluctuated between 09.74 and 99.34, Total sales,
$5,040,000.
Closing Prioes.
American Smelting   75%
Anaconda   55%
C. P. R.   133%
U. S. Steel    93%
U.  S,  Steel preferred    111%
Utah   78%
Nickel     24%
WANTS U. S. RAILWAYS TO
GET FREIGHT ADVANCES ASKED
New   York, Chamber   of   Commerce
Takes Action—Heavy Slump in
      Stock Values.
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
NEW YORK, Nov. 1.—The New
York chamber of commerce, after hearing Banker James Speyer state that
railroad stocks on the New York exchange depreciated in value $1,400,-
000,000 between Jan. 1 and Octo. 1 last
and that of 18 railroad stocks selling
above par when the war broke out
only eight had survived shrinkage below that mark, adopted a resolution
urging the interstate commerce commission to grant tne roads the freight
advances they nsk for. The resolution
recommended that the advances be
"commensurated with increased cost
of transportation and of capital, as already shown, as well as with further
increased costs, which are clearly ln
prospect"
Mr. Speyer declared that depreciation
of values and increasing wages and
cost of material could eventually lead
but to insolvency.
600 CORD8
Wood.
Wanted
Quote your best prico f. o. b.
your station.
West Transfer  Co.
P. O. Box 116
Phone 33
MINIMUM   STOCK   PRICES
WILL ASSIST WAR LOAN
Evidence of This Accumulates on Toronto  Market—Transactions   in
Bonds Increase.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
TORONTO, Nov. 1.—Evidence accumulates that the adoption of minimum
prices on the Canadian, exchange will,
instead of proving detrimental to coming war loan, actually contributed to
its success.
Tho speculation element is now entirely lacking in Toronto exchange
transactions and the proportion of
dealing in war bonds to the total of
the daily turnover shows a big Increase. Local brokers hold the opinion
that, when the fourth war loan is subscribed and makes its appearanco on
the exchange it will share an active
market with tho three earlier issues.
In tho wide open break in the New
Yonc market Wednesday those Toronto brokers (who had entertained
doubts as' to the wisdom of the course
taken by the exchange committee were
more Impressed with the workings bf
tho premium system. There were no
sales of Canadian Pacific but the closing bid was 132%. In war loans the
activity was confined to the second
issue, which accounted for $28,500 of
the total turnover of $35,500 in war
bonds. Tho first and third issues were
not dealt in at all in the afternoon
session.
BANK OF ENGLAND'S
WEEKLY 8TATEMENT
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Nov. 1.—The weekly
statement of tho Bank of, England
shows  the   following  changes:
Total reserve, decreased ' £!.05,t)00
circulation Increased, £791,000; bullion Increasod £846,365; other securities increased, £2,178,000; public do-
posits increasod, £3,789,000; other de
posits decreased £87.7,000; notes reserve'decreased £209,000; -government
securities increased £78,000;
The proportion of the bank's reserve
to liabilities this, week is,. 19.30 per
cent., as against 19.70' per cent, last
week.      v
Bank rate, S per cent
BANK CLEARINGS FOR
CHIEF CANADIAN CITIES
„(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
WINNIPEG, Nov. 1.—The following
are tho bank clearings of the principal
cities of the Dominion for the week
ending today as compared with tho
corresponding week last year:
1917. 1916.
Montreal    $90,300,887   $86,774,279
Toronto     64,026,091     61,433,599
Winnipeg   78,580,254     57,185,238
Vancouver        9,301,402       7,033^394
Ottawa ..     5,457,199       6,058,091
Calgary     10,449,418       0,115,1*9
Hamilton        4,583,550       4,477,204
QueW ...'.,.;;..      3,488,408
Edmonton        3,766,961       2,734,345
Halifax .:     2,856,309       2,720,280
London        2,173,143       2,052,572
Regina         3,826,886
St. John        1,748,99].       1.64M3G
Victoria         1,410,616
Saskatoon        2,568,428       1,968,028
Moose- Jaw  ...    1,926,(380       1,682,599
Brandon'    ■;,      952,826 718,093
Brantford  ......       808,035 646,850
Fort William  688,518
Lethbridge,  ....    1,132,733. 064,143
Medicine. Hat ..      632,983 671,884
N. Westminster.      423,517 301,695
U. S. BANS CORN EXPORTS
EXCEPT IN SPECIAL CASES
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 1.—The war
trade board tonight issued an order
prohibiting the export of corn except
in special cases where evidence of
the necessity of .exporting has been
submitted,
"This is due to tiie lato arrival of
the new corn harvest," said the board's
announcement, "and exporters have
been warned not to make any shipments unless licenses for export previously have been secured."
MOST  STOCKS  SOLD  AT
MONTREAL  AT  MINIMUM
Belief General Props Had Been Placed
Under    Market   Values    Before
Wajl Street Slump.
'   (By Dally News Leased Wire.)
MONTREAL,.-Nov. 1.—There was a
moderate amount of shifting about of
stock at the minimum prices here today, the business continuing largely
one of adjustment in speculative accounts. Of price fluctuations thero
were virtually none, except in the case
of small lots, tn which buyers in some
cases had to pay fractionally higher
prices than the mlnlmums. For the
rest the changes were confined largely
to movements out of the minimum
class to the extent that there would be
buyers at the minimum* and no sellers and relapses back into a position
of offerings al the minimum and no
buyers. In view of the acute weakness
of New York in the afternoon there
were only rare exceptions where stocks
were not to be.had at the minimum.
The main feature on the stock exchange was the general belief that
props had been placed under the market values before this latest and most
violent slump in New York occurred.
Even in quarters where the minimum
plan ,hud been meeting opposition
there was acknowledgment .that even
very substantial bank support would
hardly have saved the Canadian
list from a violent break and detrimentally influenced the coming war loan
campaign. If there was some blundering in establishing the order of affairs
on Tuesday, at, least tho blunders hud
landed the market into a situation satisfactory to the general financial position. Dominion Iron was the stock
most in demand at the minimum quotations, about 400 shares changing
hands at 52. There were offerings at
that price against 52 bid on Wednesday when the market closed.
Union Bank shares closed 137 bid
against the 136 minimum.
Tho second war loan, firm at 95%
was the most active bond.
Total business for the . day, 1174
shares, $54,100 bonds and 450 unlisted
shares.
SHAWINIGAN AUTHORIZED TO
ISSUE ADDITIONAL STOCK
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
MONTREAL, Nov. 1.—Shareholders
of the Shawlnlgan Water and Power
company, as a special meeting hero
today, gave the directors authority to
issue $5,000,000 additional stock, when
deemed advisable. The outstanding
capital is $15,000,000, but the company
has power by its chnrter to Ibbuo $20,-
000,000.
The president explained that it was
not tho intention to placo any of tho
new stock on the market at present,
PROVISIONS SOAR
ON CHICAGO MARKET
Net   Advance   of   30   Cents1 Scored—
Corn Prioes Average Lower-
Oats Higher,  ..
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
CHICAGO, 111., Nov. l.-Corn prices
averaged lower today largely \*>n account of sympathy with weakness in
the New York market. The close was
unsettled at $1.17% for December aud
$1.13H for May, % cent down. Gats
gained %' to %. Provisions scored a
net advance of 30 cents to $1.47^.
Although Wall street depression
formed the chief bearish element ln
the corn market,, weather conditions
likely to promote the movement of new
grain tended also to pull down values.
British crop estimates from a leading
authority indicated that the 1917 yield
per acre was % ot a bushel more than
had been predicted on Oct. 1. Trade,1
however, was the smallest that has
been seen for a long time, and when
shorts tried to cover on a moderate
scale in the last half of tho session
a gradual recovery set in.' Smallness
of current receipts acted a's a noticeable handicap for the bears.
Firmness in the oat market was due
to the fact that arrivals hero continued
meagre.
Big advances in the cost, of hogs
carried provisions sharply upgrade.
Washington advices emphasizing the
scarcity of the hog supply stimulated
demand, especially for pork.
and watered, the bulk of sales being
made at top prices.
Winnipeg.
WINNIPEG, Nov. :1,—Receipts of
livestock at the Union stockyards on
Thursday were estimated at 3500 cattle
and 1000 hogs. While the conditions
of the yards are somewhat disorganized, trading and prices are holding
fairly steady on good quality butcher
cattle, steers that had lots of fat selling at steady prices, but female stuff
was off except for number one quality.
Bulls and oxen were steady. Stockers
and feeders are in good demand for1
choice breedy stuff. The receipts of
hogs' were liberal, prices advancing to,
15 for selects.
GRAIN   MARKET.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
WINNIPEG,, Nov.' l.—Cash wheat:
•Xo. 1 Northern, $2.21; No. 2, Northern,
$2.18; No. 3 Northern, $2.08; No. 4
Northern, $1.9-6; No. 5, $1.94; No. 6,
$1.87;   feed,  $1.80.'
Oats: May, 67; November, 67^; December, 64%.
Plax:     May,     $2.87%;     November,
$3.04%;   December,   $2.87>4.
BUTTER MARKET WEAK.
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
MONTREAL, Nov. 1—Butter weak.
Cheese firm. Eggs in good demand at
steady prices.
Cheese: kFinest westerns and easterns, 21%,
Butter: Choicest creamery, 43% to
44;  seconds, 42% to 43.
Eggs: Fresh, 53 to 5T»; selected, 46
to 47; No. i stock, 42 to 43; No. 2
stock, 39 to 40.
Pork: Heavy Canada short mess, 52
to 53; Canada short cut back, 50 to 51.
LIVESTOCK MARKETS.
I By Daily News Leased Wire.)
CHICAGO, Ul.,1 Nov. 1.—Cattle: Receipts, 16,000; weak. Beeves, 6.76 to
17.50; western.. sieers, -8.20 to 18.70;
stockers and feeders, 6.10 to 11.50; cows
and heifers, 5 to 12.15; calves, 8 to
14.75.
Hogs: Receipts, 15,000; strong. Light,
15.65 to 17; mixed, 16.15 to 17.35;
heavy, 16.10 to 17.30; rough, 16.10 to
16.35; pigs, 12.25 to 15.25;, bulk, 16.60
to 17.20.
Sheep:  Receipts, 14,000; steady. No-
tive Iambs, 12.50 to 17.25.        „
Toronto.
TORONTO, Nov. 1. — Fifty-seven
cars arrived here today comprising
507 cattte, 49 calves, 1669 hogs and
1183 sheep and lambs,
There was a good active demand for
practically , all lines of food. There
was a cleanup of butcher cattle, cows
and canners being especially strong.
Calves wore firm to strong and sheep
and lambs firm.
Hogs hetd firm at 16,50 to 16.75, fed
SHIPPERS TO LOAD
CARS TO CAPACITY
Railways   Association    Will    Prevent
Wastage and also Undue Delays
at Sidings.'
WINNIPEG, Nov. 1.—One of the
least known but most serious forms of
waste in Canada Is to be attacKed by
the Canadian Railway Association for
National Defense, according to a statement issued today. The underloading
of freight cars and the unnecessary
holding of such cars on sidings are to
be made subjects of a special edua-
tional campaign.
Committees have been oppointed in
each province to take up these questions with all shippers. "Cars are
habitually underloaded," said one of
the members of the committee of the
Canadian Railway association today.
"T venture to believe that If every shipper made the most of the space in his
car we should have probably 25 per
cent more cars available for service.
Thousands and thousands of cars make
their ,lpng Journeys .ran? point to
point in Canada with only two-thirds
or three-quarters of their proper load,
Thousands of tons of freight are thus
delayed and the whole business of the
country slowed up just that much."
Hatton   Elected   Chairman.
At a meeting held today by the administrative committee, Arthur Hat-
ton was elected chairman, of the car
service commission of the Canadian
Railways Association for National Defense.
The recovery for Canadian shippers of over 20,000 "lost" Canadian
freight cars, a train over 150 miles of
rolling stock, ts to be onej of the first
pieces of work undertaken by the Canadian railways acting today for the
first time In, history as a single organization. Seven men representing
the railways of Canada met this morn
ing in the Eastern Townships building,
Montreal, ln the new offices of the
Canadian Railway Association for National Defense and decided that 10 pet-
cent of the 211,900 Canadian freight
ears It: altogether too much to be allowed out of the country In such times
of shortage. It was pointed out at
the meeting mat, whereas, there is of
ooiirse, a constant exchange "of freight
cars between American and Canadian
roads, the surplus of Canadian rolling
stock in the hands of American rail-
A. D. INASH
MINING ENGINEER
Consultation, Exploration, Develop
ment, Reports.
Room 1, Royal Bank Bldg., Nelson.
STOCKS
We can handle promptly your buying
and selling .orders on all exchanges. See
our board for dally quotations.
ST DENIS & LAWRENCE
Phone 39      509 Ward St.       Box 1102
NELSON,   B.  C.
The Consolidated Mining & Smelting Co.
of Canada, Limited
Offices, ;Smeltlni and Refining Department .
TRAIL, BRITISH COLUMBIA
SHELTERS AND REFINERS
Purchasers of Gold, Silver, Copper, lead and Zinc Ores
TADANAC BRAND PIQ LEAD. BLUESTONE AND SPELTER
"Does the work cheaper, better
is what W. H. Heidemari writes. "A ton of ordinary dynamite had been used with very poor results," he said, "and
finally I got Giant Stumping Powder to test out. It
gave entire satisfaction and did the best all-around work.".
Hundreds of land dealers in every
part of British Columbia always tell
their dealers or institutes to order
Giant Stumping Powder for them.
They have found that Giant, being
made especially for use in this section,
always gives better results than powders made to meet general conditions.
Get our stamp book free
It contains many illustrations showing
you how to save explosives in loading
stumps. It explains how you can get
the stumps out cleaner and easier with
Giant Stumping Powder. It also tells
how to do other kinds of farm work
with explosives. Mail the coupon and
this valuable book will be sent free.
ANaSTUMPINGPOWDER
Free Book
Coupon
GIANT POWDER CO. Ltd.
Vancouver, B.IC
Send me your book, " better Firminr. with
Giant Stumplne Powder." I am i me retted in
tbe lublrcU which 1 have marked X:
STUMP BLASTING
BOULDER BLASTING
ROAD MAKING
TREE BEDBLASTING
DITCH BLASTING
MINING - QUARRYING
ways, over and above ..ne number ot
American cars In Canada, amounts to
more than 20,000, more than enough to
relievo any present car shortage in
Canada at present. The Canadian
Railway Association for National Defense will ask either for the return
of the Canadian cars or for an equal
number of American cars and, if necessary, a committee will be sent to
Washington to arrange that such a
condition may not again grow up
GREEK ARMY TO BE LED
BY FRENCH OFFICERS
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 1.—The Greek
army will go under French command
with Gen. Braquet, chief of staff, and
200 French officors instructors, Athens despatches say. Mobiligation is
proceeding smoothly  and  rapidly.
PROVINCE WILL INVEST
HEAVILY IN VICTORY LOAM
VICTORIA, B. C, Nov. 1.—Hon.
John Hart, minister of finance, announces that the province will he a
substantial subscriber to the coming
federal loan, but the amount has riot
yet been determined. In previous
loans British Columbia has invested
$500,000. Arrangements will be mado
on this occasion whereby civil servants
can subscribe on the instalment basis.
People read the
classified columns
THAT'S   WHY    IT   WOULD    BE    PROFITABLE    FOR   YOU   TO
ADVERTISE   IN   THEM
If you Want a job.
If you want to hire somebody.
If you want to sell something.
If you want to buy something.
If y<>u want to rent your house.
If you want to sell your house.
If you want to sell your farm.
If you want to buy property.
If there is anything that you want, the quickest and best
way to supply that want is by placing an advertisement in
this paper.
THE   RESULTS   WILL    SURPRISE    AND    PLEASE   YOU—THE
COST   IS  TRIFLING
One cent a word each Insertion; six consecutive insertions, 4 cents a
word; 26 insertions, 15 cents a word.   Minimum charge, 25 cents.
THE TRUE MILITARY ODIHll
MILITARY SET
WITH MIRROR
$599.
WEIGHS 5>iOZS
V+INCH THICK
WHEN CLOSED
SHARPENS ITS OWN BLADES
AUTOMATICALLY
£**^  tne.   -Aid
——   }Qp-   atuf^t
YOU ARE REMINDED THAT IT IS ADVISABLE TO ATTEND TO YOUR
OVERSEAS CHRISTMAS PARCELS   BEFORE NOV. 15™
OBTAINABLE   AX   ALL   STORES
 ■»■■»■
W\.  PAQE'FWB    ^
THE DAILY NEW&
FRIDAY,      NOV       ?;     1S17.
THE DAILV NEWS
Published   every   morning-   except
Sunday by The News Publishing Com-
pany, Limited, Nelson, B. C, Canada.
ROBB SUTHERLAND,
General Manager.
Sualness letters should be addressed
and checks and money orders made
payable to the News Publishing Company, Limited, and ln no case to Individual members of the staff.
Advertising rate cards and sworn
detailed statements of circulation
mailed on request, or may be seen at
the office of any advertising agency
recognized by the Canadian Press
Association.
Subscription Rates—By mall 50 cents
per month, $2.50 for six months, $5.00
per year. Delivered: 60 cents per
month, $3.00 for six months, $6.00 per
rear, payable in advance.
FRIDAY,      NOV.
1917.
A     NEW     ERA     IN     CANADIAN
'■""" PUBLIC    LIFE
Tho manner in which the spirit of
genuine Unionism is spreading
through Canada is one of the most
gratifying developments that have
taken place In the Dominion since the
war began. It has brought about a
new era in Canadian public life.
Domestic politics are being subordinated to the supreme purpose of winning the war; political prejudices are
being wiped out.
In one constituency one sees liberals getting in wholeheartedly in
support of a Unionist Conservative.
In another riding one sees the Conservatives lining up solid behind a
Liberal sitting member who has voted
for selective draft and supported the
formation of a union government.
One sees the same thing throughout
the country and it illustrates the.
strength of the desire of the people of
Canada that vigorous prosecution of
the war should at this time tako
precedence of all other questions.
WELCOME TO THE  UNIONIST
DELEGATES.
Nelson today welcomes the delegates to the Unionist nominating convention and the citizens will join in
the expression of the hope that they
will find their visit an enjoynble one.
The occasion, the gathering together
of so many men and women who.have
united on t.ie great question of the
war and the necessity of supporting
the Unionist government candidate, in
order that West Kooten;iy shall back
' up the cabinet in its determination to
wage vigorous warfare against Germany, vis st-n^able pne. ,     *    --■■:,,      .
Th.e delegates have been selected by
non-partisan Win-the-War leagues, by
Unionist meetings open to Unionists
of all former shades of political opinion and by the Great War A'eterans'
association. Among them are representatives of Unionists who were formerly Conservatives, Unionists "Who
were formerly Liberals and Unionists
who hove been known as independents.
A   FEW   REASONS   FOR   BUYING
WAR   BONDS
Patriotism asks the Canadian
people to invest all they can in the
Victory war loan. Investment considerations also make strong appeal.
The man or woman who invests in
the Canadian war loan will receive interest at the rate ol approximately
5% per cent per annum. Bonds giving as high a return, which are as
quickly negotiable, and which are
equally sound are not often offered to
the general public.
And of great importance from the
standpoint of the Individual is the
benefit that everyone gains through
the possession of safe interest-bearing investments. Nothing causes
people to save like the possession of
savings. Few things strengthen the
position of a man and give him more
confidence in himself than the knowledge that he has to hi.'! credit a few
hundred or a thousand dollars upon
which •■ he can draw at any time that
he is in need.
a soldier.   But the disguise is a pretty
poor ono. ,
Great Britain sometimes acts slowly, but when action is taken it Is
generally pretty effective. The success of the defensive measures adopted against aircraft'is a case in point.
It does not seem to make much difference whether the United States declares war on Austria or not It Is
fighting Austria anyway.
Both Conservatives and Liberals are
overcoming political prejudices as a
result of the war and the formation in
Canada of a Unionist government.
Liberal members like W. A. Buchanan
and James Douglas, who supported selective draft and the formation of a
Union government are not being opposed by Conservatives. Thore would
be no justification tor opposing them.
Under the same principle Conservative-Unionist members arc not being
opposed by Liberal-Unionists, although Laurier men have been nominated in a number of constituencies
east of the Rockies where the Liberal-
Unionists are supporting the former
Conservative member. Effective support for the Union government could
not be obtained In any other way.
| WHAT THE PRESS IS 8AYING |
Impersonation
It is said to be the death penalty in
Germany to impersonate an army officer, but so far the Crown Prince
bits escaped.—Washington Post.
Sky* Rocketing
The suspense of watching for bread
and coal prices to fall gets more and
more thrilling.—Charleston Evening
Post.
The Breaks and Bulges
The man who in Stock Exchange
gambling indulges should buy on the
breaks and sell out on the bulges,
but be sure that you do not make any
mistakes as to which are tho bulges
and which are the breaks.—Engineering and Mining Journal.
Yale Men and the War
Yale opened its 21Bth academic year
on Thursday, September 26, with its
registration cut toy war conditions
from 3300 to 2000 or slightly more than
one-third.—McGilt Daily.
A Considerate Correspondent
There is ;i warm spot in our hearts
for tho man who wrote to say lhat
he had written a letter dealing at
great length with the political situation and had then torn It up because
be sympathized with ihe editors.-—
Toronto Globe,
cold Storage
One. of the good stories in circulation Is told by Joe; Tumulty, secretary
to President Wilson. He likes bis job,
but be dislikes one thing about it;
that he can't tell the boys—the friendly reporters—about} all they wish to
know. He illustrated his inability to
give information once by quoting the
case of Johnny.
Johnny was crying in the hall as
his mother came along, hatted and
coated.  She asked what had happened.
"You are going away; and so is
papa!"  Johnny sobbed.
"VVhy, child, 1 shall be away two
or three days, but father is not going
away!"
"Yes, be is!" cried Johnny. "He's
going to Homo."
"Rome? What do you mean, dear?"
asked the surprised mother.
"He said today to Mr. Brown that
he would make 'Home bowl when you
left!"
"Indeed! Well, dear, I shan't leave
you now."
NORWAY  MOVING TOWARD  WAR
WITH GERMANY.
Norway has not declared war, but
it has taken action which leads in that
direction After 'having repeatedly
warned Germany that it would not remain quiescent If U-boats continued
to sink Norse ships and murder Norse
seamen it has now announced thn.t in
future its ships will be convoyed by
warships of the enemies of Germany.
In principle this step Is equivalent
to1 arming Norwegian ships. The only
difference is that of method. Instead
of placing guns on Norse ships and
using them to attack submarines, the
weapons will be on board ships accompanying the Norwegians.
IH future, when a U-boat sights a
fleet of Norwegian vessels It will know
that it has to face a hattle and probable destruction.
|                THE WEATHER
1
Mln.
30
Mux.
41
     34
66
    ;is
54
    •>%
66
Prince Albert	
....    20
     21
46
46
....    20
61
Medicine  lint   ....
....    30
     24
64
46
2S
     26
36
36
40
     28
42
40
48
     30
40
50
r>4
The Victory loan needs your savings.
The entente cause demands that
every man will do his duty by investing in the Victory war loan. .
Canada- can't wage war without
money, Toiir savings are needed for
the Viotory'loan.
' Someone arises to observe that ..the
German crown prince is disguised as
NORWAY AGAIN  PROTESTS
SINKING OF STEAMERS
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Nov. 1.—Norway again
has protested to Germany against the
sinking of the Norwegian steamers,
saying these acts have made a deep
impression upon the Norwegian peopje.
BACK   TALK   PERMISSIBLE
<5> : <=?>
The right of the telephone subscriber to "talk back" to a telephone operator, In case of poor service, has been
upheld by a ruling of the Public Service Commission of Missouri, This is
a right that never should have been
questioned, in Missouri, or anywhere
else. There is nothing so sacred .about
the telephone that lt cannot properly
be held to the proper discharge of its
functions, arid to the proper fulfillment of its contracts. Of course, protests over the wire should be couched
in language'such as Is deemed legitimate when people arc talking face to
face, but that is all the manager or
operator'of a poor telephone service
has a right to expect. There must
sometimes be "back talk," If corporate imposition Is not to be licensed.—
Christian Science Monitor.
PEACE  CASUALTIES
Figures from the war in Europe
show thnt 6 per cent of tbe men engaged in the artillery aro killed; that
15 per cent of those engaged in infantry are killed.
Recent figures also show that 35
per cent of the babies born in tbe
most congested district of Chicago die
before they aro a year old.
All of which moans that it is better
to be a soldier in war than a baby
born In the congested district of Chicago. This condition is due lo high
and privately appropriated land
values.—The Ground Hog.
<sx_
|    IN ANOTHER  FORTY YEARS   |
$ $
Only -10 years ago the telephone
was spoken of in tho Kansas City
Times as "the marvelous now invention." In the exposition held thore
in September, 1877, a. telephone wnh
displayed in Ait ball, and that was
the first time Kansas City had seen
one. Only 10 years since the telephone
was invented; now they talk through
a wire from Boston to San Francisco; and even the wire is beginning
to be obsolete, for they are communf-
cating without, wires across the ocean.
Forty years from today thero. may appear an item from tho papers of li)17
telling of the efforts to get enough
gas to cook with, and electric Hunt,
at a decent price, and some commentator of that day may say: In this
day of radio light and heat free ns air
to all it Is almost impossible to realize that only; 40 years ago people
were dependent upon gas pumped
through pipes underground; and upon
coal; and the streets were disfigured
with poles and wires for .'onducting
electric  current.—-Kansas City  Times.
THEIRS 18 THE SACRIFICE
Theirs is. the sacrifice, theirs the
service no homo support, however
swift and generous, can match. Sailor
and soldier, volunteer and selected
man, doctor and nurse and stretcher-
bearer, they aro going out to. such
vigils and sufferings; of cold and exposure and such' horrors of combat
as imagination balks to paint. They
are rlBk!ng: their lives with a song.
They risk the tortures by which German ideals of might-made right have
transcended tho stake-fires of the
Sioux. They see the splendor of the
autumn, and daro a lifetime hi blindness. They glory in their strength,
nnd go to meet the agonies of poison
gns, or maiming worse than death.—
Now   Vork World.
GERMAN ESPIONAGE
There was, apparently, no place
where the German spy was not in
JD14-15, and tho world was asked, by
the admirers of German efficiency, to
stand at respectful .'.Unit ion and be
properly amazed.
But, on the whole, German espionage has been characterized by clumsiness and stupidity. lis operations
have been detected, exposed and rendered ridiculous by the secret service
of a country that has never had any
particular respect for espionage, and
that has less respect than ever lor It
today. There Is not a single instance,
in which the protective secret service
of the United States has beon called
on to contend with the aggressive
German espionage system, whero the
latter, with all its p.'-Monsions to efficiency, has not, if wo may 'borrow
a phrase from Colonel Roosevelt, been
"beaten to a frazzle."—Christian Science Monitor.
A WAR OF COMMUNICATIONS
Our English habit of regarding the
Intellectual problems of thu war in
terms of morality or of law Is incorrigible and It has made us miss the
military logic of the L'-hoat campaign
and the air raids completely. They
are the attempts of Germany, baffled
as we are baffled by the difficulties
of frontal attack, to find the alternatives. The way around by the sea
is barred to them even more decisively than it Is to us. The only ways
left aro the way under, which is the
U-boat campaign, and the way over,
which is the air raids. Since their
failures in frontal attack came before
ours, it was natural that they should
Jiave hit on the alternatives before we
did. What they have done is to substitute  for  the  war  of  positions,   in
which thoy saw that the attack was
at a great disadvantage, the war, of
communications, In which the advantage Is on the wholo on the side
of thu attack. Wo have to do the
same. If the advantage of making
this change In the character of the
war seemed to Germany so great that
sho was prepared to affront tho whole
civilized world and even to Incur the
hostility of America, how much moro
keen ought we to be on making the
change when we can make it without
violating the law of nations and without running tho risk of making a
single new enemy?
Perhaps -this..argument is breaking
through a door that is already open
ia the United States, but It is not
open here as the events in the air
this year have proved. Superiority
in the types of aeroplanes can never
permanently belong to either side, for
it is always possible to produce a
few machines that are better than
the masses of the enemy's force. But
what is disturbing Is the evidence
that tho enemy is thinking out the
development of air tactics faster than
we are; the. Inst raid on London, for
example, owed its success almbst entirely to tho tactical formation of the
enemy. Evidently tho development
of our air service Is merely following
that of our military and naval tactical
ideas, which Is almost stationary. But
if we are to change a war of position
to a war of communications—and on
this change depends our chance of
victory next year—the air service
must lead, not follow, in the development of tactics. In other wordH, there
should be a separate ministry of the
air equal in status to. the ministeries
of war and the riovy. For the rest
we have to make a compromise between having the enormous numbers
which are necessary tif we ar© to
secure preponderance ln the air and
having perfect types of aeroplanes. It
Is not an easy compromise, tout, on
the other hand, three months' supremacy, if only It is sufficiently pronounced, should be enough to bring
about a change that we desire. In
a sentence, what wo want is to forco
the enemy lo retreat by cutting his
communications,—Henry Sldebotham
in the New Republic.
While asleep in the G. T. R, station
at Brantford, Thomas Hughes, a returned soldier, of Winnipeg, was robbed of $179, his discharge papers and
his overseas button.
Geo. Blake, of Oklahoma City, 73
years of age, and a veteran of the
Civil War, has been enlisted as chlei
musician of the 38th Infantry Division.
Hunting Clothing
NOW   IS   THE   TIME   TO   BUY   YOUR    HUNTING   CLOTHING
WE  HAVE A FULL AS ORTMENT, CONSISTING OF:
Hats    Coats    Vests    Pants
TEN   PER  CENT   DISCOUNT  TO  CLEAR
We Also Have a Full Assortment of
RIFLES,  SHOT   GUNS  AND  AMMUNITION
PRICES   RIGHT—BUY   EARLY
Nelson Hardware Co.
BAKER   STREET
NEL80N, B. C.
John Burns & Sons ^BS"1
SASH AND DOOR FACTORY. NELSON PLANING MILLS.
VERNON, STREET, NELSON, B. C.
Every Description of Building Material Kept in Steok
Estimates Given on Stone, Brick, Conorete and Frame Buildings,
MAIL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
P  O. BOX 184 PHONE 17f
DATE SET FOR SESSION
OF CONSERVATION BOARD
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA, Nov.  1.—The ninth  annual  meeting  of  tho  commission   of
conservation  will  bo  held  here  Nov.
27-28. .
NONPARTIZAN8 WIN  AT
ELECTIONS IN RUSSIA
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
PETROGRAD, Nov. 1.—Tho nonpartisan and Conservative-Socialist
groups have won sweeping victories
in the municipal elections in most of
the cities of Russia, according to returns tonight.
COAST OFFICERS AMONG
PARTY BACK FROM WAR
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
WINNIPEG, Nov. 1.—Among a party
of. officers who arrived from overseas
tonight were Major Edwards, Lieut.
E. A. M. Townscnd, Victoria; Lieut.
Ellis, Vancouver, and" Capt. Andrews,
Victoria,'
CANAPA
How best to Serve
Every Canadian can help in
the successful application of
the Military Service Act
|HE Military Service Act is the law of the land. It will be enforced sincerely
and with firmness, but fairly. Reinforcements to be raised are limited to
1100,000 men, who are being selected by the country, not by the military
authority. Military control does not start until these men are chosen.
The Men Called Can Help
The first call is for men between'the ages of 20 and 34 inclusive, who were unmarried or widowers without children on July 6, 1917. All these men should go
immediately before a Medical Board in this district for examination as to physical
fitness. If they are not placed in the Medical Category A., their present obligation
ceases. If found physically fit and placed in Category A., they should immediately after
the issue of the proclamation calling out the first class, visit the nearest post office
and report for service on a printed form supplied. If reasonable ground for claiming
exemption exists, an exemption form may be obtained from the Postmaster, and
filled out. The Postmaster will forward this form to the Registrar appointed for
the district, and the man seeking exemption will then be advised by mail when and
where he should appear before an Exemption Board to have his case taken up.
The Employer's Part
Employers will find it to their advantage to see that all the men in their employ
who are in the first class under the Military Service Act appear as soon as possible
before a Medical Board for examination. Should an employer desire exemption for
any one of his men who is found physically fit, he may seek it on the following
grounds:
(1) that the national interest demands that a man be left at his
work rather than placed in military service.
(2) that, instead of doing military service, a man should be used in
work for which he has special qualifications.
(3) that it is expedient in the national interest that instead of being
employed in Military Service, he should continue to be educated or trained
for any work for which he is then being educated or trained.
Duty of Parent or Near Relative
Parents or near relatives of men in the class called may apply for their exemption on the above grounds or because of some special domes tic reasons. In this,
as in other cases, delay is a grave mistake.
Issued by
The Military Service Council
Birks' Stainless
Is the MODERN knife.
The knife that requires no
powder or hard polishing.
The knife that will not
stain or rust, no matter
how used.
Wouldn't you prefer such
knives in place of the old
style, always - staining,
hard-to-clean, troublesome
knives? Birks' Stainless
are in our standard flatware designs, sterling and
plated, and also with Ivor-
ine handles.
Ask       for       particulars.
Henry Birks & Sou Ltd.
Vancouver,  B. C.
hox
Dance
Tuesday, Nov. 6
IN  EAGLE  HALL.
Tickets   50C
JOHNSON'S ORCHESTRA
Proceeds   for   the   Great   War
Voterane' Association.
NOTICE
The Nelson Trades and Iaalior
council, in conjunction with labor representatives from different sections of
tho district, has unanimously decided
to Issuo a call for a nominating convention to bo held In Miners Union
Hall, Nelson, on Wednesday, Nov. 1,
at 7:30 p.m., for the purpose of nominating a candidate and arranging h
campaign. Independent and labor
men are requested to send delegates.
SYNOP3I8 OF COAL
MINING REGULATION!
Coal mining rights of the Dominloi
In Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Al'
berta, the Yukon Territory, the* Northwest Territories, and In a portion ol
the province of British Columbia, ma:
be leased. for a term of twenty-oni
years at an annual rental of $1 pel
acre. No more than 2560 acres wil
be leased to one applicant.
Application for lease must
made by the applicant ln person
the agent or sub-agent of the distrlol
of which the rights applied for art ait
uated.
In surveyed territory the land mas
be described by sections or legal sub<
divisions of seetlons and tn unsurvey
ed territory the tract applied for flhal
be staked out by the applicant himself
Each application must be aecompan
led by a fee ot (6 which will be re
funded If the rights applied for ai
not available, but not otherwise,
royalty shall be paid on tbe merchant
able output of the mine at tbe rati
of five cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shal
furnish the agent with sworn returni
accounting for the full quantity o
merchantable coal mined and pay thi
royalty thereon. If the coal mlnlni
rights are not being operated, suel
returns shall he furnished at least onci
a year.
The lease will Include the coal mln
Ing rights only, but the lessee may
permitted to purchase whatever avail
able surface rights may be consldei
necessary for the working of the mln
at the rate of 110 an acre.
For full information applicatioi
should be made to the Secretary of th<
Department of the Interior, Ottawa, oi
to any agent or sub-agent of Dominloi
lands. W. W CORY,
Deputy Minister of the Interior.
N. B.—Unauthorised publication cl
tali advertisement will not be paid tot,
i
 loWll
FRIDAY,      NOV.     2,
1917.
THE-DAILY NEWS?
SACE FIVE.
it The Star
500 SACKS NO. 1
Ashcroft
Potatoes
$2.25
PER 100 POUNDS.
CHOICE CITRONS
Per pound    .' 4c
itar Grocery
PHONE 10
IFrnit Growers—Attention
Pur next and last car of fruit for
Ills season will be loaded at the
freight Sheds on
WEDNESDAY, NOV 7th
All Kinds of Winter Apples and
Pears.
KOOTENAY   FRUIT   GROWERS'
UNION,  LTD.
fhone 180. 608 Ward St.
R. D. Barnes
Held the lucky number last
week in our weekly drawing for
a pair of $5 shoes. Ask for
ticket with your purcahse.
R. Andrew & Co.
LEADERS OF FOOT FASHION
Farmers, Ship Us Your
CREAM
Butter Fat, now, per lb 45C
F. O. B. Nelson.
WRITE FOR SHIPPING
TAGS.
Curlew Creamery
BOX 1192 NELSON, B. C.
FURS.
Guaranteed high class furs, nice selection kept ln stock or made to ordei
from selected skins. Customers' fur*
made up, remodelled and repaired.
Kleins dressed and mounted at moderate prices. Best price paid for raw
*klns.
Q. GLA8ER. Manufacturing Furrier
(16 Ward St., Nelson. B. C.   Fhone 106
|AIL EPWORTH  LEAGUE
HAS HALLOWE'EN SOCIAL
(Special tn The Daily News.)
fcRAII,. It. C, Nov. 1.—The Epworth
■gue held a well attended Hallow-
In  social  in the  Methodist church.
|ter a few remarks by the chairman,
C. McKenzie, severaf1 musical
■ections wore given by Mrs. F. L.
|mmings, assisted   by a   chorus of
young people. Games and con-
lU; of various kinds were engaged
I until a late hour. A popular corner
Its the one where a witch and a
lost dispensed neatly written for-
Tiies, while spearing a swaying
impkin revealed various fates to
■hern of the curious. "Bobbing for
Iples" delighted the smaller boys
Id a few ol ihe older ones were de-
forth a Guinea
a Box
) speediest remedy for sick
adache, biliousness and indi-
stion is a dose or two of
(EECHAM'S
PILLS
rceat Sale of Any Msdtclno In lite World.
Sold everywhere,   la bai», 25c,
tected at. it also. Refreshments were
served at the close of the evening.
William Couch has left for his home
in Valley, Wash., to enlist with the
American forces.
Enterprise Lodge I. O. O. F. held a
smoker Tuesday evening.
The names of F. E. Grummctt and
Bert Davidson were by mistake omitted from the list of those to whom
the Epworth league sent Christmas
stockings.
ROSSLAND   PERSONALS
(Special to The Daily News.)
ROSSLAND, B. C, Oct. 31.—A very
enjoyable evening was spent; at the
home of Mrs. W. M. Archibald Tuesday, at which the members of Jliss
llichaoly's Sunday school entertained
their friends at a Hallowe'en party.
Miss Florence Henderson and Miss
Kathleen Green won the prizes in the
apple content.
Mrs, J. W. .Coffin leaves Friday for
Spokane, where she will meet Dr. .T.
W. Coffin, who has heen to Chicago
and New York on professional  busi
nam.
Mrs. Helen Lyall is confined to the
house suffering from an attack of the
grippe.
L. A. Campbell went to Spokane
this morning on business.
Mrs. ,1. S. Deschamps spent the day
in Trail.
Mr, and Mrs. Hazolwood and Mrs.
Maclennan and little daughter were
visitors from Trail Wednesday.
Miss E. DeBou, who has been confined to her bed for the past few days
with la grippe, is feeling somewhat
better today.
Going to
California
This Winter?
SPEND YOUR WINTER IN 80UTHERN  CALIFORNIA
WHERE THE  SUN  SHINES
CHEAP   ROUND   TRIP   RATES
TO
SAN   DIEGO    $97.10
L08  ANGELES   $90.60
SANTA BARBARA    $85.60
8AN FRANCISCO  $76.60
ALL   TICKETS   HAVE   SIX   MONTHS LIMIT
ON  8ALE  DAILY-APPLY  OR  WRITE
E. L. BUCHANAN, K. J. SMITH,
CUF. & P. A. D. F. & P. A.
NELSON, B.C.
men
and Ranchers
FOR YOUR FALL CALVE8
U8E
"ROYAL   PURPLE"  CALF   MEAL
CAN BE MIXED WITH 8EPARATED MILK OR WATER
SOLD  BY
The Taylor Milling and
Elevator Co., Ltd.
Kootenay and Boundary
IS
SELECTDELEGATES
Liberal  in Chair and Attendance   Includes  Men and Women of
All Parties.
(Special to The Daily News.)
ROSSLAND, B. C„ Nov. 1.—Rossland Unionists at-aTmeotinff tonight
attended by men of all shades of political opinion selected 15 delegates to
the; Unionist nominating convention
which will le held tomorrow night
in Nelson. In the chair was R. W.
Grlgor, a well known Liberal, who
explained tho objects of the meeting
and stated that he did not propose
that any politicnl discussion should
be permitted. He did not propose to
permit discussion of either Uorden or
Laurier, he said. The business of the
meeting was to name delegates to a
Unionist convention, After some discussion the jfollowing delegates were
selected: Sam Forteath, Mrs. Sam
Forteath, W. K, Esling, William Dunn,
.1. Triggs, "VV. R. Braden, Lome A.
Campbell, .1. Cocking, H. G. Oliver,
H. C A. Cornish, Sam Potter, S. B.
Willson, Harry Fry. Will A. Ellotson
and  A.   M.  Betts.
Many  Liberals    and    Independents
were among the 70 in attendance.
ROSSLAND ORGANIZES FOR
VICTORY  LOAN  CAMPAIGN
(Special to The Daily News.)
ROSSLAND, B, C, Nov. 1.—Rossland has organized for the Victory loan
campaign and a. strong committee
has been named to carry on lhe work.
The permanent committee includes W>
K. Esling, manager; W. A. Ellotson,
in charge of publicity; Frod Peters, Le
Roi mine; Edward E. Montgomery,
Centre Star; D. J. Brown, Le Roi No.
2; H. T. Moir, ratlwaymnn. The chairmen of the various committees with
Mayor Page, the president, and C. B,
Smith, the secretary, form the oxecu-
WILLOW  POINT  UNIONISTS
APPOINT  DELEGATE
(Special to The Dally News.)
WILLOW POINT, B. C„ Nov. 1.—At
a meeting of the local Unionists hero
last, evening, A. It. Shannon was appointed a delegate to attend the Win-
the-War convention at Nelson Friday
next. The meeting was representative
of tho district and in the discussion
which preceded tbe appointment o-f
Mr. Shannon the popular feeling was
that Willow Point would heartily en
dorse   the   win-the-war  candidate.
WALDO HEARS ABOUT RED
CROSS WORK IN  FRANCE
Is Described by Capt. Julia Henshaw—
Mrs.  Hardman   Honored   by
I. O. D. E.
(By Daiiy News Leased Wire,)
WALDO, B. C., Nov. I.—It has been
the good fortune of the East Kootenay
chapter In the last few woe.\s to have
had two interesting visitors from tho
coast.
On Sept. M Capt. Julia Henshaw addressed a meeting in Adolph's hall,
Buynes lake, on some of the phases of
Red Cross work in France, and the
wonderful work being done in St. Dunstan's home for tbe blind, This meet
Ing was open to all who wished to
come, and, a, tyirgc number availed
themselves of the opportunity, and
enjoyed the instructive address,
collection was taken up, amounting to
$28.30, which, with other collections,
has been devoted to a Canadian stationary hospital in France.
Mrs. Macneil of Vancouver, provincial organizer of the 1. O. D. E. in
British Columbia, visited the chapter
Oct. !t. A meeting was held in Ross'
hall, Waldo, and several subjects were
discussed fully and made clear.
The. chapter greatly appreciated and
benefited from both these meetings.
A very successful dance was held at
Bayncs Lake, Sept. 21, music -being
supplied hy the Cranbrook orchestra,
Refreshments and Ice cream wero on
sale during the evening and a. couple
of articles wero raffled. The net proceeds amounted to $!U.fir., a welcome
addition to the chapter's funds.
At the October meeting presentation
was made of a pin with the appropriate bar to Mrs. Hardman, whose husband is on active service in France.
A shipment of Red Cross supplies
was sent to Fernie containing eight
suits of pyjamas, six dressing gowns,
two scarves, one pair bed socks, one
pair hand Unit socks, one crochet tie
eight wash cloths. A number of pairs
of socks were reserved for parcels being sent overseas.
CRESTON STARTS
TO SHIPJH
Exports  Will    Be 4000   Pounds—Red
Cross Sending  100  Boxes of
Apples to Soldiers
(Special lo The Daily News,)
CRESTON, B. C, Nov. L—The first
of the Valley honey export went out
on' Tuesday, when 1200 pounds of the
extracted variety was shipped by the
Blico apiary, The export in this line
will be around 4000 pounds this year,
as compared with slightly over 5000 in
1010, The entire absence of showers
in July, particularly, to keep the
clover crop developing is the chief
reason for the falling off in output,
as there are more bees being kept in
the Valley than ever before and the
winter was not a hard one on them.
E. A. Foreman, public works engineer, Victoria, and F. H. Mcpherson,
the West Kootenay resident engineer,
were making an inspection of tho
Volley on Monday nnd Tuesday. Tho
need of decided improvement on the
Kitchcner-ErlcUson road was impressed upon them, as well as works
of a similar sort all through this section. They also looked over the site
to which West Creston citizens want
the Kootenay river ferry moved in
order lo shorten up tho trip to nnd
from town.
The Creston orchestra has been
organized under tho leadership of
John Blinco. It consists of six pieces.
In addition to tho leader, who plays
the clarionet, the other members are:
E. S. Cuming, violin; G. A. M. Young,
piano; P. Tmscolt, trombone; J. Mc-
Bain, cornet; W. B. Embree, drums.
The usual export of cattle commenced this week, when the P. Burns
company shipped out a car of choice
beef nnlmals to the same firm at Nelson. Two morn carloads are being
rounded up and will be shipped this
week.
Mrs. R. M. Reid and children left
today for lhe old home at Trenton,
Ont., where they will spend the winter. Prior to leaving she was guest
of honor at an evening or whist at tho
home of Mrs. Henderson, at. which the
winners were Mrs. Bennett, Mr. Boys
and Mrs. Brown. Refreshments nlso
were served and a thoroughly enjoyable evening spent. Mr. Hold went
with them as far as Calgary, Alta.
The vital statistics; for the month
show one marriage, one death and no
births. This is the second month in
succession that tho stork has failed to
make an appearance in the Creston
Valley.
Payments to the patriotic fund for
the month are $177. To date this year
guarantors to the fund in this section
have contributed about ?1000 of ?20ft0
pledged.   "   ::
The high school girls had a Hallowe'en tea in aid of the Red Cross
funds, when over $17 was netted for
that cause.
The local Red Cross women have
over 100 boxes of apples for the soldiers overseas hung up here awaiting
the arrival oP a refrigerator car in
which to ship them.
Father Kennedy, tbe local parish
priest, and George Huscroft aro the
latest citizens to join the auto-owning
fraternity here.
Creston got the first snow of the
season on Moday, whon almost two
inches of it fell, but has since disappeared. The following morning the
mercury got down to 15 above zero.
The warehouse of the Fruit Growers
union is filled almost to capacity this
week, owing to no refrigerator cars
being available for shipping. To make
room a lined box car was loaded out
yesterday in which a heater was installed and a stoker sent along wilh
the car lo ensure a frost-proof trip tn
its destination at Coleman.
H. Mackenzie of Rossland, auditor
for tho workmens compensation
board, was here this week looking into
the payrolls of industries.
Belanger & Mongan ut about a
dozen more post makers to work on
the old Winlaw limit south of town
on Tuesday. Tbey are hustling to
get It stripped, and then will transfer to West. Creston, whero they will
operate in the cedar on the Simmons
ranch as well as the old Davis-Say-
ward limits, a deal for which is about
closed.
There's
Superior
Flavor
at*P
POSTUM
as     a     table     beverage.
A package from the grocer it well worth a trial
in place of tea—especially
When Tea Disagrees!
HALLOWE'EN  DANCE
ENJOYED  AT  TRAIL
(Special to Tbe Daily News.)
TRAIL, B. C, Nov. 1—Ghosts,
hobgoblins, witches and Hallowe'en
spirits generally reigned supromn nt
the dance given by the Trail Dancing
club In Schwartz ball last evening,
The prize for best costume was won
by G. Macdonald and that for the best
dancer by Miss Leah Morrow,
Mrs. O. P. Schwartz spent Wednesday in Rossland.
Mrs. Johnston McKenzio entortained
the Five Hundred club nt her home on
Columbia Heights. The. first prize
was won by Miss Dnnforth and the
booby hy Mrs.  Walter Douglass.
ROSSLAND NOTES.
(Special to Tbe Daily News.)
ROSSLAND. B. C, Nov. 1.—VV. A.
Ried of the Hank of Montreal staff left
this evening for Vancouver.
M. E. Pureed of the Consolidated
company arrived in the city Wednesday from Vancouver. Mr. Purcell bx-
pects to remain here for the winter.
Miss Hazel Wallace spent the evening in Castlegar.
Mrs. T. Stout entertained a number
of friends this afternoon at tea in
honor of Mrs. Fraser of Vancouver.
who is In the city visiting her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. .1. Hooper,
Mrs. W. G. Ternan entertahted a
number of children at. a. Hallowe'en
party Wednesday evening.
Mr. nnd Mrs. Morln of Trail, wore
visitors to the city this afternoon.
Mrs. J. W. Coffin leaves Friday
morning for Spokane.
Mrs. J. Cran entertained a,t the tea
hour  Wednesday afternoon.'
Miss E. DeBou Is ablu to resume her
duties .at teacher at tho Cook avenue
school after being confined to the
house with la grippe.
Friday Bargains
at Meagher's
Economy  Prices   on   New  Fall   Dress
Goods and Ready~to-Wear
HAVING PURCHASED PRACTICALLY OUR W FIOLE STOCK OF DRYGOODS FAR IN ADVANCE,
WE ARE IN A POSITION TO OFFER YOU FALL MERCHANDISE AT MUCH LESS THAN PRESENT
DAY- PRICES. THIS, COMBINED WITH THE FACT THAT MANY LINES ARE STILL FURTHER
REDUCED FOR FRIDAY SHOrPERS, OFFERS S PI2CIAL INDUCEMENTS TO YOU TO GET HERE
EARLY THIS MORNING. THAT THE SAVINGS ARE PIG YOU CAN JUDGE BY THE FOLLOWING LIST:
Cordurov Velvets at 98c
We have ir>0 yards of Good Corduroy Suiting
in Largo or Small Cord.   All colors; fall 27 inches
wide.    Good value at $1.35.
FRIDAY BARGAIN, PER YARD ...
98c
Wrapperette at 19c
Two Hundred Yards of flood Quality Wrapperette, 30 inches wide, in light or dark colors.
Suitable for Kimonos or House Dresses. 10*»
FRIDAY  BARGAIN,   PER YARD        I JO
Comforters at $2.50
Large   Size  Comforters,  well   (milted.     Have
good cotton i'iliing and are covered with
Fancy Cambric.   FRIDAY BARGAIN
Boys' Clothing Reduced
Save from $2.00 io $3.50 on your Boy's Suit
today. Over One Hundre d Suits' in the lot, iri-
cluding all sizes from 7 to 16 years. A biff range
of styles and materials to select from. Regular
values,   $8.00   to   $16.50.   PQ flft Ol Q FA
FRIDAY   BARGAINS..   $ UlUU TO $ I JlDU
Unbleached Turkish Towels
45c PER   PAIR
Ten   Dozen   Large  Towels,  Unbleached,  with
Colored Stripes and Fringed Ends.
FRIDAY BARGAIN, PER PAIR  ...
45c
$2.50
White Flannelette at 25c
" Two   Hundred   Yards   Heavy   White
ette;  yard wide;  extra, quality.
FRIDAY   RARGA1N,  PER   YARD   	
Flannel-
25c
Ladies' Cashmere Hose, 60c Pr.
Excellent quality, full fashioned, with seamless feet and legs. Sl/.es S% to 10. CIIa
FRIDAY BARGAIN, PER PAIR      OUU
Tailored Blouses, Half Price
$1.98
Good    smart   style
34 to 12.
FRIDAY BARGAIN  ..
in    Fine    Linen.
$1.93
White Hack Towelling at 20c Flannelette Gowns at $1.50
This Is less than present wholesale price.   Ten
pieces in  stock;   good width.
FRIDAY   BARGAN, PER YARD   ...
20c
Five  Dozen  Only,  in   Good   White Flannelette,
full sizes, various trimmings.
FRIDAY   BARGAIN,  EACH   	
$1.50
MEAGHER & CO.
THE   STORE   FOR   STYLE
THE   STORE   FOR   QUALITY
CHARLEY WHITE, BOXING
REFEREE,   REPORTED   DYING
(13y Daily News Leased Wire,)
NEW YORK, Nov. B.—Charley
White, known throughout the country
as a referee of important boxing bouts,
who has been ill for a number of
months of a complication of diseases,
was reported today to be dying at his
home  here.    White's   last appearance
in  the ring; as a  referee
was
\t  the
Wlllard-Mnraii   fight   in
New
York,
March 21, 101U.
TENER   LIKELY  TO   REMAIN
HEAD OF NATIONAL  LEAGUE
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
NEW YORK. Nov. l—John K. Toner,
whose five-year term as  president  of
tbe    National    league     expires    next
montli. today accepted an invitation
extended a week ago hy three club
presidents to remain in office. 'Those
who extended tho invitation were:
I'resident Hernpsteud, New York; FJ>-
bet, Brooklyn, and Baker, Philadelphia.
There Is no other candidate for the
position and tlit* election will time
place at the annual meeting of the
league in this city Dec. 11.
CbWAN'S
Active Service
CHOCOLATE
This Chocolate is a concentrated food
specially prepared for troops subject
to the hardships and privations of
trench life. Bread becomes stale, flour
mouldy and meat deteriorates, but this
Chocolate will keep indefinitely, lt
should prove a veritable life saver when
ordinaryrationsareunprocurable. Send
the boys at the front this Chocolate
to-day. lt may be obtained anywhere
ia 5c. and 25c. packages. The 25c.
package is specially wrapped for immediate mailing.
Made by
The Cowan Co'y Limited, Toronto
&
2£fe^a«?
,**%5s*¥s£
Mi   a til
<£*l=&r:
»Aa
4.
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■ ■*?<=-£,. J(
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 rA«raix-
^mrDAlLY NEWS"
....:™ PRUMYf ,  NOV.    .a,   AMK.
■■■       lit."   mil'   ammUmmiieimat
Copenhagen
Chewing
IS THE WORLD'S BEST CHEW
i COPENHAGEN!
;.••• SNUFF "}%
It is manufactured
tobacco in its purest
form.
It has a pleasing
flavor.
It is tobacco scientifically prepared
for man's use.
HHICMION MAKES
MEN DO THINGS
LONDON.—■When Winston Churchill had just come home from the Boer
war he visited his cousin Shane Leslie
at Eton and gave him this characteristic advice "Don't turn your mind
■ into a damned ammunition wagon.
Turn it into a rifle to fire off other
people's ammunition,"
Leslie says this was the best advice
he ever received regarding education.
It ts certainly a kind of advice which
is very much needed at the present
day. Both teachers and parents are
somewhat Inclined to treat the boy's
hraln as it. it were an ammunition
wagon. They regard the mind as a
storehouse; a school or college education' as the means of filling that storehouse with useful knowledge; and a
good education as-one which provides
different forms of knowledge in such
proportions as the boy is likely to
need afterwards.
Conservatives and progressives differ as to the kind of. information which
the boy needs, but they are alike in
laying stress on the value cf this storing process. Teach the boy the things
with which he will not have to deal in
after life, says the classicist, because
we shall contribute to his breadth or
culture. Teach the boy the things
with which he will have to deal in after
life says the modernist, because these
are> the things wthich it gives him
pleasure to know! and remember.
Both classicists and modernists are
wrong, because the healthy boy is not
going to store up the knowledge. He
is going to use it once or twice and
then forget it. Here and there we find
some Dominie Sampson or Admiral
Crichton who remembers all the learning, ancient' and modern,, that ever
came his way, hut such characters are
rnre. The educated man is not the
man who knows certain things but the
man who can do certain things. Good
education results in developing certain
habits and powers. The acquiring of
knowledge is an Important means of
training those habits and powers but it
is an incident nnd not an end. To
measure th© value of an education by
the amount of knowledge which the
boy has stored up is like measuring the
success of business by the amount of
gold which the owner has hoarded in
his cheats.
1 A good course of education will give
the student the habit of seeing some
things which others cannot see and the
ability of using his mind to do some
things which others cannot do. To the
former we give the name* culture, to
the latter the name efficiency. Neither
culture nor efficiency is greatly dependent upon the amount of a man's
knowledge. Each represents a power
of doing things. Knowledge gives opportunity for culture and efficiency,
rather than culture or efficiency Itself. The boy who has studied the
history of music or painting or has
read good literature and good history
has had the opportunity of acquiring
a certain depth of insight and breadth
of enjoyment. Whether he has actually
acquired them depends chiefly upon
himself. The boy who has studied
arithmetic or chemistry has been
shown ekamples of method which he
ran use efficiently if he is strong.]
enough. Whether he is strong enough
depends upon himself.—Arthur T, liad-
ley In. Harper's Magazine.
'I
J
ft CONS
St
ED
Best for liver and bowels,
bad breath, bad colds.
sour stomach
Get a 10-cent box.
Sick headache, biliousness, coated
tongue, head arid nose clogged "up with
o cold—always trace this to torpid
liver; delayed fermenting food in the
bowels, or sour, gassy stomach.
Poisonous matter clogged in the intestines, instead of being cast out of
the system is reabsorbed into the
blood. When this poison reaches the
delicate brttln tissue it causes congestion and that dull,.throbbing, sickening headache,
Cascarets immedlatel y clea nse the
stomach, remove the sour, undigested
food and foul gases, take the excess
bile from the liver and carry out all
the constipated Waste matter and poisons in the bowels. '
A Cascaret tonight will surely
straighten you out by morning. Tney
work while you sleep—a 10-cent box
from our druggist means your head'
clear, stomach sweet, breath right,
complexion rosy(„apd your liver, nnd
Rowels regular for months,
WILL NOT RESTORE
Dr.  Parkin  Declares   German   Menace
Must Be Eliminated All Over
the World.
VANCOUVER, B.C.—"If any Cana
dian speaks of the possibility of Can
nda running an independent coarse ln
the great world which is lied together
by steamboats and telegraphs, you can
tell him that he does not understand
the problem with which he is dealing.
This statement, one among several
important utterances, was made at tho
luncheon of the Vancouver Canadian
club at the Hotel Vancouver by Dr.
Georgo R. Pai'Ain. Rhodes scholarship
commissioner, when dealing with the
paramount prou.ems which would face
each part of the British Empire after
the war was ended. He had shown
how utterly Impossible It would be for
the conquered colonies to be returned
to the Germans when peace was concluded. Australia had conquered New
Guinea and the New Hebrides, because
she did not wish to remain constantly
armed to the teeth to resist any German attack that might bo made. In
Africa there were 800,000 Hereros who
had remained unmnssacred after IS
years of German rule and in another
part thero were 8,000,000 natives who
had experienced a similar rule and they
had all now been two years under
British rule. General Smuts had said
he was willing to leave it to a vote of
tho natives as to which rule they
would remain under, the German of the
South African. The United States had
established a Monroe doctrine for
which the country was prepared to
fight, but this war had brought forth
three cases in which the Monroe doctrine would have double claim for recognition and such, a democratic nation
as the United States could do nothing
else hut admit the justice of the claim.
If the Germans were allowed to retain
Dar-a-Salaam in these days when submarine warfare, with its ruthlessness,
was carried on, the Germans might tie
up one-third of the total commerce of
the world,
He was talking about these things
one day to Senator Lodge of the United States senate, and the senator answered that tne United States did not
want to see any more Germans In
the Pacific.
Canadians Lack Grasp.
Sometimes be almost wished that
Canada had something close beside it
so that It would take to heart the
problem of tbe war. Kb spoke as an
ardent Canadian but he had distinguished a certain absence of grasp of
the absolute necessity for complete
self-sacrifice and devotion. There
should be a sweeping away of wretched
party politics. When a submarine came
to the port of New York it showed
that it could hold up practically the
whole of the shipping of the United
States through that port, and it was
then the Canadians began to understand what would happen if a force
was in the gulf of S. Lawrence or on
the Pacific coast.
It was just us true of political ad
national life as of religious life, that
It was only they who endured to the
end who were going to be safe. One
of the greatest problems was the Ca,-
nadlanizing of a II those people, of
alien birth, who were settled in the
country.teaching them the duties and
responsibilities of free British citl-
zonshlp. No more difficult task could
face any community. They must be
prepared to spend money and time and
must provide preachers and teachers.
The Quebec  Problem,
But>there was one thing that stood
out from them all. They had a whole
province that was out of sympathy
with the general Canadian life, out of
sympathy with tin; large outlook of the
nation, out of sympathy, strangely dnd
oddly eaouffli, with their motherland
Prance. Tbat was one of the strangest
things he knew. The people had said:
"How can we fight wttn you, when
some day you might be fighting our
motherland?-' but when France was
about to be sorely stricken, to be bled
white, these same people changed their
tune ,and said, "Why should we raise
large families here to send them to
fight for Prunce when France will not
raise enough sons to fight for herself?"
That was one of tho hardest things
he had ever heard. That was on astonishing claim. He did not know the
reason, It was ono the English people could not understand. The people
of Quebec had been under bad leadership and the people of other provinces
would havo to deal gently with them
and must have tho utmost patience
with them. They were Ignorant people
who did not read or think much.
With the exception of Alberta.and
Quebec all the provinces of the Dominion are in favor o* continuing to
raise money for tho patriotic fund by
voluntary subscription, according' to
the statement of T. M, Tweedie, who
hns returned to Calgary from Ottawa,
where he attended a meeting of. the
-xscutive committee,
BEFHIENDED STRANGER
ROBS GARTLEY ELEVATOR
When  Invited  Into Office to "Warm
Himself" Threatens Occupants
With Gun
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
MUNSON, Alta., Nov. 1.—Wednesday night a holdup took place at the
home elevator at Gartley siding on tho
Canadian "Northern railway, six1 miles
east of Munson. Mr. Whitaker, tho
manager of the elevator, along wilh
Mr. Fraser, the traveling superintendent, were in bed in tho office of the
elevator about 10 o'clock when a
knock came lo the door." Mr. Whitaker got up to see what was there
when a stranger inquired the road to
Delia and also if he could get warm
by the fire. The stranger was Invited in to get warm, and threw back
his coat and pulled out a revolver and
told Whitaker to stick up his hands
and turn his face to the wall. Fraser
was told to do likewise, which he
straightaway di<k The stranger then
rifled the office and secured $980 in
cash and after locking the door jumped into his car and drove off at .a
high rate of speed.
The provincial police were at once
notified and are at work on the case.
COAL STRUCK  IN  NEW
MINE AT SOUTH WELLINGTON
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
NANAIMO, B. C, Nov. L-Coal was
struck today by the Canadian Collieries in the new mine being opened by
them at South Wellington, four miles
•from this city.    The seam was tapped
by a slope 120 feet from tbe surface
and development work will be rushed
with all possible speed.    It is anticipated tho new property will soon at
tain a dally output of 1000  tons and
will  be  marketed   by   way   of  Lady
smith.
The above diagram shoyrs tbe proportions of the
various medicinal qualities contained in Zam-Buk—
which is all medicine,
This diagram represents a type of ordinary ointment, which contains only a small proportion  ol
medicine.
WILSON  NOBLE, M.P. FOR
HASTINGS,   IS   DEAD
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
LONDON.   Nov.   L—Wilson   Noble,
member  of  parliament   for  Hastings
from 1886 to 18i)». died unexpectedly
yesterday.    He was born  in 181.4.
LIPTON WANTS TO BUY
SCHOONER AMERICA
Having Failed to Lift Cup She Won,
Thinks  Next   Best  Thing   Is
to Acquire Yacht
(By Dnily News Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Nov. 1.—With reference
to his expressed desire to purchase in
the United States the schooner yacht
America which. Jn 1851 won the
America cup, the blue ribbon prize of
the yachting world, Sir Thomas Lip-
ton said to the Associated Press:
I feared the America might be
broken up if sold, and this would bo a
pity on account of her great historical
value. I have not been successful in
lifting the American cup, and I
thought the next best thing would be
to buy the winner of it and present it
to the American nation."
MIKE O'DOWD OUTFIGHTS
CARBONNE  IN  ALL  ROUNDS
■■ 41V Dally News Leased Wire.)"'1"'"
NEW YORK, Nov. 1.—Mike O'Dowd
of St. Paul outfought Frank Carbonno
of Brooklyn in 'every round of their
10-round match in Brooklyn tonight,
punishing Carbonno severely. O'Dowd
weighed 153 nnd Carbonno 152%
pounds.
Jeff Smith, Bayonne, N. J., made his
first appearance in Brooklyn since
returalng from Australia tonight, outpointing Mike Tigue of this city in
a 10-round match.
TAKE STEPS TO RELIEVE
COAL SHORTAGE IN EAST
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 1.—To relieve
the coal shortage in the east the shipping board tonight modified regulations for the transportation of bituminous coal for the northwest via lake
ports, so as to divert eastward much of
the coal which has been going to meet
the demands of the west.
AUTHORITIES   AWAIT
WORD   FROM   RELATIVES
According to reports received from
tho general hospitul last evening, no
arrangements had yet been made in
regard to the burial of Robert A, Winearls, whose death occurred Wednesday afternoon. Instructions are expected to arrived today from relatives
in Winnipeg.
MPORTANT CHANGE MADE    ■
IN HANDLING EXPORT FREIGHT
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
MONTREAL, Nov. 1.—An important change has been made hy the Dominion railway commissioners at the
request of the Montreal board of trade
In the handling of export freight. Up
lo the present export traffic such as
flour, etc., arriving in Montreal for
export and not covered by through
bills of lading has beon charged for,
when delayed awaiting steamers, at
the car demurrage rate of $1, $2, $3, $4
and $5 for the "rst five days after
the lapse of the free time, 48 hours,
and $r> each additional day thereafter.
The new rule will be free time for five
days at Montreal and special demurrage toll of $1 per car for each subsequent day.
The secret of Zam-Buk's power lies in the fact that it is all medicine.   Ordinary ointments contain about 5%
medicine and the balance animal fat.   Seven important qualities combine to make Zam-Buk a unique balm.
1st. The Healing quality—which you will see from the diagram
predominates. By comparing the diagrams you will see that one
box of Zam-Buk contains more healing power than a great many
boxes of ordinary ointment. *
2nd. The Soothing power of Zam-Buk is very great. Almost immediately it is applied it ends the pain and irritation of a wound or
sore.   It then draws out the inflammation and reduces the swelling.
3rd. The Antiseptic power of Zam-Buk Is three times as great
as is commonly met with. This is the quality that prevents the
growth of Injurious microbes, and thus prevents festering:
4th. Zam-Buk is Germicidal. That is, it is capable of destroying
all germs in a wound or sore, while its antiseptic power prevents
their spreading. These two qualities, combined, make Zam-Buk
a certain preventive of blood-poisoning.
5th. The power of Penetration which Zam-Buk possesses is extraordinary. This quality makes it invaluable in the case of deep-
seated troubles, such as rheumatism and sciatica, and also for
chronic skin diseases.    Zam-Buk gets to the "root" of the trouble.
6th. The Stimulative quality of Zam-Buk is very important, as it
enables the balm to act as a tonic on the surrounding tissues and
hastens the healing process,
7th* As a Deodorant Zam-Buk is unequalled for discharging sores,
bad legs, ulcers, wet eczema, etc.
It is obvious that in buying Zam-Buk you get the best possible
return for your money, which is always—and particularly at the
present time—a matter of great consideration to a good house*
keeper. All dealers or Zam-Buk Co., Toronto.   50c box, 3 for $1.25.
T**Q Tj^ "C^   —Send this advertisement, name of paper and lc
J? tx rVrflvrf   stamp (for  return  postage) to Zam-Buk Co.,
i Toronto, and a free trial box will be sent you.
TOY
DOGS   BEING   TRAINED
TO  DO THEIR  BIT NOW
LONDON, Oct., !).—(By Mail.)—
George Mpore, the, renowned author
of "The Brook Kerith," who has been
denouncing the "pampered pet dogs"
of society and urging their wholesale
extermination on .the ground that
while serving no useful purpose they
consume an inordinate amount of the
nation's food supply, may be obliged
ere long to abandon his campaign
against the "poms," "pekes" and the
rest, for even these "toy" nnd lap
dogs are being made to do their "bit."
At least, some of them are, a notable
example being one "Chlng-Chung," a
pedigree Pekinese which is the favorite pet of Lady Alexander, wife of
Sir George Alexander, the theatrical
knight, who is one of the idols of the
British matinee girl and the original
creator, among many otber characters of Rudolf Rassendyl, in "The
Prisoner of Zenda," Villon in "If I
Were King," and Aubrey Tnnqueray
i Plnero's  famous  play.
Pressed  Dog  Into Service
Lady Alexander, who Is renowned
as one of the best dressed women in
England, has always been a willing
worker in the cause of charity, and,
ever since the war began, she has
been prominent in all. sorts of movements on behalf of the fighting men
and their dependents. Her husband,
who recently has been extremely ill,
also had done his "bit" up to the time
of being sternly ordered by his physician to take to his bed, and one day
it'occtirred to Lady Alexander that
the one and only member of their
household who was not.helping in anyway to win the war for the allies was
her little canine companion "Chlng-
Chung," Forthwith she decided that
this no longer must he, but the question then was to decide exactly what
thp diminutive Chlng-chung could do.
At various railway'Stations in London
and other British cities, there are
what are known as "collecting dog.^"
i.e., specially trained canines who,
wHh penny In the slot contrivances
strapped to their backs circulate
among intending passengers and col- :
lect money for various institutions
that exist on behalf of the railway
workers. It wns remembering tbe activities of these dogs, Lady Alexander
to|d me the other day, that supplied
the answer to tho question of how her
Pekinese could be useful. She
promptly decided that Chlng-Chung
should he pressed into service ns a
collector for the Red Cross.
bihee then, wherever his mistress
lia's gone—to bazaars, charity matinees and the like—there also has gone
"Stops bleeding instantly, removes all
inflammation. Prevents Blood Poisoning. Sure cure for
Thrush."
DOUGLAS 1 COMPANY MNFR3,
M*fM££ M/rM/0
little Chlng-Chung nnd proceeded,
upon his- arrival nt whatsoever the
function might be, to hold out his
little paw 'for contributions to the
Red Cross. "And lu this way," said
his proud mistress, "he has collected
up to now exactly nine bundled and
twenty pounds, sixteen shillings and
f oar pence."
That amounts in American money
to something like $4600, which is
pretty good for a little society dog in
not quite a year. This is the first
public mention that hns been made,
by the way, of master Cblng-Chung's
activities, but now that they haw*
been made known, no doubt other
fashionable owners will follow sult.i
aud one canine activity may lead to
another until the ground will be cut
entirely from beneath the feet of
George Moore, who was personally responsible for getting the deafening
"taxi-whistle" being prohibited by law
lor the duration of the War and who
since then has been conc-mtratlni; a
good deal of his zeal and ono'.gy Willi
the object of either getting pet dogs
taxed on I of existence, or sending
them, wholesale, to the lethal cliam-
bi;r,
it Is a" rather curious fact, by the
way that the British Isles, which must
possess more.dogs, in relation to tho
population, than any other country on
earth,, represent one of the few places
where canines of all degrees,; perform:
More Money
AND MORE TRADE1
are the result Of
intelligent use of
The Daily News
Display Ads
The advertising department of The
Daily News would be pleased to
talk business with you. Phone
144 for advertising solicitor to call.
practically no work whatever. The sole
exceptions are the shepherd dog and
the watch dog, and the comparatively
few "police" and army dugs. Dogs are
largoty .used for sporting purposes, of
cdurse, hut chasing foxes and hares
and "pointing" birds can hardly he
described as work.
Work in Other Countries
lu Belgium, France nnd other European countries, of course, dogs are extensively used to draw loads, and
many's the one I huve seen in our
own country drawing a sled in the
winter arid thus assisting Ha youthful
owner to cover his "milk-round!" They
used, too, to he made to churn and run
cider mills, .though 1 have1 newu'l
met a single canine that looked as if|
he relished doing either of the last!
mentioned things. In fact, it used tol
be an adage that the farm-dog knewl
which day was churning day and Invariably hid when it came around.—|
Edmonton Journal.
According to Senator Saulsbury, of J
Delaware, who na's been investigating, f
Teuton emissaries have been system- _
atically spreading untrue reports of]
the loss of transports and huge fatalities very similar to those circulated
in the Dominion in the early stages of '
tho war.
You must never
be without
PEsPSBrMheable CURE
ON the appearance of the tint symptoms of a colli, let ■ Peps tablet dissolve In the
mouth, and then Inhale direct into the lnnga the powerful medicinal vapor, that are
released from the tablet.   Thla wonderful breatheable medicine soothes the delicate
air passages, n*d not only stops • cough by clearing the phlegm from the bronchial tubes,
but provides the throat and chest With a pe/«d aVcms tialiut Ihttmu that spread coughs,
colds and even more serious chest trouble.   A box of Peps from the druggist now may
' mean your escape from a stubborn cold or attack of bronchitis.
j All dealers, Nc. box.
•V for
"311 THI MM ;
iBuinin'mur.l
COUGHS, COLDS
■e BRONCHITIS.
■ *».'«■**!.    ™»*f*.-J«   .'J.W*..Wn..ii£yJ%,,^ iBf'tm- MtimMWHtoS&WW-
 FRIDAY,     NOV.     2;     1917.
THE DAILY NEWS
ge&Kfcpy
RAQE 8BVCN
Little Ads that Bring Big Returns
N1BN8ED AVERTI8ING  RATE8     FURNI8HED ROOMS To RENT.       INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE
> Insertion, per word     lo
ilmum charge    25c
consecutive Insertions, per
ord      to
onty-Bix consecutive Insertions
me month), per word   15c
lbs, one insertion     50c
Triages, one Insertion   60c
,thB, one Insertion   SOc
d of Thanks    50c
ach subsequent insertion    25c
its and Funeral Notice $1.00
11 condensed   advertisements   are
h In advance.
1 computing the number of words
a classified advertisement count
d word, dollar mark, abbreviation,
lal letter and figure aB one word,
dvertlsera are reminded that lt is
trary to the provision of the pos-
laws to have letters addressed to
tals only; therefore any advertiser
irouB of concealing his or her ldf>n-
may use a box at this office with-
any extra charge If replies are
id for; If replies are to be mailed
dvertlsers allow 10 cents extra in
itlon to price of advertisement, to
postage.
he Newa reserves the right to re-
any copy submitted tor publica-
IITJUATIOJJSJVA^ANT^ALE^
SON EMPLOYMENT AGENCY—
, Parker, 309 Baker St, Phone 283.
'^NTED—Woodsmen, good pole con-
t;   all wanting work  to  register;
tresses.
FOB RENT—Suites of furnished house
keeping  rooms   In  Anaable   block.
Enquire room 32. (7109)
FURNISHED SUITE—Campbell's Art
Gallery. (7330)
KERR APARTMENTS.
((6873)
FURNISHED    housekeeping     rooms,
over Poole Drug Company.    (7336)
FURNISHED housekeeping t-ooms in
brick block; large bright rooms with
gas and uso of bath; ?10 per month. C,
W. Appleyard, 505 Baker street. (7337)
J^OR^RENT^
POR RENT—Six roomed house, close
In.   Apply J. W. Gallagher's store
(6708)
PROPERTY   FOR   SALE,
WILL SELL CHEAP, 10 acres of land,
lake front, opposite Burton City, Ar
row lakes.   Box 112, Mace, Idaho.
(7350)
WANTED.
WANTED—Second hand set of bobsleighs with  shafts  for one  horse.
A. North, Sirdar. (7339)
WANTED—Shingle bolts In large or
small quantities.   Will pay big price.
Western Box &  Shingle Mills,  Ltd.,
Nelson. (7111)
NTED—Two first class mill-
rights, going wages. Address
w's Nest Pass Lumber Company,
Winer, B.C. (73S1)
WANTED—SPLIT   CUDAK  POSTS—
Kootenay   Lakes   Cedar   Company,
Nelson, B.C. (7112)
ITUATION WANTED—FEMALE
'OUNTANT     and     stenographer,
!■*
rat clasB experience, wishes posi
Apply Box 413, Nelson.      (7335)
NTED—Lady   wants   position   as
Dusekceper to bachelor or widower.
7391, Dally News. (7331)
L       TEACHERS WANTED.
luJJTED — Male    principal    Hume
jllihool.    Duties to commence after
Joistmus   holidays.    Apply    C.     M.
nng, secretary, Nelson (7370)
ARTICLES   POR   SALE.
BRCOATS, Doublc-ljrca3ted, warm
Jiezo cloth, $10  each,  C.O.D.    En-
jt'e Sowden and Company, 503 Ccn-
BUIlding, Victoria, B. C.     (7340)
pift SALE—One  perambulator,  liist
condition;  a bargain.    Apply
|rnings 012 Hoover street or phone
(7374)
iR SALE—Cash register; steel safe;
loublo barrelled shotgun; office
njuer; platform ,.scales; .roll top
(Hi; bar back, marble "top; trade riia-
jVcs.   J. P. Morgan, Nelson.     (7350)
r SALE—Mentgos newspaper fold-
r; folds 4, I, 8, 10 and 12 pages; ln
It class condition. Snap for cash.
j Dally News, Nelson. (678)
r SALE — Change stitch Singer
owing machine, practically new.
Jar's, Ward street. (7329)
UNG KIN, R. R, No. 1, Willow
'olnt — Vegetables, apples, pork.
,gon in town Tuesdays and Fridays.
Ite for prices. (7197)
R SALE—Assayers balance, new,
.ihsworth & Son, maker. J. Henry,
iaworth, B.C. (7259)
R SALE—Edition Dictograph com-
lete; electrlo power. Apply to Dally
sts business office. (664)
R SALE—Shaving machine for Edl-
m records.   Box 686. Dally News.
„JN REPLYING TO ADVERTISE-
tents ln Condensed Columns, kindly
iiOon you saw lt in The News—it
'. help you.
R SALE—Five Yorkshire sows, 8
lontlis, 120 pounds; sired by "Agas-
Princc," $2r, each. Also pigs for
'.ember delivery. V. Smith, Gray's
Lek. (73-50)
WANTED—One-horse   light   delivery
sleigh, or set delivery bobs in good
condition;  price reasonable.    Lawson,
Appledale, B.C. (7380)
WANTED—Hand     sewing    machine.
Phono  389  R2. (7379)
WHEN REPLYING TO ADVERTISE
ments in Condensed Columns, kindly
■nention you saw it in The News—lt
will help yon.
BUSINESS CHANCES,
FOR SALE—Little    Davenport    cafe,
Nelson.    Fully  equipped  and  good
business.   Bargain. (7194)
BARBER SHOP FOR SALE, Vernon
street; good location; good business;
for $350; two chairs. Address Ralph
Deglrolamo, 1'. O. box 902, Nelson,
B.C. (78S2)
FLORISTS.
GRIZZELLE'S GREENHOUSES, Nelson.   Wreaths,    wedding   bouquets,
cut flowers.   Phone 187.
WHOLESALE.
A. MACDONALD & CO., WHOLE.
Bale Grocers < and provision Merchants. Importers' ofTeas,.-Coffeas,
Spices, Dried Fruits, Staples and
Fancy Groceries, Tobaccos, Cigars,
Butter, Eggs, Cheese and Packing
House products. Office and warehouse, corner of Front and Hall Sts.
P.O. box 1095; telephones 28 and 23.
ENGINEERS.
GREEN  BROS., BURDEN A CO,
llvll Engineers, Dominion and B. C.
Land Surveyors.
Surveys of Lands, Mines, Townsltos,
Timber Limits, etc,
Melson, 516 Ward street, A. H. Green,
Mgr.; Victoria, 114 Pemberton Bldg.,
If. C. Green; Fort George, Hammond
street, F. P. Burden.
A. L. Mcculloch,
Hydraulio Engineer.
Provincial Land Surveyor.
Baker St., Nelson. B.C.
CHAS. MOORE. C. & M. E„
Provincial   Land   Surveyor,   Architect
Baker St., Nelson, B.C.
SALE—Ono pair draught horses,
height about 2800;   set  of harness
\ wagon.   Western Box & Shingle
i« Is, (7334)
SALE—Marc, about 1000 pounds,
! knch or pacrt, cheap.   Wickham and
Ichcll, Robson . (7357)
R SABE—Dolivery outfit; horse,
'agon, sleigh and hnrncss; all in
id condition. Thorpe & company.
(7351)
SNAP—Heavy farm horse, wagon,
.arrow and plough for sale; $75 the
Johnson, Robson. (7344)
lit SAL1%7800 ohoicc laying hens,
ill good {Ttealthy. stock, .Including
,wn and white Leghorns, white and
tjmbia Wyandottos. Box 867 Nel-
[, ... (7359)
R SALE — Two heavy teams of
[orses, weighing 2900 and 3400 lbs.
/en to nine yeara old. Price reason-
e. Can be seen In Nelson. A. G.
nbert Co., Ltd. (6876)
POULTRY AND EGGS.
R SALE—Trio 1'okln ducks; Rhodo
,land Red cockerels, Bolglan hares,
B. Edwards, Nolson. (7343)
Ir SALE—Black and white Lcg-
orn hens and pullets and Barron
kcrcls. Mrs. Burton, Box 44, Mlchol
tlsh Columbia, (7348)
LOST  AND^FOUND	
%T—Between Latimer and Baker
Iroots, a boy's purse containing
ill sum of money; reward. Daily
vs. (.3'8)
ST—One lxnx skin muff. Return
> 301 Viotorla street, (7375)
gT — Please1 return' immediately
idy's handbag taken from Masters'
thouse.. Mrs. Hlokos. >(7390)
AUCTIONEERS.
C. A. WATERMAN & CO., Opera blk
WMTcUTLER?^AUCTaONEBR,  BOX
474; phone 18.
 BARRISTERS   &   SOLICITORS
DONAGHY & DONAGHY, Barristers
Solicitors, etc., McCulloch block, Nelson, B.C., plack block. Vancouver.
ACCOUNTANTS
W. H. FALDING,
Publio Accountant, Bank of Montreal
Chambers, Rossland, B.C.
STENOGRAPHY.
SHORTHAND, Typewriting, Penmanship.    Day and nlgbt classes;   820
Viotorla St.    Box 741. (B.lSl
_A88AYER8^
B. W. WIDDOWSON, box A-1108, Nel.
Bon, B.C. Standard western charges
OPTICIANS.
R. L. DOUGLASS, Nelson—Graduate
optician and optometrist.   Room 18.
K. W. C. Block.
^SJCWIDJHArHJJBEALER8x^
THE ARK pays cash for second hand
furniture, stoves; 606 Vernon
.TAXIDER^MjSTS^TANNER8
WHERRY & TOW, 629 Pandora avenue, Victoria, B. C.   Western Cana-
ada's tried firm.    Big game    heads,
rugs, specialty.   Trial solicited.   (7113)
PRICE BROS., taxidermists. Taxidermy work and rug. and robe making
a specialty . Send for price list. Price
Bros., Rossland, B. C. (7349)
pT"TORMA^r^PalntinTrr"st1Il^^
perhanglng, kalsomining.   phone or
call Club hotel. (7257)
FUNERAL DIRECTORS,
D. J. RpBERTSON, F. D. D. A B., JO*
'-. Victoria street.   Phone 292;  night
phone, 117-aW ,
SACRIFICE SALE—Seven roomed
modern house, heated with hot air.
Stone basement and foundation. Also
well built four roomed house on rear
of lots. In good neighborhood; two
blocks from Baker street; one lot and
a half; this house was built by a leading contractor for himself, was sold
for $5600. Owner has instructed us to
sell the property to clean up the mortgage, $2500.00; $1000.00 cash, balance
same as rent.
RANCH ON ARROW LAKES—Waterfront, fine sand beach, one of the
finest locations in B.C.; 12% acres; 10
acres planted in five-year old trees,
commercial varieties; tho wholo place
is cleared and plowed, in first clasB
shape.    Good modern  bungalow and
outbuildings.     Water   right.     Price,
$4500.00.   This is less than it cost to
put the work in tho place.   Easy terms.
McQUARRIE &  ROBERTSON.
Nolson, B.C.
H. E. DILL,
General Insurance Agent.
Fire, Llfo and Health policies issued
in tho oldest and strongest companies
on the most liberal terms to the assured.
Phone 180, K.W.C. Block. 508 Ward St.
A meeting of the Nelson Women's
institute will be held In ,thc Y.M.C.A.
Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Report of convention at Cranbrook will
bo given by Mrs. Mohr, government
delegate. (7389)
CARD OF THANKS.,,
The members of tho Nelson Cadet
company desire to express their best
thanks'to all those who by tholr gratuitous assistance tended to make tnelr
Hallowe'en party a success; especially
to Messrs. Brown, Forrester, Romalne
and Trcglllus for their services in tho
orchestra; to Mrs. Blssett for her success in fortune telling; to Mrs. Dunn
for arranging and superintending the
music and dances and to Mrs. N. M.
Cummins, Mrs. Gngnon, Mrs. Pascoe
and Mrs. Young for the excellent way
in which the supper wus prepared and
served. (7392)
EGYPTIAN PALMIST.
SHI3 WILL TELL your past, present
and future.   Cull on this young lady.
Full  satisfaction or  no  charges;   315
Baker street. (7385)
THE    NEAL    INSTITUTE,    CRANBROOK, B.C.
Where you can get rid of tho drink
habit in three days. Write for furthei
particulars.
MI8CELLANEOU8.
OLD CARPETS made into new rugs.
Rugs and carpets cleaned in  your
homes without taking up.    Colors restored  on faded carpets.    Phone 385.
(7380)
WILL ANY GOAT breeder in Nelson
or district write particulars to box
73SS,  Daily  News. (7388)
DIVORCES—Easy,  confidential.    Address Lawyer, box 1202, Boise, Idaho.
(6979)
LOCAL TRIBUNALS
HOLD ALL POWER
All     Exemption     Claims      Must
Through Their Hands, Says
Ottawa Telegram.
..In UjCiUij, tu..a Le.ttur asJUns for^n^,
formation.lvgardliig.the power of ay.-.
eruption tribunals' ami to assist then,
in dealing with tho question of exempting mine and smolter workers under the military service act and referring tn the circuital- issued by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting' com-
pany, the following telegram from the
department of justice has been received hy Judge Form:
"There is no authority whatever for
statement contained In Mr. Warren's
circular to employees of Consolidated
Mining and Smelting company of Can-
ttdil, Limited, lhat all employees would
l)o exempt nnd Unit it was unnecessary
for them lo take any slops in rcgartl
tu exemption. The company has been
wired accordingly. This com puny
stands In no different position than any
other employer of labor in Canada and
it and its employees must comply with
the law claiming exemption or reporting for service through prescribed
channels,
"No doubt certain branches of the
mining Industry are of great importance and the local tribunals established under the ae.t will unuuestion-
,ably bear this in mind whon dealing
with questions of exemption in relation to miners, lad all questions of
exemption aro left to the local tribunals and the ease of Ouch man mast
bo dealt, with on its individual merits.
It the local tribunals do their duty it
is impossible, thai the mines can provide a haven Cur those trying to avoid
service..
"E. L. NRWCOMBB,
"Deputy Minister of Justice."
A TREATMENT
FOR NERVES
Woman Tells How Lydia E.
Pinkham's Vegetable Compound Helped Her.
West Danby, N. Y.-"I have hid
nervous trouble all my life until I took
Lydia E. Pinkham's
Vegetable Compound for nerves
and for female troubles and it straightened me out in good
shape. I work nearly
all the time, ss we
live on • farm and I
have four girls. I do
all my sewing and
other work with
their help, so it
shows that I stand it real well, I took
the Compound when my ten year old
daughter came and it helped me a lot
I keep it in the house all the time and
recommend it"—Mrs. Dewitt Since-
baugh, West Danby, N. Y.
Sleeplessness, nervousness, irritability, backache, headaches, dragging sensations, all point to female derangements which may be overcome by Lydia
E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound.
This famous remedy, the medicinal
ingredients of which are derived from
sho.ee roots and herbs, has for forty,
years proved to be a most valuable tonic
and invlgorator of the female organism. ■
NELSOIHIEWSjP TBE DAK
No, 7338 is the winning ticket lor
ths Kondyland drawing ending Oct.
31st. (7384)
Remember the Hallowe'en frolic at
the Y.M.C.A. on Saturday, Nov. 3rd.
Admission 25c, children 15c.      (7387)
CES ARMY  I
FOR TRIBUNALS
Major    Belson    Appoints    Reprsenta-
tives of Military Authorities for
Exemption Boards.
Announcement has been made of the
appointment of representatives of the
military authorities for the various
exemption tribunals in the Kootenay
district. After formal recommendation the appointments avere made by
Major Belson, provincial representative of the authorities at  Victoria.
They are as follows:
Nelson, Major Gilbert Anderson;
Rossland, blcut. Hamilton; Nakusp,
Uol. V. Harrington; Revelstoke, Lieut.
Lane; New Denver, W. Tomllnson;
Kaslo, D. A. McAlmon; Creston, W. C.
Forrostor; Cranbrook, a W. Edwards.
*****************
+ VOTERS'  LIST 8H0WS *
* 468   REGISTRANTS *
* Wilh  the close of the voters' *
* list yesterday afternoon  a. total +
* of l.r,8 names appeared. Of this *
* number     about   one-half     were *
* names of women. +
*****************
NELSON
OCTOB
SCHOOL
In Public School Division One Leads in
Attendance for Past Month
Attendance figures at the Nelson
public school for the past month are
led by division one with a near full
percentage of 97.52. The standing of
the varlousi divisions 'follow:
Div. I., percentage, 97.52; perfect at
tendance—Kathleen Armstrong, Jack
lloyce, James Cairns, Howard Calvert,
Stanley Carter, Mamie Crool, deoffry
Eyton, Beryl Graham. Florence 1-Iouro,
Margaret Ingram, Margaret Jarvls.
Marjorle Jerome,, Irene Labadie, Mae
Lawson, Ellen .Munro,. June Plmlr,
Edith l'roudfoot, Alice Ran, Dorothea
Sandercock, Eileen Sinclair. Marlon
Tail, William Traves, Helen Wallach,
Evans Wesson, Edythe Thompson.
Dlv. II, percentage, 92.12; perfect attendance—Winnie liailess, Kathleen
Muck, Ernest Wakey, Norman Brown,
Jessie Croll, Wyatt Eddy, Donald
Grant. Cretan. IHorstoad, Evelyn Jeffs,
Winifred Keys, Barbra Kllborg, Olive
Leppcr, Esther Liobscher, Prank Lieb-
sehcr, Helen MoCllsh, Grace McDon-
old, Clifford Mcintosh, Gladys McLeod, Rolf Sleeves, Wesley Traves,
George Walker,   Ernest Welsh.
Dlv. Ill, percentage, D-I.-I3; perfect
attendance—Percy Amas, Gordon Armstrong, Marjorle Armstrong, Alex Cus-
sidy, George Dill, George llamson, Tom
Johnstone, Ada Joy. Grace Laughton,
Margaret Liobscher, Gladys Mnnkin,
William Mawdsloy, J'lrank 'Meagher,
,At«ay Maolnnos, Teddy MSjVlcar,
Kosa Peters, Louisa Ryan, Warren
Smith. Willie Stanley. George Thur-
man, William Wuldio, Mario Walker.
Division IV, percentage, 89.31; pet-
feet attendance — Clarice Blackwood,
Gordon Boyee, Robert Byres, George
Donaldson, Margaret Douglass, Nance
Gracoy, Florence Graves, Harold How
son, John F. Hume. Grace Keefe, Alta
Lammedcc, Gerald Long, Cecil Ucilcy,
Uaena Tallon, George Wagstaff, Kathleen Williams.
- Dlv. 5, percentage, S9.23; perfect attendance—Mary Barker, Elaine Coles,
Stuart. DosBrvsay, Nelson Fletcher,
Oswald Genest, Cecil King, Edith Law-
son, Ida Lclrnc, Beatrice Matheson,
Eric Moors, Dick Morgan, Jessie McDonald, Robert Peebles, Ruth Robertson, Clifford Turner, Vera Wnlley,
Edith Walton, Bert Walton, Helen
Young, Charlie Steele, M. Irene Gibson.
Division 0—Porcontage, 03.4, Perfect attendance—Mary Abbot, Lloyd
Armstrong, Marcor - Black, Sofie
Chmilowskl. Myrtle Gllettc, Eva Gillette Charlie Hoai-c, Madollne Johnson, Belle Lively, Horry Liobscher,
Otta Mandan, Bonnio Martin, Hazel
Maundrell, Ross Morrison, Annlu Mc-
Innis, George McKoown, Phyllis Me-
Leud, Gertrude MoNollly, Henrietta
McMuhon, Lloyd Held, John Robb,
Beatrice Stanley, Alan Stevenson, Arthur Stevenson, Ada-Sinclair, Phyllis
Fowler.
Division 7—Percentage, 91.34. Porf
feet attendance—UUly Brown, Evan
Brown, Wllllo Freno, Aimer austaf-
son, Stanley Hull, Wllllo Harkness,
Hazel Hlllnni, Joe Ink, Marlon Juntos,
Alfred Jeffs, Tessle Knox,' Muriel
Matindroll, Frances Middleton-, WI|Hc
Muraro, Hazel Murphy, Helen Murphy,
Charlie Oponshaw. Gilbert Pago. Harry
Pike, Erie Ramsden, Fred Ritchie,
Odin ■ Sostad, Tom Sturgcsu, Nell
Webb. Wllllo Williams, Alllstor Mao-
Charles.
Division 8.—Percentage, 91:28. Perfect attendance—James Bate. Arthur
Boyco, Gertrude Forrester, Margaret
Gausdal, David Graham, Rdg. Graves.
§lady»:Hull,   Evelyn   Hay,   Dorothy
lifel'son, William' Ingram,    Gordon
'irvitrfc;  Frances Lively.   Myrtle   Me..'
Opportunities a'Plenty for Economical
Shoppers on Friday
SPECIAL   DISPLAYS   ALL   OVER   THE   STORE    OF   MONEY-SAVING    BARGAINS    FOR   MEN,
WOMEN    AND   CHILDREN
OVERCOATS   FOR  MEN—A  special   line   of SPECIAL  VALUES   IN   STAPLES  AND   HOSE
Fine. Brown Tweed Overcoats, extra well made, ONE BOLT ONLY, BLACK WOOL SERGE—
double sewn seams, deep cuff on sleeve, half-belt, Splendid    shade    of    Black;    40    inches    wide,
military style, convertible collar,    A OIA flit Regular }1.00 per yard.                                   CQr>
quality coat at a, low price.   Each   .JI'+iUU Special Bargain Friday, Per Yard     Dub
MEN'S  ALL-WOOL TWILLED PANTS  FOR w™™i„ ^W^^f^f^"°Z \
HARD   WEAR-Heavy   Weight   Grey   Mature; a    35  inches  wlde     Sl)e(.lal  Villuc  -.  ftft
one of Carr's best. »C 7K lor Friday-Five Yards for  t) I ■UU
Price Only, Per Pair   $3.1 J umff|  GIRLS,  AND B0YS,  gTOcKiNGS
MACKINAW     COATS     FOR    COMFORT- ~}n  plam and   Rlbb«'i    extraordinary   values;
Nothing better for the outdoor mun than one of ,' s'zcs'    ,               ,., .                                 ' ttfii*
these   All-Wool   Coats;    heavy   quality;    double All One Price, Per 1 air   T«*l»
breasted   Norfolk   style,   with   belt;    Brown    or PURE   IRISH   LINEN—Round  thread;   suit-
Grey Check; all sizes.                            Oil   Rfl ab'°   lor   tlrawn   ancl   embroidery  work;    grass
Each           u| I iwU bleached; snow white; in two widths:
45 Inches Wide— 0«1   Cfl
ALL-WOOL HEAVY HOSE—Brown   Mottled; Per Yard       ijlllUU
good weight for soldiers or civilians.            Rilf» "''l '"ehes Wide—                                         ffi  ^C
Price, Per Pair    WWV Per Yard      $ 111 3
No. 972—
MEN'S WORK BOOT—Made from Black
Mennonlte, which is soft and pliable, over heavy
oak soles and an extra clamp sole filled with steel
slugs; solid leather heels and counters; plain
toe; a boot for comfort as well as hard
wear.   Our Price 	
LADIES' WHITE SILK BLOUSES—Heavy
quality silk; has largo collar, trimmed with pearl
buttons, tucked front; sizes 3-1, 38, 38 and 40,
Regular values up to $8.50.
On Sale  	
$3.50
$5.00
To replace would sell for $7.00.
SILK      CREPE-DE-CHENE      BLOUSES—Iu
Copenhagen and Navy; sizes 38 and 40 i
only.   On Sale 	
$3.50
No. 111—
MEN'S WORK BOOT—Mmk from Black
Mennonitc Grain over good weight nailed soles;
heavy leather insoles; a good work boot.
Our  Prico   	
To replace, $6.00.
$4.50
GIRLS* CORDUROY VELVETEEN HATS—
In all of the pretty new shapes; Round and Tri-
uorn Tarns; Mushroom Shapes, slightly turned up
in front; colors Mole, Wine, Smoke, Grey, etc.;
for girls five to ten years. A4  "jr
On  Sale       flifU
China To Be Proud of Can Be Had Here a'Plenty
NO WOMAN CAN LOOK AT BEAUTIFUL CHINA WITHOUT LONGING TO POSSESS SOME
COME AND LOOK OVER OUR COLLECTION. EVERY WANTED LINE IS HERE AND PRICES
WON'T STOP YOU FROM HAVING IT.
SPECIAL  PRICES  FOR  DINNER  AND  TEA  SETS
97-PIECE DINNER SET—Semi-Porcelain,  beautiful design.
White and Gold; neat size cups.
At  the Low price— Per Set  	
51-PIECE DINNER SET—Dainty Green Decoration with Gold
Edge; one of our best lines in a small set.
Special Price, Per Set 	
YE OLDE TIME LIGHT BLUE WILLOW WARE—English
China Tea Sets, comprising six cups and saucers, six tea plates,
one covered sugar bowl and one cream jug.   No home
is complete without one of these sets.   Prico Only
BEAUTIFUL IMPORTED CHINA TEA SETS—Assorted
patterns; very pretty and good shape. Six cups and saucers, six
tea plates, one covered sugar bowl, one cream Jug. ~ "
Per Set 	
CLOVER      LEAF     PATTERN      SERVICE—
Porcelain, Plain White, with edge line and clover
leaf in gold;   exceptional value  in this  hard  to
get pattern.
Six Cups and Saucers for 	
$16.75
$14.50
$6.50
$4.55
$1.15
ENGLISH   CHINA   CUPS   AND   SAUCERS-
Worcester   Shape,   with    fine    gold    edge;    neat
and dainty.
Six Cups and Saucers for 	
$1.75
(th? Hudson* Bay (Tompiu
. HERBERT E.BURB1DGE STORES COMMISSIONER
Keowen, Roberta Pike, William Rappe,
Elmer Reilley. Edith Ryan, Doris
Sleeves, Frances Schulzc, Vera Thar,
Don Wilson.
Division !t—Percentage, »tr).13. Perfect attendance—Thomas Bate, Lelun
liloomer, Reginald Chlmlooski, Harold
Ericson, William Foote, Dorothy Hall,
Roste Hall, Marjorle Hardy. William
Jeffs, Fred Lcno, Don Leslie, Gerald
McLeary, Isabella McCuaig, Gordon
MeKen/.le, May Page, Samuel Thomas,
Merle Thorpe; Jcauio Wallach, Isahelle
Walton, Gray Wellson.
Division 10— Percentage, D2.-17. Period al tendance—Anna Anderson,
Leonard HIakcy, William Byres, Norah
Cairns, Frank Carlson, Agnes Cassldy,
.lean Coles, Stanley Crysler, .lames
Cunliffe, Charles Driscol. Helen Eddy,
Gladys Fotheringham, Cyril .lackman,
Hoy .Johnson, Donald Kurtz, Erin Mac-
allisler, Doris Pago, Morris Richardson, Gertrude Ritchie, Gertudo Rut-
ledge, John Thelin,  Laura Wlllcy.
Division 11—Percentage, 00.19, Perfect attendance—Jac* l.iunyan, Richard Ewort, Jack Francis, Harold Gillette, Florence Grant, Rosic Jeffreys,
Singnie Kilhcrg. Vera Kcrby, Jack McDonald, Allan Mclnnes, Gordon Richardson. Ethel Sutcliffe, Conrad Thar,
Gwennie Thorpe, Alfred Wood, Finlay
Welsh.
Division 12—Percentage, 94,60, Per
fect attendance: Harold Abbott, Wilfred Bush, Jack Byres, Jennie Cal-
hick, Isabel Cowley, Edward Chmil-
owski, Jack Deildal, Aslrid Gausdale,
Connie Hickman, Margaret Hlpperson,
Jack llorstcad, Jack Huddlcston, Albert Kitto, Valentine Marshall, Harold
Matthews, Howard Maundrell, Elizabeth Middleton, Ida Ryan, Roland
Thompson, John Towter, John Wallace,   George  Wallach,  Cyril  Steele.
Division t:t—Percentage, 89.21. Perfect attendance: Connie Cain, George
Cam pion, Ruth Erickson, George
Graham, Leonard Gustafson, Rankin
Hanna, Dorothy Hardy, Eddie Harris,
Stanley Lcno, Evelyn Matthews, Ruth
Orr, Trueman Rock, Marguerite San-
dercock, Alma Smillie, Margaret
Smith, Lily Sostad, Elly Stevenson,
Gerald Stlbbs, Evelyn Thomas, De-
loros  Warner.
Division 14—Percentage, S0.2S. Perfect attendance: Margery Billings,
Dorothea Coles, Helmut Farouholtz,
Cameron Fraser, Tommy Halsoy, Le-
roy Irvine, Charles Jeffs, Roderick
McCleod, William Page, Kathleen
Page, Louise Peebles, May Howe,
Robert Sommers, Mathllde Yorgenscn,
Edith Wilton.
Division 1 j—Percentage, 84.7,1. Perfect attendance: Joe Chimilowski,
Fred Coffey, Margaret Cotter, Winnie
Foster,   Walter  Gillette,  Dorothy  Hii-
Private   Hospital
LICENSED BY PROVINCIAL
GOVERNMENT
We give particular attention to all
emale trouble—home-like apartments
for ladles awaiting accouchment. Cor-
tfied nurses sent out on private cases,
own or country. HigheBt references;
easonable   terms;   Inspection   Invited.
Mro.   Moore. Suoerintendvnt,
THE   HOME   PRIVATE   HOSPITAL
Palls and Baxer Sts., Nelton, B. C.
P. O. Box 772.
Phone 372 for Appointment.
lam, Paul lluddleson, Mary Jaj*'vis,
Beryl Johnson, NJlie Kerosh, Henry
Ma dau, Virginia Morrison, John
Marl od, Billy Poole, Margaret Richardson, Elsie Turner, Jlc Wright,
.John Wood, Jack Wells, Dorothy Mc-
Xeilly, Gerald Ca penter, Edna
Buchanan.
Division Hi—Percentage, IIO.UM. Perfect attendance: Ruth Abbott, Isabel
Benson, Dorothy Wakey, Elizabeth
Borden, Arthur Carlson, Edward
Coloy, Bcrthel Erickson, Robort
Footc, Eddie Graves, Frank Holmes,
Alex Mclnnis, Caroline McNcilly.
Ronald Ramsden. Ralph Olson, Annie
Smith, Dorothy Eturges, Edgar Wat-
erer, Christina Williams. Marjory
Wilson.
Condensed "Want" Ads Order Form
Us. this blank en whloh to writs out your condensad ad., ono word in eaoh spaco.   Enoloso money
order or chock and mail direct to The Daily News,  Nelson, B. C,
Rata:  One cent a word eaoh insertion, eix con seoutive  insertions  charged  as four,    Eaoh  initial,
figure, dollar sign, etc, count as one word.   No ch arge less than 25 cents.
Plsass publish th* above advertisement times, for whioh I enclose I.
Addrsss ...
If dssirsd. rspllsa may be addressed to Box Numbers at Tha Daily Newa Office,   If repliea are to be
milled enoloee 10s extra to cover oost of posts gs and allow fivo worda extra for box number.
!>,!.
 -rAarwj*ttrr-
f he bajlytrews-
■ntmpft—mv.- *='.niis=
UNEQUALLED FOR GENERAL USE
W. P. TIERNEV, General Sales Agent,
Nelson, B. C.
Cars supplied to all railway points.
ions
BRING YOUR PRESCRIPTIONS TO US. YOUR PHYSICIAN CAN RELY ON OUR
COMPOUNDING AND OUR
DRUGS. ONLY GRADUATES
DI8PENSE.
Canada Drug & Book Co.
Eastman  Kodaks  and  Supplies.
Willard Chocolates
THE ARK
Ladles' Vests, good weight....3Sc
Curtain Scrim, yard  15o
Curtain Cretonne, yd. 2Bc to 30c
Portieres, pair  S4a75
Window Shades, each  600
Crockery Cups, li dozen......750
Flannelette Blankets 12-4 pr S2.75
Men's Shoes, old prices $2.75 to S5
New  and   Second-hand   Furniture,
Stoves and  Ranges  Bought
and Sold.
J. W .HOLMES,
Phone 65L. i 606 Vernon St.
Place Tour Orders Now (or
GREENHILL COAL
The most economical coal' on the
Market.
D. A. McFARLAND. Agent
Insurance, Real Estate.    Room 6, K
W. C. Block.
Telephone 41. P, 0. Box 24
JJainty, delightful
Alice
Brady
In a play of exceptional
appeal,
"THE       HUNGRY       HEART"
Other  reels   of   interest.
Coming- Monday,
MARY   MILES   MINTER
Nov.  12  and  13
"IDLE   WIVES."
Auction Sale
of Jewelry and Watches
STARTING   NOVEMBER   18T
Afternoons    and    EvenlngB    at
2 p. m. and 7:30 p. m.
PART OF J. O. PATENAUDE'S
JEWELRY STOCK
SOLD BY
The Wallace
Jewelry Co.
Rossland, B.C.
NOTICE
Strike on at Skyline  Nine
AINSWORTH, B. C.
All men working or going to work
will be placed on unfair list.
NELSON MINERS' UNION
MARCUS MARTIN, Secy.
CRADDOCK TO MEET TURK
WRESTLER FOR CHAMPIONSHIP
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
DES MOINES, la., Nov. 1.—Earl
Craddock of Anita, la., defending his
claim to the world's wrestling championship, will meet Yusiff Hussane,
the Turkish wrestler, in a finish catch-
as-catch-enn match here on Nov. 21
according to an announcement today.
ITALIAN   FORCES  EFFECT
WITHDRAWAL TO NEW LINE
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
'ROME, Nov. 1.—The Italian forces
under the Austro-Gcrmun attack ln
northern Italy have effected a withdrawal on the line of the Tagllamento
river with the third Italian army nearly complete, the war office announced
today.
The Umbrella
Bargains Are
Going Fast
DON'T   MISS   THIS   GOLDEN   OPPORTUNITY
TO HAVE YOUR CHOICE OF OUR ENTIRE UMBRELLA 8T0CK
FOR
$5.00
Both Ladies' and Gent's Umbrellas
8TERLING 8ILVER  AND  GOLD  PLATED  MOUNTED  HANDLE8
EXTRA   FINE   8ILK   AND   WOOL   TOPS
THESE  ARE  ALL  SUIT  CASE   UMBRELLA8
We Guarantee These Umbrellas to Be Serviceable
COME IN—NO TROUBLE TO SHOW G00D8
J.O.Patenaude
Artistic Jeweler—Expert Opticisn end Watchmaker
WOVALOID
WE   HAVE   EXCLU8IVE  SALE  OF  THIS
BE8T  QUALITY  RUBBER  ROOFING
Ws Ousrsntes Evsry Square of It and ths Pries Is Lewsr thin any other
High Class Roofing  ,
8AMPLES AND  PRICES  ON   REQUEST
Wood-Vallance Hardware Co.,Ltd.
1 WHOLESALE  AND  RETAIL NELSON,  B.C.
T MEETING
DELEGATES TO THE CONVENHON
Stirring Win-the-War Addresses Are
Made by Sergt. Charles Molnnes
and C. R. Hamilton.
At the Unionist meeting held in the
opera house last evening Beven delegates were elected by acclamation to
the Unionist convention to be held
in the city tonight. The nomination
was preceded by addresses by Sergt.
Charles Mclnnes, recently returned
from overseas, and by C. R. Hamilton,
K.C.
The delegates are-as follows: George
Ferguson, Mrs. Goulding, whose three
sons have joined the army, C. D.
Blackwood, A. S. Horswill, C. R. Hamilton, K.C., H. H. Pitts and D. A. McFarland.
Two delegates, Fred Roberts and
Sergt. Mclnnes, have been appointed
by the War Veterans.
Six have been named by the Nelson,
Win-the-War league. These six are:
T. D. Stark, Donald Guthrie, Mrs. W. J.
Mohr, Aid. J. A. McDonald, T. L.
Bloomer and R, W. Hinton.
The 15 Nelson delegates thus include
Unionists of all shades of former political opinion.
Sergt.   Molnnes Speaks.
On introduction by the chairman, C.
D. Blackwood, Sergt. Charles Mclnnes
said in his opening remarks that ho
was not appearing as a representative
.of any political organization nor as a
representative ot the Great War Veterans* association but as an independent citizen with the interest of country at heart. The movement whicn at
the present time was sweeping the
country, the speaker referred to as an
instance In which history was again
repeating itself, (He was not in accord with the term "Win-the-War,"
stating that he did not think, after the
showing Canada had already made in
the world conflict, that the use of the
term was necessary. Canada was determined and would win the war.
-Going back to the outbreak of the
war, Sergt. Mclnnes reviewed the excitement, the first war rush, and the
following enthusiasm and fervor of
the next few months when 33,000 Ca-,
nadian soldiers answered the call to
arms. From that time on Canada had
followed the action with pride. Men
and more men were needed. The support the men at the front now required
was the sending of additional soldiers
and the only way to carry out this vital
necessity effectively was through the
selective draft system. Should this system fall into the hands of those who
would not carry out the plan, declared
Sergt. Mclnnes, it would be a disgrace
to Canada.
Draft System Necessary.
The draft system was the only recourse, the speaker continued, even
tnough it would havo been better, to
have had it inaugurated in the autumn
of 1914 it was the more important that
11 should be carried Into full effect at
the present time. This was the most
important issue facing the Canadian
people today. In placing the system
into play there were two classes of men
who were injuring Its effectiveness, he
said. They were the press correspondents who misconstrued the statements
of public men and the small party politician who worked for individual benefit.
"In choosing your delegates," Sergt.
Mclnnes concluded, "I hope you will
get thoso who will endorse the plan of
selective draft '.system and support
those who will work for it. There are
some young men who do not want to
JoJn the army and they can menace
the carrying out of the Issue by putting
in someone who will net support it."
Canada First.
In the applause which followed the
chairman introduced Mr. Hamilton. He
always felt, he snld, that the destiny
of Canada should be with that of Great
Britain. , ae was of the opinion that
many could riot read of the utterances
of Laurier and say that it was his, the
reader's opinion. He had been in accord with tho Conservative principle
that Canada should stay by Great
Britain and in his opinion there were
many- Liberals who believed very sincerely along these lines. During the
coming month, he said, many Liberals
would show'that they wero with Canada, first and last,
England had been the only successful colonizer in the world. Spain and
France had mado failures of it and
England, too, had tailed when in the
first they had lost the American colonics. These she had lost in the attempt to exploit them In her own self-
interest. Since then she had successfully directed her energy toward keeping them together.
One End in View.
Those in attendance tonight were not
there for party and self but for the
successful carrying out of the war. It
was hot only for war times, the speaker
said, but for long after that. A great
deal of dangerous ground has to he
covored, he said, and if everyone
was careful and kept a careful rein on.
party and self interests and kept to
the line on which the movement had
first begun then it would be a matter'
of satisfaction for the rest of our lives.
On the other hand should the movement fall back on party lines it would
be a matter of regret for a long time.
. Immediately after the close of the
address by Mr. Hamilton the chairman
called for the order of business. John
Fraser was appointed to act ns secretary.
t
SHOWS BIG AVERAGE
Division Four Takes Attendance Honors With Division Two a
Close Second.
At Hume school division four took
the attendanco honors for the month
of October with a percentage of 96.84.
The full report of the school Is as
follows:
Division . 1.—Teacher, Mrs. E.
Williams. Enrolment, 29. Percentage, 8-1.27. Perfect attendance—Leo
Deslreau, Bertha Gilchrist, Hugh
Horswill, John Houston, William
Houston, Albert Roynon, Sadie Shuttles orth, Laura Shuttleworth, 'Roy
Smith, Ernest Smith, Catherine Stark,
Dorccn St. Denis, James Will, Rossland  Young,  Crawford  Young.
Division 2—Teacher, Mrs. Marget
Ople. Enrolment, 27. Percentage,
9B.28. Perfect al tendance—Joan Cob-
bett, Roy Firkins, Audrey Foot, Tool-
sic Houston, Violet Lake, Gladys Lambert, Evelyn McKim, Walter Poole, Harold Pike, Bernice Rendu U, Ruby Roynon, William Shuttleworth, Ethel
Smith, Albert, Stubbs, Cameron
Denis, Orrin St. Denis, Erna Looman.
George Waldle, Vernon Young.
Division "3—Teacher, G. Mclntyre.
Enrolment, 34. Percentage, 80.81.
Perfect attendance—Otven Berry, Eric
For Practical Men
Semi-ready Clothes
When you want to do
a little woik around the
place your Semi-ready
suit knows how to take
care of itself. It isn't going to be put out of shape
by a little rough usage.
Another thing about these clothes:
they're stylish, but they're easy fitting
and comfortable; they accommodate
themselves to such outdoor activities.
Come in and see the now models for
fall; If you*re "hard to fit," we have just
what you need. - .
$20 to $35
J. A. Gilker
BOYS' 1AND   GENTS'  OUTFITTER
swaessssssatres
THIS COLD   SNAP FORCES   ONE   TO LOOK  CAREFULLY
INTO ONE'S COAL BINS—BE WISE
ORDER  NOW AS THERE  MAY  BE  A  SCARCITY  LATER
WE  HAVE  NOW   IN   8T0CK:
Ten Tons and Over.   Tons.
Franco-Canadian Steam     S T.Eo S 7.75
Five Tons and Over.
C.W.C. Lump, Domestlo  ••       9.00 9.25 ,
C.W.C. Nut, Domestic (Range)        7.60 7.75
Wyoming Lump, Domestlo       10.25 10.50
Wyoming Nut, Domestlo (Range)  ,       8.50 8.76
Ten Tons and Over.
Bankhead Anthracite, Domestic (Egg Site)     11.75 12.00
TERMS—CASH ?W1TH   ORDER _.i
Kootenay Columbia Fuel Company r ••
CHAS. F.  MoHAROY,  AGENT
wmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Repairs
When in need of watch, Jewelry or
optical repairs. Send or bring them
to us. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Mail orders receive our careful attention.
J. J. WALKER
JEWELER AND OPTICIAN
Chapman, Hazel Giilett, Roso Hart-
wig, Janie Langill, Annie bundle, Annie Mason, Mary Morgan, Lowls Nelson, Gordon Roynon, Kathleen Socman, Alfred Saunders, Catherine Skil-
licorn, Lily Smith,
i Division 4—Teacher, Miss C. A.
Coates. Enrolment, 30. Percentage,
96.M. Perfect attendance—Alvin Bal-
com, Ralph Berry, Harold Chapman,
Edna Chapman, Harold Curran, Pattle
Firkins, Morris Frenoh, Mac Keys,
Jean Lundle, Norman Ldurltz, Bobble
Mllburn, Margaret Morgan, Alex Ring-
rose, Mabel Smith, Dorothy Smith, Alfred Smith, Dorothy Stubbs, McBrlde
St. Denis, Ruby Young.
- Division 6—Teacher, Mies A. Abey.
Enrolment, 32. Percentage, 87.68. Perfect attendanco—Silas Balcom, Allan
Barber, Howard Beatty, James Davidson, Russel French, Jack Horswill, Ira
Marquis, Charles McLean, Lottie Nelson, May Saunders, Mary Shardelou,
Stanley Smith, John Stark, Charles
Stubbs, Horace Vyse, Amy Walker,
Charles Walker.        ,    ,
REALTY IN SAY
Outsiders Coming to City for Winter
Oust "To  Let" Signs on
Residences.
City realt ymen state that the demand for better class houses has been
greater this year than for several
years. Owners of blocks say that they
ere having no difficulty in letting Individual rooms and suits. The consensus of opinion is that the resident
population of the city will this winter be considerably greater than last.
One real estate dealer gave his opinion of the influx of persons for the
Winter as due, to some degree, to increased prosperity through mining activity in tho district during the past
summer and the usual custom of residents in the outside districts to spend
the winter in the city on account of
the school accommodation offered
their children.
UNIONISTS WILL
DE TODAY
About 20 Delegates Already Here—50
More to Arrive Today—Green
Reaches City.
About 20 delegates for the Unionist
nominating convention this evening
reached Nelson last night. They included men and women of varying
shades of former political opinion.
About 50 delegates from other points
will arrive today. These with the 15
Nolson delegates, will make up the total representation of 85 for the West
Kootenay riding.
The convention will open in the
opera house at 9:15 o'clock this evening. This hour was arranged to permit tho Rossland and Trail delegates
to come over on the evening train.
R. F. Green, the Hitting member, who
will bo a candidate for the Unionist
nomination, is a guest at the Strathcona.
W. A, Anstie, Liberal candidate,
come ln last night and is at the Hume.
I
Social and Personal
Mrs. Sturgeon and Master Joo Vigneux aro visiting friends in Alberta,
Nurse Ebbutt, who underwent on
operation Saturday lost following an
attack of appendicitis, Is reported as
progressing favorably.
Sergt.-Major W. G. Marlow of Kamloops was in the city yesterday visiting old friends.
FRED C.  MOFFATT
FOR RETURNING OFFICER
I A telegraphic despatch from Ottawa
announces the appointment' of Fred C.
Moffatt as returning officer ln West
Kootenay for the coming federal elections.
AT THE THEATRES.
Beautiful and charming, Miss Alice
Brady is delightful and entrancing in
"The Hungry Heart;" the intensely
interesting film play. .made >tyy the
World. Film corporation from "Frou
Frou," the famous stage play. Miss
Brady, in this now film play, is called
upon to enact a character that calls
for real dramatic ability of the highest
possible order. In every scene her
acting rings true. Not once does she
over-act, or under-act. She is exactly
right throughout the .progress of this
tremendous offering.
Sconically and sartorially "The
Hungry Heart" Is perfect. Not the
slightest detail has been overlooked.
Money has been spent lavishly ln
making this the perfect production.
THe Gem theatre will have the pleasure ot presenting this production to
Its patrons today only,   |
•1000 REWARD OFFERED
IN ABDUCTION  CASE
Action Tsk«n by Alberta Government
Regarding Disappearance of
'-,:'    Edmonton Qlrl,
EDMONTON,   Alta,   Nov.   I.—Tne
provincial government today offered a
reward of 11000 for Information lead-
ing to the apprehension and convlc
Hop of the person or persons concent'
od' in the abduction ajid detention of
Mary Congdon.''
Miss fiapgdofl waa mvisrsA in »b9
Package Cereals
We are advised that the Food Controller has extended th* time for thi
disposal of Flour and Cereals in small packages, giving the Manufacturer,
and Wholesalers till the 30th November to dispose of their (took,"and
allowing the Retailers to sell till the 31st December.
After that date, original packages must contain 20 lbs. or over. ■    .->
The Brackman-Ker Milling Co., Ltd
Corson's
CHARCOAL
TOOTHPASTE
Will Whiten
Your Teel*h
254|
City Drug Co.
Phone 34. - P. O. Box 108!
PRESCRIPTION SPECIALISTS
MOVED
I beg to announce to my present
and prospective customers that
I am now in largor quarters at
411% Ward street and am ready to
meet their demands more efficiently
in Jewelery, Watchmaking and
Optical work.
A. D. PAPAZIAN
411'/s  Ward  St.,  two  doors  from
Post Office.
Drugs by Mail
Try us when you need goods in a
hurry.
Try us when you want intelligent
service.
Pure Drugs and Medicines, Films
and Camera Supplies, Gramophone
Records and Needles, Sprays for
Roses, Fruit Trees or Poultry
Houses, etc.
Rutherford Drug Co.
NELSON, B. C.
household of W. R. Pearce, Edmonton,
and disappeared Oct. 25, after attending a church service. Her bug containing personal belongings and $2 was
found on tho high level bridge across
the Saskatchewan river. An automobile was seen In that vicinity, the
driver of which was acting oddly that
night Miss Congdon was 27 years
old and had a good reputation. The
police theory Is that of suicide In the
river. Her employer and friends believe that she was abducted.
BENNY LEONARD WILL  HAVE
BOUT WITH SAILOR KIRKE
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
DENVER, Colo., Nov. 1.—Benny
Leonard, lightweight champion, now
commissioned as an instructor of boxing in the army, will meet Sailor Kirke
here Thanksgiving day in a 10-round,
no-decislon bout, It was announced toduy. A telegram announcing that army
officials had given Leonard permis-
son to make a western trip was received from Billy Gibson, his manager, by promoters here.
Kirke Is lightweight champion of the
Rocky mountain region.
RETURNING OFFICERS
FOR  ELECTION  NAMED
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA, Nov. 1.—Returning offi-
cers for the general elections are appointed as follows:
Cariboo—S. C. Burton, Kamloops,,
Comox-Alborni—W. N. Carty, Vancouver.
Kootenay,  East—H.   G.   Lockwood,
Golden.
Kootenay,    West—F.    C.    Moffatt,
Nelson.
Tale—H. A, Shatford, Vernon (merchant).
LAURIER DEFERS GIVING
OUT HIS MANIFE3TO
(By Dally News Leased Wire.)
OTTAWA,  Nov.    1.—Although    tho
date of  the  election  has  now  been
definitely set, and writs for tt issued,
TONIGHT—7 TO 10:40
8PECIAL COMEDY PROGRAM
Christie Comedy,
"HER CROOKED CAREER"
Billie Burke
—in—
"Gloria's Romance"
Bray Cartoon Comedies,
"COL.   HEEZA, LIAR   PLAY!
HAMLET"
and
A "MISS NANNY GOAT,
AVIATOR."
LATEST BRITISH WAR NEWI
OTHER FEATURES
Tomorrow—Mollis King in "Th
On-the-Squsre   Girl."
Love's Eternal Drama-
Enchantingly Told!
Amid the picturesquo sweep o
the far flung sands, radiant witl
the color and poetry of the oast
vibrant with tho soul-stirrinf
romance that characterized Rob
ert Hichens' notable novel anc
play, this accomplishment ir
screen art enthralls with its ma
jestie beauty and appealing
story. Like a scarf from out
the desert woven of multi-color
ed strands of lift, the .dawn oi
love and tho dusk of regret arc
pictured in a gorgeous pageant
Embellished with wondrous'sot-
tings, vivid with spectaculai
scenes ana enacted by a notabli
cast, including
MIS8 HELEN WARE
and
THOMAS SANTSCHI
"The Garden of Allah"
(In Nine Parts)
TWO     DAYS,    COMMENCINC
WEDNE8DAV, NOV. 7th
—at—
THE   STARLAND   THEATRE
it Is unlikely that the expected ma
festo from Sir Wilfrid Laurlor will
forthcoming until early next week
Is said to be a lengthy document.
U. S. TRANSPORT HIT BY
TORPEDO  BUT  MAKES PO
(By Daily News Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Nov. 1.—The Amerh
transport Finland was torpedoed
ccntly while returning to tho Uni
States from the war zone. The ves
was damaged, but made port Un
its own steam.'
EIGHT KILLED, 21 INJURED
IN AIR RAID ON  LOND
(By Dally Nows Leased Wire.)
LONDON, Nov. 1—About   30   a
planes, in soven groups, took part
last night's air raid.    Bight persi
were killed and  21 others were
jured.
"PSALM BOOK" TURNED OUT
TO BE HUN'S "SPY QUID
(By Dally News Leased Wire;)
PETROGRAD, Nov. 1.—Among
German prlsonersof war at Tula v
found copies of a "Psalm book," wh
awakened suspicion owing to Its r
usual style of printing. Examlnat
proved It to.be a "spy's. guide",
code.
Early—
CHRISTMAS   IS   NOT   THE   ONLY   TIME   IT   PAYS
TO  8HOP  EARLY
Can't  we  serve  you  today—or tomorrow—instead  of
several weeks from now?
NOW—we have our best variety—our widest range of
patterns—and all tha new styles to offer.
If you ar* going to have a New Suit or Overcoat this
winter, do your shopping early.
Emory  &  Walley
FIT-REFORM    WARDROBE

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