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The Nanaimo Mail Mar 7, 1896

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Array I
VOL. I.
NANAIMO, BRITISH COLUMBIA,  SATURDAY MORNING, MARCH 7, 1896.
NO. 38.
is? m
Seeds.    Seeds.    Seeds.
—'^m—
—We have just Opened out a Large Stock of—
-V-
A,
FIELD,
GARDEN,
FLOWEK
Prices as Always, Down to the Lowest Notch.
GROCERIES are still very low in price.    The goods are
the best obtainable.
Potatoes, per sack  65 cents.
Jams, 71b pails  G5
Beans,, 401bs  1 00
Boiled Oats, 301ba    1 00
California   Table   Fruits,   Pears,   Apricots,
Peaches, quulity guaranteed, a tins  1 00
Cleaned Currants, 121bs  1 00
Musutttelle Raisins, choice, 20lbs  1 00
Valencia Raisins, extra good, 141bs  1 00
Everything rise in the same ratio,' and we guarantee quality in
every case.   Send along a trial order and be satisfied.
Goods "nd Prices and Prices are right.
THE PEOPLE'S ST(M
(fa JAMES YOUNG. Victoria Crescent. ^Tj
[ To attract settlers you must be able that it is no uncommon thing for
Great Success of the Convention
at Winnipeg.
Outline of the Proposed Plan—Officers
Elected—Mr. P. ,1. Ileane Speaks
for British Columbia.
The immigration convention in
luniher and fisheries, British Columbia must ere long become the
greatest industrial centre in the
Dominion of Canada, or for that
mailer, on the North American
continent. Our mines are noiv be-
ing rapidly developed and capital is
Winnipeg on 'I hursdny, 1< ridity and | g0;„,, j,, froto ..p parts of the world,
particularly from the United States,
to carry on this important work.
to prove to them not only that the | one little steamer, manned by some
soil is productive, hut that they can j 15 men, to catch over 200,000 lbs.
dispose of I heir products profitably, in three days off the north coast.
Here is where your direct interest! You cannot fail to realize what
in the development of British Col- all this means. Let our mines be
umbia comes in. With its great developed, our lumber trade expand-
wealth of   precious   metals,   coal, led and our shores populated by a
thriving  fishing  community, and
what a splendid market there will
NEWS SUMMARY.
r
t
^*&X>^'*',»'V*^^^^^V<k^'*''ft-%*^»^'^,V%'V%^%'%*'
^
The Cash
I BootandShoeStore
No. 19 Commercial Street,
QUn OPENING
On Saturday, Feb. 29,
The Latest Styles of Men's, Women's and Children's Goods. Will be sold at Lowest Cash
I**rices. »
E.E.C. JOHNSON, Mgr.     \
Saturday, of lust week was a great
success—successful in numbers; in
: the interest, the zeal and the intelli-
[gence displayed, and in the enthu-
j siasm evoked. A plan was outlined,
| to be formulated and worked out by
; the executive board, comprehending
the idea that all governments and
j great  landed  organizations of the
j west and northwest combine their
strength and influence in one eeu-
I tral organization.  Thus. Gilroy was
elected president,  A. J.   Andrews,
vice-president and treasurer; F. W.
Heubach, secretary.   Chairmen of
the  different districts   represented
were also elected, A. C. Flummer-
felt, of Victoria, being chosen for
British Columbia.    Tbe chairman
of each district will call  a  meeting
as soon as pos.-ible for the purpose
of discussing and explaining what
had beendonein Winnipeg in order
that  each   local   organization   be
completed as soon  as practicable.
.Mr. F. li. Turnock, of Calgary,
moved   tiie   following    resolution,
which was carried unanimously:—
Thai in the opinion of this convention   the  development   of the
great mineral resources of the west
is of the greatest importance in connection with the settlement of the i
country; for the reasons that such
development will not only result in i
the introduction of a vast amount
I of capita] into the west, but will
I,1*,. greatly increase the exchangeable wealth of the country, and will
; furnish a largo and profitable local
i market for the products of the ranch
and farm.   The convention, there-
J fore, urge the Dominion government
I to take every possible step to bring
I Ihe mineral resources of the west to
the attention uf (lie milling men and
capitalists cf Great Britain and the
| United .States, and to render every,
encouragement   and assistance to!
!extend tin.- important industry.
M>. F, J. Deane, of Victoria, in
With the progress being made in
other directions, the constantly increasing trade with China, Japan
and the Australasian colonies, the
ever growing export trade in lumber and coal, tbe unmistakable indications are that British Columbia
within a comparatively short per
be for your products. We can sup
ply you with much, but our purchases in return will be commensurate. To-day we import three-
fourths of our food stuffs, although
unnecessarily so, for were our agricultural lands properly settled up
we could produce in certain lines
all we require, but under any conditions we must look to Manitoba
and the Northwest for many of the
necessaries of life.
British Columbia wants to see
the territories and provinces to the
east of her grow; the quicker their
development, the better for us—for
iod will be one of the greatest wealth we shall supply you with fruit, fish,
producing countries in the world,'lumber, hops and, later on, with to
and second to no province in the
Dominion as an industrial centre.
This being so the importance to the
fanners of Manitoba and the Northwest Territories of cultivating trade
relations with British Columbia cannot be over-estimated. Already
these relations are assuming proportions of no mean extent, and
they will be as steadily increased
as British Columbia becomes set tied
up and her unrivalled natural resources are developed. Thereforeit
is distinctly in your interest to aid
in this work. Remember, too, that
you can offer no better inducement
to Unending settlers than that right
alongside of the farm lands you desire them to occupy is a big mining
country. You should, one and all,
as good business men, make your-
bacco. These two latter products
grow to great advantage in certain
of our valleys.
Our interests our mutual. The
prosperity of one means tbe prosperity of all; hence British Columbia can heartily co-operate with this
grand immigration scheme, which,
it is to be sincerely hoped, will
prove as successful as tbe most enthusiastic of the delegates here assembled could desire.
  ■»««.	
banner Moves the Six Months' Hoist.
Sir Charles Tupper moved the
second reading of the Remedial Bill
on Tuesday.    In a great effort he
championed tbe object of  the bill
and its necessity from  a constitutional standpoint.     He claimed it
was tbe imperative duty of Parlia-
the subject,
no coercion
selves thoroughly acquainted with)ment to legislate on
the resources and requirements of and that there was
British Columbia, and by circula- about it.
ting these faots far and wide, at- Hon. Mr. Laurier made an do-
tract the right class of Bottlers to quent speech in reply, its oharac-
our province, and at the same time teristic being a hold declaration of
place yourselves in a position to sc-j his independence of the Catholic
cure a share of the trade that is church. While personally he was
bound to spring up with the popu-lnot opposed to Ihe redress of the
lous mining and manufacturing Catholic grievance, be held that the
centra soon to materialize. Government had failed lamentably
After giving details of tbe vari- t0dri wi,h the ma"°rin *&*»+
, ,       ,.    .        .,     ,-        manlike manner.    Before pledging
ous mining  districts,   Mr.  Deane itgelf the Government s|,„uid hllve
continued:
British Columbia
to the world's gold supply
inquired into the correctness of the
contribution  Statemenl   made  by (he minority.
He declared himself to he the leader
In-,! year
exceeded $8,000,000, #2,500,000 of.of a Breat party which knew neither
which came from Kootenay alone. Catholics or Protestants as such,
This year a low estimate of our but woul(- rv,u]er i-»tl«* to both
production is ,$10,000,1)00. Up in i P***'*'^* He moved the bill be read
the far-famed Cariboo there is re-i11 "eond time six months hence,
newed interest in both placer and I *Mr- Wallace strongly opposed
quartz mining, and that district!1"6 ■'••■> '•••■• Hon. Mr. Dickey as
seconding .Mr. 1 unlock s resolution,' w*u 800n |)e contributing its mill- strongly supported it. Mr. Edgar
dwelt on the importance, of adver- ions to the world's wealth. On;niovt'** •••«- adjournment of the
Using tiie great mineral   resources  Vancouver Island, in Alberni dis- debate. 	
great mineral
jof British Columbia,  which were
j practically unknown to tbe mining
men and oapitalistB of Great Britain,    lie   trusted   the  association
would take measures   to   force   a
i knowledge of our wonderful mineral
riches upon the financial world.
Air. Deane, who i.s special corres-
ff
TANTS
100 PAIE
JUST RECEIVED--A11 West
of England Cloth.
Your Choice for  -   -   -
OVERCOATS—A fine line of those Heavy
Chinchillas.   Will clear at $20.00.
MOKGAN,
'-*U**\**+^^^0^m*m*m~*>m'^<U-*S^>m*>l***m+*S+S-   '
Tho Fashionable Tailor,
Commercial Street.
trict, is another extensive gold-
mining camp, yet in its infancy,
but promising in the near fuluro to
equal those on the mainland.
And then our coal mines, with an
output of 1,000,000 tons per annum. So far it is only the coalfields
on Vancouver Island that have been
at all systematically developed, but
upon the construction of the Crow's]
pondent of the Province, and repre- Nest Pass railway, the known ooal-
eented the British Columbia Hoard fields of that area will be opened up
of Trade, also made a timely speech an,d, * bi8 coke-making industry
,   .      , ,.      .",.,,    will follow, with the constantly-
during tbe convention, in winch he increasing number of smelters as a
said: market,    J  could  tell you much
I must ask you once and for all more in this strain—of wonderful
time to disabuse your minds of the copper and iron deposits,of our rich
"Sea of Mountains" illusion con- marble and granite quarries, etc.-—i
ceniing British Columbia, It is but you will he put in possession of
true that British Columbia is a this information, properly compiled I
mountainous country, but those and detailed, through the medium
mountains represent to us a wealth of this association.
The Liberals seem to be turning
things round over in England. Success follows upon success. Tbe par-
liamentry election in Southampton
necessitated by the unseating of Tan-
kerville Chamberlayne, Conservative, on the technical charge of having violated the Corrupt Practices
Act, has resulted in the Liberals
win nine the seat. Three candidates
werein the field: Sir Francis Evans,
Liberal; Mr. Candy, i}. ('.. Conservative, and Gibson, Independent
Labor. The vote was as follows:
Mr. Evans, 5,.ri.">7; Candy, 5,522:
Gibson, 278, At the general election Mr. t'lianiherlaviie's majority
over Sir Frauds was 748, At that
lime there were five candidates for
the seal.
Constantinople, March 8.—The Turkish foreign minister has received the
Our foreign trade in lumber last  United States Minister, Mr. Alex. VV,
year amounted to $1,000,000, and il Terrell In the presence of Miss Clara
is constantly on the increase with Barton, president of tho American  Red
South America, the Orient and Aus- Cross  Society, end   the   government
promises to permit miss Barton and assistant! tn travel in Armenia and distribute relief, li In now known, though,
thin in Imperial circles, ii was drawn np
and authorising Miss Barton t» riistrib-
nii1 relief to the Armenian luffljrers, arid
nt first approved by the Saltan, bul wns
■ afterwards withdrawn by hip majesty,
sympathy In this movement to se- qualed for strength and durability, in the meanwhile thousands of persona
cure  tbe speedy settlement of the:    It would be impossible to tell you : arc suffering from cold and famine.
Canadian Northwest. much of our great fisheries. You all!   .     ,   , ••*
Leaner is reei
which we would not  exchange for
tbe province of Manitoba and the
Northwest    Territories    combined.
But in addition to our mountains
we have extensive areas of iinignili- tralasia.   Vou in Manitoba use our
cent  agricultural  lands,  immense lumber, and our shingles cover the
stores of timber, and fisheries that roofs of a very large proportion of
cannot be surpassed.    Tbe presence the buildings  between  the  Pacific
here of Prof. Odium and myself are coast and the Atlantic.   All over
evidences  of   British   Columbia's Canada our lumber is In use, une-
What I want to impress upon you eat our canned salmon, and further I wl"""r » '"•civinu* iel,yr„,„s from all
now is the fact that the people of east our halibut is finding anexcel- ovt"'( ",,!,,la ""■"•■■■■■'"•"■"»• l""1 "" ""'
Manitoba and of tbe Northwest lent market. As a matter of fact,
Territories are directly interested in , our deep-sea fisheries are practically
tbe development of British Coluin- untouched. Could we settle all along
bin and vice versa. Alost of you our count a fishing population who
here present are farmers, and we could dispose of their catch to steam-
have heard a great deal 6f the won- ers visiting them at fixed dates,
derful productiveness of the soil in j these steamers being supplied with
your particular districts and of the I proper refrigerating facilities, an
peculiar advantages this or that sec- immense impetus would be given to
tion offers for cattle raising, dairy-! this industry. The cost of marketing and similar pursuits. This is I ing the fish would be greatly low-
all very well, yet you must not lose ered, giving us bet I or chances to
sight of the fact that the essential compete with the American dealers,
requirement for profitable farming To give you an idea of our halibut stock at a great inurln,
is good markets for your products, fisheries,! can vouch  for the fact son A Co. lob bargains,
noble stand he has taken on the Remedial inn, nnd not a few of these telegrams
eome from the province of Quebec.
Rl'SIXKSN NOTES.
Mr. J, K. T. Powers of Stevenson & Co.
has just heard from Mr. Stevenson, now
visiting the centres of trade in the Mast,
and they can assure the public of Nanaimo and vicinity that, they will astonish
all their OUItOmeri this season with the
low prices. They have secured a large
assortment of the Samson, Kennedy
Watch Steven-
President Cleveland opposes the
recognition of tbe Cubans as bellig-
erants.
Sir. Ceo. Newes, of "Tit Bit"fame,
is having a yacht built to challenge
, for the Cup.
The U. 8. Senate has passed the
bill for the increase of the navy by
1000 enlisted men.
Tbe Cuban insurgents are being
constantly reinforced by recruits
; from the United States.
The insurgents in Nicaragua have
been defeated with a reported loss
I of 500 killed and wounded.
Tbe Dominion Government has
definitely decided to purchase 40,000
stand of Lee-Enfield magazine rifles.
j Creat Britain will appropriate
I the sum of £22,000,000 for the purpose of strengthening her naval defence.
It is reported that all the powers
have agreed to recognize Prince
Ferdinand as tbe lawful ruler of
Bulgaria.
President Cleveland will not be a
'candidate to succeed himself—probably because be knows he could
I not succeed.
British coalowners are agitated
lover the competition of the West-
phalian (Germany) coalfield, with
Hamburg as a port.
In the Supreme Court of Philadelphia Judge Williams on Wednesday confirmed the judgment of
the lower court in the case of H. H.
Holmes, and sentenced him to death
for the murder of Benj. F. Pietzel.
The date of execution has not yet
been fixed.
Tbe fisheries report of the department of marine and fisheries has
been submitted to parliament. It
returns the value of fisheries of the
Dominion in 1894-5 as $20,719,-
573. In that year $160,000 was
distributed in fishing bounties to
14,496 claimants.
Tbe Active, a Dundee whaler,
which caught nine whales, yielding
four and a half tons of bone, on the
Greenland grounds, cleared $30,000
by the trip, which gave 360 per cent.
dividends, the largest profit made
in tbe business in Dundee in 30
years. Whalebone is worth $10,000
a ton in England.
Lord Salisbury has communicated to the Armenian committee a
report from Sir Philip Currie, the
British ambassador at Constantinople, in which he states that the
misery and sickness among the refugees at Zeitoum is inconceivable.
Miss Barton, who desired to go to
Zeitoun, was refused permission by
the Porte.
Berlin, March 4.—Up to this
morning 71 bodies of the victims of
the Clophas coal mine disaster at
Klattowitz, Prussian Silesia, had
been brought to the surface. This
includes ihe bodies of four volunteers who had been engaged in the
work of rescue and was overcome by
the heat caused by the fire in the
mints. It is Believed about 50
miners are still unaccounted for.
The Italian army in Abyssinia
has been overwhelmingly defeated
hy the Shoans, the loss being estimated at 5000 killed and wounded.
The defeat is attributed to bad generalship. Great consternation and
excitement ensued in Rome and
throughout Italy, resulting In tbe
resignation of the Crispi ministry,
and it is believed nothing short of
dispatching the strongest possible
reinforcements to Africa will appease the public clamor.
Advices received by El Imparcial
say the Cuban insurgents iu New
York are preparing lo issue a loan
of 1100,000,000, of which a portion
will he offered, according to these
advices, to American senators and
representatives, "on condition they
obtain recognition as rebels.'' El
Imparcial and El Liberal continue
their vehement protests against
tbe action of the United States
senate. The former remarks:
"Americans wish to attack us because they believe we are weak.
That is cowardice."
The English Tories are dreaming
of a great African empire, larger
than I he one that their stamp duties
lost them in America. It is to begin
at the mouth of tbe Nile on the north
and is to extend lengthwise through
tbe heart of the continent to Cape
Colony on the south. Rhodes represents this idea, and as long as
he does represent it anything will
be forgiven him—except failure.
The raid into the Rand waB a
failure, but it was his first. He and
the Smith Africa Company are
boih expected to do better nut time.
X. V. World. METEOROLOGY.
THE U. S. WEATHER BUREAU PREPARING  FOR  ATMOSPHERIC
OBSERVATION'S.
KitesTlitil tt 111 A'.« ml itntl Carry -Instr
f Two   Milt
Aerial T«<
lil :'.«   tt'ealht r V;i
There surely never was anything quite
so remarkable n Its woy nf thi* dew kite
wJrich Is about to b( employed by tho
Weather Bureau for studying the almost
unknown regions oi tho upper air. This
Is an entirely now Held of exploration,
-.inl the s tentille experts of the Government propose to invade It antl record observations with instruments ol precision.
The facts lima gathered are expeoted to
simplify the business of making weather
forecasts and to render tht latter much
more accurate than heretofore. Much
may be accomplished eventually In this
way hy as i nts In halJoi ns - at ponding
hoped-for Improvements In s . h flying
apparatus  kites are to be eni| loved,
Wx] eriments are now being math with
u specie* ;■' kite which would astonish the
best-informed Bmnll boy, Nobody un-
; i aa) i ted w ' 'i the Ij igher j rinciples of
iierostntion would imngini that such a
1 lung < oi Itl | usslbly [ly li looka more
i ko;» serie ■ ol dry goods boxes strung to-
geth: r than tl i.c .'. It tt Phi bo: qs how-
i vi p, nre i I silk, and they have no tops or
bottoms, A string of five of them weighs
..'■ ounces the framework being of very
light-sticks of wood But you ought to
see tho machine *.■< ..;. It doesn't fly
like an ordinary kite; it goes up into the
„,r w.*h u rush and hoars far aloft like a
n over ing bird almost without perceptible
motion
The Inventor of this strar.gr Hying
machine Mr. S a. Potter o! the
Weather Bureau's start, yesterday he invited your correspondent tt< go out to his
country plaoe near Washington and see
bis kites go up There were a number of
them, all constructed on the same pnn-
i .pie. but having a varying number of
boxes ur "cells.*' as they are termed, The
most serviceable pattern thus far seems to
be thai which consists ol only two boxes
Stood on end ,t, s '*** feet high, and its
weight is exactly I ounces. It has 1
square feet oi silk or muslin, the idea
lining that the weight shall not exceed one
t tiiicc fur each sijuare foot oi lifting surface Muslin is UFod For every-day experiments, but silk -1- lighter nnd therefore
1 otter.
un t!d crest of a bill was a I uge reel.
wound like a Fpool v.-.*.:. 2,000 feet n
strong cord, The reel was bolted to a
table, the legs ol tiie Intisr being driven
deep Into Tin- grount: and otherwise secured* This arrangement w..- necessary because of the tn mendi us | n I of the kites.
which otherwisi would run away with
the table,   reel and ail     Mr, Potter tied
itipi'! - two story ■: tec ■ the end of
the sir.:,*.-, tossed i into thi air. and up
Itehoi m naturally j*1- ■■ hird wn tld rise
11: the w i.e. (*,:«. ran the eerd from the
reel, ;»:.;; uj and ! soared the kite into
the blue empyrean, when* .t hung almost
motionless at a height of MPi feet perhaps
"Tbe wind s ight to-day." said Potter, ' With .. got d breeze I I .aw s< nt my
t [It-es as high ..- *. >■" feet We are oi ly
;,• the beginning »*f our experiments and
we shall do ever  so much   better  before
long,   in thellrstp his cok!  s very
I envy and n !t w i mon tl tool nl ll wi Igh
a good « (..' so n< to i .... di wn the kite.
At the Woothei Bureau wt an getting
really n lot i I very line I..: strong, steel
win. and thai is l< I p *ub>titutod for the
cord. II will weigh nol nearly as much.
and will be hotter foi th) purpose alto-
get her. With this improvement In tbe
apparatus i expect lo bi able to raise
kites to un nil i tide ol ,.t least a m ie.
When we oar tli tha wt shall be in a
p< -dtlon to ascertain Important facts about
the npper region* «i the atmosphere.
Kventually wohopi ■■ attain an elevation
k\  wo milof or i on
"It .«- of the utmost Importance thai
the kite shall J.-*- n tho air a« nearly
without motioi at posslbli because il is
Intended to carry var!< ur si If-registering
Instruments. I ndei Kiich r umsumoe*
,i would ni * dt *' havi the machine
diving and pi nglng about. One ,(. the
Instruments whlei wi propose to nsi l«
'or dett rminlng ti u.perai nre In the
upper level* of thi hji " weight about
two p- iniis bt ng man chiefly of aluminum, and eon tal nn clnnkwnrk mechanism, by meani oi wh I a thermometer
record lx Lnaorlt-ed on n shoei q! white
paper, I itht r apporai it ii now bi int.*
devised by Prof, Marvin* ol the Weather
Hnreatt, foi nnti i ■■• • f <K sin Ing
wind voloc v. humidity nnd barometric
i Bvsute—-the nst coins *. measure of
bi gin. ol oonrse l erl ai ■ also we ^hnll
malti nou of Un amonni ol electricity
i resent In the atmi "-j hi re si differuni
levels.
"Knowledge * t.'. I thew i nil I oni Imi
mtioh to do with thi * ience nl foncast-
Ing the weather, ■' may fairly be said
that the key of successful forecasting li
to be found inn ■ latnrnn e with Ute condition! (! the upper air, v\henweare
able to make oo urati obseivationi at
heights fri<m oni ti lie to two miles above
the, surface el the earth we shall have
made a great step ahead      lint, while wi
i.ape ta accomplish much by this exploration of ejevatetl region ol the atmosphere,
respecting which almost nothing Is known
at present, it is too early to speak with
confidence, As yet, we Save scarcely begun but work, Prof. Moore, chief Ol the
Weather Bureau, to whom nil the credit
of tills idea is due. proposes to send Prof.
ila/en up in a balloon In the midst of a
Storm some day before long, fur the purpose of securing observations.
" That hns nothing to do with the kite-
Lying, however. Our new reel for the
latter purpose will be wound with 10,000
feet or Dearly two miles- of steel wire.
An  Important   advantage  of  the wire is
that it offers comparatively little resistance to wind. If you have 3,000 feet of
ion! l :ii> of an inch thick upheld by a
kite the surface presented by it to the
wind is very considerable, and the resistance to the nil current thus offered tends
to poll the kite down.    Accordingly,   the
kite on a wire is aide to rise much higher,
and the higher it goes the greater The I
velocity ol wind which it finds to uphold
it for wind velocity increases as the higher levels of the atmosphere are reached.
Greater wind velocity means increased
lifting power for the kite, so Thar it can
sustain more wire, It is by figuring on
these data that wo arrive at a reasonable
expectation of being able to lly our kites
at an elevation of two miles when our arrangements arc completed."
While he talked Mr. Potter had not
been idle. The two-story kite Btill Heating in tho air. he attached a separate
piece of corn 100 feet in length to another
kite of the same pattern. Tho end of this
string ho tied to the main cord near the
reel, and then he tossed kite No. S into
ihe air, Ir rose rapidly, and a moment
later thero wore two artificial birds of
muslin and sticks soaring aloft, one fnr
above the other. This prooeBS was repeated with a third bite, and that was sent
ui in like manner. Tho strain on .the
■ ord had become by this time very considerable and Mr, Potter explained that
in a high wind it was the hardest kind ol
wmk ;t. fetch a llock ol his birds to earth
again, the pull being sometimes -h
poands or more, In a severe ga!e it might
run up to 50 pounds, with half a dozen
■.:!!■- thus str .ng in tandem  fashion.
Vi.'.i see.'' said Mr. Potter "iy arranging thi m In this way we an get any
amount of lifting power that we want,
and heavy instruments may be carried to
a great heigh:. In order to maki simul-
taneonE observations at different levels,
we . ave only to arrange the supplementary kites along the main tor.; at determined intervals. We knew just how much
wire has run off tho reel, and by taking
into account the angle of the wire to tho
earth'f surface and making allowance
for tho slaok, we can calculate pretty
closely ihe elevation of each kite A
two-el: kite in. a fair breeze Will lift three
pounds in a gale it will carry eight
pounds."
"What is the cause of that peculiar
purring noise whioh the kin*-make ail
the timer" asked your correspondent.
■'It is the vibration of tho muslin due
to the wind.'; replied .Mr. Potior. " I
could show yon something more interesting than thnt If wo were using wire Instead of cord. I have flown my kites repeatedly with wire, and Always an electric
current along the wire has been noticeable. Sometimes it is very slight, while
at other limes it has beon so strong as io
cive severe shocks ami semi out sparks
half an Inch in length, To avoid the
shocks, I have been obliced repeatedly to
ground the wire by hanging another piece
of wire over it. Tills electrical action is
due fee difference in the amounts of electricity j rosea! at various atmoBpherlc
levels It is very odd, by tho way, to
notice the way In which crows behnve
wit)} regard to thi kites. Close by here
in the neighborhood of thi National
i 'ometery, at Arlington, i- oni tn' the
greatest crow roosts In the country, and
often the birds- fly around the kites In
flocks squawking and exhibiting every
symptom of curiosity."
Though the new kite is Mr. Potter's
own invention, the idea from which it is
derived was original with an Australian
nxpi rimenti r named Hargrove The
liargravcklte, however. Is heavy and very
dillii 'iii to «'..•: a-hynt* Like the Potter
kite ll consists In Its simplest, form of two
boxes topless and bottomless, joined, to*
gethei by a frame ol wood. But the boxes
an rectangular, whereas those of Mr. Potter s kite are diamond-shaped. By tills
modification of form Mr.Potter is enabled
to make his frame ever so much lighter, ro thnt the whole affair weighs scarcely
more than a pound. Any boy can make
t- i h ;. ; te and fly It fai more easily than
one ol the ordinary sort. It lib's itself.
one might say,re [ulring only to be tossed
nt- thealrwhen .hire Is a lair breezi
blowing. The Potter kite has several
times the Iiting power of the common
kite,possessing four plane surfaces instead
"1 ('Tie
I'll! - ientitio kite, like man in his descent from the apes, has tost Its tall.
Before tin new Potter kite was invented
the Weather Bureau experimented with
Malay kids .■ '■ et h gh, of muslin Tho
Malay kiti is built on the same plan as
an ordinary boy's kite, though somewhat
simpler.ha\ ing only two stii fc* instead of
three, Ai many as ;> dov-en kites of this
kind ware flown on one-ord. random
fashion, like the Potter kites, They were
constru ted on mathematical principles,
am. thus gol along without tails; but
they dived ami plunged a great deal, ami
ware by ni means satisfactory for purposes of meteorological observation,
Recently experiment! have bean made
with sending up kites of the Potter type
with cameras, by wMelj photographs
wen- taken from considerabli elevations.
/, noticeable point about those photo-
graphs «'»s a peculiar distortion of the
perspective.
I\y means of kite observation it is in-
tendea* to make a porl of profile map of
the atmosphere, In which curves of tempt rat un- and barometer will be located
loi different season* ol thl year Such
data may be valuable to englneon of
Hying machines when proctlcnlly perfected, .us) a-char's are use'iu ti sai.'rs.
By means of them it will bo easy to de*
tormlne what currents ol air ..re Likely
iii t* mei with at various height*, it is
imagined that kite-flying on scientific
prlo Iplei may be serviceable In future
ware, A i-emera sent np on a line of
kites may be utilized to take photographs
of the enemy's rorces and fortifications,
Kites may i ven carry bombi filled witl
high explosive* and drop thi latter where
they will do the most good. The Signal
Corps could be easily and cheaply equip*
ped w th . It**, whloH would weigh little,
t.itti might be folded Up in una I spate
lu the National Museum is a remarkable collection of Chinese kites, whioh
i:.'. Ml a versatlli Ingenuity of contrivance in flying apparatus undreamed of l>j
I luropeans or A merit nns The small boy
of the United Ktates, born an inventor
ecAUSl ho is a Yankee, thinks he is performing ■> n :it il he succeeds in causing
to soar a simple pentagon of sticks and
pi.] er with a tail of rags, Such a toy
bears the same relation to The Chinese
kite ;*s Is bortiB by the flint hatchet to the
modern ax. In the collection spoken of
are kites in the shape of frogs, lizards,
cranes, owls, gigantic lies and enormous
grasshoppers. But by far the most ex*
traordinary is a kite 80 feet long, io the
Shape of a snake like dragon. No one
but a Chinaman or a Japanese would suppose that Mich a thing could be flown.
it is composed ol a number of pasteboard
disks, each a foot in diameter, fastened
together with spares between by a cord
running the length of the dragon, which
has a ferocious looking paper head. The
string held by the manipulator of this interesting plaything is attached at three or
more points in the length if the dragon,
so that the latter may be Controlled in the
air. Whi.e afloat the long tall has an
undulating and serpentine (motion, thus
producing a vory realistic otife.Qt.
Aro the eyelashes to keep tbe pupUi of
the eyes in obedlencoF
WHEN WORK FITS WOMAN.
An litK i;\, Itnticdy,
"i'he electrician Is n sompnratively new
man in the Industrial field, lu older
branches ol work rhe groom: has been
cone over so often that all sorts of contingencies are provided against, but un-
lookotl-for conditions are the daily lot of
the electrical engineer who has to be alert
and resourceful. An operator who was
wiring a theater ',r, a groat hurry was
driven to despair by the way in which the
carpenters would constantly ur.do in a few
seconds the work of hours. They would
insist on driving nails In his wires, and
cutting the circuits whenever they
thought they had occasion to do so, As
remonstrance failed, he went on another
taik. Rigging up a I'.Mnoh fire gong he
connected all .his circuits with it. Within half an hour after the gouft was installed it went <•(: with a clanging which
brought every workman in the building
down Into tho street, Oriosof " I 'ire"
resounded through overy part of tho theater ami there was ;, ),uge scare. After
awhile, when it became evident that there
had been n false alarm, the engineer got
the bauds together and took them hack
Into the building, He tin re explained
to thi in tha! every rime any one hut his
own men even si much a- touched a
wire tin- gong would go oiT, and the man
who touched tho wire would gel n shock
of electricity that would paralyze him for
llfr- His circuits were never troubled
again.
Elnvato Domestic Service am! Check the
Mail Kitsh oCOlrla for Business Lttc.
Edward vv. Hok, in February Ladies'
Home Journal, considers editorially
''When Work Kits Woman." n text under
which lie enters emphatic and vigorous
protest against the mad rush nf women
to seek employment in mercantile and
manufacturing establishments. The
article is evidently inspired by the recent
public utterances of one of tho largest
employes of wommi in Pennsylvania,
who, in raising his voice against this
evil, asserts "that more wrong has hecn
done to thousands of j;i;'ls who have gone
into our commercial houses than the
world creams of." ami urges young I
women who are seeking positions, to engage as domestics where thoy aro safe from
dangor, where their surroundings would
be elevating and congenial, anil in a Held
which greatly needb them. Mr. Bok emphasises tiiese utterances and goes farther,
saying 'The fact cannot be disputed
that no single factor in modern life is
doing so much to degenerate our young
womanhood a- ihis mad raw on tho pari
c f trills, impelled by necessity or not. t<*
go into the business world. These may
sound like strong words to the ears of
some, but to those who are really cognizant ol the immensity of the evil results
ihat are being wrought, they will simply
iii ihe ease am. not go beyond it. In altogether too many of our •ommercial and
Industrial estalblaliments, stores and
factories, thi men into whose hands is
given the power to employ and control
ti)r'< an not fit, from .. moral standpoint,
to herd swine, And yet thousands of our
young women are allowed to go from
their home- tc work undor the influence
of these men and in the atmosphere vitiated by them, And why! Simply because
it is considered moro'respectable' to be
employed in an office, store or factory
thnn to engaged In domestic service. The
very wold 'servant' lias a taint about it
that the majority of young women dislike and from which thoy flee. But what
else are they in business establishments
than servants, pure am. simple! There
can be no difference but an imaginary
one. That is all. Par less leniency is
shown In our business houses to women
employer than is shown, as a rule, in our
homer to domestic hojp—Infinitely less."
Air. Bok further argues that ii the mistress would seek to elevate domestic work,
to treat servants with greater consideration, and to have the daughters of the
family show some active interest and
participation in household work, bettor,
more intelligent and more reliable women
would he attracted to the kitchens of our
homes, and the destructive rush ol young
girls to work in stores, counting houses
and factories, would be largely chocked,
and a modern evil to n great extent curtailed.
NVeitlenoi'lc.
Xeedlowork withstands the ages
When it is beautiful it is worthy oi art
museum-. It is not only decorative In
Itself, but it is decorative employment.
A woman i mbrolderlng makes a1- 'harming a picture as a lovely girl painting
All the .adi.s of high degret in all the
cruris la all the ages have :lone beautiful
needlework, and the fashionable woman
of to-day seems to have suddenly remembered thii». Smart boudoirs and draw-
in.'/- rooms all of a Midden display fascinating little work boxes and embroidery
frames, and In the row minute.- Iioforo
dinner is sorvod the hostess busies herself
with taking a few st it olios in the en-
i banting fabric that is growing under her
fingers, the wh:!e she gossips gnyly with
the friends who are tuning en fa ml He,
Mitten*? and comforters for thu poor are
with gri.nl justice no longer being nmde
by society women. rhe sewing and
knitting or this description is left for
needy women to do who cannot do anything else, their Work being bought from
them and turned over to more needy people. It ll the fashion to give one's
friends examples of one's handiwork of
the new-Old regime Instead of "fascinators." which ttlway did mus* the hair so,
m w \ rlc-dteus are worked for i no's girl
fr onds who are betrothed. The rector no
longer dreads the shown- of slippers
whi- h he can never wear oni enongb to
malt- then, good luck to throw after all
the brides he blesses, bnt lias vtslpns of
wonderful altar cloths, whioh it is the
dream of every fashionable Roman Catholic ami High -'Mireh Kpiscnpftllan
woman t" embroider, Most Am or lean
women, though, lack the pntionce requisite for so big an nndnrtnking,
\ signal Han's Spree,
The Xew York Sun of the 18th ult.,
gives a somewhat thrilling account Of a
railway Signal man's spree, and what
came out nl it, Geo. Mason, a signal
tower man on the Long Island railroad,
neur New York, got drunk and took
forcible possession of his signal tower,
driving the day watchman out at the
point of a loaded revolver, lie soon got
the signals mixed and stopped two passenger trains going in opposite directions,
Word was quickly sent to an adjoining
station, and all trains thnt should pa-s
were stopped, A number ot men were
sent uuil overpowered the inebriate, antl
look him away to a police station, where
be was looked up. Providentially, no
loss of ilie or property resulted from his
spree. The next, day he was tried before
ii police maigstrate, and sentenced to two
months' imprisonment, the magistrate
regretting he could not give him a heavier
rentence Such an incident shows what
danger there maybe to A whole community when one man drinks too much.
THE SQUARE-BUILT MAN.
Two  Occasions on Which  Ho Said "Well,
General/' to Wolsclcy.
"War correspondents 1" exclaimed Lord
Wolseley. "Some of them aro desperately brave, while others are anything bnt
heroes. The majority, I think, do their
duty well, even when It leads them into
tight places, By the way, talking of
tight places ami war correspondents, Ire-
member an incident thu*. may interest
you. It was at tho beginning of the
Ashantee campaign, just after our landing; a square-built little man came up to
me and said, speaking slowly, and with
an unmistakable American accent:
" 'Gonernli allow me to introduce myself: I am the correspondent of the Xew
York Herald.    I—'
''Too busy tn attend to him, I out him
short with ' What can I do for you -ir:-'
"He rep Hou, importurbably. with the
same exasperal ing slowness, ' Well, General, I want to be as near you as 1 i an
if there is any fightln1 to lie seen.'
" '(.'apt. So-and So has charge of all the
arrangements concerning correspondents,
I rejoined, curtly; ym\ hod better see
him.' And with thi-I turned on my
heel and went about my business,
1 i saw no more oi my correspondent
with the aggravating coolness and slow-
nest ol speech for many a d;,y I tl.tt Dot
oven know whether he was accompanying
the ci lumn oi not.
"Personally speaking 1 was. only in
danger once during the whole expedltii n
It was shortly before we entered Goomas-
sic. I had presssod forward with the advance troops, hoping to break the last
effort at resistance and have done with
the affair, when the enemy, utilizing tho
heavy covert, came down and iairly surrounded us. Por a few minutes the position was critical, and every man had to
light, for the enemy's tire was poured in
nt close quarters. They pressed upon us
from all s dos. dodging !rom tree to tree
and continually edging closer, hoping to
get hand to band, In the hottest of it my
attention was caught by a man in civilian'- clothes, who whs some fifteen or
twenty yards in front of me, and who
was completely surrounded by the advancing savages. He seemed to pay no heed
to the danger, but., kneeling on one knee.
tojk aim and fired again and again, and
I seemed to see that every time he llrod a
black man fell, I was fascinated by his
danger antl coolness. As our main body
came up and the savages were driven
back. I weir, forward to see that no harm
came to ray civilian friend, who rose just
as 1 reached him, To my astonishment
it. was the correspondent of the New York
Herald, ami be began again in the same
slow, cairn way:
" 'Well, general—
"Again 1 interrupted him: 'Yon were
lucky to escape. Didn't you see tha yen
were surrounded".'
" 'Well, general." he began again I
guess I was too much occupied by the
niggers In front to noy much attention to
those behind."
"That was evidently the simple truth.
Whatever men may say in the future
about Henry M. Stanley, no one that has
seen him in danger wlllduny that hlsoour-
ace is of the .Mrs: ijuti tity, 1 took a liking
to him on the spot, an i we became great
friends; nor has anything occurred since
to alter my opinion of him.'' — London
Sat unlay Hevlew.
McetiM  A ii « i.ii o-« i
During the recent sosBion of the Quebec
Legislature, which has just closed, some
important changes were made in the
Liquor liconse law of that province.
Among them are the following: Any of
the municipal councils, except those of
Montreal ami Quebec, must certify a Willingness to tiie Issue of liquor licenses, or
they cannot, be issued nt all. and the decision of the souncil is absolute In case
tbe applicant has been previously convicted of vlo.uting the license law his application must he refuse.i. If the majority
ot the ei cot ors tn tin munlolpality, or of
a polling sub-division, have iileil tho IT
opposition to any iiconic being granted
within thnt limit, none can be granted,
special liconses •an be Issued for picnics,
races or large gatherings, In municipalities Where local i tion by-laws are in
lone licenses are issued for the sale
of liquors fur medicinal purposes, bui no
such liconses can bo issued to public
houses. The reason 1b obvious. A purchaser of liquor from an unlicensed person,
or during pbhibitcd hours, is liable to a
penally of from *'■ to fr'JS for each
offence. Any licensed person harboring
a sonstnhh while on duty, or giving him
liquor, or attempting to bribe him, is
liable to a penalty ol $50,
It Is next to impossible to give an instance in which a dog Identifies an object
by its hue, ami there is little positive evidence thai the larger quadrupeds have
much sense of color. Domestic cattle are
so far affected by violent contrast of
white ami dark thnt the presence of a
black, white or very clearly spotted animal in the herd sometimes results In calves
being thrown of the same oolOF or markings. Bill though red is -aid to irritate a
bull, and to excite hunters by association
Of ideas, the latter statement nsts partly
ou surmise. The writer has seen a setter
refuse to retrieve a black rabbit because
it apparently thought Its master had shot
a blaok cat. But a house-living dog shows
no preference for a red carpet or rug
over a blue or variegated one, and expresses DO surprise or curiosity whether its
master wear- a red uniform or a blaok evening suit, None of the cits whether wild
or tame, sliow any i arilallty for bright
hues; ami among all the stratagems used
fnr time immemorial by hunters, the use
of color ns a lure for qundrupeda is notably absent. — Popular Science,
I or < Iruiiini: Itlltrh lire-*, (loads.
Every  one  has or wants a black   gown
nowadays, and   such  goods    us   serge,
cheviot, cashmere, Henrietta, etc, are
easily chimed. First remove tho grease
.-pots with naphtha nnd remember that
this fluid L very explosive when exposed
to cither light or lire. Make a lather of
warm .soapsuds, using a good, not strong
soap and a tcuspoonful nf horui to every
two quarts of water. Into this dip the
gootls ii|i and down and wash bt tween the
hands; then wring gently and pal partly
dry; hang in the shade and win n nearly
dry iron nn the wrong side with a moderately warm iron. Always rinse once In
luke-warm water, and iron until the
material is perfectly dry. Never rub a
fabric that is being renovated on the
Washboard, nor wring it tightly, and in
using naphtha remember that it roughens
the hands, antl that after using it It is
well to put vaseline upon them and to
wear old gloves. Wash alpaca in the
same manner as oashmore, adding a little
gum-arabic to the rinsing water, if the
black goods are of a rusty color restore
them by sponging with ammonia and
alcohol. Always use a piece of thu same
material or one mar to it to sponge with.
—February Ladies' Home Journal.
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TOBACCO   AND   EDUCATION.
Recent Action of Two Universities Against
the I'^e of Tobacco in College,
If tbe action of the authorities of two
nnlverities \a an Indication then a war is
to be begun by the higher oduotionnl institutions upon the use of tobacco in college. The Boston University has recently made tho rule that those students who
are. unwilling to give up the use of tobacco while in the University building may
withdraw and their tuition fees will ho
returned. The step taken by the Northwestern University while not so decisive
ih nevertheless understood to mean that
the use of tobacco will be discountenanced
ed in that institution Statements have
been handed around among the students
ask.ng them to give their opinion of tho
result'- ol the use of tohnoco in their own
ease nnd to say whether they are willing
to pledge themselevs against irs use in
future.
;; statistics gathered nt leading colleges
have any weight it will ha\e to he admit-
ed that the free use of tobacco has an Injurious (Tec', upon the health of students.
The best known ami most thorough tests to
determine this question wore made at
Y.-.l- and Amherst, which institutions
can be taken as fairly representing the
larger ami the smaller ooilegqs, In IS91
Ian at YTtlo published the re-
observations oi the use of long undergraduates. Tn a
*,' students ho found that in
he 77 who never used tobacco
the 70 who did use it 10. -i
per cent, in gain iu weight. 24 percent.
in increase of height and £0.7 per cent.
in growth of chest girth, Hut the most
marked difference was in the gain in lung
capacity, the non-users recording a gain
of 77.6 per cent, greater than the habitual chewers or smokers.
This is a nunarka m- showing, bui it Is
surpassed hy an Investigation matte
among the undergraduates at Amherst.
It was found that during the four years
ui a college student's life at that school
the non-users of tonbcoo gained .'■ per
cent, mure in weight, .'(7 percent more
in height and 42 per cent, mon- inches
girth than the tobacco users, while tbe
increase in the lung capacity of the former was ',:> per ci at. greater than in the
latter. This larger relative Increase
among the non-users of tobacco ai Amherst than at Yale is accounted for by
the fact that the average ngo of the
Students' at the former school I % lower than
at The latter school, and hence they are
more susceptible to any cause which
affects thom injuriously, If similar Investigations wore made nt other colleges
much the same situation would doubtless
be found to exist among the users nnd
non-users of tobacco as was discovered at
Vale antl Amherst.
But the physical effects are not the only
bad results of tobacoo using. It harms
the intellectual faculties also According
to Prof. Kisk, of the Northwestern University, when a coslogo class at Vale ban
been divided Into four sections according
to scholarship it was tii^covered that the
highest section was composed almost entirely of non-smokers and the lowest section alnio.-t entirely of smokers. Such
demonstrations of the mental and physical results ut the use of tobacco by collegt
undergraduates, says tho Philadelphia
J'ress. ;■ nsyily the effort beinir made by
some college authorities to check its use.
Bnt startling as the results of the investigation among young men ar college
are, It is probable that an Investigation
as to the effect- of smoking on the health
t,f young school lads would be much mure
startling. The newspnp'rs record now
and then the death or Insanity of some
boy from the use of cigarettes, But no
account Is taken ol the stunting ol the
minds and bodies of the great mass of
young lads from tho same cause.
There aro plenty of laws on the statute
hooks intended to check the use of cigarettes among the young, hut in the main
they are inoperative. \i:d yet It is al
thji period thai the reform must begin
It would probably be found thnt in tiie
great majority of oases the student who
smokes acquired the habit before he entered tho college. Ii is rarely formed
later. II parents and public school authorities would do their duty the most
effectual check could be put on the u-e ol
tobacco, Tho crusade ol oollego authorities will doubtless give good results, bit'
It is late, To be effectual the battli
against tho harmful effects of totaon
must be begun while a lad i- still at
lunie and under the direct Influence oi
his pan nts,
a ii Ai.-tm  Member.
Colonel Plorcc, of Dakota, tells of :.
member oi tho Legislature ol that stati
who takes an lutercsl in public affairs.
and who is in the habit ol "talking
right out in meeting." Not manj
mouths ngo the governor, who hub beoi
ul a deadlock with tho Legislature already, sent iii tho nomination of a one
legged man for a prominent fifl.ee. ami
:t became the duty of the Legislature u
consider whether to confirm it or not.
The statesman to whom Colonel Plerci
alludes took the floor and made a brio!
but effective spoch. "Gontlomon of tht
Legislature," he said, "lot us look tin
situation calmly in tho fnco and soe il
wo  can stand this sort  of   nincompoop
lu the office 1" which he has been liom-
touted, lie trades mostly, as I'm told,
gentlemen, on his Limber U').r, but don't
ie fooled on that. Did ho late hit meat
and bono leg in the war. gentlemen,did
he loso ll ,n the war^ No, .-ir. he did
not lose It in the war. Did he lose it
io the harvest floltD No, sir. ho did not
lose It -a the harvest field, Then how
did he lose It? you ask, and you have
a right to ask it. gentlemen. It Is youi
right t" ask nil questions you've a mind
to about the way this duffer lost hii
leg. He was riding, gontlomon, over tht
prairies of this great and growing slate,
turning out of their humble cottages tin
widows and orphans ot poor soldiers
who were not able 10 pay rent, in th*
dead midst of winter, when the good
and wise Creator, who shelters and feeds
the sparrows and never allows tho children -1 the righteous to bog bread, frost
his shins off,M—K.M-hange.
THE   ASHANTI   EXPEDITION.
The Worn Bufore the   Soldiers—One   •i>
Britain's Little Wars?
While other war alarms aro sounding
England is pushing on .her campaign
against Ashanti with unabated vigor.
This map will help to make the present
situation clear; audit is worth describing, for it is doubtful if a small campaign in Africa waa ever more admirably
planned.
The black line shews the route tho
British column will follow from C'.ipo
Coast Castle to Coomassie, the residence
of King Prompeh. The peculiar feature
of the campaign is t hut t his line of march
is being prepared, as far as possible, before the British troops are landed from
their ship. England wants it to be a dash
to Coomassie, and such a thing cannot
be achieved without a lot of preparatory
work.
The route lies nearly all tho way
through forest, which is made almost
Impassable by the dense undergrowth.
Thousands of natives have boon employed
cutting a wide road from the coast to>
the I'rah river and the road makers are
now at work beyond the river. Karl/ in
December thousands of natives embarked from tho various ports along the (-Md
Coast for Cape Coast Castle, and w'ro
si't at work carrying lhe supplies into tho
interior A large supply depot !^*- Jjeen
established at Mansn, and auWl.^^ *t.
Prahsu, Other natives under KuropuTa
command have been stringing a telegraph line along tiie route, and It is now
oomph'iu:l to Prahsu, The onglnoer corps [
havo completed a bridge over the Drah.su
river at Prahsu, ami at last accounts
were bridging a small river a little further north, Rest huts at five different
camp stations havo been built between
the coast nnd Prahsu, so that the troops
will not need to pitch tents at the end of
the day's marc!:. In f.ict, everything is
being done to save the soldiers work, and
enable them to march with celerity.
Tho troops will comprise 78(1 white
soldiers, 40U hundred men from the West
Indian Regiment, and U00 Hussars, in all
1,78ft men. under the command of Mr
Francis Scon, Prahsu will fie the base
of operations. A hospital containing
Sixty beds lias been built there, and a
smaller hospital has been erected atMan-
BU, As the column advances beyond *he
j'rah, stations will be established With
carriers and hammocks for the speedy
transportation of the sick to the hospitals
of the coast. These stations will also be I
defensive posts, by means of which i* is ,J
intended to maintain a perfect line of
communication with the coast,
Stores of every kind will have to be
oarriod on tho heads of natives, ami at
least 13/000 mon and wmuen. each carrying about fifty pounds, will be engaged
boy on d the Prah river in this service, It '
is known that the water of the region
contains much deleterious matter, and
all that is used for drinking purposes
will percolate into large canvas tanks
through Pasteur filters. Lakers will bo
sent across the Prah to bake fresh bread
at the defensive posts. The artillery will
consist of a small mountain battery, a
battery of six seven-pounder liehl guns a
Maxim and :i number of rocket tub.*--.
All the white troops will be kept on board
ship until everything is ready, and thnn
tuey will debark, and start at once along
the road that is ready for thom, Such
is the scheme of tho expedition, and it
cannot be denied thnt It has been admirably conceived, Prempeh probably doesn't
realize the very uncomfortable hox ho it
in. Rnemles are coming against him,
not only froin the south, but also from tho
north. The King of Koran.-.a, which place
is shown an tbe map, has agreed to help
the Knglish,und to march on the Ashanti
OBpital if arms and ammunition   are sent
riiiriii Decorations for Children** forties.
In giving a birthday parry for children
lhe table should he decorated with the
birthday flower of the month in which
thoy were horn: .lanuary, snowiirnp;
February, the prlmrosei March, violet;
April, daisy; May, hawthorn; .June, wild
rose; July, Illy; August, poppy: Sep-
(ember,convolvulus; October, hops; November, chrysanthemum; December,
holly. Rnch has an appropriate senti-
mi'ii; attached to It. The snowdrop
moans consolation; the primrose, youthful sunshine; tbe violet, modesty; the
daisy, innocence; the hawthorn, hope;
the wild ru.-o, simplicity; the lily, purity;
tho poppy, the comfort of sleep; the convolvulus, content ment; hops, aspiration;
the chrysanthemum, cheerfulness; holly,
foresight and protection.—February
Ladles' Home Journal,
tn him. So a force of Haussas, with a
large qnnntity Of gunpowder antl lead fir
arming   the   tribesmen,  have   been   dis
patched   t«  him under the command,of
an Knglish captain. The Koranza
natives are aXOOllent fighters, ami their
country being open and free from forest,
is well adapted lor the propoHtfJt%>e|u-
tlons.
This war Is being made upon  lhe King      ■
of Ashanti because   he persists in raiding    » |
for-laves, molests tribes that are nn.b.r *•
British protection, and keeps on the terrible practice of human sacrifices, The
end of it will probably bo the appropriation of the whole of Ashanti by Ureal
Britain.
t nine Hath i no.
"1 wanted a bath in a North Carolina
hotel." said a traveling man to a Wash*
Ington Star writer.
"1 rang lor ihe be* I-boy — there WM
but ont—aud when he arrived I asked
him if they had a bath-tub about the
house.
"Vol, sah; nice tines, sab," he said.
"Bring mo one,"
"In a lew minutes the boy returned,
bringing on his shoulder a coffin, with
Silver-plated handles and a lid all complete.
"What does that meanV" 1 asked, indignantly.
"Uat'sdo bath-tub, sah. He landlord v
used to ho In de nmlertakin' business,
sah. and had some collimh when he took
dis hotel. Ills son is a tinner, sah. an*
joss lined de coffins with tin. Try it,
boss.  You'll tin' It hery nice."
"Conquering my scruples, I opened
the lid antl found the COflln lined with
tin, as Kin ted, antl 1 took the bath, but t
didn't faol just right about   it."
Her Only ll»|ie.
Mid yon ever soe Miss Winch wt ther?"
"No: what, of hor7"
"She was married the other day to m
blind man.''
"Mow very odd,"
"No: you wouldn't say so If you'd ivet
been her." WILLIAM VAN HOME
■HIS     RETIREMENT      FROM
CANADIAN   PACIF.C.
*:tVir cwrii inl Reply to the Street Statement
is $omcwhat Sphynx-TJke.
Somewhat of a sensation was caused tn
Montreal during the week by the nn-
uoupcement thnt Sir William Van Home
intended to retire from the presidency of
the Canadian Pacific Railway Company.
Sir William has been so prominently connected with the company since its inception that such a rumor could not help
creating considerable interest and much
speculation. A correspondent called at
■4be Canadian Pacific offices to ascertain
■■what truth there was In the report*  when
* 7 J?
the following statement was handed out
as authorized by the president: "The
statement that I am to resign is unauthorized. I may say, however, that I hope
io drop out of active service before long.
There are several things I would like yet
to do, or be instrumental in doing, if 1 tin
■not have too long to wait for the opportunity."
it is further unofficially stated that Sir
, William will not retire for some  months.
1 and that on his retirement the office will
he tilled by Mr. Hhaughness'y, the present.
vice-president, who has accompanied
Sir William on his last three or four trips
over tho entire road.
FEMALE  CRIMINALS.
XL Scientist** Ailemp! n> \u Hne Tht Ir physical t'hnractertstlcs.
Prof. LomI rose's theory is briefly that
the criminal type Is a recurrence to old
ancestral forms of low di volopment, "a
product of pathological and atavistic anomalies"; the criminal, in fact, '"stands
mid-way betwei n the lunatic ami tho savage." The theory Is built up on the observation, not of marked peculiarities
• tamping the offender with a brand easy
to be recognized, but on countless small
deviations from the normal type, shared
by the criminal population, it is true, in
common with many law-abiding individuals, bit! in a far higher percentage, ami
especially significant in combination.
The aotnal physical peculiarities observed among female prisoners nre not very
numerous or striking. Among Them may
be mentioned heavy jaws and high check
bom*. Huu-ro. strength <if arms and
length of limbs were found lobe nolow
the average, and though the facial diam
eter wns larger tho cranial diameter xriu
oonsidt rably Jess than in normal subjects,
ftjjich of tho evil appears i<. be due to the
brain. The poflt-mortom exam nation of
thirty-throe revealed In eleven out of the
number "grave microsooplo lesion of the
central system and Its Involucre."
Passing to skull anomalies, they wore
found less frequent among female than
among male criminals, always except-
■ s i he -. li Ie of murderesses wind]
*,'■ pecnllai The skdll of Charlotte for-
day !«* itbd in this oonuo- tion ..* displaying very striking Irregularities,
The   fol owing   si mil   anomalies   are
among I hose which have I eon ■ I -i -ved to
ie ur amoi gnrmlnal and •'..'• n womon;
f ;    I -  •   asy       i   y.  oi n striking van: of
eorres] •• do i o •■« twei n   i he tw<   v di >• ol
the face has i i not ceil In . . per ct nt.;
Irri gui ir ty n the ■•' a] -■ i the i ars I •
twi » a( cot imo . . ■ long erli ,.• n\9t ,md
i ■ • ' ng ears appt artt be i ion . spec ally ham tor st ■ .-: the swlt dii r ai d ihe
I io goni": .. -' ■',<-.. nose i. y he noted
among one oni ot overy fou • ovl I un -:
wh It '. - t at ni -■ - nn re «..-• ..-■
i' e iiw :■.".•. -.I- ■. en It • .. di feet shar
(' ed   n   n u wit h  a la .:■ pro)   rtlon ul
lui endlarh      ■'  •■ Irllo phi -ingn >• iy e . ■.
'•>•>'.  ■"• -j with tho ^  .■«..:.-.:,, 'vn.\ of a
:i,...„ -.v. -i   il'servod al*    r. .   .,. .-   mim
I < r ■■' 'i' :i. ■■ ffen ■ r- md oo; do t,i~-
. ',. :.y degenerate type* so :. ^ the cast
of !.. I . . "■■ ..• l lit M :.;■■ .,.-, pJiy«!-
ognn ■■'   an I hypen -. ph,\ ■ I ti*i   mufieio-,
II the i .:. '. i-t. v, i 'i ;-i iargi Mtiailru-
i" -l wert i ■ w.. ng, f , ■;• palate
1 '.re- , left 1 in de lui ■»«. ai I ■ .:-,. eib,
1 v,r_L -. ,.-M.| tin i ■ i ,l'.'. .,■:.■ i j ■. rtnals,
"• •• '    ';- " i- twi i  .s:..       ;, unions
. ■ ..' ah
.'■ i sen i t» ucli. taste, smell and
hoariuc. wi • .: pi ii . ,.■. doi v consent
of tin pri.-nnorsand were fount! tn beoon-
**dt ral ly -• -• .. uti than In normal sub-
Jet b, In ■*» m of smell i ■,*»■■ ally the
trim! or, lass -un,. to be singularly do'
Ui :«■:.'.. 11. only 'hne ngi nl llfteon of the
t on crlmi ials hml ti normal fli Ida vinlnn,
■. . these anomalies are far less j mm incut
and frequent in female- than in males,
and the true criminal typi'ie comparatively seldom encountered in women.
It may be asked what good can result
tr.'-, all this laborious olasslffoation of
minute oharactoristios. Muoh of it, doubt-
lost i- over ■■lali.rated and beside the
mark, which is disputed ground, the reo-
tird-* of dlrTorent observers varying in
many important point*    But  the bro.ul
fact remain- ihat children are horn into
the world with certain well-defined traits
of mind and body distinct from their iYJ-
loWs, an;l that ol those children a large
proportion are found in later lift* tn have
>,juii on* the track ami become absorbed hi
'.he criminal class, A recent investigation
in London 'clmols has shown that tho
number of those children amounts to 18
pei 'eat... Is there not some reason to believe that wise treatment and special
training from the beginning might bring
under control the passions of which the
bodily anomalies jirr-ent a faint and often
err^ap Index, and save many lives from
tnisahlefnnd ultimate despair'--Loudon
Hospital.
A Cincinnati clergyman thought he
Would raise hi- own porl;. So he bought
live pigs and fattened them. -Now that
they ore tit to kill, he says they seem so
much Ilea his own children that he hasn't
the heart to kill them. Tiie pigs are In
good luck, but it's rather hard on the
vlijidnn,—jjef-toh Tyonsoripu
RELATION OF  TEMPERATURE   TO
MILK.
The position taken in these columns
that it is by no means settled that high
temperatures nre conducive tu economic
butter production is in part confirmed hy
results "f experiments at the Vermont
Experiment Station that have since come
to hand. The tests were not direct, being
the summary of temperature observations und milk records taken in The routine work of tho station, These are
summarised for a long period, with the
result that it appears that the quality of
the milk is changed in reverse of the
movement of the thermometer: that is,
whin the thermometer goes down the
quality of the, milk goes up. The same
rosr.JT. was noted in relation to quantity,
Such tests as these can only be accepted
ac evidence, for they are neither eriticni
nor sciontiflo in ohnraoter, We shall not,
therefore, dwell upon them and occupy
only further spaco fur tiie stimuli.ry given
by the station:
".. Fall Tost-—Nearly two-thirds of the
changes ;;, por cents of total solids, and
over hall the changes in fat percentages
were inverse to thormometric variations,
i, — Winter Tost—Nearly two-thirds rl
tho hanges in fat percentages wore inverse to tbermometrio variations
.-. Summer Soiling Test (VVorld's Fain
—over half the changes in per cents of
total solids and three-quarters *>f the
changes In fat percentages were inverse
to thormometric variations.
4 Spring ami Summer Pasture Test
■ Ml. Vi. Kxpt. Stat. Bpt., ji.fi. 05 to (JS)
—"< ; per cent', of the changes in the
quality were in tlie opposite direction to
dianges In temperature."
; Summer Pasture Test (6th Vt,
Bxpt. Stat, Rpt., p.p. 130 to 133)—"08
per cent, of the changes in total solids
ami i~. per cent, of the changes In fat
percentages were in the Inverso direction."
• 0. These five separate tests, covering
practically the entire year, and the conditions of pasture, summer soiling and
winter barn feeding, point directly to the
eon lusion that the tendency of cows is to
give frcm day io day richer milk when
the tomj orature falls and poorer milk as
it rises, or. in other wort's, the quality
of tho milk (solids and fat) varies inversely ?o temperature changes.
Tho above touches only quality of milk
It will not be understood tha!
vocale low temperatures, tl
temperatures, The right temperature is
n't u am able, but in cold weather above
■).'■ t!eg"("s gained by close quarters sacrifices all there is gained, or so it is believed.—A   •   Agriculturist.
1  that  iwe   ad-
Ii.it is. freezing
HittulliiiCH Iti i
John 'ionm said at a far
to run
ir four
If   she
stabled
institute
in Maine, held by tho Maine Slate Hoard
of Agriculture, that "the heifer should
come into the dairy at two years old, and
I want her to have the same barn education tha' my dairy cows have. If she
comes -n in the fail I want her
with my COWS for the la-t three
months before she comes in.
oomes in in the spring I want hor
with my cows, and then when -he comes
into the dairy she knows what ll is to
be handled. 1 do not believe in too much
tomfoolery about her, but I want to have
her handled, I should teach her to be
tied up regularly, and somt times make
bolleve milk her. Then she will come
int-otbt dairy with'dairy habits and you
will not have the work of breaking her.
Some uf you can remember that process.
It surpassed anything that Harnum ever
ham 1 would feed her liberally of bran
for that developing life she is having to
supply.
"I wiint this heifer stabled every day in
the year after she comes imo ihe dairy.
Lot us make this stable life a continuous
habit, n that we shall have uniform
milking and handling. Another thing I
would mention in thi- connection: I
would not have tills heifer come back
into ihe dairy just as soon as I could get
her there: 1 want an interval of three or
four months. If the natural period bo to
comi ba k into the dairy in a year, thon
make it fifteen or sixteen month-.''
'.;. you agr.e« with Mr. Gonld that
st:.'* Ing .• heifer shonld be enntinuousS'
ft t i
t rnMTinit;
Prof, Kobertion its dairy commissioner
of Canada, reports an experiment in
^burning sweet cream at different temperatures, varying from H up to .".s. decrees. Tho table of results Is quite complete We condense his facts, The lowest
amount »■' fat in the buttermilk was
found when t was churned at 41 degrees.
F* and the largest amount of fat in tho
buttermilk at the highest temperature,
or..; J- degrees, this being. Oof ono |or
ceni The time of churning decreased as
the temperature raised from '.in minutes
at -i degrees lo Id minutes at ,V> degrees.
Tht experiments were duplicated in one
case, tht- highest temperature of churn
ing being 55 degrees and In tho other 58
degrees. The »atne law followed in both
trials. The concin-ions are thus stated by
the commtsssloner:
"The results from these 4-' tests in-
u. ;.'i "hat:
' When the churning of sweet cream Is
Started at a temperature ol 50 degrees K,
or under, the quantity of buttor fat re
malnlng In the buttermilk need not exceed 0,35 ^f one per cent.
* For the efh< iem recovery of thebuMer
fat by the churning ol sweti cream, the
temperature ot ihe cream should not be
above 50 degrees F. when the churning is
started: nnd the eh urn (if a revolving
one- Bhonld not be tilled to more than
■i.i-' uarter of 4ts actual holding capacity,"
ACloMic-I.hu- nivalin-.
Our Illustration s'iow-; a device for
carrying two olothes linos, both of which
may be elevated at once, it ennsisrs of a
stout poet set well into the ground, and
having in the upper end a. -lot two inches
Wideband six long. In this is ,i lever of
tough hard wood, two Inches square and
six feet long, playing   freely   on   a  half
I* /       ■■•     I I
inch bolt, which extends through tho
post from side to side, One end of the
lever Is rounded off, ami firmly mortised
to the other is a  cross pleoe three nnd a
hair foot long, near the extremities of
whhh aro attached the clothes lines.
After the lines havo been filled, the long
arm of tho lever is brought down and
booked under tho nrojoctlou of the short
post, elevating Ttie * lines with their
burdens about two and a half feet above
Uiet original position* This action is reversed when it is desired to reach the
lines.—American Agriculturist,
i:ii Perkins's Advice :<» Vounic Ladles.
''Young Ladies,"" said Eli Perkins to the
Nashville Seminary girls, "1 want to t;tlk
seriouly to you about your mother-: "li
may he thnt you have noticed a careworn
look upon her face lately. Of course, it
has uot been brought there by any act- of
yours: still it is your duty to chase it.
away. I want you to get up to-morrow
morning and. get breaklast: and when
your mother eonios and begins to express
nor surprise, lm right up am! kiss her on
the mouth. You can't imagine how it
will brighten her dear face.
*'Besides, you owe her a kiss or two.
Away back, when you were n little bit of
a girl, she kissed you when no one else
was tempted by your fever-tain ted breath
and swollen face. Vou were not so attractive then as you are now. And
through those year- of childish sunshine
and shadows, she wns always ready to
cure, by ila; magic of a mother's kiss,your
dirty little chubby hands whenever they
were injured in those first skirmishes
with the rough old world.
"And then the midnight kiss with which
she routed so many bad dream-, as she
leaned above your restless pillow, have
all boo:! on interest these lung, long years.
"Of course, she i^ not so pretty and kiss-
able as you are; but if you had done your
share of work during the last ten years,
the contrast would not be so marked.
"Her face has more wrinkles than
yours, and yet if you were sick that face
would appear far more beautiful than an
angel's as it hovered over you. watching
every opportunity to minister to your
comfort, and every one of these wrinkles
would seem to be bright wavelets of sunshine chasing each other over the dear
face,
"She will leave you orio of these days.
These bunions, if not lifted from her
shoulders, will break her down. These
rough, hard hands, that have done so
many things for you, will be crossed upon
her lifeless breast.
"Those neglect*! lips that gafc you
your flrst baby kiss will bo forever closed,
and thoso s.'id. tired eyes will have opened
in eternity, ami then you will appreciate
your mother; but it will be too hue."
Fried lee-Cream.
Fried Ice cream has become very pupu-
lar in Philadelphia. A small, solid
cake of ice cream is enveloped in a thin
sheet, of pio crust, and then dipped in
boiling lard or butter long enough to
cook lhe uut-ide covering tu a crisp. If
served immediately, the ice cream is
found to be as solidly frozen as when it
was first prepared. The process of frying
is so quickly accomplished and thu pastry is so good a protector that tho heat
has no chance to reach the frozen cream.
Another novelty is baked ice cream,
which has" a meringue top,
iu storing Cane Seats*
To restore cane seats that have become
sagged and io make (hem tight antl like
new, a German paper give- a simple
remedy, The chair is turned over and the
caned seat thoroughly moistened and
washed with very hot water, a sponge
being used. The cane should lie allowed
to absorb the water freely. The chair is
then placed either In the open air, or still
belter, in a draft, where it Is allowed to
dry. After drying the cane seat will bo
found Whltoand stretched as tight as new.
NOSES AND SMELLING.    «W
There are fourteen bones in the nose.
Burns had the genuine Celtic type of
nose.
A blunt uo-e Is generally Indicative of
dulut --.
The uo-e nf the mole is movable like
that ol the hog.
The Greek nose was straight and tolerably prominent.
Pimples nu tho no-e are frequently
caused by Indigestion.
The uosi of lice th ovcil was large, thick
and Ill-shaped,
Iu extreme old age the sense of smell Is
often cut [rely lost.
The Duke of Wellington was called
"Nosey"' by his soldiers,
Mnnll nostrils aro said by physiologists
to Indicate small and weak lungs,
hi all ages tho nose has been regarded
as strongly Indicative of character,
Tha Turkish nosf bears a tolerably close
resemblance to tiio Semitic typt*.
A nose of proper proportions should be
one*third tho length of the face.
h'Ish are undoubtedly provided with h
reiHunubly acute sense of smell.
Uoethu had a large Roman nose, rather
Kiore bent than usual in that typt;.
The blind are often almost preternatural lj gifted with the sense of smell,
The sense of smell Is probably moro acute
iu the dog I him iu any other animal.
A sharp Hose pointing forward Is the
charactei'isi lu of Impudence and curiosity.
The Dnko of Wellington wns blessed
with n Roman uose of generous proportions.
The first  Dukfl of Marlborough bad n
huge Roman no-e. the no-e of a  military
uonqitoror.
In man I lie lOUSC of smell is less devel-
opetl than that ofslght, as it Is much less
heeded.
Caesar had a large Roman no-e. Ii was
in fact, out of proportion with the restol
his face.
,\ largo no-e In a weak face is Indicative
o£ uuintelligence and stupidity, Idiots
havo such noses,
Queen Anno bad ;i largo red nose, from
drinking. Sho was call "Brandy Xau" by
her subjects,
In i he lower races of mankind t ho souse
ofsmollis moro acutely developed than
in ila- Caucasian.
The frog has the shortest pa-sage be
tweeu his nose ami his mouth ; the crocodile hostile longest
Pugilists say that a blow ou ihe nose is
attended with more pain thau one oil any
other pari ol the body.
Most insects an* provided with a sense
of smell, though by what means it is exercised is in many cases unknown.
A red nose may be due in a choleric temper, a bail liver, or bad liquor. In any ease
it is an unfortunate sign.
Man is the only animal whose nostril.-*!
open downward. Kven in the highest ape?
the nostrils open to the front,
All birds which Mud their foot! in lhe
earth or dust are provided with very lluck
coverings of feathers over their nostrils.
A portrait bust of Hannibal, which bus
come tlown to us from Roman limes, represents him with a strong Koman nose.
HATS OF
Ospreyand Ostrich. Ribbonpd Felt.
The osprey again waves ow the bonnets of the fair, and the ponpon aspires
to heaven above it. Very popular in one
of the new scoop shotel shales is "combine" of osprey and ostrich ribbon of
felt, edged with witlc velve/or with nar-
■7 /
rower ribbon, emphasized at intervals hy
big silver buckles.
Another ha», whioh a Buddhist might
commend, has a high crown sewn out of
cords of black and green and a brim of
black velvet bearing a few folds of green
shot ribbon knotted into choux at either
side; and there aro five big ostrich
plumes to wave nt the rear.
IHE WALKING GIRL.
She  Appeari With  the Modern   rati  for
athletics   for   Woineiif*
Until t|ijite recently walking seemed
to be » lost art among American women.
It is true that ladies walked miles In
shopping expeditions or promenades ou
fashionable thoroughfares, but for a
party to sec out lor a twenty-live or tifty
mile tramp into the country was a tiling
unheard oh But the fashion has been set
and walking parties are quite the proper
thing, and beboldl Dame Fashion, never
slow, comes to the front with well-designed anti comfort ible costumes for such
occasion-. The short skirt, tho brond,
thick-soled shoe, and the high gaiters Insure freedom and ease of motion; and
thus clad, with email knapsack swung
over her shoulder and stout staff in baud
the American girl can treatl native soil
with as much pleasure as does her Eng«
11 sh sister. True, the pedestrian on the
other sitie of tiie sea has tho advantage
of a cooler climate. But there are plenty
of times in spring and fall and even cool
tiays in summer when the woman on this
side of the Atlantic may start off on a
ten or twenty-mile jaunt in perfect comfort. A short time ago two young ladies
clad in the regulation traveling costume
walked Into a village among the Cat*
skills well-known as a summer resort.
They were regarded with no little interest as thsir garments told plainly that
they had traveled some distance. At tiie
house where they Stopped for the night
they entertained the guests delightfully
wilh an account of their experiences and
! adventures. Their homes were in the far
West, but they had been East for some
lime, having just beon graduate!! from
one of the leading Eastern colleges. At
the close of the college term a party <tf
jive graduates >et out for a hundred-
mile tramp At the time when the young
ladies arrived in the little mountain village they hatl almost reached themaik,
having walked from Northampton..Mais..
directly over the Berkshire hills Into
New York. "Oh, we have had nil sort!
of experiences," said one of the young
ladles with a merry laugh. "Some f)lks
were afraid of us and Mimo though 1 us
Insane, but WC have enjoyed every foot
of the way. We have stumbled onto
some of the queerest little towns and met
seme of tho strangest people, and we
have gotten mora practical knowledge of
the country than we could possibly havo
gal nod in any other way Heaven help
the women who don't walk. They don't
ktinw what they miss.'»
It was evident that these young ladles
had not missed anything) as they described the scenery they had enjoyed.
They were well tanned, nfl they wore only
small caps ami carried no umbrellas,
But they were as fresh and bright as
daisies  notwithstanding the   fact   that
ther hatl made over seventeen miler* that
day. In answer to a question put by a
guest as tu their feeling WOAOf, one of
the young pedestriana replied with a
laugh, "I think we could dance this
evening with as much real enjoyment
as any of you folk-who have been Indoors all tiny.  Except for our shoe-, "the
added with a roguish glume as she displayed a stile worn almost through.
Aa the fashion spreads there la no reason to doubt timt lu the near future
walking tours will rival bloyold tours In
popularity, There will certainly be thlt.
advantage that a walking tour WOUld he
wttliln tho reach of many women to
wlium a bicycle is an undreamed of luxury. Any Ingenious girl could easily
construct a serviceable tramping outlit
out of some of her cast-on* woulen gown-,
and with a pair of stout hootsand galtora
and a cap sho is ready to set out. Of
course she will not bo aide at first to
walk ten miles a dBff or even live. Uuta
little systematic training by taking.short
trips and gradually increasing them will
soon enable the average girl to accomplish fifteen  miles a day with  perfect
comfort When she has learned the art
of walking well she will be ahleto go on
any number of pleasant little journeys
With a sense of vigor and independence,
Which is delightful, ami she will Imi
healthier, happier aud more intelligent
for her tramps abroad.
Latest  Idcus tn I iti-hlntis.
Nothing Is prettier for a tailor-made
gown than a do, skin vt-t, with dainty
speckled buttons for trimming.
Themo-t elegant wide skirts have lhe
folds falling in (lutingsnil around and are
strapped at the seams with velvet, plush,
etc. Plainer skirts are frequently finished
off above the lower edge With rows of narrow braid in tucks,
The latest cycling hat Is of felt, boat-
shaped or flat-brimmed and with two
quills, a bow of ribbon, is complete.
An odd style ol hair-dre-slng is lo part
1 the hair on one aide and raised high in
aeep waves across the head. A pad isoiten
worn under the side hair to give it the
necessary full effect.
An ideal opera wrap is a mantle to the
waist of ermine, very full and lined with
dead-leaf color satin. On the shoulders
are cape-like epaulettes of shot green and
brown velvet richly embroidered in jet,
steel and gold, while lappets of the.same
velvet fall from the neck in front. ' The
high collar is lined with fur.
Another evening cape is of yellow and
white striped orepon, lined with delicate
pale-green silk.    Yellow velvet, beaded,
bangs in short-winged sleeves from   the
I shoulders     Deep collar of frilled velvet is
! lined with white fur.
A pretty bridesmaid's gown seen at a
; roceni wedding was of spotted apricot silk
I shot with white. The skirt was plain and
! wide and the bodice tight-fitting, of yellow
■ satin, with a white chiffon fichu tucked
| into n deep bell of satin, finished with paste
buttons,—Chicago News.
NORTH POLE FOUND.
A Report to That   Effect Received   at  SU
Petersburg*
A telegraphic dispatch received at St.
Petersburg, from Irkutsk, Siberia, says
that a -Siberian trader named Kouchuar-
eff, agent of Dr. Fridjof Xansen, the Norwegian explorer, who sailed in the From,
June 24.1898, for the Arctic regione, has
received information to the effect that
I Ir, Nansen has reached the north pole
and found land there. He is now returning towards civilization.
VENEZUELA'S PITCH LAKE.
\ (tcglon Where Men and Women Hmr
N.j.1 to Nothing.
Capt Boot, li. Kelly, formerly a shipmaster in the service of the Clyde Line,
has ju-t returned with Mrs. Kelly from
Venezuela,where for twenty-one months
he has been engaged in mining pitch in
Pitch Lake, near the coast. The lake,
which Is six miles long, is nothing but
pitch. Capt, Kelly say.-. Tho blocks are
-.it out of the lake just as ice is cut
Iron the Hudson,
"They are then carried ou the backs of
natives to a railway and shipped to tho
nearest seaport, six miles distant. The
pitch is sent north and ultimately, converted into pavements, A few hours
after the blocks have been cut out tiie
holes close up and present an even surface.
"The 150 miners nt the lake, who are
Indians, Spaniards and negroes, wear no
clothes to speak uf, When lhe temperature gets down to seventy degrees they
shiver, The women in the vicinity of
the lake are clod just as lightly, with
only n bandage about the hips, When
my wife first went to Venezuela the
women flocked from miles around to
gaze at a woman who was fully clad.
"The hirest trees keep out the fresh air
and the liiht- glows like a furnace. The
miners have t keep trending as the pitch
softens or they would get Stuck in the
lake.
"On all sides are soovplons,tarantulas,
snakes, luards. centipedes urd other interesting things. The dies a: of tho
size of cherries and they will bite ,ron.
Boa-const riot ora are < ver twenty feet
long, ami there are ail sorts of queer
four-footed beasts,"
Tiie Captain and Mrs, Killy expect to
return to Venezuela in the spring.
Manitoba Appointments*
The following appointments haye been.
gazetted:
To be commissioner- for taking affidavits for use in the courts of this province—David "Wilson, of Orange Ridge,
and James I*oherty, uf Winnipeg.
To be issuer of marriage licenses—
Eugene Widmeyer. of Gretna.
To be a provincial constable for the
province of Manitoba—Archibald Mo
Cualg, ofHartneyJ
To be deputy bailiff of the county court
ofShoal Lake—Thomas CJark. of Shoal
Lake.
To be deputy registrar of Sourla river—
Charles Prior Egtlin, of Melita, vice
Joseph Campbell,
The resignations of James D. Orr, John
WiUiama and Frank Schultz, as justices
cf the peace have been accepted,
''Mamma I really cannot see why vou
call my Reginald 'the lodge;' indeed. I
cannot.-' '"I call him that because he is
such a poor excuse for a man.'*
N
ORTHERM - -
PACIFIC RY.
riME   CAKD
T&kin?  effect   on  Snndsy.   December
16th, 1894.
K. Bemud
Re. "■.**•*.
I    I
•*■*?•*■-= If
ukaff
s
Wm« II Tt'lt'lltttlll?
"A Btrnngo caso : tolopatlty cnnie
uinltT my obBurvntloi] recently," snld R
well-known telegrnpla-r *■•> t» group «.f
listeners ;,t the Planters' the other iUy.
"Some years ago thero lived in r!.e ctty
;.:: operator and newspnporman named
Jolmstonei who met with nn accident
Dial disabled l.iui From work for gonfo
months. Not being very well llxed flnan-
oinlly,bis little savings were s..i,n exhausted in meeting current espouses and ).ay-
lug dooti r's Mils, until nl Inst he did not
have a cent In the world, and was nol yet
strong enougl to hustle tor n living.
In this extremity Johnstone npproaolieu
nn acquaintance and told him the situation, and asked for a loan until he could
yet <>n his feel ngfttu. This was some
six or seven years ae/... May, the man
npproached Ly Johnstone, advnncod sufficient money to pay outstanding claims
nnd tide over fi r n fow days until 1 e could
look around and Hml something to do.
This was tho last seon i>f Johnstone in St.
Loui<; ho disappeared as completely as
though swullowed up In the earth, none
oi Ills former notiuaintancei knowing
witnt had ' ocome of Itim.
■•Now come, the strange part of this
sti.ry. Monday, December SU, lost, limt
May on ibe street, and during the course
o' conversation bo casually inquired for
Johnstone, asked if 1 knew what hatl he-
como of him, saying that he could nol get
him out ef his head—had been thlnLinit
■ if him all day. I replied that I did not
know whether lie was living or dead,
had not heard anything aoont him since
he disappeared from St. Lonls some s.x
year- a'te. May then related hisiir.anclal
dealings with Johnstone, anil we parted.
'Nc«* Year's evening a let'er was re-
ooived hy May postmarked al n small
tuwn in Colorado, written ly Johnstone,
ami containing an express money order for
the full amount of the claim. The letter
was dated December ■'.". tbe verydoy May
had made itunilry of mo as to whether I
knew anything about Jobnstone whether
be wns alive or dead, How no I account
for It! 1 don't try tn explain it. It is
too much for me."
mii,.., ,.t,. i....n's liolng*.
The newspapers of a town are .ts looking glasses, says an exehanga It is here
yon see yourselves as others see y, u Vou
smile on them ami they smile Lack at,
yon: yon frown ,>n fi.em. and yen are repaid in Kind, Thev are the rcdex of a
town If the town Is doing business the
newspaper will ,how it In it- advert s.ng
column- 1: the merchants are spiritless,
shiftless fellows, whosestores arc jumbles
of ..nl. and am, the newspapers will
.bow li by the la< k of .pa * they take. If
y.m want the world to know thai you
have a live tl wn yen can only let it he
known through it- newspapers.
ltOr,
105F
18,2r
n u.
n SlaJ
llCTa
10 SI.
10 Ola
BSta
ECOs
TMia
11 dip
18CT
Up    o
CSp; |,0
Mr-. t.«
SSP16.B
Mpa.6
i3pr.<
OJpiM.S
«0p«.4
Up it t
MpM.O
SCpM.O
2C'p68.!
'.'a .Cf
!U at
1(1 I6S
«r co
ocp ,si ■
3rps*R
: 8. Bound
-Bead iewt
eTATIOKS.
 Wlnalper 1
..yonare Jnucticn., 1
 St. Norfcet l
 Osrtler 1
 st. AfFtie	
— Union Point	
... .Hirer Flsla.—
 Morris	
 Bt, Jean	
 Leteaer.	
 fimerscn	
— .Pern'olna	
■ .Grand Forks	
WlnrJregJmictlon. 1
 Mmh	
Mlr.-eapo'ls.. .
 61, Pinl	
 Chicago	
ISSp
MORRIMRANDflK IRANCH.
X. Bound
Bead np
i  *
un? I
r.sop i
e.Mp ■!
5..9P ■-■
car is
..Sf-r U
s.ssr'i
s.l«pii
itipn
lisp 11
i.,:p io
.l.nr- io
b.R-p 10
h.Zy 10
h.STa 10
STATIONS,
W. BoU-HI
Bead dowts
= *5
•Safe
,l.*.2a B
|0.S7s S
'O.lia 5
S.,9. s
f.Z9t t
S.'Ki !
S.iSa *
V.SOa s
No. IS'
O^P 10   '—Lowe Farm.-.
25 21.a Hrrtle	
8-T 26.1 Eoland	
JP n.l Bosebenk	
t» M.I Miami	
s«« M.O Dcenrood ._.
g* Ml! Altanont	
ow B2.i|.„. .sometwt	
M« OS < ....Swan Uke.„,
»(» :«.0 . .IndisD Sprint*...
Ms :».4l.^.K»rlspolii._.
-»a B«.!|._..QreenwaT	
■'■« •>" »■',-■'
BSalloa     Eelmont. ._.
o:"!09.7 Hilton	
M« 117.B Afhdown	
f.Ss 120    .„. wswsncaa.-.
•W. 198.0 __Elllo**8	
BBS 1M.5 ...Rounthiraita.
;.*« 1ST.2 ._.Martinv!Ue	
00S 1«. 1 Brandon . ~
* nop, at Baldnr fot neals
UCUti 6 sop
1 BOji, E cos
2 l.'.p     44*
I tip 3U
!Wp  9 60s
s lOp io 2Sa
s i-r osta
5 «-p 11 441
<01plS10p
i 20p li lip
4 :'••[• 1 92p
4Slp| 164
6 05p 2 18p
f lsp 2a3p
' ■lj   S 26p
II rl 4lBp
(■ . i ' 68p
fS4p b".*B
I *Cp B ITp
6 f3p 6 04D
T05p  6S7p
rssp 7isp
7<:p .8: op
PORTAfiE LA PRAIRIE IRANCH.
W. lonrfi   g r.
I P.eadricirt c;
,  adxed Ko. - at
US.       -f
trery Par j r:
Except Son ic
STATIONS,
E hor.no.
F.ead np
14,
sr?!*r Day
Except Sun.
048
: OC
f o-'.
t 3C
;-
rm
pa
tni
pn
im
pn
en
pm
pa
..-..Winnip-t.._.
C    . PcrjigeJc.nctton
E f. « ..St. Charles	
1C I •...Eeadlnclr	
18 C".Whit* Rains....
24 E '.GraTd PI: E*por .
2* I », La Salle Tank...
?2 2 •.. .  Eustace  ....
30 l •....Oakvtne	
,S 2«._.   Curt:,	
C I   Portaeels Prairie..
•Plan Station.
0 pn
! an
*' an
' in
7 an
-' an
' an
1 an
- an
i p.m
b an
Station, rraried-.-hare no agent. FrctsAS
meet rcprtpAid
Nnirbe- 1C7 and los care throcgli Pullman
Vctltuied nrnring Room Sleeping Car, between
Winnipeg anC Bt Paul and Minneapolis. Ala*
Palaei HTnli-f. Car., close conneo'lon at Chtean
wlui eanern jnes. Connection at Winnipeg Jnne-
ttor. wIil train, io and from the PadOc toast.
Per rater .nd fnll Information concerning oon-
cec'.ieu with other line., etc., apply loanr agent
cf tleoo-rpanr, or
CEAS. 8. FEE. H. SWOT08D,
G.F.AT.A.. St. Paul. Gen. aci., Winnipeg!
C1T7 OFFICE,
,E« Main Street. Winnipeg*.
\* n. Kissing u rics.im.
The rta-t-n Lis>.|n<* i- -o pleasant, -ays
an osculatory expert t>t scientific tendencies, is because the teeth, jawbones
and !i*'s are full tf nerves, anil when
the lips of persons meet an electric current i*. geueraidl. anil, lo put it facetiously, you don't have to have a dynamo machine, nor a Lattery In the
house, nor a call-box, nor a button jo
touch, to rinj.* up the central fll.ee. a"ml
there is no patent on it. ami the poorest
person in the world can onjoy the ilet>
trie current better than the millionaire
and it never t-ets out of order.—Philadelphia Times.
DoUnd t.» Have M' tr.
After the new minister had delivered
his lirst sermon In the Presbyterian
church of a little Washinirton town recently, a deacon approached him and said)
" Vim iliiln t give us eny Latin er tlreek
in yer sermon to-day."
".No, ''said the minister."I did not, I
was not aware that the eiin*.*re-:atl(,n included any who understood those Inng*
ua*:es."    And this w-as a hit of sarcasm.
"Wail, ther ain't none who ilu/. 'rei,lied
the deacon; "but we folks up here want
to heV wat's ■rein' on In them .-lty
churches, an' well iiev to ax ver tu
give «t !u us.''—Nurlhwett .Maga.iue.
MANITOBA «t NORTHWESTERN
ZUILWAT CO.
MARCH 5th, 1895.
Kegr. Ar passenger trains :nn a. follow,:
WEST-BOfND.
Losre Winnipeg at P.S5 on Tneadar  Thr.ndST
and Sf/.-.irrtay for Porsge ia Prairie. Minnedoes
.nt* icie-mediate station,.   Mixed train, leave
Minntdoaa on arriral cf passenger train* u below
HAST-BorivD,
Leare Minntvlosa and intermediate station, on
Mont*.ar, w erinefriRr arid Fr.day. Mixed trains
arrive r.t Uln&edoss as beiow:
Pass.
Pus,
Toe*.,
Thnr.
STATIOXS.
Mon.,
Wed,
* S-t.
AFrl.
Ill    Lr _
    W'lnnlpeg
 Ar a 25
Tnes.,   MUed
Mixed    Mon.
Sat,     The.
.
Fridav    Wed.
1! If. .   11.41
Port, la Fralrie
1E.36       19.10
14.Of..    15.. Ji
Alisdstone.
10.20       17.45
If 10.      17.1'
. . Hespaws	
14.10      16,16
:t ii      is :•,
.Miune.losa.
12.40      14.45
Sft.
Mon.
17.45.... Ar...
.- .Rsriti City   .
 Lr   13,45
M-.sed
Mixed
Tuesday lo
k-.ish::
STATIONS.
Yorkton
SamrdsT to
Wedn'y fron
Yorktou.
Russell.
16.81
].*"   .Mlnnedcsa. .
A-
16.06
17.40
——..Newdsle —
13.40
if io
— ...Shoal Lake...
12.16
21.10
 "Birtle	
10.81
W.80
 Blnsearih...
B.ES
.. c
 Kassell	
E.Ml
; !■.
Ar Yorkton...
Lr         i-to
■Mesus,   i.'Mnt nor at stations betwten Por*
lage :a Prair'e and Winnipeg only when Vigoalletl
or when there rre pescengeri to alight.
W. K. EAEBi, A. Mcl*ONALD,
«*.€-.. Vscagtr Asx't tier.' Pu. AgtB
1 tjbe'ii*iaiiniiiioflcnii:;;t,:r:::i:„,hl
PUBUSHJISD EYl'RY SATCKDAY MORNING
li v rn m
MAIL PUBLISHING COMPANY
I    E. C. Beaiid, Editor nnd Malinger,
llastiou sheet. Nannimp, B. U.
SUBS0BIPT10N  RATES,
ireded at those
the more
insignificant. For instance, Father
Lacombe, on behalf of the hierarchy, wrote a long letter to the Liberal loader in which he said:
"I must tell you that we cannot
WE J1A V RUN AGAINST A COMET, called "glome," discovered by Edg-
      ., ■   n ' * u   i „  erly, and which is contained in the
The 1'os. <ible Consequences of Such a
Collision.
A N. V.  Sun special says:   The
comet   di scovered   by  Astronomer
atmosphere.     Only the truly good
can obtain it, says Edgerly.
Edgerly   also  runs  the  Martyn
.    ... College of Oratory.   Here, he says,
Pernne of the Lick Observatory two | ]]e discovered the wonderful glome.
weeks ago is advancing towards the He s.lvs his sect has 110,000 mem-
earth at  the   prodigious   pace   ofk d   .,   t their melnberKhip
accept your commissi,,,! o   inquiry :, 600j0p0 , alles a day, and unless '  ,        mQm.   This money,
..oo   or any reason, and we w      It 11 e it oh nges j taoonrso it may hit the L^ ,, usec( in experimenting
.ve-  best  to  light   it.    If—which may i    rt, gome   time during Saturday,, .,„,,  ;',',„.on„„.,n,ia     it js ., f.,ci
' '"'' tiod not grant-yon do .ml believe (a?arch 14      Calculations made by 1I,, ,     Pr0PaSancla*    ll ls » Ia™
• ■I.inn ii-     '  '" '"■'"    ^,i "'    ,,   f \ that he receives large quantities of
mail.
Fifteen years ago Edgerly was one
- '        !          ' : I P™*** I-, be beater, and over-1 ™~ ^e on March 1st and sheer I i^S^TfSSiS'SSud
I,.....,,-.,-.,-  ,0:   :..  th7w^'!!:lnle..1"'!'1!'.^ L™-l°™?lftWayfrP.m%earth' ,If.howev?r'I Cora Davison, a daughter of the wo-
By tuiiil
-One year—
Six  lIl.HllllS
'I'iiree nu.ntl
Delivered l.y oarner ..
A woltll TO OUR PATB0N8,
Readers nf O10 Mail nre specially roquostet] ■ which  1
idvertiseinents before mnklii
it to be your duty lo accede to our ] pro«_ Lenschtier, of the State Dnf-I
demands, and that the Government, j versjty   0f    (.California,   convinced I
""him that the comet would take a
lo  give  us  the
purchases,   observation and experience have   li,,.,,...,,   ,,.i,;]„  l.,„,,,inir  firm   to the      "- .1 »u
tiiroHii, vwnie Keeping nrm m un   ftway from the earth
bnslnoss man or linn who attvertlsos Unit Is the
must accommodating, sells the cheapesl and
deals tho most lioorally In every way with pal
runs. Tiie advertisements ot Lhe i-rlnclpn] deal-
ers ,11 Manalmo appear In lhe columns "f Oiis
paper. Deal with them, watoh our columns
oloBuly tor bargains, and beware oi the tricky,
trashy, traveling transom tradora.
SATURDAY MORNING,
MAt-l II 7,  INM
Eeclesiasticism Extraordinary.
It would seem that the Government, despairing of success with
its Remedial Bill on its merits, has
resorted   to  (he   m
i pre
end of the struggle,! inform you Ljje professoif has made a mistake
with regret that ttii: KiusooPACY, Lj the millionth part of a unit in
LIKE ONis man, I'.-.TTKii WITH thE k*s ggUres) i lie cornel iiiav strike us.
ri.Kno',', will risk to support those , j.,.(,f Pickerkig, of Harvard I'ni-
Witp may have i'.ti.i.KN to defendLer8ity) who\was asked if it were
us. ! possible for tbe comet and the earth
[t is unnecessary to recount any to  meet in  collision, replied that
further thu occurrences of the last  such a thing was certainly possible.
"In fact," he continued, "if ihe
earth laslslohg enough,such a thing
is practically sure lo happen, for
few weeks to show Ihat Ihe Conservative party has handed  its desti-
man under arrest in San Francisco
for blackmailing, with whom he
lived two years. Later he secured
a divorce antl was disbarred, Then
he resumed his relationship with
his mother-in-law, and was associated with her up to the time of her
leaving Chicago for San Francisco.
 ■>»«•	
The Imperial House of Commons
at this time consists of (170 mem-
ties over to the safe-keeping of the there are several comets' orbits Ibers—461for England, 84 for Wales,
church. The tactics which have which pass nearer to the earth's J 72 for Scotland and 103 for Ireland,
been pursued so far under this un- orbit than the semi-diameter of the The complexion is:  Conservatives,
ost reerettable I holy alliance, and which are likely to comet's head, and at some time the 340; Liberal-Unionists 71; Glad-
o. 1   H.nii.uiii       j , .      earth and comet will certainly come stone Liberals, 177; Nationalists,
course of appealing to religious pre-1 characterize the corning campaign, together_     Such   enoounterB   .vin, 71; Parnellites. 11.
accept the; —»♦»■
will occur
judices, and that in  the most „t>- can only be viewed with the great- however, be rare.   If w
iectionable way     It Iris been sug- est alarm bv all lovers of our lib- estimate of Abinet, they will occur j   A telegram 1ms been received in New
eested that thenolicvof the Gov- erty!   We incline to the belief that once in 15,000,000 years in the long Westminster hulieating that a., extra
gesteel wiat tne poncj 01.tne uo /                             ih-Ponwrvi run*"   As to  the consequences of appropriation of a 50,000 has been placed
.eminent    throughout    this   whole the bettei element of I lie U.nseiva- j.^^   &   oollisill]1)   prof.  Pickering in the federal estimutes.forthe improve-
Manitoba School Question has been tive party and those who  under- gajfj jt was impossible to .estimate, ment of navigation on ftie Fraser.   This
dictated bv the  hierarchy of Que- stand Hie  proper functions of the for want of knowletk-e of Ihe matter, i«  understood  to be exclusive of the
bee     Be this as it may one thin- church in  ;ill  denominations will composing a comet.    "If we accept $10,000 already appropriated for this iav
is now tolerably clear, and that is° resent this introduction into ('ana- the modern theory,''be said, "every- noruini ■■■"■|™>*. _	
that the Government is now forced dian federal politics of.ecclesiastical th,nS fPen.d,s "" n"' 'ilZ€ ° .' "'
vn.ii tne ■lo-.eiiiiiiini  is now lon.t.u 1 separate  solid   parts   or  particles  Brlim O'Lvnn had no boots to wear,
to depend for success in the co. g authority and religious strife. w£*ch fi,rm  U)e main part ()f lhe sohooame^
elections on ecclesiastical interfer-      ■•'• British Columbia we have so COrriet'sinass. If they weighed tons, if 1 eun nndMrhitnoid'ir,'rsaysBriano'Lyuu.   j
ence and the consequent unnatural far -'ved happily,   in business and the bombardment would be
influence over the consciences  of j politics we have acted without re- serious; but if, as
the electors.    The truth  of  this isjg*--'<-  to  a man's religious convic-  ^^X^'sult "ll™mpiy be a He stepped a little west ot Albert street,
lifestfrom the recent tactics ofltions, and in the coming campaign gra'nd meteoric shower.  Now," con- \\l $£% lS^^talmp^i^^
iwehope that the same course will tinued the professor, "although the'' 	
posi
This week the snow flies, but there will
be no flies on our new goods, which wilj foe
pure and good as the beautiful snow. Watch
this space.
l.-<l'%^By%^%%%^%^^^^li^is^%^%^%%%%'*>%^%%^fV%%.'ev«
1
I
1 vwwvwww
very  no hunted ti
ikely
as pin
,,,,„„,,,,„.,, Ill-plv    Says ho: The rluht ono P.vo not yet found oul
.-corns mole uweij,   , i;.||hl WhlineW -I'll buy only from bjm,
For li.
Us the el
lores all along the main route,
line I've
II buy 0
pest," says llrinn O'Lynn.
j be pursued -thai  religious differ
ienceswill he con lined to their proper sphere, a departure from which
ii..thing  can justify, not even (he
I desperation   cf   the   Conservative
party.
t
ity is not so great. So far as we
know, the probability is not much
greater than that of some oilier
comets striking -us."
—»- EEMOiOX AND PBOGRESS.
Some of the most important in- 	
dustriesof Canada are now severely Opinions of Eminenl Divines on Pop-
handicapped by a tariff which taxes llliU' -CovIch.
raw material beyond the protection The church   should  regard the
afforded to their Bnished product, rights of the laborer to be as sacred
The protectionisl   remedy for ibis and binding as those of the million-
■•.nssiliilirv  nf   tlvil    mmsl   Rtrilrlno- We showed hlmi mrciilf boots, kid and cmvnine,
possioiui}   111   ui.u   eoiiui  sitiKing •j.|,oonogwe praise most—no soanta nttheslde,
the earth is real, still  the probabil- Wo'vobootsolallklnilsfromO^ueboeiuirtliorlln.
.      . at " Sure you've 1 ta for tho million,  snya Brian
mill
the Conservatives in the bye-elections and in the House. For instance, in the (.'ape Breton election
Bishop Cameron was moved to send
11 circular letter to the priests and
prelates of his diocese in which he
referred to all opposed to (he Remedial Bill as ■'Hell-inspired hypocrites, . . . seeking their own -elfish ends in defiance of God, . . ,
jeopardizing the salvation of countless souls,  .   .   .   and who, to add
insult to injury,   will  move foi  a state of things would be to increase aire.   The laboring men of lhe day
commission of investigation instead  ihe duty on the  finished product;  need justice, not pity,
of remedial legislation." the Liberal policy 1
, ,,   .,, .     .■  •   1   .•       move or diminish I...	
Again, in the(nici.it nn election, ,      , ,    •     , .:,,,., ,,,,/,„,.,.,■„.,■ ,,. ,.i,.;i.,, ,1,,,..,, ii,„
,?".'. taw material.   Any industry being time unaei'taKes tOiStnite ao,wn the
the bishop of that diocese issued a [n noe(* ,,,- relief, a Liberal govern- individual's^right £0 get drunk or to |
pastoral letter ordering the electors nient would exert itself to give that bet or to desecrate the
to vote for the Government candi- relief by removing the tax upon ii
dale as the one mosl acceptable to l'"'*1  *"'  '*■' iron, or i: i su|
the church.  This extraordinary in
t," Buys Brian O'Lynn.
all boots, Jtld and enwhi
iT.ynn. [nolrnsli
lie botmht lilm bis boots, which ol cqu«b.wort
ney. lor we sell only for
lie mil taken lu, [cash.
■ lit," Bays Brum 0 Lynn
lie imlil iluwli bis ii
To too nubile ho says
liny only from Whit
"If there's a lonlt In the toe or side of jraursljoe,
Jual Inkoll to Whitfield, that's all you need,lo:
lie will pc« it or patch jusl while you are III.
And tho -iinrw see..is like nothing,   say. Urian
O'Lynn.
WHITFIELD, the Shoe Man.
VioTouia OiKsci'sr, Nanaimo.
Rov. ii. K. Murphy, llaiitlst, Lincoln. Neb.
Any reform which at lhe present
Lord's day,
as   a  mere  individual, is  sure  to
of overreach the public conscience and
various kinds. The slcatiy maintenance of that policy, without vio-
terference was criticized by the lead- ]t,llt|y disturbing the conditions of
ing French Liberal paper of Quebec, industry, would produce most be-
L'Electeur. The result was thai nefice'nl and far-reacliing results.
the paper waB called upon to imme- There would be !1 >u';ulv movement
diiKely apologize for its astounding
overshoot its own mark.
A
LAEGE CONSIGNMENT of Full Goods from
-"*- Glasgow—IMPORTED DIRECT.
Also a consignment of famous West of England
Cloth which are open for inspection. This consignment undoubtedly comprise the best material
tlint lias ever been imported to this city. We
guarantee the latest style in suits in every detail,
and the lit exact. :::::::::::
Our reputation continues to take the lend over all
other establisments.    ::::::::::
m. A. CALDWELL,
.•.lerchaijt Tailor,
Commercial Street.
impudence upon pain of being prohibited by the hierarchy from every
Catholic home. This unwarrantable exercise of ecclesiastic power
in .temporal matters called forth a
strong protest from those in Quebec
who prize their free citizenship, This
worldly opposition, however, did
not cause (he slightest withdrawal
to be made by the church. <ln the
contrary, the (papers of Quebec were
filled with letters am
from bishops, abbes, priests nnd
cures supporting their right to control legislation. We quote a typical passage from such a letter by
Abbe I'at'uet:
"To the ecclesiastical power then
belongs the right to judge whether
the interference should lake place iu
the form of command or of counsel,
and when that Interference takes
the imperative form, a> in the case
.of  the Manitoba  schools, only one
.      ...      ,     .. ,,     Bailee for evening wear,
it is good politics to listen to the nian hasn't any
voice of righteoup
Kov, s. a. Ni
citizens.
holson, K.ilioui,
in the direction of freedom, simplicity and economy; just as, under
tiie policy of aiiiing industry by
taxation, there is a steady movement in the direction oi restriction,
complexity and extravagance; and,
above all, in the former cass, (here
would be a stead) movement toward placing all the industries of
the country upon that basis of self-
reliance which many of ihein have
already attained.   There would be
less   hope   and   fear  regarding the  ... • ■■      . , ■., ,    ,
', .ii*      higher tvoe in the pulp:,!; and last
action of governments and parlia- , °       **i    .• i     ,        - ,.i  •
f ,  i t,        '•    i        lv, we need a higher type oi  ( hl'is
ments, and more stability lor indus- •'
declarations try and commerce.    Keeping these
objects steadily in view, tiie Liberal
party can well   afford   to  exercise
that patience which is as essential
to reform as enthusiasm.
Rev. tl. K.Kolnnd, ICpls., Covlnirton, Ky.
The day is past when a deatl conscience is the price of party loyalty.
They are the best party men who
stand for the right, and as a parti -
san I dare to say that a party,
does not merit success which  must!'" footwear, from shoes so good to kick
achieve it al the cost of degraded wlth that ""   kicks about them, to
manhood.   The day has come when  those that toueh the top notch
SHOES FOR Abb OCCASION'S
niprlse absolutely everything handy
ol ole-
Thai   v .lint*
tbt about ihe points
I of our slines;   they are all thut they
'nd.    | should he from heel' to toe, from s.ilis to
We need a higher type of man- tops. Their handsome appearanue makes
hood in professional life, at the bar tl'/'.'l" l;i''!'m'H •". leather, so to speak,
.        ',    .       .                i      i ,i while their superior quality causes tneui
and on the bench—a manhood that ,„ W(..„. nko pat|0,,M;   Our sin es have
will sentence a millionaire as iin- put the whole town on it solid footing,
partially as a bootblack,    We need and marie pedestrianlsui nopular.   Had
i higher type of the  press, and a shoes tax the feet, and high nrkes tax
• '                   ' the puuketbook.
ORR & RENDELL'S.
OUB
The abolishment of the ward system is also being agitated iu I tularin.
At a recent meeting of Ihe Brant-
ford Hoard of Trade, T. II. Preston
brought up the matter for discussion, ami, after a number of prominent citizens bad expressed themselves  favorably, a resolution  was
STUCK OF
%|
■ £•***,
Lb
Cannot be  surpassed In the
City. We keep a special lineof
thing remains to be done by the adopted  endorsing   the principle.
faithful, and that is to obey.   We In supporting the motion Mr. Pres-
iinnlv hope that nil the Canadian "," pointed out that there aremany
Catholics, whatever may be their able men who could not be returned
political  banner, will  understand from their own wards which tbe city
this doctrine, and   not give to the as a whole would be  glad to elect,
tianity- not a namby-pamby religion, but a religion that is good for
seven days in lhe week aud 'J I hours
in the day.
Rov. c. J. Qroenwood, Baptist, Utlca, N'.v.
We modern Christians are willing   to preach   antl  pray,   but   we
don't want  lo associate with com- ,ii    •      rn   .      .1/1 it'..„
mon humanity.     The trouble with ( 110106   I (TlS jlll(l   ( 01166,
our nominal Christianity is that it Ciiillinl Fruits  Etc.
is too tender to be touched, too holy
to be handled, too nice to be nudged, OUR PRIDES AUK LOW und thi
too exquisite to be exposed, too dig- QUALITY OFotmGftoos EXCELLENT
nilied lo be desired, too respectable
for decent people, too cultured for
common people, too shallow for sen-
Bible people and  too idealistic for'
every. '
ty people.
Itev. .1. 1.. Gordon, Boston, Moss,
A MODERN ROSICRUCIA.N.
Dqn'tgo elsewhere until you have tried
+ THE ARCADE •:■
Where they Defy all Competition.
J. H. MCMILLAN,
TEA AID COFFEE
TRY—"^r
N. E. P. SOCIETY.
Blend No. 1—at 25c. per pound.
"   2---at 4<k\   "
"   3—at 60c.   "
«   4„.at (>()cf   "      «
6 lbs. M. M. at $1.50.
S.—Assam, Souchong, Ceylon, -Orange Pekoe,
best produced. Our own Blende*} Qofc
fee at 35c   Cannot be beat.
tr4
iTT/1
church and the world the sorry
spectacle of a deplorable division
where union under the enlightened
guidance oi '.}::: hierarchy and with
the concurrence of the right-thinking 1'rotestantt of this country is
essential to the triumph of justice
ind that there were many men who IHfl clllims t() „,lV(, Dlsooverea th J15 Victoria Crescent,
get into the council through the Elixir of Eternal Life.
ward system   that never would be
heard of in that connection if the; A Boston dispatch says: Lawyer
wards elected but one man eftoh, Edgerly, once of Lynn, Mass., is op-
or the choice had to he made by the oupying the attention of the public
city as a whole.    An  objection to ! by his establishments a newseot
,   , ■ , ,,,,. ,,,... ,.,,,   ..  ,1.,, i,,(,,,iiiii-■ the underlying principles of which
•mil   I he   inn inleti'incc  ot  re icniis int. li.ieseni svsuiiu was ine inctiuai • ,   ,'       „, .     ,, ,
n*,i<{5Jn! ity of the franchise.   Por example, aw unbounded confluence in Edg-
" \A owning $ 10,000 worth of property !erly and his profession that he has
.,, in one ward could vole for but three ! discovered the secret of  living for
.   .   .,   . , 1   l~ aldermen, while B owning $5,000 ever,   fheseot calls itself the Ral-
lntimidations to the press and the Worth of lironerty scattered over live !ston ««'iilth  Club, and  sometimes
peace in this Cnnadiai
tion."
Nor has the church confined
Edgerly is
llso the proprietor of Martyn 061-
centurieB - •' plan. '• adopted, would entirely re- j lege and the Martyn 1 ress Assooia-
» besietd,,,, ""'v«* Another advantage, men- Mon, both 0! which are branches of
f besieging tioned by Mr. Hey^ w.onld be a re- the Live-Porever Club. Edgerly's
tg a course auction of the influence of the ward headquarters are at 1281 O street,
public. We to-dny witness the spec-; wtirda had fifteen votes.   This was I the Live-Forever Club
tacle that has not  been paralleled an  absolute absurdity,   which his
in British countries for cen
of   the  church   actually
parliament and dictating
of procedure to the rulers of our politician', thus giving additional
country. The Krench Catholic mem- importance to tin; akiermitnic posi-
bers have been especially molested Uon*                  <a>
in the performance of their duties The massacre ol thirteen Armenian
v... il,,.„„o. nl rinttiloci ,m,i unirifit-il   'iiinilies is reniirleil  from the district of
by threats of political and spiritual Moogh( an(| f.'v(, Armen)(lI)9 ,ire g„id w
disaster, and this abuse of ecclesins .have been killed at Kiruhier.
SCIENTISTS Bay the Comet
will miss the earth. It is
equally true how McLeod can lit
you so wonderfully with a suit of
clothes in the very latest style.
See our stock uf Spring anil .Summer Goods.    :::::::
Washington, D. 0
To become members of the club
one must buy Edgerly's books.
They are 149 in number and cost
$300. The books deal in generalities, after the manner of " Motor"
Keelev, and tell of a new substance
McLEOI), The Tailor
28 Victoria Crescent,
S. H. WEBB,	
City Auctioneer
im' Commission Merchant
SALESoondiictot! In Wellington, Union
unci Adjoining Districts.
Johnston JJlock, Nainiiino.
WM.    K,    JJLyx«V*,,
Opposite Gibson Block, Commercial St.
MONEY TO LOAN,
EASY REPAYMENTS.
Apt for the Dominion Building and Loan Association,
Subscribed Capital 82,25(1,000.
No entrance fees unless lonns nrr accepted.   Money ndvancfd
within 20 days of application.   All terms and agree*
nieiMs are in bluiik and white, so you can understand I hem.
SAFE.      CONVENIENT.      PROFITABLE.
Insurance  Companies.
Royal, Queen,
London and Lancashire,      London and Canadian,
Quebec of Ontario.
THE MAIL, the People's Paper, $2 a Year • •
T"'!' -'«■
,1
$6000 NEEDED FOR'96
The Work of Improvement Goes
Merrily On.
Contract Let for Halibiirtou Street
Sidewalk—All Fences Must Be
Eeraoved From Streets.
A full board was present at the Council meeting on Monday evening, when
the following business was transacted i
COMMUNICATIONS.
From W. S. Gore, acknowledging com-
inuuit'iitioii from the Counuil requesting J school grant, and
Mayor Davison explained it was  the
Intention of the committee to interview
and there was great danger to prisoners
in case of fire.
Aid.   Planta   facetiously stated  they
Coal freights from Swansea and Cardiff
are now quoted at IBs. per ton. This
shows a steady advance and indicates
higher figures for coal shipments.   The
| U'ISijoi   UgUlGO   1U1  tun,   Olll]JllJClll.O.       XIII
otild not require so large a building for j market here already shows an improve
the few stray birds that had to be taken
care of. He thought it was not necessary to ask the Government for the use
of it, as it was hardly likely they would
refuse tliem this privilege after using it
so many years.
The motion carried.
At the suggestion of the Mayor, Aid.
Wilson moved that Mr. J. McGregor be
asked to use his efforts to carry out the
object of the motion.   Carried.
Aid. Planta drew attention to the
newspaper comment in regard to the
Council ignoring Mr. McGregor, M.P.P.,
in   the  appication   for   an   additional
ment. Jobbers antl retailers are complaining of dull business, as consumption is light and competition very keen
to secure orders from steam consumers,
cutting prolits very line. Intimations
have been recently cabled that if Australian coals are not advanced, enabling
the proprietors to pay better wages,
there is every likelihood of labor troubles in the near future.
SW9
PIEST CALL
balance of appropriation on school building.   Received and filed.
From the secretary of tbe School Board,
asking a credit of $2062 for payment of
jspntracts on school building. Granted,
r From Dr. McKechnie, Health Officer,
asking that instruments be furnished
bin, for testing milk in accordance with
the Milk By-law.   Complied with.
From H. Guest, applying for half the
fine of $200, Imposed In the case of Peter
Weigle. Referred to coinmittee consisting of Aid. Morton, Wilson antl Foreman.
From Forester A Hilditch, contractors
for building on Hirst estate, asking for
usual street privileges.   Granted.
From a number of working men, protesting against ihe recommendation of
tiie Board of Trade to raise the license
of   transient traders   from  $5   to   $50,
Mr. McGregor before they met the executive council.
THU  HIRST SIDEWALK.
Aid. Westwood stated that the sidewalk encroached on the Hirst estate on
Commercial street, and asked that the
portion beyond the street line be removed.
Aid. Bradley moved, seconded by Aid.
Wilson, that it be left, in
the .Street committee.
Aid. Sinclair said it seemed strange
that this complaint should lie made, us
it was only a year since the survey was
made; and Aid. Planta claimed that the
Hirsts had given permission to build
the sidewalk on their property.
Aid. Westwood said the sidewalk was
which would merely benefit a few sellish j entirely on their property in some places.
individuals to the detriment of the | Aid. Wilson moved an amendment
many. Received and filed, the matter that the Street committee bring in a re-
to be dealt with under tbe Revenue By- report next week embracing negotiations
law. ' for the purchase of  that portion  of tbe
' ifEPOBTS ok COMMITTEES. Hirst estate necessary to keep the street
From thaStreet committee—(1) asking at *ts pre8ont width; seconded by Aid.
further time   to  report   on   Franklyn ; McDonald.
ttb-eet drain; granted. (2) Recommend- Aid. Westwood did not think there
ing that a sidewalk be. laid on Kennedy was anything to be gained by It, as he
sweet ■■i.*. :>-!a)il lyii to the hospital; had been put to a lot of trouble in the
received and filed. (:i) Asking further matter already, and now wanted to get
time lo report on alley on McCleary on with'trie Work,
treet, and Heedhaw .street,   between j    Aid. Wilson—Aid. Westwood thinks I
am trying to block bis private business,
but lean assure him in my efforts I am
Off for the Yukon.
Messrs. W. Sloan, T.Flack, W.Seouse
and J. Wilkinson left by the steamer
Willapaon Wednesday on route to the
Yukon. Notwithstanding the fact that
their departurdftvas taken at a very early
hour in the morning, there was a large
number of their acquaintances on the
wharf to see them oil'. The larger portion of their outfit will be purchased at
Juneau, consisting of sleighs, provisions
and tools. They have taken some line
dogs with them, which will be used for
drawing the sleighs, thetlogs beingspec-
ially trained for this purpose. Their
destination is Circle City, and (100 miles
of the journey will be made by tiie sleigh
and nearly 400 by water. The quartette
be hands of w*" ',e provided with provisions suflic-
| ient to last them over two years, and
expect to return with sufficient gold to
repay them for their venture. It is not
too much to say that four men more
deserving of success nev*r left tiie country, and if ever men accomplished anything by energy and pluck, they ought)
to do it.
V***S/   i   \*!V
This Paper
Is owned, controlled and con-
11
uid! H. PLEAOE,
llvll I  cvNriot	
GKNEKAL-
Examination for Colliery Man-
agei—Certificate of Competency.
A Full Assortment ut the Lowest Market Rate
JOB WORK.
Promptly Attended to.
All kinds ol
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That I
an examination for Managers' Certificates of Competency under tiie above Act I
will be held at Nanaimo on or about the
Second Thursday of April, 1890.
Candidates intending to present themselves at such examination must, on or
before the first day of April, 1896, notify
such intention to the Chairman of the
Board, from whom all particulars can be ,
obtained,
Applicants for examination must not:
i be less than 23 years of age, and must
dueled bv workillginen in the j have had at least two years' experience
'underground in a coal mine (or mines),
interests   of   tho   people  at'Along with the application they must
also send a certificate of service from
their j,resent or previous employer, 	
TAKE NOTICE that there will also1
be an examination as above mentioned   1\|     T     TTTT>TiTl1T?T'  Xt f^Ci
at Union in the monj-h of August, 1806. |JU- ° •   J-oJ-UUlUIJiA  Ub \j\J.
ARCHIBALD DICK,
Chairman of Hoard.
Nanaimo, Jan, 21, 1890.
Tin and Sheet-Iron Work.
Victoria Crescent, Nanaimo
onice Tel. 30.   P, 0, Ilox lc.   Residence Tel. 101.
Victoria road and Nieol street; granted.
Mj Reporting the contract finished on
the Sabiston estate, and suggesting a few
additional repairs, etc.; laid over for ilis-
c.ussioil. (,r>) Recoiirtiii'.i,ilii:i' ..tl'.,| all
persons concerned be notified to remove
t ,eir fences from tbe street, and until
this is done that work on Irwin street
si leualk be Buspeiuledj adopted,
From ihe I/it'litVuH; cuiiiM itttc, recommending that a light he placed on the
corner of Needhaui and Strioklitm? streets
and that it be 8 or 10 leet above any
oilier light.. Atlopted; untie* tohe^lven.
The Road Foreman reported work done
on Milton, I'riileaux and Irwin Streets;
and cleaning drains.  Received and filed.
Aid. Bradley was grained further time
ti report.on Klijaii Bray's case.
DKVKURBl*   UUS1NKHS.
Aid. Wilson brought up the matter of
improvements on the tiablstou-Wlluox
ornate, and alter some discussion it was
referred, on motion of Aid. Morton, to
t ie Street committee to attend to what
further repairs ami oilier work they
detuned necessary.
LOAN   1IY-1.AW.
The Annual Loan By-law fur ISOfi wus
atlinned and ordered published* This
by-law authorizes a loan of ij.iiliOU for the
expenses ui lhe current year.
SIOTI  ..VS.
Hy Aid. Foreman— That the offer of
the K, A N. R. R. Co. In remove the
ashes from the roun , bouse be accepted.
Curried.
That a six-foot sidewalk be constructed on the west side of Kennedy street,
betweed Fiuwilliuin ami Franklyn. Carried.
Aid. Wilson moved, seconded by Aid.
McDonald, that lhe Street committee
prepare specifications for the proposed
alterations in the civic oiHces,
Aid. I'lanta requested his objection to
the work placed on record.
Aid. Wilson did not believe he was
. erious iu this matter, as bis previous
record showed that he held a contrary
opinion, lie also thought his ideas of
retrench ment were rather late iu the
day.
Aid. I'lanta said he certainly hud opposed retrenchment such  as  had   been
proposed by some of the aldermen.
The motion curried,
TKNIIKItS.
The following tender! per lineal  yard
only working for the interests of tbe city.
lie asked if the Fire Wardens were satisfied that the foundation had been undermined.
Aid, McDonald said he was not satis-
lied about the affair.
Aid. I'lanta warned them, if they prevented the work being carried out, the
estate would have a gouti claim for damages.
Mayor Davison thought Aid. West-
wood might have notified the Council
earlier, especially when he knew the
si,le.v-.il  wus.oii.tlie Mivst estate.
Aid. I'lanta moved an amendment,
seconded by Aid. WeRtwood, that the
sidewalk be removed.
The motion carried.
MI SI'Kl,I,AN Kill's   Ilt'SINl'SS.
Aid. Sinclair slated that water was
Hooding the upper portion of Wentwortb
street, and suggested that the horse and
cart be employed to fill it up with gravel.
Aid. Wilson concurred, and the matter was referred to the Street, 'onm ittee
for immediate action.
The Fire W'/.!ilei s reported  there hud
been a misunderstanding regarding the
I suspension of the caretaker at the Fire
j Hall, and he had been reinstated.   Ke-
I port, received and action endorsed.
Mayor Davison sab', in ,""gini! [to the
.VA'H' Al)VERT1SEMENTS.
CORPORATION
CITY OF NANAIMO, B. (I
A LY-LAW
To AUTHORIZE THE CORPORATION
OF THE CITY OF NANAIMO TO
BORROW THE SUM OF SIX THOUSAND DOLLARS IN ANTICIPATION
OF THE RECEIPT OF ITS REVENUE FOR THE YEAR 1890.
WUEUHAB, Under and by virtue of subsection 181 of section 104 of the Municipal Act, 1802, every  municipality
may, under the conditions contained
in said Bllb-se'l-ion, borrow from any
person such sum ol  money and bearing such  rate of interest as may be
requisite to meet the legal current expenditure of the corporation which becomes payable out of the annual revenue before the revenue for the year becomes payable by the taxpayers; and
Wiikuiias, To meet, the legal current ex-
puiidlt'uie ul  the Corporation  of  the
City of Naniiimo lor the year  lKliti,
payable out of   their annual revenue
before such revenue for such year oe-
conies payable by the taxpayers, it is
retpiisite lor the said corporation to
borrow the sum ol six thousand dollars;
Therefore lie it enacted by the Mayor and
Aldermen of the Corporation "/ tht City
of Nanaimo aefoUowei
1.   From and a'ter the final passage
of this By-law it snail be lawful for (lie
Mayor antl  Finaiieu Conittiiltee of tbe
Council of the Corporation of the City of
Nanaimo to  borrow upon the credit of
the suid Corporation from any person or
pel sous, linn or lir-ns, corpora.ion tn* corporal ions, who may be willing  to advance the saitic, the sum of six thousand
dollars in such amounts and at such
times as the same may iu the opinion of
the  Mayor and  Finance Committee
.      .      ,      , , ,     I Kin-   .Mi.,,.1    an.i    i luaiice t'Ollnlllliee  ot
accident to Edwards, he had arranged to | tl,eCouncil bo retpilred, bearing interest
pay bis  family *;(!  for lhe* present, as | at a  rate not excoeulng nine per cent.
per annum.
2,    tie Moneys BO borrowed shall lie
expen.icd iu del my I ng the legal current
large, and any allegation that
its course, policy or sentiment is in any way influenced by considerations apart
from the general interests of
the public is
Slanderous and False.
We believe that our record
conclusively attests the truth
of this assertion, and that the
result of our humble efforts
has redounded in a measure
to the bciiclit of the people,
especially in this city, it is
therefore for the people to
decide whether their support
may be depended on by us
as ours may by them. Upon
the lines indicated
Our Die Is Cast,^-=^>
Antl we fain would hope
there is no risk in the
hazard of the die. In all respects we have fulfilled our
pledges made ill the first
issue as fur as in our power
lie, and have confidence that
our efforts will be appreciated in the future us in the
past.
But—=r^
There are times when it bo-
Farm for Rent
A FARM IN CRANBERRY DISTRICT,
known as the Starks Estate, offered for
rent, subject to approval of the court.
About 60 acres under cultivation, with
all  necessary  barns,  dwelling-bouse
and store buildings.  It also comprises
a splendid orchard of four acres in good
healthy condition.   This farm is situated about six miles from the city.
SEALED TENDERS
Receivkd Ue to Monday, March 2nd,
For further Information apply to
11. 8. McDonald,
Guardian of Estate, Haliburton St.
successors to
JOHN HILBERT
Funeral Director and Embalmer
Graduate nf the Oriental, the Eureka,
the New York and Clark's
School:- of Embalming.
1, 3 and 5 Bastion St., Nanaimo
Eevier House
SKINNER STREET,
MRS. JAS. HAWKING, (late of the
Temperance House) desires to express her thanks to the public for
former patronage, and now begs to
slnte that the llevier House has
been comfortably arranged for the
accommodation of hoarders, steady
or transient. Single or double rooms
with hot or cold water baths, antl
electric light in each room. Everything strictly first-class and charges
moderate. Remember the house, a
half-minute's walk from the old
Stand north.
NOTICE.
All accounts due the Estate of John
Hilbert must be paid on or before the
16th of January, 18!lfi, to Mary Jane
Hilbert, Bastion Street. All outstanding accounts after that date will be
placed in the hands of a collector, with
full Instructions to press for same. In
future the business will becondueted by
M. J. HILBERT & CO.
Nanaimo, Jan. 3rd, 1896.
THE BEST   -:-
is the CHEAPEST
Bakery and
Restaurant
Invites Inspection and Comparison
as to Quality and Price.
THE   BEST BREAD IN  CITY,
Awarded  First Prize at the Agricultural Show.
BEST TWO-BIT MEAL IN THE CITY
The Nanaimo Bakery Excels
comes necessary to remind |SMART & TH0KNE.
supporters and sympathizers
that a practical demonstration of their support and
sympathy is needed—thai a
newspaper is not a synonym
for a mint or a golil mine,
and that the
Bastion Street, opp. Telegraph Office
P. ROWBOTTOM, Prop.
they were in need.
Adjourned until next Monday evening. I
In regard to Ihe deputation appi inlid
luncll to wait upon the Govern-:
expenses of the sunt Corporation fur the
year ISiiii, and shell, together with the
interest thereon, he repayable and repaid to tht- louder or lenders thereof on
or before the 81stdayof December, 1808,
out of the municipal revenue for the
said year.
n.   The acknowledgment of such lla-
, bility snail be In the form of a pr unis-
neccssniy,  inasmuch   us  Mr. Mcliregor ' sorv note or noics siioicii  by the M.iyor
had already approached the Uovernnient, ••»■• Oleik and the Finance Committee
on the subject and had furnish, II the | **•,«" %%™£ ,„. ,,,,„ „ l|ie
bytheCi
ment with the view of obtaining an ad-'
ditlonal appropriation for themew school
bitil ling, the City Clerk bus received a'
letter from  the Ministerial Education
stating that an Interview is entirely un-1
Sinews of War.
Must come from without, ami
without which the war of Ihe
people cannot be watted with
any degree of satisfaction or
with any hope of success.
This is one of lhe time.**whon
The Popular Bakers.
MACE & POSTER :
g
ALWAYS   IN   STOCK >
GROCERIES,
MINERS' CAPS,
UNDERWEAR,
LAMPS, Etc. etc.
TAXIDERMIST DEPARTMENT .
'id
House Painters
Paper-Hangers
Kalsominers
Bums axii Animals set up in a thorough workmanship manner.
On Hand—Pour  fine  Deers' Heads,
which will be sold for price of sett ing
then, up.   Also a line case of Birds.
SEWIKG MACHINE NEEDLES OF Ul (IMS.
Sign P5&|=
d. s. Mcdonald.
(ill Haliburton Street, Nanaimo.
WHARF STREET.   -   Pcslcllice Boi 71
Nanaimo Business Directory
gJtV Orders left al 11. I.ukey's Printing Office, Bastion Bt., will be promptly
attended to.
BARRISTERS.
for tbe Haliburton street sidewalk were
read:
Hiilutvttllf. OroMhliin.
M. Morrison  73c. 12c.
.Caldwell A Hardy  78o.        BL»..e.
P. Nile  74-..C.
J. Sharpies 8lic.        54c.
K. 0, Barnes & C. Nilson 70o	
W. A. Nettle    84c.        (12c.
A. W. McDonald     (18c.        68c.
In reply to Aid. Wilson, Aid. Sinclair
said there were 112 feet of crossing.
On motion, the contract wus awarded
to A. W. McDonald, and the deposits of
unsuccessful bidders ordered returned.
KKVKNUK  1IY-I.AW.
Aid. Planta moved thu first reading of
the Revenue Amendment By-law, mutt.
On a plea of urgency tbe hy-luw passed
its first and second reading.
PROVINCIAL COUUT HOUSE AND JAIL,
Aid. Bradley moved that the City
Clerk bo instructed to write to the Com-
.missioner of Lauds and Works Inquiring
on what terms the Government will sell
or leuse the old court house and jail to
tbe eity.
Mayor Davison was glad attention had
been  called  to  this matter.    A lockup
facts regarding the same. In this connection il is only fair to stale that there
was no intention to slight Mr. McGregor
on the part of the Council, as has been
charged. The appointment of tbe deputation was purely a measure to emphasize I,, tho Government the importance
and necessity of the object.
San Francisco Coal Market.
Prices of coal are quoted in San Francisco as follows:
I'KR TON,
Wellington  »8 00
New Wellington      8 00
Southfleld    7 50
Seattle  f6 00(.«5 50
Bryant    5 60
(loos Buy    4 50
Wallsen'd    0 50
8eot-*h    7 50
Brymbo    7 50
Cumberland, In bulk $18.60; sacks 15 00
Pennsylvania Anthracite Egg  18 00
Welsh' Anthracite Egg	
Can nol       8 00
Hock Springs, Castle  Gate and
Pleasant Valley    7 (10;
Harrison's circular says: "During the
week there have been seven arrivals
from the coast collieries with 12,726 tons
and 1(118 tons from Australia. In the
iiasl 25 days there have been but two
foreign cargoes come.toh.and—from Newcastle, N. S. W.—consisting ol 4(128 tons;
hence the stocks on hand of Knglish und
Australian are being gradually diminished. There arc due from Australia
about 15,(100 Ions, and there are over
150,000 tons capacity engaged to transport coal from Newcastle and Sydney;
Bome of this will not load for several
'Annual Loan By-law,' 180(1.'
Passed   by the Municipal  Council on
the 2uh day of February, istiii.
Affirmed by the Municipal Council on
the 2nd flay of March, I Will,
I
J. II. DAVISON, Mayor.
JM.J
"■""    An/.M TtlOltPlOK, C. M. ('.
APPLICATIONS.
(THE     HOARD     OP   PUBLIC
-**- School Trustees invite applications
up to
Saturday Evening-, March 7,  1890-
for the position of Janitor anil attendance othcer of the New Central School
Building.   Salary f 50 per month,
Applications to lie
tary. The Trustees
refuse any or all a]
S. GOl'GII,
Secretary.
Nanaimo, B. C. Feb. 2(1, 180(1.
urj\
Tht
Is constrained to impart
such an unwelcome fact to
its patrons and friends—ns-
sured, however,that such announcement is no more re«
gretfully made than it will
be   received   ami  cheerfully
responded to as far ns possible. But remember that, in
accordance with the policy of
the  paper, in this respect
there will he
rfommercial Hotel.
Corner Cinnnit rciiil mul Hiistinn sis.
Thli innc <"tai>iMii<<t Hotel In oomfortibly
fitted up with mportor Rcoonnnodt'
tloim for (mvi-li-rn tnul other*.
DARKKH .t POTT8, Barrlsten nod Solicit-on.
11» Commercial itreet
M
F. CAKE, llnrristi-r and Solicitor, Room 11,
Joli niton Black.
innks .k Mi inm's, Burrliton, Boom 6.
Johnston Block, CommorolR] itrsot.
Y'ARWOon A Yiii'Xii. BarrlMen,
rot,,,inTcitil md BmUoii itmti.
BOTANIST,
T.
HARDY, liohin,,.
OOllL   Try Marly
DriiRulit, Wlnfleld Crw*
I  I'll!" OllllllH-lll.
DRKTI8T8.
Nol,.. but the bMI brandi of win,.
Ale in,.I fintirh dlfpsiuwd at ll,,- Lur
•r. i>*« fix n i.;i
r.
Ho
Uqaon,
Prop.
Tel,.|il„,ii|. 7.JI,
ie sent to  the  Secre-jTiT- fin n-m,*nZ /\-mr\      Mem. Pfllvcrwl—
s reserve the right tol    V A        I   ,| 1,01 i°l / ll I    ■       'J'"'"'-' l'"rl ciinsC"
iplicutifiiis.  ._ j il U        \J\J\J I UlUilt i ■»*S* A,.u''.'!1"." '""'' "'
rioMPKTiTiVK Plans and Spkcifica-
V tions ffir the construction of nn Iron
or Wooilen Bridge across the Millstreani
River will be received from residents of
Niiiiiiinio only, np to
Monday, March il, lflDA, at 7 p. in.
The   Municipal Council  reserve  the
right to reject all or any plans submitted.
Particulars on application to
ADAM THOMPSON,
^^^^^ ^^^^^^^_._ -r. _ City Clerk.
$\d Bastion was liftrdly u suitable place, ' coining season aro nui very encouraging.' Nanaimo, B. C. Feb. 2(1, 1811(1.
months. Freight rates from that section
are sienilily maintained, with a tendency
, towartl an advance, as tbe inducements
was a great necessity to lhe city, as the   for grain carriers lo seek this port for the
A_l_l I       I        - -
Millstreani Bridge.
Nanaimo Moat Market,
VICTORIA I'KKSCKNT,
Wholotli una Ratal] Dealer! in nil Idndi of
.    Frrsli iiiiil Salt Moats.
Etc ,
■ il: MASON, Dentist. KxtraotlngsipooMUjr,
I'  ,,„. „ti.l HttiDrHdinlnUtortn,
tilllt'c. Oflil-I'ellow'l Block, Niiiuilino.
\\* .i CURRY, li. 11. **.. Union Blook. Kl'mi-
'* .   ollUM 'fork j-,ii<niiiliT,l.
DRUQOI8TS,
pRESCKXT PHARMACY. II.ii.i. a steaiimTk,
" pn>)irteton, Victoria Creioont. Dupsnalng
tin,! family raotpet,, npoolalty.
MflillWKI.I.. ATKINS, wats.ix en.. Limited,
Medical Hall, c-~
. oiiiiiicri'ini and Bas*
Sausages,
WE HAVE 'EM.
I The Bo.xf, Print ing Material
< aud 'the knowledge lo use it
( to tiie best effect.
Try'em Yourself
A Trlii' Uolloltod.
y tree oi ohanra,
Shipping Ordon,
-M. LE6ERRY & CO.
Lodge Notices.
^ lul-rrmnn  Lodge,  No. ,i:.t, Sons of St.
Qeorae,—Regular weekly meeting li neld
in Hubert's Hull, Whalf street, on SATURDAY evening SI 7:80o'clock, visiting
brethren cordially Invited to attend.
FRED, WAQSTAff, Sec.
Peoplo who Appreciate ,
PI'RE DEUGS
Have Uittrprwerlplleni dliptniod al
PIMBURY'S DRUG STORE.
Their MOSI ere Bight, IWsphOM 3.
tion sired*,.  Telephone 1*1
DYK WORK8.
vanwm.i DYE WORKS.—Djrelng, Cleaning
i>   and Repairing   lixicol itreet,
C, I 'll.tlll.TiHf,   Mil, 11,11,T.
1'ISII   MARKET.
aMAHSlt, Wliolesole Dealer In  FiKh and
•    oniiif.. Baitton Btreet, Stuuiimo.
HOTKLS.
(■HAMi BOTEI/-W, BTSlt, Proprietor-Vie-
»>   torts Craioent.
|XTi:iiNATlnXAl. UOTKI/-PETER WEIGLE,
1   Prnpricior.   Victoria f recccnt.
INSlIKAKOB AND FINANCIAL AOBNT
MWOI.FR, flu iii,, 'Inl and Inmirance Artent,
• Johnston ninrt.
liKAl, BSTATR—INBURANOB,
LlllltKMAX A  HAIiliV, Ural linlpil,.  Broken,
r    RoftlOn street.
SKI-fiNIi-IIAND  STORK.
D.
TAYLOR, PchIit in nil ItlOdl Of Npw tnd
H«*<vn<MIiin-l  I'tinifmri'. UM Kimpy Art*.
ale* <»f ''very ilo«trrlptlo)i.
Next to (/ui'tim'i!% connoraUl street. METEOROLOGY,
THE U. S. WEATHER BUREAU PREPARING  FOR ATMOSPHERIC
OBSERVATIONS.
Kites Thai M 111 Afcrundi
il Curry tnstrn-
iii'i;|*Thi   Kilcti—Varied   t'ses <>I  Tliew
Aerial Toyttol lite Weath< r Man.
There surely never was anything t;nlto
bo remarkable in Its way m tho new kite
which is about to bo employed by the
Weather Bureau for studying tho ft]most
unknown regions of the upper air. This
Is an entirely now field of exploration,
and the scientific experts of thi Govern-
inoiil propoae to invade it and record observations with instruments ol i reclslon,
Tho fart* thus gathered ore expected to
simplify the husinepi cf making woather
forecasts and to rondei tho lottoi much
•!,""i' accurate than heretofore. Much
may i'i' accomplished eventually Ln thh
way by ascents in lial own*-, I >:■ pen Ui g
hoped-foi Improvements in * ich flying
apparatus   kites are to i-i employ rl
Kxperi.mcnts are now being madt with
a hiloch ■ of kite whioh would astonish the
best-In -.■ mod small buy. Nobody tin*
hi (j tain 11 tl with the I ;.-;-i i principles ol
norostnrlt ■- wuuh imngint thai mi h a
thing could possibly lly ii looks more
like .1 hit e oi drj goi iff • ■ --■ sti ing to
gethcr than like a kite, L'hi ... :.■ f
ever, aro i : silk, and they J ave do topi or
bottoms, A string of Ave . ft! em weighs
Ufi ounces, tl e ir.m.t work ■' i ing i £ very
light si cks of wood. 13utyou ought to
sot the M-- bine gi uj. 1; dm t n't fly
like an ordinary kite it goi 5- up into *!..
air with a rush and hoars far aloft like n
hovering bird almost without porceptibli
motion.
The inventor of thi*- strange Hying
machine • .Mr. fe A. Potter 1 . the
Weather liureau's stuff, yesterday he invited year correspondent to go out to his
country place near Washington and see
hip. kites co up. There were n number oi
them, all constructed on tho same principle but having a varying number of
boxes or "cell**. " an they are termed, The
most servii eablo pattern thus far seen s to
be that which consists of only two boxes
Stood on end it ie '-• . fee* high, and its
weight in exactly ].'■ ounces. It has ]
square feet ■-! silk 03 muslin, the idea
being that the weight shall no; exceed one
ounce for each square foot of liftinc surface, Muslin is used for every-day experiments, boi silk is lighter, and therefore
I ett( r.
On the resl oi n dll was a i uge reel
wound like a spool with £!,000 fe< t
strong i■•.*! "in roe wn-i bolted to ..
tabic, the legs oi rhe latter being driven
deep into tin- ground and otherwise secured, This arrange;.-.1 nt was necessary because 1 f ihe tromeudt ns pull of the bites,
which otherwisi would run away with
the tnbli     reel and all,    Mr. Potter fled
kite on a wire is able to rise much higher,
and the higher :t goes the greater the
velocity of wind which it finds to uphold
it for wind velocity increases as the higher levels ol the atmosphere are reached.
Greater wind velocity means Increased
lifting power Ur tho bite, so that it. can
sustain more wire. It is by figuring on
these data that wo arrive at a reasonable
expectation of being able to Hy our kites
at an elevation of two miles when our arrangements arc completed."
While ho talked Mr. Potter had not
been idle. The two-story kit.e still floating in the air. he attached a separate
piece of cord 100 feet in length to another
kite of iho same pattern, The end oi this
Firing ho tied to the main cord near the
reel, and then he tossed kite Xo. 3 into
tho air. H rose rapidly, and a moment
later there were two artificial btrdf <>f
muslin and sticks snaring aloft, one far
abovo the other- This process war, repeated with a third kite, and that was sent
up in like manner. The strain on the
cord had becoiuo by ibis time very considerable and Mr. Potter explained that
In a high wind it was the hardest kind of
work to fetch a '■:■■ ek ol hit birds to earth
again, tho pull being sometimes 41
pounds or more, In a severe gn!e ii might
run up to f>( pounds, with half n dozen
kites thus strung In tandem  fashion,
Viin see,'* said Mr Potter ' by ar
ranging them in this way we can get any
amount of lifting power that we want.
nnd heavy instruments may be carried to
a grcal height, In order to main simul-
tanenuE observations at different level?,
we hai u only to ..1 range the su] pigmentary .kites along the main cord at determined intervals. Wo know just how much
wire  has run 011" the reel, and by tal: ng
WHEN VrVDRK FITS WOMAN.
I '  (   !
one of his '*• * si ■■ 1. *■• the end of
tht string tossed it into thi air, and up
it she* ni naturally ns a bird would ri*e
or tht wing. Out ran the cord from the
roe. fthfi -i and up soared the kite into
thi blue empyrean, when It hung almost
motlonlesF at a height olM-Ofeet. perhaps.
"Tho wind is light to-day.*1 Bald Potter. ' With a good brcezi 1 have sent my
kit** as high as ii 01' feet, We are only
at thi beginning 11 our experiments nnd
wi shall do evei so much better before
long. In the first place, this oojd is very
heavy, and a few hundred feet nf ;■, wi Igh
a good deal so a* to pull down tho kite.
At 1 he Weather Bureau we are getting
reai y (1 tol ol very line, but strong, steel
wirt and * bal is to lo snb?tf111 ted for tho
eord. It will weigh nol nearly as ranch,
and will be battel foi the purpose alto-
get tier. With thlB improvement in the
apparatus 1 expect to hi* able to raise
kites ti on nltitudi oi .-it least a mile.
When we car* do that wi ^l.:ill be in a
position to a-*:-! rtaln important facts about
the upper regions of ihe atmosphere,
Eventually wohope to Attain an elevation
t !  tWO n.'.-e-*   ( *      I -1
"It is of the ittmoRt importance that
the kite shall hang l the air as nearly
without motioi at possible, because it Is
intended t< sorry varioui self-reglBtwrlng
Instrument! ' ndo? kudIi cireumstances
.t would not t.i '.t havi tht- machine
diving and ,. .nginu nl cut. 1 tne of the
Instruments whioh wt propose !■• ute lis
for determining Leinperaturii In the
upper level* oi it.*; i».r it weighs about
two no utifl \h i.g mom chiefly ol nlu-
mlntun ••!'' uontalim ulnekwark mtehan-
lam, by meant ol which a thermometnr
ruoord .•■ ineerihud on .l sheet ol white
(■aptr. Oth ei np par h m ,•- now being
devised iy Prof, Marvin, ol the Weather
Bnreftu !; r antomati ally registering
wind veloolly , nmit Ity nnd barumetrlo
i eMure—the last being a measure of
height ol course 1 erhni - also we shall
make nou tf i).r amount of electricity
present in the atmosphere at different
levels.
"Knt w tiivf 1.' all these conditions has
mm ll to u< with :;.t <• ilence of forecasting the weather. :: may fairly be said
that the key of successful forecasting ta
to he found In ,v ■ inintance with the conditions oi the .n • r air. w lien we are
able to make accurate observations at
heights from one mile to two miles above
the surface ol the earth we ehnll have
made a great step ahead. Hut, while wo
hope to accomplish much by this exploration of elevated region of the atmosphere,
respecting Which almost nothing Is known
at present, it Ifl too early to speak with
confidence, a- yvt, we have scarcely bo-
gun our wor.;. Prof, Moore, chief of the
Weather Bureau, to whom all the credit
of thll Idea is due, proposes to send Prof.
Jla/en up ln a balloon in tho midst of a
norm some day before long, for tho purpose of Securing observations,
"That has nothing to do with the kiteflying, however. Oltr new reel for the
latter purpose will he wound with 10,000
feet or nearly two miles of steel wire.
An important advantage of the wire is
that it offeri comparatively little, 'resistance to wind. If you havo 3,000 feet of
cord . 89 of an inoh thick upheld by a
kite the Surface presented by it to the
wind is very considerable, nnd the resistance to thi aii t in 11 nt thus offered tends
to poll the kite down.    Accordingly,  the
:t:t,i. oc
earth s
for the
iosely
two-col
pounds
pounds
"What
purring
junt tbe angle of the wire
surface   and   making  alh
the
rvnee
slni».   we   can   cab ulato pretty
tho  elevation   of eacli  kite.    A
kite in a fair breeze will lift throe
jn   a   gale it will  carry  eight
L
the cause  of   that  peculiar
se  which   the  kites make all
tho timeV  asked your correspondent.
"Jt is the vibration of the muslin due
ii the wind," replied Mr. Potter,
could slew yt-w something moro interesting than that if we were using wire Instead oi cord. I have flown my kites iv-
peatodls with wire, and always an electric
current along the wire has boon noticeable. Sometimes :t is very slight, while
ai other times It h:*s been so strong as to
give severe shocks ami semi out sparks
half an inch in length, To avoid tho
shocks, I have been obllsed repeatedly to
ground the wire by hanging another piece
(■!' wire over it. This electrical action is
due tc, difference in tho amounts o.' electricity present, at various- atmospheric
levels. It ie very odd, by the way. to
notice* thi way Ln whioh crows, behave
w th regard to the kites. Close by here
.i, tbe neighborhood of the National
lemetory at Arlington, i- ono of the
pn-;.:ev!, crow roosts In the country, and
often the birds fiy around the kites in
Bocke squawking and exhibiting every
symptom of ouriosity."
Though thenew kite is Mr. Potter's
own invention, the idea from which it is
der ved was original with an Australian
expi rimenti r named Margrave. Tbe
I3argravekite,however, is heavy and very
il Ifi ii: to start a-flying i.iki rhe Pinter
.: ie, 11 ' onsists In its simplest foi in ot two
boxes, topless nnd bottomless, joined to-
gel her i y a frame ol wood, But the boxes
an rectangular, whoreas those of Mr*Potter's kite are diamond-shaped. By this
modification of form Mr. Potter is enabled
t> mnkt his frame ever *~o much lighter, so thai the whole a!;air weighs scarcely
more than a pound, Any boy can make
such .'* i ite and t!y it far more easily than
om oi the ordinary sort. It (lies Itself,
oni mighi say.retiulrlug only to be tossed
.nj« rJie air whon there is a fair breeze
blowing. The Totter kite has several
times r.ho litinc power of the common
k tcposeuesing four plane surfaces instead
oi c "i
Thi sc entitle kite, like man In his descent *r< ta tbe n| (•■•. has lost Its tail.
Before the new Potter kite was invented
thi Weather Bureau experimented with
Malay i-..!*te .". feet hrgh, *' muslin, Tho
Malay kite > built on the sumo plan as ;
an ordinary boy's kite, 1 hough somewhat
fcimpli r,having only two sticks instead of
three. At many as a dozen kites of ibis
kind "i re flown on one cord, tandem
fashion, like the Potter kites. They were
constm :ted on mathematical principles,
and thuf got along without tails; but
they dived and plunged a great deal, and
wort i> r.< means satisfactory for pur*
pi M-r t'. meteorological observation,
Kocontly experiments havo been made
with sending up kites of the Potter type
with cameras, by which photographs
were takci. from considerable elevations,
A noticeable point about these photo-
graphs wi»s a peculiar distortion of the
perspective.
By means of kite observation it Ir intended to make a sort of profile map of
the atmosphere, in which curves of temperature and barometer will be located
for dlfTerenl seasons oi the year. Much
data a,ay he valuable to engineer* of
Hying machine* when practically perfected, ju>t as charts arc useful to sailors,
By means of them It wiil be easy to determine what currants of air arc likely j
to heme: with nt various height-. It is
Imagined ihat kito-Hying on scientific
principles may be serviceable in future ■
wars, A camera pent up on a line of ,
kite* may be utilized to take photographs
of the enemy's tones and fortifications;.
Kites may even carry bombs filled with
high explosives and drop the latter Where
they will do the most good. The Signal
1 Jorpa oould be easily and 1 heaply equipped with kites, whioh would weigh little,
arm might he folded up in small space
In the .National Museum is a remarkable collection of Chinese kites, which
exhibit a versatile Ingenuity ol contrivance in fiy Ins apparatus undreamed of by
Europe-ana or Americans. The small boy
ol the United Mates, horn an inventor
ecause he Is n Yankee, thinks ho is performing a 11 at if he succeeds in causing
to soar a simple pentagon of sticks and
paper, with a tail of rags. Such a toy
bears the same relation to the Chinese
kite as is borne by the flint hatchet to the
modern ax, In tho collection spoken of
are kites in the shape of frogs, lizards,
cranes, <■<wis. gigantic dies and enormous
grasshoppers. But by far tho most extraordinary is a kifco SO feet long, in the
shape of n snako-liko dragon. No ono
but a Chinaman oraJapanese would suppose that such a thing could be tlown.
It is composed Of a number of pasteboard
disks, ouch a foot in diameter, fastened
together with spaces between by a cord
running tho length of tho dragon, which
has a ferocious looking paper head. Tho
string heal by the manipulator of this interesting plaything is attached at three or
more points In the length .if the dragon,
ko that the latter may be controlled In the
air. While afloat the long tall has an
undulating and serpentine,motion, thus
producing a very realistic eifejt.
Arc the eyelashes to keep tho pupils ol
the eyes in obedience!1
J~l«*xjit*- Domestic Service nnd Check ft-o
Mad r-iuslt of Girls for Ittifdru-tiB Life.
Edward W. Bok„ In February Ladies'
Koine Journal, considers editorially
"Whon Work Pits Woman," n text under
which he enter* emphatic and vigorous
protest against the mad rush of women
to seek employment in mercantile and
manufacturing establishments, Tho
article is evidently Inspired by the receni
public utterances of one of tho largest
employes of women In Pennsylvania.
Who, In raising hit voice against this
evil, asserts "that more wrong lias been
done to thousands of girls who have gone
into our commercial houses than the
world dreams of," and urges young
womtr: who are seeking positions, to engage as domestics where they nre sale from
danger, where their surroundings would
he eli vat ing and congenial, and in a field
which greatly neeut. them, Mr. Bnk em-
phasi/es these nttoruncor-i and goes farther,
saying "The fact cannot be disputed
that no single factor in modern life is
doing si much to degenerate our young
womanhood as this mad race on the part
of girls, Impelled ly necessity or not, to
gi- into the business wcriii. These may
Bound'like strong words to the ears of
some but t" those who arc really cognizant ol the Immensity of the evil results
that eve being wrought, they will simply
lit ihe cast' and not go beyond it, In altogether too many of our commercial and
industrial estalblshments, stores and
factories The men into whose hands i*-
given the power to employ and control
girl-, a; 1 not (it, from a moral standpoint,
to hi nl swine. And yi x thousands of our
young women are allowed to gi> from
their home.- to work under the influence
of these men and in the atmosphere vitiated by them. And why; Simply because
it-is considered more'respectable' to be
employed In an oflice. -tore or factory
than to engaged in domestic service. The
very won; 'servant* has a taint about it
the majority 0. young women di —
md from which they flee. Hut what
are they in business establishments
servants, pure and simple? There
be ni difference but an imaginary
Thai is all. Far less leniency is
! siown in our business house.- to women
1 employes than is shown, as a rule, in our
1 homes to domestic hel] — infinitely loss."'
I Mr. lick further argues that if the mr-
tress would seek to elevate domestic work,
to treat servants with greater consideration, and to have the daughters of the
fnmlly show some active, Interest and
participation in household work, better,
more intoUigt at and mnrorellable women
would t>i attracted tr, the kitchens of our
homes, and the destructive rush nl young
girls to work in stores counting houses
and fnctories, would he largely checked,
and a modirn evil to a great extent curtailed,
thai.
liki 1
OTIC.
THE SQUARE-BUILT MAN.
Two  Occasions on Which   He Said "Well, Ir
General," tn Wolselcy. \
"War correspondents!' exclaimed Lord
Wolselcy. "Some of them aro desperately brave, while others are Anything but
heroes. The majority. I think, do their
duty well, even when It leads them into
light places, By the way, Talking of
tight places and war correspondents, Ire-
member an incident that may interest
you. It was at the beginning of the
Ashantoe campaign, just after our landing; a square-built little man came up to
me and said, speaking slowly, and with
an unmistakablo American accent:
" 'General, allow me to introduce myself: I am the correspondent of tho New
York Herald.    I—
"Too busy to attend to him.. I ont him
short with ' What can I do for you -ir:-'
"He replied, imperturbahly, with the
same exasperating slowness, "Well, General, I want to be as near you as 1 can
if there is any fightin' to be seen.'
" 'Capt. So-and .-V has charge of all the
nrrnngi ments • ono irning correspondents,
I rejoined, ourtly; 'you had better we
him.1 And with this I turned en my
heel and went about my business.
"i saw no more of my correspondent
with the aggravating coolness and slowness '. sf eech for many .. day, I did net
even know whetnor he was a 'companying
tho column or nor.
■'Personally speaking I was only in
iring the win le expedite n,
'fore we entered Ooomns-
-sod forward with the ad-
hoping tu break the last
ance and have done with
TOBACCO   AND   EDUCATION.
THE   ASHANTI   EXPEDITION.
An r it * * live .-< aiedy.
The electrician is a eompnratlvely new
man in the Industrial field, In older
branches ot work tht ground has boon
(rone >*vor so often that all sorts of contingencies are provided against, but unloosed for ■ onditions are the daily lot of
the electrical engineer, who has to be alert
and resourceful. An operator who was
wiring a theater in a great hurry was
driven to despair by the way In which tho
carpenters would constantly undo in a few
seconds the work of hours. They would
insist on driving mtUs in his wires, and
cutting the circuits whenever they
thought they had occasion to do so. As
remt ub trance failed, he went on another
tack Higglng up a i'.-.iiili h*re gong he
connected all his circuits with It. Within ball an hour after ihe gong was installed ii went ot; with a clanging which
brought every workman In the building,
down into the street. Cries of "Fire"
resounded through every part of the theater and there vras a huge scare. After
awhile, when it became evident that there
had been a false alarm, ihe engineer got
the hands together and took them back
Into the building, He there explained
to them that every time any ono but his
own men even so much as touched a
wire the gong would go off, and the man
who touched the win would get a shock
of electricity that would paralyze him for
i lif. His ei* :uits were never troubled
again.
N(,
Needlework    witi
When it i- beaut ful
mnsi ::. -.     It   is   net
itself,   but it Is ;ii  or
!*.i uork.
thstands
the    ages
i1- worthy  of art
only do- orativo in
tlvo  em ploy mi nt,
A woman embroidering makes as t harm-
inn '•' picture as a lovely girl pair.ling.
All tho .adi.'s of high degree In all tho
courts in all the nget havo :lone beautiful
needlework, nnd the fashionable woman
of to-day seems to have suddenly remembered this. Smart boudolrfi and drawing-rooms nil of a sudden display fascinating little work boxes and ombroidery
frames, and In the lew minutes before
dinner is served the hostess busies hersell
witti taking a few stitches ir. the enchanting fabric that is growing undo1' her
lingers, the while -he gossips gayly with
the friends who are dining en famllle,
Mitten- and comforters for thu poor are
With great justice no .linger being made
by society women, i'he sewing and
knitting of this description is left for
needy women to do who cannot do anything else, their wi rk being >>i ught from
11 em ar.d turned over To more needy people it is the fashion to give one's
friend* examples ol ono'i handiwork i>f
the new-rid regime Instead of "fas ■ na-
to:v.," which nlway i\.<.\ mus- the hair so,
now prle-dleus are worked foi one's girl
friends who ore betrothed. The rector no
longer dreads the shower of slipper*
which he can nevei wear out enough to
make them good tuck to throw alter all
the brides he i losses but has visions of
wonderful altar oloths, which, it is the
dream ol every fashionable Roman Catholic and High Church Kplscopallan
woman to embroidi r. Most Amerlonn
women, though, lack the patience requisite for so bfg an undertaking.
A *-i^ rial Man'* vi*i * e.
The Xew York Sun of *uhe 18th ult»,
gives a Eomowhat thrilling account of a
railway signal man's spree, and what
came out of it. Geo. Mason, a signal
tower man on tho Long Island railroad,
near New York, got drunk and took
forcible possession of Iue signal tower,
driving the day watchman out at the
point of a loaned revolver. He soon got
the signals mixed and stopped two pas*
seugor trains going In opposite directions.
Word was qulokly sent to an adjoining
station, and all trains that should pu-s
were stopped. A number ot men were
sent nnd overpowered the inebriatv, and
took him away to a police station, where
bo was locked up. Providentially, no
loss of life or property resulted from his
spree. The noxt day he was tried before
a police maigstrate. and sentenced to two
months' imprisonment, the magistrate
rr grot ting ho could not give him a heavier
sentence,      Such an incident shows what
txangi r  there  may be to a whole com*
munlty when one man drinks too much.
dnngi :■ once <
It was shortly
sle. I had pre
vance troops,
effort at res!
tho affair, when the enemy, utilising tho
heavy covert, came down and !airly surrounded Us. For a few minute.1; the position was critical, and every men had to
light, for the enemy's lire was ponred in
at close quarters. They pressed upon us
from all s des. dodging from tree to tree
ami continually edging oloser, hoping to
get hand to hand. In tho hottest of it my
attention was caught by a man In civilian's clothes, who was some liftesn or
twenty yards in front, of me, and who
was completely surrounded by the advancing savages. He seemed to pay no heed
to the danger. Put. kneeling ou one knee,
took aim. and flred again and again, and
I seemed to sec that every time he fired a
black man fell, I was fascinated by his
danger and coldness. As our main body
onme up and the savages were driven
hack. I wen; forward to see that no harm
came to my civilian friend, who rose just
as ' reached htm, Tu my astonishment
it was the correspondent of tho Now York
Herald, and lie began again in the same
slow, calm way:
" 'Well, general-—'
"Again 1 interrupted him: 'Yon were
lucky to escape, Didn't you see tha; you
were surrounded:'
" 'Well, general.' he began again I
guess I was too much occupied by the
niggers In iron: tt. pay much intention tu
those behind."
"That was evidently tho simple truth.
Whatever men may say in the future
ahtc.it Henry M. Stanley, no one that bos
seen him in dangei will douy that his courage is of the firs; 1 uullty. I took a liking
to him ou the spot, and we bocame groat
friends; nor has anything occurred since
to niter my opinion ol him."—London
Saturday He-view.
fjuetiee License Aineadmeitts,
1 Miring the recent *■ flsion ol tho Quebec
Legislature, which has just closed, somt
important changes were made In tht
Liquor license law ol that province
Among them are the following: Any ol
the municipal councils, excopt those ol
Montreal and Quebec, must certify a willingness to the Issue of liquor licenses, or
they cannot be tsaueii at all and the decision of tho sound i is absolute In case
the applicant has been previously convicted of violating tho lice use law his application must bo refused. If the majority
ot the electors In the municipality, o; o;
a polling sub-division, have filed their
opposition us any license being grantee
within that limit, none can be granted,
Speoia! liconses :*an be issued for picnics.
races or large gatherings, Iu municipalities whore local 0] .;or. by-laws are In
force, licenses an issued for the sale
ol liquors for medicinal purposes but no
such licenses can he issued to public
houses, 'i'he reason Is obvious, A purchaser of liquor from an unlicensed person,
or during pohlbited hours, is liable to a
penalty of from ?.'- to £-..'- for each
offence. Any licensed person harboring
a constable while on duty, or giving him
liquor, or attempting to bribe him, is
liable to a penalty of 160,
Seiiiir of Color tn Animals*
It is next to impossible to give a:i instance in whit h a dog identifies an object
by Its hue, and there is little positive evidence that the larger quadrupeds have
much sense of color Domestic cattle are
so far affected by violent contrast of
white and dark that the presence of a
black, white or very clearly spotted animal in tht herd sometimes results In calves
being thrown of tho same color or markings, lint though retl is raid to irritate a
hull, and to excite hunters hy association
of Ideas, the latter statement rests partly
on aurmUo.  Tin writer has seen a  setter
refuse to retrieve  a   black rabbit because
it apparently thought it- master hnd shot
a Liaek cat. Hut a bouBO-HvlngdOglhowt
no preference for a red carpet er rug
over a blue or varlegntod one. and expres-
M" no surprise or ourioslty whether Its
master wear-- a red uniform or a black evening suit. None ol the cats.whether wild
or tame, show any partiality for bright
hues; ami an.ting ail the stratagem! used
for time immemorial by hunters, the use
ol color as a lure for quadrupeds is notably absent.—Popular Science.
t or t ki
Klin ). hii <-<• (Intidi
Every one hn« or wants a black gown
nowaday-, and si *■ goods- as serge,
cheviot, cashmere, Henrietta, etc., are
easily cleaned. Pirst remove tho grease
spots with naphtha and. remember that,
this fluid u very explosive when exposed
to either light or Are. Make a lather of
warm soapsuds, using a good, not strong
soap and a teaspoonful of borax to ew-ry
two quarts of water. Into this dip the
goods up and down and wash between the
hands; then wring gently and pat p.rtly
dry; hang in the shade and when nearly
dry iron on the wrong side with a moderately warm Iron, Always rime once In
luke-warm water, and iron until the
material is perfectly dry- Never rub a
fabric that is being renovated on the
washboard, nor wring it tightly, and in
using naphtha remember that it roughens
the hands, ami that after using it it i>
well to put vaseline upon thom nnd to
wear old gloves. Wash alpaca lu the
same manner as cashmere, adding a little
gum-arabic to the rinsing water. It the
black goods are of a rusty color restore
them by sponging with ammonia aim
alcohol. Always- use a piece of the same
material or one near to it to sponge With.
—February Ladies' Home Journal.
Action of Two Universities Ajrninst
' he l'-.r of Tobacco in College,
If the action of the authorities of two
univeritles is an indlontion then a war is
to be begun by the higher odnotional Institutions upon tin- use of tobacco In college. The Boston University has recently made The rule that Those students who
are unwilling to give up tho use of tobacco while in the University building may
withdraw anil their tuition fees will he
returned. The step taken by the Northwestern University while nol so decisive
is nevertheless; understood to moan that
the use of tobaoco will be discountenanced
od in that Institution, Statements havo
been handed around among the students
asking them lo give their opinion of the
result* of the use of tobacco In their own
case and to say whether they are willing
to pledge themselevs against Its use In
fi : ire
If statistics gathered a: hading colleges
have anv weight it will have to be admit-
ed that tho free use of tobacco has an in-
, nrlotts 1 IToot upon the health of students.
The bis*, known and most thorough tests to
determino this question were made at
Valt and Amherst, which institutions
un bt taken as fairly representing the
larger and tho smaller-colleges, In lbi'l
the physician al Yale published the results of his observations ou the use of toil.: *o a1 unit'.' undergraduates. 1 n a
lass <: L4. students he found that in
lour years the IT who never used tobacco
surpassed the 70 who did use it 10.-J
per ci at, in gain in weight, 34 percent.
jii inereast of height ami i.'o\7 per cent.
.'. growth of chest girth. But ihe most
markod difference was In the gain in lung
capacity, the non-users recording a gain
of 77.fi por cent, greater than the habitual chowers or smokers,
This is a remarkame showing, but it Is
surpassed by an investigation made
among the undergraduates at Amherst,
It was found that durfug the four years
of a college student's life at that school
tiit non-users or toabecu gal nod-4 per
eon: mora in wt Ight, .17 per cent more
in height and 42 per cent, more inches
girth, than the tobacco users, while the
Increase in the lung capacity of the former was 75 per cent, greater than in the
latter. This larger relative Increase
among the non-users of t obit coo at Amherst than at Yale is accounted for by
the fact that the average ace of the
Btudents at the former school. -.lower than
at the latter school, and hence they art-
more susceptible to any cause which
affects them injuriously. If similar Investigations were made at other colleges
much the same situation would doubtless
he found to exist among tiie users and
non-users of tobacco as was discovered at
Yale and Amherst.
Bnt tho physical effects are not the only
had result* of tobocoo using. It harms
the Intellectual faculties also According
to Prof. Kisk. of the Northwestern University, when a coMoge class at Vale had
been dividi d Into four sections nc ordlng
to scholarship it was di-a-overed that the
highest section was composed almost entirely ti! non-smokers and the lowest section almost entirely of smokers. Such
demonstrations of the mental and physical results of tho u^v 1 f tobacco by college
undergraduates, says the Philadelphia
Press, justify tho effort being math- by
some collage authorities to cheek Its us&
J-ut startling as the results ol the investigation among young men at college
are, It is probable that nn Investigation
as to the effet ts ol smoking on the health
ol young school lads would be inut h more
startling, Tho nuWKpup-rs record now
and then the death or insanity of some
hoy from the use of cigarettes, Hut nn
account is taken of the stunting of the
minds and bodies of tho great mass of
young lads from tho same cause.
There are plenty of laws on the statute
books intended to check the use of cigarettes among the young, bui In the main
they are Inoperative, And yet It is at
thv period that the reform must begin.
Il would probably be found that in the
great majority of oases the student who
-mokes acquired the habit befi re he entered the college It is rarely formed
later. If parents and public school an*
thoritlej wm.id do their duty ihe mosi
effectual check could he put on the use ol
tobacco*. Trie crusade of collego authorities will doubtless give good results, bit*
it is late. To bo effectual the ban It
against tho harmful effects of tobnect
must in- begun while a lad is still at
home and under tho direct influence 01
his parents.
An Alitteitl  Member.
Colonel Pierce, ui Dakota, tells of j.
member of tho Legislature of that -ran
who takes nn Interest In public affairs,
and who is In the habit, of "talking
right out in meeting.'' Not mnnj
months ago the prvernor,, who has bcei
at a deadlock with the Legislature al
ready, sont in the nomination of a one
.1 ggod man for a prominent office, antl
:t bocamt the duty tit the Legislature te
considor whether to confirm it or not
The BtotcKinan it* whom Colonol Floret
alludes took tho floor and ninde a brloi
but effective spech. "Kontlomen of tht
I.eg slature," ho said, "lot us look the
situation calmly in the fa CO and see il
we tan stand this sort of nincompoop
tu tli ofl o in which he has been iimti-
luated, IN' trades monly, as I'm told,
in it. on bis timber leg, but don't
ed on thnt Did bo lovo Ills meat
ne leg 111 the war, gentlemen,dit)
M In tho war': No, sir. he did
not Iti»o It in tho war, Did ho lose it
In the harvest flolitf Xo. sir, ho tlhi not
lo-i ll .a tho harvest field. Then how
did in lose It? you aik, and you have
a right to ask i;. gontlomon, it is youi
right to at»k all questions you've a mind
tt nl oul the way this uufTcr lost his
log, I Jo'was riding, gentlemen, over tht
pralriei oi this great and growing slate,
turning nut ol their humblo cottnges the
widow- and erpaar.s of poor soldier."
who wort nol able to pay rent, in tht
dead tliidsl of winter, When the good
and wise ' 'roator, whu shelters and feeds
tin sparrows and never allows tho children ol the rightoous to beg bread, frozi
his Fill] ■- tiff. '—Kxclumge.
The Work  ??efoi-e Hie   Soldlera—One   ot
llriUin's I.SItle Wars.
While other war alarms aro sounding
England is pushing on her campaign
against Ashanti with unabated vigor.
This map will help to make tbe present
situation clear; ami it Is worth describing, for it is doubtful if a small campaign in Africa was ever more admirably
planned.
The black lino shews the route '"■he
British column will follow from Cape
Coast Castle to Coomassie. tho residence
of King Prom poll. The peculiar feature
of the campaign Is that this line of march
is being prepared, as far as possible, before the British troops art* landed from
their ship. England wants it to bo a dash
to Coomassie, antl such a thing cannot
be aohiovod without a lot of preparatory
work.
The route lies nearly all the way
through forest, whioh is made almost
Impassable by tho 'lease undergrowth.
Thousands of natives have been employed
cutting a wide road from the coast ^0
the Prah river and the road makers kre
now al work beyond the rivor. Karlj in
December thousands of natives embarked from tiie various ports along the-.ti..^d
Coast for Cape Coast Castle, and \vere*^»
Bet at- work carrying the supplies Into the
interior A large supply depot has bn.'n
established at Mnnsu, and another *t
Prahsu. Other natives under Knropaan
command have been Btviuging a telegraph line along the route, and it is n >w
completed co Prahsu. The engineer corps
have completed a bridge over the Prahsu
river at Prahsu, and at last accounts
Were bridging a small river a little f :z-
ther north. Rest huts at Ave different
camp stations have been built between
the coast and Prahsu, so th.tt tiie troops
will not neeti to pitch touts at the end if
tho day's march. In fact, everything \s
being done to save tho soldiers work, and
enable iheni to march with celerity.
The troops will comprise 78(1 white
soldiers, -100 hundred men from the AV-'st
Indian Regiment, aud 600 Hussars, in ill
1,780 mon, under the command of ~:r
Francis Scott, Prahsu will be tbe base
of operations, A hospital containing
sixty beds has been built there, and a
smaller hospital has been erected at Min-
su. As the column advances beyond Che
Prah, stations will be established wish
carrlors and hammocks for the Bpoedy
transportation of tbe sick to the hospitals
of the coast. These stations will also be
defensive posts, by mean- of which It \n
Intended tn maintain a perfect lino
communication with tho coast.
Stores of every kind will have to
carried on the heads of natives, anil
least 12, ''tun men and women, each carrying about, fifty pounds, will be engaged
beyond tho Prah rivor in this service, It
is known that the water of the region
contains much delotcrlous matter, and
all that is used for drinking purposes
will percolate Into largo canvas tanks
through Pasteur niters, linkers will '■«
sent across the Prah to bake fresh bread,
at the defensive posts. The artillery wlU
consist of a small mountain battery, a
battery of six seven-pounder field guns a
Maxim and a number of rocket, tub.*--.
All the white troops will be kept on board
ship until everything is ready, and then
they will debark, and si art at once ah ng
the road that is ready for thom, Such
is the scheme of the expedition, and :t
cannot be denied that it has been admirably conceived. Pivmpeh probably doesn't
realize the very uncomfortable box he .•
in. Rnemles are coming against, him,
not only from tho south, but also front * l>o
north. The King of Koran/a,which pl.ve
Is showu on the map, has agreed to help
the Knglish,and to march on tbe Ashanti
capital If arms and ammunition  aro B mt
genth
be fOl
hi
Mnnil Decorations No-  ( lit lilt-en's   I'uilles
In giving a birthday party for children
the tabic should bo dooomtcil with the
birth ny flower of the month in which
they were barn: -lanuary, snowdrop;
February, tho primrose; March, violet;
April, daisy; May, hawthorn; Juno, wild
n se; July, Illy: August, poppy; Hop-
tembcr.coitvoh ulns; October, hops; Nov-
ember,      chrysanthemum:     December,
holly, Kach has an appropriate sentiment    attached    to   it.     The    snowdrop
moans oonsolatlon; tbe primrose, youth*
fill sunshine; the violet, modesty; tho
daisy, innocence J tho hawthorn, hope;
the wild rose, Simplicity: the Illy, purity;
the poppy, the comfort of sloop; the convolvulus, contentment; hops, aspiration;
the chrysanthemum, cheerfulness; holly,
loiet.igh* and protection.— February
Lades' Heme Journal*
of
at
to him* So a foroe of HnussnSi with n
large quantity of gunpowder and load fnr
arming the tribesmen, have been dispatched to him under the command ale
an Knglish captain. The Koran 2ft
natives are excellent fighters, and their
country being open antl freo from   forest,
is well adapted for the proposed operations.
This war is being made upon  the Sing
of Ashanti because he persists in raiding
for slaves, molests tribes that are  under
British protection, and keeps up the terrible  practtoo of human sacrifices,    Tho
end of it will probably be the appropriation of the whole of Ashanti by i-n».tf
Britain,
Coffln  Hnlh Tub.
"1 wanted a hath in a North Carolina
hotel." said a traveling man to a Washington Star writer,
"I rang for the bell-buy—there was
but ono—ami when he arrived I asked
him if they hatl a bath-tub about tho
house.
"Yes, sah; nice ones, sab," he said
"Bring mo one."
"In a few minutes tho hoy returned,
bringing on his shoulder it collin. with
silver-plated handles and a lid all complete.
"What docs that meanl'" I asked, indignantly.
"Dat'ti de bath-tub, sah. De landlord
used to he in tic uudortakln' business,
sah, ami hatl some coffins when ho took
tils hotel. His sun is a tinner, sah, an'
jess lined do coffins with tin. Try it,
boss. You'll flu1 it bory nice."
"Conquering my scruples, I opened
the litl and found the collin lined with
tin, us Stated, and 1 took the bath, but I
didn't f.'ol just right about   it."
KerOnla Hope.
I     "Did you ever see Miss Winohwcther?'*
"No; What of her?"
"Sho was married the other day to •
blind man."
"Mow very odd,"
"Xo; you wouldn't soy so If you'd evsi
isen her." 1 WILLIAM VAX HOME
,HiS     RETIREMENT      FROM      :     £
CANADIAN   PACIFIC.     '
trie GalcinlRepl) to the Street Statement
fi iu Sumewlial Sphynx-I.iltc,
Somewhat, of a sensation was caused In
1^. lontreal   during  the  week   by  the jin-
luiouncement that Sir William Van  Home
l intended to retire from   the presidency of
Yj> '.ho Canadian Pacific Railway   Company.
1*1 Sir William has been so prominently connected with the company  since its incep-
, ion that   such a rumor   could not help
Parenting considerable interest and  much
J speculation,    A correspondent called nt
: the Canadian Pacific offices  to ascertain
■what truth there was in the report,   when
■'bo following statement, was handed out
sis authorized by the president; "The
statement that I am to resign is unauthorized. J may say, however, that I hope
to drop out ol activo service before long.
There are several things I would like yet
|o do, or be instrumental !.n doing, if I do
not have too long to wait for the opportunity."
It is further unofficially stated that Sir
William will not retire fur some months,
and that on his retirement iht ofllco will
be tilled by Mr. Shaughnessy, the present
vice-president, who lias accompanied
Sir William on his last three or four trips
/over the entire road.
FEMALE  CRIMINALS.      .
A Scientist's A i no 11 it .., Dellne Their I'liv-
sb ;il t tiiti'iieterthtles.
Lombroso's theory is briefly that
nal  type  Is a recurrence  to old
forms of low   devolopment, ";.
Prof,
the criml
ancestral
product of pathological ant* atavistic anomalies"; the criminal, in fact, "stands
mid-way betwei n the lunatic anil the sav-
j»go." The theory is built up on tho observation, not of market! peculiarltleG
stamping tin- ottender with a brand easy
jfco be recognized, but. on countless small
[y\j-deviationb  from the normal   type, shared
/by the criminal population, it is true, in
common with many law-abiding imlivid-
ualSj but in a far higher percentage, and
especially significant in combination.
The actual physical peculiarities observed among fonialo prisoners are not very
numerous or striking. Among thom may
' he mentioned heavy jaws antl high cheek
hones. Stnturo, strength <f arms and
length of liml s were found to he bolow
the average, and thouch the facial dtam
eter was larger the cranial diameter was
oonsltlerably less than in normal subjects.
Much of the evil appears tn be due to the
brain. The post-mortem examination id'
thirty-throe revealed in eleven not of the
number "grave microscopic lesion of the
central system antl it- Involucra."
Passing to skull anomalies, they wore
found less frequent among female than
among male criminal-, a I way- except -
ii g the -kulis nf murderesses which
are peculiar. The skull of Charlotte Cur-
day is cited in this connection as display-
lug very striking Irregularities.
The following small anomalies aro
among those whioh havo been observed to
recur among cirminal and fallen women:
Facial asymmetry, or a striking want of
oorresj ondence between the t wo sides of
the face has been noticed In "." percent,;
Irregularity In the shape of rhe ears i-
twice as common anionic criminals, and
projecting ears appear to be inoreospei laity characterisi c of the -windier ami the
ipoisoner: a irooked nose maybe noted
among.it.e oul ol every four evll-tpatrs:
while the flat no-' Is moro distinctive of
the law abiding citizen, it is a defect -liar
oil In common with a la:-'.'" prop irtion of
incendiaries, .-. virile physlogn >my. com-
J' hied often with the voice ami larynx of a
(man. were observed also in ■: largo number of female offender-;, md eert.iln distinctly degenerate typos, sn h a*, the cast
of face known as tho Mongolian ph.rsi-
ngnomy, ami hypertrophy of the imifii'k.s
ofthone :■:. observable In larp quadrupeds we"' not wanting. Cleft palate,
hare-lip,loft-handertnese, anomalous teeth.
tho igh common enough among n rum Is,
were found to be twice us freojiicnt anion '
ksss^sl
'/;■ t- sense of toucl
i* tiring were ex peril m
if rhe prI-oners,and w
liderably   less ..cub
L
■!l
. taste, sn
ntetl on hy consent
•re foUtKl t" be con
than in normal snb-
' ie ts. jti sense o( smell especially the
11. reiinal class seoma to bo singularly do-
flclont, and only throe "lit of lll'teen of the
torn oriminnls had a normal Held nf vision.
All these anomalies are far less prominent
find frequent in females than In males,
and the tiue criminal type is compara-
i vely seldom encountered in women,
It may he asked what good can result
from all this laborious classification of
tnlnutccharacteristics. Much nf It, doubt-
[ties, i- ovor elaborated and beside the
mark, whioh is disputed ground, the roo-
otiU of difforont observers varying In
many Important points. But the broad
fact remains that children tire born into
the world with certain well-dolliied traits
of mind anil bodv distinct from their follows, antl that or those children a largo
proportion are foil ml In later life to havo
run off the track anil become absorbed In
do criminal class. A recent investigation
In London schools 1ms shown that tho
.number of these children amounts to IS
percent. Is thero not sumo reason to believe thnt wise treatment antl special
training from tho beginning might bring
under Control the passions of which the
Itodily anomalies present a faint, antl often
erring Indus, antl save many lives from
mischief and, ultimate despairy—London
Hospital.
A Cincinnati clergyman thought he
would ralso hi- own pork. So ho bought
five pigs and fattened them. Now that
they are lit to kill, he says they seem so
much IIko his own children that ho hasn't
the heart to kill them. Tito pigs are in
good luck, hut it's rather hard on the
djildren.—Uostou Transcript.
RELATION CF
TEMPERATURE  TO
(vllLK.
The position taken in these columns
that it is by no means settled that high
temperatures are
butter production
results of experil
Experiment Static
to hand. Tin* test!
thi-   summary   o(
conducive to economic
s in j,art conlirmed by
|nients at the Vermont
>n that have since come
,6 were not direct, being
temperature observa
tions  and milk records taken in the re
tint    work
(io station.
were Invt rst to tl
... — Winter Tesi
the    hunges   in
verse ;... t hor in on
.-. Summer So
—Over hall' the -
total solids ami
changes In fat pe
to thenhometr
■1.  Sj ring  and
(Dth Vt. Bxpfe S
—'■'•■I    per   cent
quality wore  in t
ohnnges in tempo
fi Summer 1'
Expt. Stat. Kpt.
per cent, of the
and 64 per cent
percentages were;
tion."
('-.   These   live
practically the en
tions of pasture
winter barn feed!
These  are
summarized for tk long period, with tho
|ars that the quality  of
nged in reverse of the
thermometer;   that  is,
ometer goes down the
ijk goes   uji.    The same
in relation to quantity.
|sf« can only be  accepted
c   neither   critical
(larac-ter.    We shall not,
upon them and occupy
for the summary given
result, that it apjie|
the milk   is   oha
movement of the
whon   tht-   thorn:
quality of the mi
rosult   was
Such   teste i
as evidence, for tl|
nor scientific in c
therefore,   dwell
only further sj act)
bv tho slat it
Pall Test—pearly two thirds of the
changes in per cents of total solids, and
over half the changes in fat percentages
ormometric variation
— Nearly two-thirds of
at percentages were ln-
btrlo variation
Ing Test i World's Fair)
hanges in per  cents
thrce-fiuarters nf the
'oentnges were inverse
irlations.
Summer Pasture Test
it. Rpt., 11.p. ii'« to OS)
of the cfianges in the
ie opposite directiou to
•attire."
.sture   Test   (fltll     Vt,
p.p.   130 tt>  133)—"lid
changes in total  solid:
of tho changes   In   far
in the inverse   direc-
rieparate teats,   covering
lire year, and the obndl-
summer Foiling  and
ig, point directly to the
conclusion thatthje tendency of cows is to
give from day to day richer milk when
tho temperature falls and poorer milk as
it rises; or. in olhjer   words,   the   quality
of   the   milk (sol
vorsoly to temperature changes
Tho above lonci)
It will no; be
vocute iow temper
temperatures, T
not namable, bu
•if degrees gained
flees all there is g;i
ds and fat i   varies   in-
isonly quality of milk,
derstood that, we ad-
vtures. that is. freezing
ie right temperature is
t in coltl weather above
py close quarters sacrl-
.Ined, or so i!   is believ
ed.—A'.... Agriculturist
liaitdllnga Heifer.
,Tohn Gould said at a farmers' institute
in Maine, held by the Maine Stale Hoard
of Agriculture, that "the heifer should
come iut-o the tlairy at two years old, and
I want her to hav" the same barn education that, my dairy cows have, li she
comes in in the fill I want her to run
with my cows foi the last three or four
months before she conies in. If she
comes in in the spring 1 want her sinblcd
with my COWS, and then when she comes
into the dairy she knows what it is to
bt handled. 1 do not believe in too much
tomfoolery about her, but I want to have
her handled. I should teach her to be
and sometimes make
Then she will come
dairy habits and you
have the \trork of breaking her.
-f you citn rpmember that process.
ng that, liaruinn ever
il her liberally of bran
i)S life   she   is having to
tied up regularly,
believe milk her.
into tht- dairy with
home
it surpassed anyth
had. I would fee
for that developln
supply.
" 1 want this hei
the year   after
fer stabled every day in
onio.s into tho tlairy.
Lor us make this stable life a continuous
habit,    sn   that   wl.
( hunting
Prof. Robertson
of   Canada   report
churning swoet ere
atnres,   varying   fil
irrees,    The table o|
piete.    We condens
amount   ul   fat in
found when it was
F. and the largest
buttermilk   at tht
or ;.t :»s degrees, th
cent      The time of
the temperature  n
e shall  have  uniform
milking and handling. Another thing I
Would mention in this connection: I
Would not have ibis heifer oomd back
into the dairy just as >oon as I could get
her There: I want on interval of three or
four nvnths. ]f t tie natural period bo to
eome ba.k into tht' dairy In a year, then
make it fifteen or ,-i.vieen months,"
Oo you   agree vrith   Mr.    Gould   that
stabling a heifer si ottitl be continuous}
at  41 degrees to HI ^nitiutes a
The experiments wt[
\\vt-t Cream.
■*■ dairy commissioner
an   experiment     in
ikmat different temper-
|om    11 up   to  58 de-
results is quite com-
3 his facts. The lowest
tho    buttermilk   was
illumed at •!! degroes,
.mount, of   fat in tho
highest   temperature,
s  being ,d of one   per
burning decreased as
sed   from (IQ minutes
degrees.
re duplicated   in  one
case, the highest temperature of  churning being 55 (tegrei
degrees,  The same
|s and In the other  58
aw followed   in   both
trials.  The coticlusipns are thus stated by
the commissioner;
fn>
" The   result
dlcate that:
" When the churn
Started al a temper;
or   under,   the quailt
maiding in the hull
oeed 0,36 of one per
•• Ktir the efficient
fat by the churning
temperature   of  th
above 50 degrees P.
started; and the eh
one i  should nut hi
onu-qiinrtor  ot  V
itv."
ng of sweet cream is
tare Of 00 degrees l-\,
thy of butter tat remit Uk need not exeat.
'0 oo very of the butter
ol sweet cream, the
cream should not he
when the churning is
|uru (If a revolving
filled to more than
actual holding capac-
A t tntlies-l
i lur  Illustration
carrying   two olotht
may be elevated at
stout post set well i
having in tho upper
wide and six long,
tough hard  wood, t|
six feet long, playli
ine Klevntov,
shows  a  device for
-., both of which
It consists of a
tto the   ground,   and
end a slot two inches
n ibis is a  lever of
|wo inches square and
freely   on   a  half
Inch   holt,   which
posl   from  side to i
lever is rounded off
tn the other  is  a
half   feet   long,    n
which   are   uttuc
After tho lines hav
arm   of   the   lever
hooked under the pr
bed
in these  -C.' testa
in
tends through the
Ido. One end of the
|amL firmly mortised
IS piece three and a
|d' the extremities of
the clothes lines,
been lllled. tho long
Is brought down and
tieelion nf the short
post, elevating tne ' lines with their
burdens about two and a half foot above
the original position* This action is reversed when It is desired to reach the
lines.—American Agriculturist.
i;ii Perkins's Advice to V/ouim Ladies.
"Young Ladles," said Eli Perkins to the
Nashville Seminary girls, "I want to talk
scriouly to you about, your mothers: "Ii
may be that you have noticed a careworn
look upon her face lately, till course, it
has not, been brought, there by any acts of
yours: still it is your duty to chase it
away. 1 want you to get up to-morrow
morning aud get breakfast: and when
your mother eomes and begins to express
her surprise, go right up and kiss her on
tho mouth. You can't, imagine how it
will brighten her dear bice.
"Besides, you owe her a kiss or two,
Away hack, when you were tl little bit of
a girl, she kissed you when no one elso
was tempted by your fever-tain ted breath
aud swollen face. You were nor so attractive then as you are now. And
through those years of childish sunshlno
and shadows, she was always ready to
cure, by the magic, of II mother's kIss,your
dirty little chubby hands whenever the}
were injured in those first skirmishes
wiih the rough old world.
•And then the midnight kiss with which
she routed so many bad dreams, as sho
leaned above your restless pillow, have
all been on interest these long, long years.
"(If course, she is not so pretty and kiss-
able as you are: but if yon had done your
share of work during the last ten years,
the conl rast would not he so marked.
"Her face ha- more wrinkle- than
your-, ami yet if you were sick that face
would appear far more beautiful than an
augers ns It hovered over you. watching
every opportunity to minister to your
comfort, and every one of these wrinkles
would seem to be bright wavelets of sun-
shiuechasing each other over the dear
face.
•■She will leave you one of these days.
These burden-, if not lifted from her
shoulder-, will break her down. Those
rough, hard hands, that have done so
many things for yon, will be crossed upon
her lifeless breast,
"Those neglectrftl lips that gave you
your first baby kiss will bo forever closed,
and those sad, tired eyes will have opened
iu eternity, and then you will appreciate
your mother; but it will be too late,"
Fried Ice-Cream.
Fried ice cream has become very popular in Philadelphia. A small, solid
cake of Ice cream i> enveloped in a thin
sheet of pie crust, and then dipped in
ladling lard or butter long enough to
cook the outside covering to a crisp If
served immediately, tho lec cream is
found to be as solidly frozen as when it.
was first prepared. The process id' frying
is so quickly accomplished and tho pastry is -n good a protector that the heat
has nn chance to reach the frozou cream.
Another novelty is baked tec cream,
Which has a meringue top.
rtestorlllg fane 'Si-als,
To restore cane sears ihat have become
sagged and to make them tight antl like
new, a German paper give- a simple
remedy. The chair is turned over and tho
caned seat thoroughly moistened and
washed with very hot water, a sponge
being used. The cane should be allowed
to absorb the water freely. The chair is
then placed either in tho open air, or still
better, In a draft, where it is allowed to
dry. After drying the cane seat will bo
found white and stretched as tight as new.
NOSES AND SMELLING.    «S
There arc fourteen boncH En i ho nose.
Burns had the genuine Celtic type of
nii-c.
A blunt nose Is generally indicative of
d illness.
The nose of the mole is movable like
thai of the bog.
The Greek nose was straight and tolerably prominent.
Pimples on the nose arc frequently
caused by hidtgest Ion,
The nose of Beethoven was large, thick
and ill shaped.
In extreme old age tho sense of smell is
often en: I rely lost.
The Duko of Wellington was called
"Xosej" by his soldiers.
Small nostrils are said by physiologists
to indicate small and weak lung-.
In all ages the nose bits been regarded
as strongly Indian ive of character.
The Turkish nose boars it tolerably close
resemblance to the Semitic typs.
A nose of proper proportions should be.
one third the length of the face.
I'Msh are undoubtedly provided with a
reasonably acute souse of smell.
(ioethe bad a large Roman nose, rather
gjore heat i lain u-uat iu that type.
The blind are often almost preternatural ly gifted with the souse ot smell.
The seuscof smell Is probably more acute
in tht -dog 1 han in any oilier animal.
A sharp nose pointing forward is the
characteristic of Impudence and curiosity.
The Duke of Wellington was blessed
with a Homan nose of generous proportions,
The flrst  Duko of Marlborough had a
huge Itointlll no-e. the nose of ii military
conqueror.
In ui.in i he sense of smell Is less developed thau thai of sight, as It Is much less
needed.
I 'near bad a large Koman no-e. It wain fact, out ol proportion with the rest ol
hi- fitco.
A large nosa In a weak face 1- Indicative
ol uiiiutelligence and stupidity. Idiou
have Mich noses.
t^uecti Anne had n large red no«e, from
drinking. She wa-cull "Brandy Nan" bj
her subjects.
In tne lower rice- ni' mankind the sense
of smell is more acutely developed than
in the <'aucasiun.
The frog has tin- shortosl passage be-
t ween hi- none antl his mouth ; the croco-
dih hostile lougesv.
Pugilists say that n blow ou the nose is
attended with more pain than one ou any
ether part of the body.
Most Insects are provided with a sense
of smell, though by what means it Is exercised Is hi in any Cases unknown.
A rod nose may be due to a choleric tempo!*, a bail liver, or bad liquor. In any case
it N an unfortunate sign.
Man is the only animal whose nostrils
open downward.   Even Inthe highest ape-
tlie nostrils open to the front.
All birds which find their food iu tin
earth or dust are provided with very thick
coverings of feathers over their nostrils.
A portrait bust of Hannibal, which has
comedown to us from Hontan times, rep-
resents him with a strong Homan nose.
HATS  OF
Oiprey and Ostrich, Ribbon and Felt,
The osprey again waves over tho bonnets of the fair, antl the ponpOU aspires
to heaven above it. Very popular in ono
of the new BCOOp BhOVel shapes is "combine" of osprey and ostrich, ribbon of
felt, edged with wide velvet.or with nar
rower ribbon, emphasized at intervals by
big silver buckles,
Another hat, which a Buddhist might
commend, has a high crown sewn nut of
cords of black and green and a brim of
black velvet bearing a (vw folds of green
shot ribbon knotted into choux at either
side; and there aro five big ostrich
plumes to wave at the rear.
7HE WALKING  GIRL.
She
Appears With tbe Modern Fad far
athletics for Woiuenf
Until quite recently walking seemed
to he n lost art among American women.
It is true, that ladies walked miles in
shopping expeditions or promenades on
fashionable thoroughfare-, but for a
party to sei out for a twenty-five or fifty
mile tramu into the country was a thing
unheald of, liut the fashion has been set
antl walking parties are quite the proper
tiling, and behold) Dame Fashion, never
slow, comes to the Iront With well-designed and comfort »ble costumes for suoh
occasions. The short skirt, the broad)
thick-soled shoe, and the high gaiters insure freedom and ease of motion; and
thus clad, with small knapsack swung
over her shoulder and stout stall' in hand
the American girl can tread native soil
with as much pleasure as does her Knglish sister. True, the pedestrian on the
other fiitie of the sen has tho advantage
of a cooler climate. But there are plenty
of times in spring and fall and even cool
days in summer when the woman on this
side of the Atlantic may start oft* on a
ten or twenty-mile jaunt in perfect comfort. A short time ago two young ladies
clad in the regulation traveling costume
walked into a village among the Cat*
skills well-known as a summer resort.
They were regarded with no little interest as th dr garments told plainly that
they had traveled some di-ta^ee. At the
house where they stopped lor the night
they entertained the guests delightfully
with an account of their experiences anil
adventures. Their homes were in the far
West, but they laid been East for some
time, having just beeu granuatcft from
one of the leading Eastern colleges. At
the close of the college term a party 0?
five graduates set out for a hundred*
mile tram? At the time when the young
ladies arrived in the little mountain village they had almost, reached the maik,
having walked from Northampton.Mais.,
directly over the lierkshire lulls into
Xew York. "Oh, we have had all sorts
of experiences," said one of the young
ladies with a merry laugh. "Some fdks
were afraid of us and some thought us
insane, bit we have enjoyed every (ont
of the way. We have stumbled onto
some of the queerest little towns, and met
seme of the strangest people, ami we
have gotten more practical knowledge of
the country than we could possibly havo
gained in any other way Heaven herp
the women w!m> don't walk. They tion'l
know what they miss, "
it was evident that these young ladies
had not mlssod anything, as they described the scenery they hatl enjoyed.
They were well tanned, as they wore only
small caps and carried no umbrellas.
But they were as fresh and bright as
daisies notwithstanding the (act that
they had made ever .-eventertji miler that
flay. In answer to d question put by a
gu*ft as to their feeling Weajif, one of
tho young pedestrians replied with n
laiMfh, "1 th.ok we could dance this
evening with a- much real enjoyment
as any of you folk1- who have been indoor- all day.  Except for our shoes, "fhe
added with a roguish glance as she displayed a sole worn almost through.
A-l the fashion spreads there is no reason to doubt that in the near future
walking tour- will rival bicycle tours in
popularity. Ihcre will certainly be thi.
advantage thai a walking tour would be
within the reach of many women to
whom a bi- ycle is an undreamed of lux-
urv. Any Ingenious girl could easily
construct a serviceable tramping outfll
out nf some of lur ca-t-nfT Woolen gown-,
and with a pair ol stoiit boot-sand gaiters
and a cap she Is ready to  set  out.   Of
course hhc will not bo able tit Ii rs r. to
walk ten miles a day er i ven live. Jluta
little systematic training by taking short
trips and gradually increasing them will
soon enable the average girl to aooom*
plod: fifteen miles a tlay with perfect
comfort. When she has learned the art
ol' walking will she wilt be able to go on
any number ul pleasant little journeys
with a BCUse Ol vigor aUd independence,
which is delightful, ami she will be
healthier, happier and more intelligent
for her tramps abroad.
Latest Itleim tti i rhIUoiik,
Nothing i- ] rettier for a tailor-made
gown t lain a dor skin vest, with tlalnly
-I eck!cd buttons for trimming.
The most elegant Wide skirts hove the
filids falling in (lutings all around anil are
strapped at the seam* with velvet] plush,
etc, Plainer skirts are frequently finished
off above the lower edge With row- of narrow braid in tucks,
The latest cycling hat !•■ of felt, boat-
shaped or flat* brim mod and with two
emlls, a bow of ribbon, is complete*
An ottd style ot hair-dressing ;s to part
the hair wn one side and raised high in
deep waves across the neari. a pad lsoiten
worn under the side hair to give it the
necessary full effect.
An ideal opera wrap is a mantle to the
waist of ermine, very full and lined with
dead-leaf color satin. On the shoulders
are cape-like epaulettes of shot green and
brown velvet richly embroidered in jet,
steel and gold, while lappets of the same
velvet fall from the neck in front, 'i'he
high collar is lined with fur.
Another evening cape is of yellow and
white striped orepon, lined with delicate
pale-green silk. Yellow velvet, heath d,
hangs in short-winged sleeves from the
shoulders. l>eep collar of frilled velvet is
lined with while fur.
A pretty bridesmaid's gown seen at a
recent wedding was of spotted apricot s.ik
shot with white The skirt was plain and
wide and the bodice tight-fitting, of yellow
satin, with a white chllTon fichu tucked
into a deep bolt of satin, finished with paste
buttons.—Chicago .News.
VENEZUELA'S PITCH LAKE.
\ Region Where Men nnd Women Hear
Nt xl lo Not blag.
Copt Kobt, li. Kelly, formerly a shipmaster in the sorviceof the Clyde Line,
has jn-t returned with Mrs, Kelly from
Venezuela,where for twenty-one mouths
he ha- been engaged in mining pitch in
Pitch Lake, near the const. The lake,
which i- six miles long, is nothing but
pitch. Copt. Kelly say-. The blocks are
cut out of the lake just a*- ice is cut
from the Hudson.
"They tire then carried on the backs of
natives to a railway aud shipped to the
nearest seaport, six miles distant. The
pitch is sent north and ultimately, converted Into pavement-. A few hours
alter the blocks have been cut out- the
holes close up and present an even surface,
"The 150 mini rs at the hike, who are
Indians, Spaniards and negroes, wear no
clothes to speak uf. When the temperature get- down to seventy degrees they
shiver. Tho women in the vicinity of
the lake are clod just as lightly, with
tmly a bandage about the hips. When
niy wife iirst went to Venezuela the
women Cocked from miles around to
gaze at a woman who wa- fully clad.
"The forest trees keep out t'ae fresh air
and the lake glows like it furnace. The
miners have to keep treading as the pitch
softens or they would get stuck in the
lake,
"On all sides are scorpions.tarantulas,
snakes, lizards, centipedes and other Interesting things. The flies are of tbe
size of cherries and they will bite iron.
Una-constrictor- arc over twenty feet
long, and there are al* sorts of queer
four-footed beasts."
The Captain and Mrs. Kelly expect to
return to Venezuela in the spring.
NORTH POLE FOUND-
A Report to That  Effect Received  at SU
Petersburg*
A telegraphic dispatch received at St.
Petersburg, from Irkutsk,  Siberia.  Eays
that a Siberian trader named  Kouchuar-
i eff, agent of Dr. Fridjof Nansen, the Nor—
, wegian explorer, who sailed inthe ! ram,
'■ June 24.1898, for the Arctic regions, has
received information to the effect that
J >r. Nansen has reached the north  pole
and found land there.   He is now returning towards civilization.
Manitoba Appointments.
'   The following appointments haye been
gazetted:
To be commissioner- for   taking afh*-
lavits for use in the courts of this province—David Wilson, of "range Ridge,
! and James I 'ouerty, of Winnipeg,
To be issuer  of  marriage licenses—
' Eugene Widmeyer, of Gretna.
To be a provincial constable for the
prov'nee of Manitoba—Archibald Mo-
Cuaig, of Hartney.1
To be deputy bailiff of the county court
of Shoal Lake—Thomaa ciark, of shoal
, Lake.
To be deputy registrar of Souria river—
j Charles   Prior Eetliu,  of   Melita, vice
Joseph Campbell,
The resignations of James D. (Irr, John
Williams and Frank Schultz, as justices
of tiie peace have been accepted.
''Mamma I really cannot see why you
call my   Reginald   'the lodge;' indeed, 1
cannot."'   'T call him that because he is
j such a poor excuse for a mam"
Was li Telcpath:
"A strange case i ( telepathy came
under my observation recently,'' said a
well-known telegrapher to a group -*f
listeners at the Planters' the "ther day.
"Si.tne years ago thero lived inthe city
ati operator and newspaperman named
Johnstone, who met with an accident
thnt disabled him from wox'k for some
months. Xot being very well fixed finan-
clally,hls little savings were soon exhausted n: meeting current expenses and paying doctor's bills, until ftt lap: he did not
havo a cent In the wt rid, and was not yet
strong enough to hustle fur a living.
Iu this extremity Johnstone approached
an acquaintance and told him the situation, at.d asked tor a lean until he could
get "ai his feet again. This was some
six or seven yeats age. May, the man
approached by John-tone, advanced sufficient money to pay outstanding claims
and tide ovor ft r a few days until he could
look around and llnd something to do.
This wa- the las: seen of Johnstone in St.
Loui't , he disappeared as completely as
thougl swallowed up inthe earth, none
of his former acquaintances knowing
what bad become of him.
■Now comes rhe strange part of this
story. Monday. December 30, last. I met
May on the street, and during the course
of conversation he casually Inquired for
Johnstone, asked if I knew what had become of him, saying that be could act get
him out of his head—had been thinking
of him all day. 1 replied that I did not
know whether ho was living or dead,
had not heard anything anout him since
he disappeared from St. Louis some six
year- ago, May then related hi-linanctal
dealings w;th Johnstone,  and we  parted.
'New Vear's evening a letter was received by May postmarked at a small
town in Colorado, written by Johnstone,
antl containing an express money order for
the full amount of the claim. The letter
was dated December 30, the very day May
had made Inquiry of me as to whether I
knew anything about Johnstone, whether
be was alive or dead. How do I account
ftir It! I tlon't try to explain it. it ii
too much for me,"
N
ORTHERN ■ -
PACIFIC RY.
TIME    OAKD
Taking   effect   on  Sunday,   December
16th, 1894.
K. Bonncl
Betdnp.
«    S
I
■3     Sn
I20p
106p
12 12p
12 22p
111:'.,
11 Ha
nor*
10 31a
10 03a
9 S8»l
800a
7 00a
11 06P'
lS'Op
'. 8. Bonod
Bold dOWB
STATIONS.
Ii5
lip     0
0!p| ,,0
SOp   9.1,
S8pU.8i
22p2J.6;
13p27.,j
02pM.5i
»0p 40.4
22p 4E 8'
f.ep5«.0l
SOp 66.0!
20p68.1
36a 168
S£a 22! I,
i.'T 453 ;
40p 470
OOP 481 j
SOp 888
 Winnipeg	
..FSTUge Junction.
 St. Sorbet	
 Cartier	
 St. Agatlie	
—Union Point.	
. ...SUyei Plains	
■ Morrig	
 St. Jean	
 Utellier	
 Emerson	
.— .Pembina	
■ Grand Forks.—.
Winnipeg Jnnction,
 Dnlnth	
...Minneapolis.. ..
 Et, Paul	
 Chicago,	
lltlSa
12 S7p
12 40p
12 62p
5 47t
6 07*
626m
I lOpI 6 Sit
1 17p 7 02*
1 28p 7l»a
145p|       48
1 68p S 26a
2ITp1 918*
2 Sop 10 lis
2 SOp 11 Ha
6 SOp. 8 26p
10 LOp
7 2.5a
8 30a
7 lot
9 36p
lSSp
MORRIS-BRANDON IRANCH.
I. Bound
Bead np
Mirr.-i'"I .. To*r*l'l Dolnjra.
The newspaper! of a town are its look*
ini: plASHCs bbji an esonangOi It is here
you soe yonrnelTeB as other*, see you. You
smii>* t»n them nnd they smile hark at
you: you frown en theiu. nnd you are repaid in kind. They are the rellex of n
town. It the town is dolnir bnstnesi tho
newspaper will ihow it in Its advertising
columns. 1: the merchants are spiritless,
shiftless fellows, whosestorei are jumbles
of junk and .iatn, the newspapers will
show li by the lack of space they take. If
y.tu want the world to know that you
have n live town you ean only lot it Lte
known through its newspapers.
uMton jfo
ifHco, erhd
V* In   K IssllIB Is I'leUMIIit.
Tbfl reason Uis.lni* Is so plea-ant, says
aii oscillatory expert ot RclonttJlc tend*
uui'les, is because the teeth, jawbones
anil lips are lull of nerves, anil when
the lips of persons meet all olertrle current u generatod, and, to put It fnoo-
tlo-.Hy, you don't have to have a dynamo iiiaihitie. nor a battery in the
Iioiisp, nor a lalllu x, nor a button
touch, to rinjr up the central
there is no paten; ou it. and the poorest
per-..n In tho world can enjoy the electric current better than tho millionaire
mid it never gets out of order.—Philadelphia Times.
BOIiml In lluve SI vie.
After the  new  minister had   delivered
his  lirst sermon  in  ihe    Presbyterian
church of a llttlo Washington town recently, a deacon approached him and -aid:
" Vou didn't give us eny Latin er tlreek
In yer sermon today."
".No, "said tho minister,"I did not. I
was not aware thai tho oongregatlon Included any who understood those languages."   And this was a lilt, of sarcasm.
"Wall, ther ain't nonewhoduz, 'replied
the deacon: " hut we folks up horp want
to hev wal's goln' on In them city
churches, nn' we'll hev to ax yer tu
give et tu us."—Xorthwest Magazine.
1.20P 3
7.50p 1
6.53J '1
6.49T 12
6.2Spl2
4.SHT. 12
S.68p U
8.14p 11
S.61pU
a.isp n
1.47p 10
il.ldplO
J2.57p 10
J2.27p 10
,*1.67a 10
1.12s 9
,'0.S7a 9
-0.18a 9
9.49s 6
9.89a S
9.06a 8
8.2Sa S
7.50a E
Ko. 127
STATIONS.
J»P        —Winnipeg.—
«P, 10   —Lowe Farm.
«2J>: 21.2 Myrtle-
S^P! 25.1 Bolsnd..
\it 88 6 Kosebank.
5»« N.e Miami
S8» 49 0 — Deorwood._.
?7» 54.1 Altamont	
09» 62.1 Somerset	
55a 68 4 .-.Swan Lake.-.
40a 74.6 ..Indian Springs..
SOa 79.4.-.Mariapolla*_.
15a 86.1 Qreenway	
ooa 92.8__Baldnr	
Ska i02    .„.. Belmont. . -.
21a 109.7 Hilton	
05a 117.8 Ashdown	
68s 120    ._. Wawaneaa._.
49a 128.0:   ,,,,Elliotts	
ssa 129.6 .. .Bonntbwalte..
lsai87.2!._.MarUnvllle	
00a 145.1 Brandon	
stops st Baldnr for meals.	
PORTAOE LA PRAIRIE IRANCH.
W. brand E §
Read Down g?
nixed No. -*■»
148.       ,f
Every Dav 2 i
Except Sun i£
STATIONS.
E bound.
Read np
KixedNo.
144
Every Day
Except Sun.
5 45
5.IS
OH
6 19
G 42
706
' 13
7 25
7 47
600
b30
|      .-.. Winnipeg.. _.
0    ■ Portage Junction.
6 5* . .St. Charles	
10 I *. ..Headlngly	
18 0'..White Plains....
25 8 '.Gravel Pit Spur ,
2« 2 ».i La Salle Tank...
32 2» Eustace ■._.
89 l«....Oakvllle	
48 2« Curtis	
62 6 Poitue la Prairie.
•Flag Station.
12 lo pm
11 65 am
11 a am
n 21 sm
in 57 am
lo 32 am
lo 24 am
io n am
o 48 am
0 84 am
a 15 am
Stations marked—•—have no agent. Freight
must be prepaid.
Number 107 and 108 have through Pullman
Vestlbuled Drawing Room Sleeping Cars between
Winnipeg and St. Paul and Minneapolis. Also
Palace Dining Can. Close connection at Chit-age
with eastern lines. Connection at Winnipeg Jnno-
Hon with trains to and from the Pacific Coast.
For rates and full Information concerning connections with other lines, etc., apply to any stent
of the company, or
CHAS. S. FEE, H. 8WINFORD.
B.F.4T.A., St. Paul, Gen. Aft., Winnipeg*
CITY OFFICE,
»S6 Main street. Winnipeg-
MANITOBA A NORTHWESTERN
RAILWAY CO.
MARCH 5th, 1895.
Eegnlar passenger trains run aa follows:
WEST-BOtJND.
Leave Winnipeg at 9.55 on Tuesday, Thursday
and Ssturdsy for Portage la Prairie, Mlnnedoaa
and intermediate stations.    Mixed trains icare
Minnedpn-. ou arrival of passenger trains as below
lAST-BorXD.
Leave Mlnnedosa and Intermediate stations on
Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Mixed trains
arrive st M'.ir.ledosa as below:
"Pass!
Tues.,
Tbur.
A Sat.
STATIONS.
9 66    Lv Winnipeg
Tues.,
Sat.
12.16.
14.06..
16.10.
16.45..
Sat.
17.45...
Mixed
Thnr. I
12.40    Port, la Prairie
16.10       .♦Gladstone,
17.10    . . Neepawa..
is.so   ..,Mlnnedosa
Pass.
Mon,,
Wed.
 AFrl.
 Ar   21 25
Mixed     Mon.
Friday     Wed.
Ar..
Mixed
Tuesday to
Russell,
Saturday to
Yorkton.
16.26
17.40
19,00
21,10
22.80 _
28.20
l|   1S.S5        19,10
16.20 17.46
14.10 16,16
 12.40 14.48
_ Mon,
.Rapid city Lv 13.46	
Mixed ~~
Monday from
Yorkton
Wedn'y front
Russell.
STATIONS.
Lv,,,Mlnnedosa...Ar
 .Ncwdale	
 BhoalLake	
 ..'Birtle	
 Blusearth	
I. - —^RUBselL,"~~
Ar... .Yorkton.., .Lv
16.06
13.40
12.16
10.36
8.65
8.00
4'40
•Meals,   Trains Btop at stauons between Por-
Isge la Prairie and Winnipeg only when signalled
or when '.here are passengers to slight.
W. R. BAKER, A. MCDONALD,
General Manager Ass't Gen: Pat. Ag«j \
LOCI LEGJSLATUKE.
A Number of Protests Ajrains
Proposed Legislation.
The Fatal Accident at (lie Union Mine
tu Be Brought Dp—Education
Bill Exported Complete.
MONDAY.
Mr. Kitchen presented a petition
from residents of Chilliwaok asking
for "the introduction of a l.iil to
prohibit clubs in rural municipalities."
.Major .Mutter moved that theDo-
minion Government In1requested to
remove the sand-bar at the mouth
of the Somas river, so as to allow
the largest, ships to approach Alberni.   Agreed to.
Mr. Macpherson moved for a return of all information collected by
the Bureau of Staiisties regarding
municipalities.
Mr. Sword moved for all correspondence and papers relative to
the British l'aeitie Railway to be
laid before the House. Agreed to.
In answer to Mr. Williams, lion.
Mr. Martin said the Government
intended taking such action regarding the loggers' petition as may he
considered in the best interests ol"
the province.
Dr. Walkem moved for a return
showing the number of Provincial
Land Surveyors who applied forem-
ployment under the Government
last year, together with the number
employed.    Agreed lo.
The House went into committee
on the bill to create a fund for educational purposes by the sale of
public hinds, anil Mr.Swe.rd moved
an amendment providing that the
warrants beissued only on the written request of ten members of the
Legislature not being members of
the executive. The amendment was
lost on party division, as was ai-o
a motion by Mr. Sword that the
committee rise (without reporting
progress). The discussion continued until the committee rose and
reported progress at 6:45,
Hon. Mr. Turner, in reply to Mr.
Cotton, said the estimates would
probably be presented next week;
after which the house adjourned.
mail, on such conditions, including ret i-
procal concessions as to running powers,
as may lie agreed upon ; or on failure oi
agreement between the two companies,
on such conditions, as to facilities and
compensation., as may he determined hy
arbitrators, to be appointed according to
the provisions of the 'Common law procedure Act, 1854.' "
Capt. Irving—To insert in the Lillooet,
Fraser River and Cariboo Gold Fiel
annual report of the Minister  of
Mines.
House adjourned at 5:45 p. m.
1'RIDAY.
The petition from those interested
in mining at Kootney in reference
to the Assessment, was ruled out of
order, also for Simpson at Quesnelle
McGregor presented a petition
from the Mine Laborers Association
Limited, hill: "-(.On malting uppllca-, of Nanaimo, signed by Thos. Keith
tion for leases, the company shall not he and R*l-l'« Smith, against the pass-
limited or confined toany area, and the ,lKe of the School Lands bill.     The
(lol.I Commissioner ti
application is made n
proval of lhe Lieut.
C iiinoil, grant such
withstanding that th
for may exceed in m-i
acres to which sueh It
ited by law."
i whom any such
ay, with the ap-
titint-Governor-in-
application, not-
J hind so applied
'a the number of
uses are now  lini-
WEDNErillAY,
Petitions were presented by Mr,
McGregor and Dr. Walkem in favor
of the Alberni Water, Electric and
Speaker ruled it out of order.
The house asked that the petition
from Kootney ruled out of order be
printed, when Walkem asked that
the same be done with the Miners'
Association petition from Nanaimo.
Both were ruled out.
The house went  into  committee
on the  Langly  Municipality  bill,
and rose and reported progrrss.
The Alberni Water Works bill was
read a second time.
Helmcken  moved the  second reading
CITY AND PROVINCE.
Telephone Co. bill and praying that of t'1->act to incorporate the Consolldat-
the bill he passed. et* Railway Company and change its
Mr. Williams moved for returns  IKU,H'- 	
showing   in   detail    the   amounts! "*"*'*"
charged last year as traveling and
incidental expenses by members of
tbe provincial cabinet and members
of the civil service.    Agreed to.
Hon. Mr. Martin, in reply to Mr.
Sword, said certain tracts of land
at the southeast corner of the province and in East Kootenay were reserved for railway purposes.
Hon. Mr. Eberts, iu reply to Dr.
Walkem, said the Government was
aware ihat Judge bole ha- been out
of tne province, hut had no official
information of hi.- present address.
Leave of absence had been granted
bim, and ii was understood Mr.
Justice McCreighi would attend to
bis duties during hi   absence.
The.following bills passed their
third reading: .Vow Westminster
ami Burrard Inlet Telephone Co.;
Vernon and Nelson Telephone Co.,
ami ibe British Columbia Southern
Railway Co.
The House went into committee
on  the Columbia & Western Rail-1
way bill.     Mr. Williams  veil to
insert a provision forbidding any
other company to come in until two
years have expired, and during the
discussion of this the coinmittee rose
and reported progress.
lion. M-r.-Turner presented a petition from ibe municipal council
ol Kaslo protesting against the proposed lax on the outpul of mines.
The Asheroft & I ariboo Railway
bill was committed und subsequently reported couip
meitls.
SUNDAY SERVICES.
V.   It,   ('.   A.
Sunday at 4 p. m., the Salvation Army
will have charge of the meeting, At8::ill
Division Xo. 11, Sous of Temperance,
will have charge of the son;; service. All
welcome.
ST. ALDAN'S CHURCH.
Third Sunday in Lent, March 8, 1806,
Holy Oonnniniii.u S a. in,; Continuation
service 11 a. m.; Sunday school 2:30 p.
m.; Evening Prayer 7 p. m. The Lord
Bishop of Columbia will preach tit the
morning service and the Ven. Archdeacon Scriven in the evening.
Week Day Services—Morning Prayer
daily at 9:80 a. m.;  Holy Communion
on Thursday at S a, in.; Children's service, with address hy the Archdeacon, on I
Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.;EveniugPrav-„-,i,   ■>■   ., ... n;    ,
er and address on Wednesday at 8 p...,'.; \of tlic W LSt W ',|l,n!-'t"» mines
Band of Hope on Monday at 3:80.
PHRSBTTKRIAN 0IIUH0K.
Morning service at 11 o'clock; Bible
class and Sabbath school at 2:30 p. in.;
evening service at 7. The pastor will
preach at, both set vices. All welcome. S.
C. Stewart, pastor pro tern.
BAPTIST CIIUItCH.
Services at 11 A. * . and 7 P. si. Sunday
school and pasco.'e Bible class at 2:80
p, m. Midweek meeting, Wednesday,
7:3(1 P, M. All seals tree; all are invited,
lion." Rev, VV. A.'Gunton, pastor, 109
Farquar street.
Ti
Y. M. ('.
The followlni
dered at the Y
\. Entertainment.
: programme will he ren-
with
ameuu-
iiBtruc-
DAY.
.-. nteri  a
of  Van,
lime for
Columbia & Wi stern railway.
is presented a petition from
It. favor oi securing
thin! re-
imitteeas
TUESDAY.
Major Mutter, on behalf of the
select coinmittee appointed for the
purpose, presented a favorable report on the "Act to Encourage
Dairying," will: recommendations
amendatory thereof.
The house went into committee '"'
on the bill to amend the Education ,   '''   "•••"•n"-  i"
Act, and the following amendments "'"'" ""' ,'",',",:i" ""'
moved  by lion.  Col.   Baker  were '''.'•"■'"l'»
agreed to:   That   a  school  district '"
shall not lie established for less than '.'''
20 children, ami for anv less .mm- rcsWe**ls ol Citril
ber  a  monitor  may  be provided; K resi,k''" physician,
thateach   board   of   trustees  shall *■'*•-. McGregor presented tl
appoint its own secretary (who may ■' ,: "f »-e puhlio accountse<
be one of the trustee.-)   and  fix his ■ollo*vs,!
salary; and that trustees shall.serve That'" A-"il- 1805' ••'*-•'■- ■vaa P"*-1 h'
without emolument orreward(with ",e C' ''' "'' '''"'>' '"■' im> a8 taxeB>
certain  exceptions), and  shall not   ?**.2-50.41, an .lime, 1806, for theyear
be interested in any contract au- I8;,r>' ^•■)2l-'-,5; -his latter sum through
thorized bv tbe board.   An amend- Brr(>r •■'*•■-credited lo the city of Victoria
ment   permitting   tbe   election   as 'nsteatl of from the C. P. R. i-oinpany.
trustee of  any woman   "being lhe The committee find that the item of
wife of a freeholder or householder *8,260.41 I'""1 '" April,  IHI5, for  1804,
nnd whose husband is not a school >B ""' "■'"""'l received in pnymeni of
trustee'' was carried, as also one In- •■"•( ■ ''• ••• company's taxes on theas-
Dr. Walkem  providing  that  only ■*<-*-s*---ent for 18U4, and is in place of the
British subjects be eligible for elec- ar i assessed for I8ii*i, declared in-
tion. The amendment bv Hon. Col. valid I'y the court. (Sec Public Accounts,
Baker in favor of university iitfiilia- 80th •l"1"'' |li". i'a-'' ls •
tion was ttgread to. and the bill  re-     That il June, i.s!.;.. when ihe Drst
ported complete With amendments, proceeds of the loan  were received  iii
The report  of  the committee on Victoria, the overdraft at  the bank of
the Fire Insurance Policy bill was  British Coin a was i(8U2,040.
adopted. Several   Btatemenls   were  submitted
Hon. Mr. Turner moved  the sec-   »■"' *••>*- '•'I""'1. *•"<- ■> '"in the fol-
ond reading  of  the bill   to amend lowing Information Is extracted:
the Assessment Act,   and  after a The total "'"''I's for ihe half year,
lengthy discussion   the  debate was 1808, were f888,617,   The balance In the
adjourned. onn** "" special deposit 1st July, 1896,
NOTICES OF motion. was *27«,277i and on  account current,
,.    ,.     .            .,,   .       .           ,.., i|86U,853.   The total expenditure for the
ur, Macpherson—To introduce a lull ,   ,,                            .._.,.
.           i ri.   i         i          •   • half year is shown al    .1 ,.ii, besides
.  to uineiul  the  henevolenl  societies  act, .   '_   ,                        ,,              ,   .
*Hi)i. ■ i.i.i,,o. on ihe parliament  buildings,
Mr. Korster-I'or a return showing all Education "OBI *1U6,28*1.
the evidence taken at   the Iniiueil  held Timber Leaeea-Ol the sun, of .i-l'.i,-
onlhe body of John   Bowe, who  was B-M.ll, brought to a imit under timber
killed by a fall of rock while in the em- lea8wl ''■"""' ''"' -Vl •" •■•'diii«80th June,
ploy of the Union Colliery Ccmpany, l^fll-i tiie auin of (4li,4fi'i.fll was arreura,
correspomU ei nneotlon with the The amount of arreara under this bend-
same.; and the verdict of the jury. Injr at 81sl   December,   1806,  was >;i:o,-
Mr. Helmcken— To introduce a b'llto *-"•*■*>■
amend tha liquor license regulation ad, Timber Royalty and Ueenscs-01 ihe
Itjiji sum  of U8,687  brought  to account as
Mayor Mul tor— For a return  showing timber royalties and licenses during the
all timber leases granted in Covrti-han- year ending 80th Julie, 18 5, the sum of
Alberni district lo dale, with acreage, lf8,076.88 was arreara.   The amount of
and duration and terms of lease; also arrears under this heading at 31st Dee-
how far each lessee has carried out the Bin her, 1806, waa 1(9,802.06,
terms of lease. lion. Mr. Tun er, in reply to Mr.
Dr. Walkem—For a return showing Sword, staled the government per
the fees and emoluments of sheriu's for capita grant was strictly confined
1895.
Dr. Walkem—For a return  respecting
the  appointment of guardians re the
estate of 11. ,M. Cooper, and the amount
of security demanded from each.
Mr. Graham—To insert in Columbia
and Western Railway Company bill:
"l'rovideo, however, that, should any
other company build u line from 1 enlii-
ton so as to intersect thla company's
line at any point, this company shall
allow them running powers between the
point where such Intersection takes
place and Ibe eastern   terminus of the,
.M. C. A. hall to-night
I'AJlT   I.
Piano Solo Miss McGWl
Song Miss Stirtini
Song Mr. K. Hartley
Piano S..lo .Miss Bertram
(Late of Australia.)
Song   Miss Doheson
   Mr. Hell
Duct   Misses Stirtan aud (runner
Mr. .*>. Mo.tishuw
bong,
Piano
Song
S >11K-
'Waiiing"
Miss Bertram
Piano Polo..
l-AKX  ll.
Mr
. MissMcGlll
W. Moli.isliuw
.Miss Bertram
  Mr. Bell
Mr.  Jones
Piano Solo . . .
Song	
Song	
Vocal Duet. .Misses Stirtan and Gamier] for t!
Son},'  Mr. S. Mottishuw I
Son—"Ibune they brought her warrior]
•lead"  Miss Bertram
Song     Mr. K.Hartley
Chairman—Aid. A. Wilson.
Accompanist—Mr. C. Brenton.
Admission 111 cents.
.Spiritualism.
A meeting w ill be held in Spiritualists'
hall, Odd-Fellows' block, Victoria Urea-
cent, this (Saturday) evening at 8 o'clock,
Short talks by (j. Campbell, on subjects
selected by the audience, interest,tng
and to the point. Hear all sides, theii
decide, The public tiro cordially invited
to attend.
Average School Attendance.
following an- the average attendances
at the public schools for February;
CKXTIIAI. SCHOOL.
1st Division—J. shaw, principal
2d Division—J. I
.'Id Division—Mis
-41 li Division—Mis
6th Division—Mil
titli Division—Mb
al lo way
l.awson
Mel.ius
Haiti ,,
11 inner
7th Division—Miss Muir
Nth Division—.Miss Woodman
SOUTH WARD,
1st Division—Miss Duncan  .
2.1 Division—Miss Marshall ..
NORTH   WARD,
-Miss Doheson.
-Miss Edwards ..
68.00
■Hi 40
44 02
48.06
111 14
68 80
(is 87'
Westminster Liberals will nominate
their candidate on the 12th.
" Beautiful" weather, but minus the
balmy breezes and Italian skies.
The Hon. Col. Baker has withdrawn
his libel suit against the Province.
- Twelve candidates will  be confirmed
by Bishop Perrin at St. Alban's on Sunday morning,
The foothall game to have taken place
ao Wellington to-day will probably be
changed to snowball.
The date of the final for the junior
Association cup has been changed to the
4th of April at Victoria.
Provincial conatables may now he recognized by a small portion of uniform In
the shape of a peaked cap,
The employes of the Xew V.  C.  Co.,
will receive their pay to-day, and which
will he a little larger than the previous j
month.
A meeting will he held  in  the Hotel
Wilson this evening for the  purpose of
re-organizing  the cricket club for the !
season.
The Fire Wardens will   on  Monday
evening report favorably on the proposi- j
tion for the corporation to take over the
lire department.
A big boom will be centered in the
Kootney country this season and it is
affirmed that fully 10,000 miners will
lind occupation three.
The members of the I. O. G, T. gave a
very Interestingentertainmenton Thursday night for the purpose of raising
funds to renovate the hall.
The stock of the United Alberni Gold
Mining Co., of which James Dunemuir
is president, will he put ou the market
in 15,000 shares at 60c., 10,000 at 76c.
and the balance at par.
It   is  reported  that, several  wealthy
Ciiliforuians will shortly secure control
wit! that
arrangements are now being made to
that effect with the assignees.
Owing to the United States Revenue   Repairs Neatly
Cutter fouling the Jehsen  in the San   Shirts, Collars ami Culls a Specialty.
Francisco harbor on March 3, the latter  WHITE LADOK ONLY employed,
may be detained for repairs, as her Stem
has been somewhat damaged.
It is some satisfaction to know that
the Interests of British Columbia were
properly brought before the Immigration
Convention at \\ innlpeg by a newspaper
man through newspaper enterprise.
J. Ulriek, a Ti tin, charged with a brutal assault on one of his countrymen by
biting off half bis ear, wns sentenced hy
Judge Harrison on Wednesday to two
years and a half in the penitentiary.
Anticipations in regard to the lower
Englishmen's river bridge were fortunately not realize!, for the structure stil|
slamls, though slightly injure I. Mr.
Bray, Government agent, has given instructions to have the bridge made safe.
A sharp earthquake shock was felt
here Saturday evening about 8 o'clock.
It was about this time the comet was
billed lo change its course from its direction toward the earth, and pi
bumped against us on the turn
Preparations are being made at Aluernl
opening upof many of themines.
(In • nc mine al the present time there
are 2;! men working and said to he making a good thing. If the claim known
as the "Saunders claim" continues to
bold out. it will prove a valuable mine.
Politicians in Ibis city and Victoria
are confident that the overthrow ot the
Provincial Government is near at hand
and that the climax will he reached when
the estimates are brought down next
week. The difficulty is claimed to le
over the British Pacific scheme.
The hark I.eon is now loading lumber
from llaslam's mill for Alaska. She will
take 260,000 feet and 800 piles. We learn
that the proprietor of this i:,ill is iu a
heller position lo export lumber than
any other individual mill-owner in the
province, and ii is lo be hoped thai the
future will see many vessels urrivu at
this port for similar cargoes.
PIEST AEBIVAL
-IN-
Dry Goods
42 Pieces of Wool Dress Serge)
cts. per yard,
In Navy, Cardinal, Royal Blue, Black, Light, Mid and
Dark Greys, Fawn, Cream nnd Strawberry; also an excellent range of
Ladies' Black Cashmere Hose at 25e,pr.
Lookout for Bargains. ''*.
Chas. E. Stevenson & Co
CASH   DRY  OOOJ3S,
41 and 43 Commercial St.,      Nanaimo, B.C.
loneer Steam Laundry
and B. C. Toilet Supply
have opened a Branch Oflice in the
McAdie Block, Victoria descent.
done.
Parcels delivered  in the
charge.
Terms strictly cash, C. O. O.
city free ^{j
Box 05.
D. M. STEWART, Proprietor.
The Most Complete Stock
Th,
—OF*
Gents'
farnishiiiff
Scotch Bakery
VICTOIUA CKESCENT
Has not changed Imiids—only one of the
partners has retired; but
Our Celebrated Bread     V.'
I» miide by the mime hands, nnd customers call depend upon getting the same
t_^
Sweet Bread
Fresh Cakes.
and
IN THE CITY, AT
r: Jas. McGregor's
From tin-;
rtisent I'rojirii-tur,
JEROME WILSON.
Victoria Crescent.
"CRITERION"
Restaurant and Cfiop House
Commercial Stbbkt.
Oysters in every style.
Meals, 'Joe. itiitl upwards.
Good Beds, 25c. anil upwards.
Spring Chicken always ou band,
&rlii}gtoij Hotel
MR. .1. A. THOMPSON.
Having completed tho erection oil lie Arlington
Motel at NA.NOOSE BAY, this handsome and
commodious hotel is now prepared to receive
and eotnjortably entertain travelors and others.
I'HE CUISINE
Is presided oier by Mrs.Thompson, and the
Tabled'Hote constantly provided with all the
delicacies ol the season. Combined with the
elegant furnlshi .1 apartments, the visitor finds
the surroundings ..! the most pleasant desorlp-
I lion.
PERSONAL.
1st Division*
2d Division*
68 86
•l-l ttfi
mi :ir
Customs nml Inbuilt Revenue,
Following  nre   Ibe   customs  reluriiH
f..r the month of February:
Duty colleeted	
Miscellaneous	
Total
(iooils in
Dutiable
IMPORTS,
iported (ice   .  .
Total 	
Inland revenu
were:    Spirits
cigars $1'
D;
returns for
100.82,   mull
total *7?4 51.
>'lh.
to iho average actual daily attendance ol |iit|iils oi school age,
The Co-operative Associations bill
wus considered in committee und
reported complete as amended.
Die Mechanics1 Lien bill was considered  in et mi m it tee,  which rose
and reported progress after adopt-1 Apples. ...  M. 78 per box
ingseveral seotions, ivxuioes ,. ._._65e nor saok
.Mr. Hume presented a petition
from mine-owners nnd miners of
Kaslo protesting against the pro-
prnposed lux on mint nils,
Hon.  Cil.  linker presented  the
Local Retail Market.
Floub—Ogilvle'a Hungarian.(6.00 f hi. J
Green Crown  (i.tii)   "
Hercules      4.IIII    "
Sugar— Uestgranulated .. (5.60'j;'sack
Blight yellow 4.36
Hams '. From Ifie. to 17e
Bhhakfast Bacon, ... 12c to 17c
Lard—Best    i6o
Buttbr—Creamery   86a
Dairy .   .   28u
Onions    He
EaOS  2.1c, per down
nples II. r"
Pi
.Mayor Davison left for Victoria Thurs-
.08 7ft ' day and is expected hack to-dap,
Mr. It. Rankin, formerly of the N. V.
Till 4'.'   ('. Co.'s machine shops, lias removed to
Viu liver, having accepted  a   posit
with lhe ('. I'. R. machine winks  th
Rev. ('.  E. Cooper was tenders I
farewell reception in the Foresters'hall
at Wellington on Monday evening.   He
will leave on Ibe 10th hist, for England,
Mr. D.Jordan look passage on Tuesday
by the City of Everett for San Francisco.
W. F. Devereatt, 0. I')., and purly have
gone to Toxichi,
Messrs,& Ban-ford mid J. McKennel!
will leave for Vancouver this t iiinj* to
7,800 nn attend u meeting of  delegates of the
Rugby Foothall Union,
T. R. F. Midlines  returned on Thursday from an extended visit to Victoria.
.1. A. MeLellan.of the Post-Intelllgen-
eer, is paying lb • city a business visit.
Mr. M. R. Counter intends  to leave
shortlv for Honolulu.
Try PliilpoM's Tomato Catsup
25c. and 5 In. per Bottle,
IO Xrrrr Sleep.       Open Ung mid Night.
- Private Hoarding
City Market
HEMANS & WAMSLEY
Wholesale and Retail Butchers
COMMERCIAL STREET
P.O. r."x2:!7 Telephone 7-K
FOR A REFRESHING DRINK
;'!'   .;.       ( CiiAMi'Ad.N
) Soda Wat
'(ill,'(IV   ) GtNQBB At
\ III. CO  ( Sarsapari
Ai-ik tbl'   -I-      (OhampaonbOider
Law]
■iiii -
Ginger Ai.k
11,1.A
EUREKA soda WORKS,
Mionifacuircri.nViiiirrancc Drinks,SJ'run..,_
Delivered tree to „n parti ol city aim vlclnrtj
tUf- I'tomnl attention |.»i,l toahlpuluirordora
folophouo M. P. il Box jii. SSnaimo.
k* +
t!2,HI2
161
c. c. Mckenzie,
FRANKLYN HOUSE Land Agent and Conveyancer,
AND ACCOUNTANT,
!j:!,!iti-i OS
,1    Kill (III
Wallace Street,
BH-WMK tiik METHODIST CHURCH
and tiik . . . UNION BREWERY,
OmOBl   FHOXT STHKKT, NANAIMO.
Town LoU and Parma tor Sate,  Money to Loan
on Mortgage ut low raten.
Agent for tho United Klro tmuranoe Company
of .Mioiciicjiter, Kngland,
(8,7(111 IKI
February
li41)4, IH,
ciiicketiB !5 to 60 cents
A copy of tne agieeinetit of the Na-
liounl Bporting ('bib of London waa read
to James .1. Corbet! on Thursday last.,
lie Mini he would hic.li (hem iih foon aa
I received bv him.
NK W .11) PERTI8EMENT8,
For Kent.
Two Large Stores
On   Victoria Crescent,, in  best
situation.   Kent moderate. For
particular! ajiply nt
THIS OFFICE,
(Julian Cigar Factory.
Our ClgAft are made of thu Oholooit Havana
Tobaccoi-  our famous
Cuban Blossom **»
Black DiaiiKiml
rr
The City Tea Supply Co.
Aro giving away a few handioma Promturoi
lu books, consisting of Bhakespearei" Musical Li'rtvos," "ltoyal Gallery of Poetry and
Art," " Thi! Favorite Cook Hook," etc. On
obtaining ono of those books it entitles tho
purchaser to a membership In tins Olobe
Library Association.
Are eallod fur I'vi-rvwliere,
1 any Imported cigar.  Made
nixl nn- fiiperi'-r in
by Union Labor.
W. W0EDEN, S^'
A
M. .1, BOOTH, Wharf Street.
KSTAHMSIIKt)  IRII2.
JOS, M. BROWN, Watchmaker.
oV\On Demagnetized short »ouM
Uy HI'KliAl, UAOB1KKRV on tho PrimllWi
Fine nnil CompltOAtSd WiitcltcH i.ii.I olooki
Carefully Cleaned and Repaired
FISH AND GAME.
Market, Bastion Sthket.
Mourner, mid HhlppltiR auppltorl on .hort notice
nt WholcHiilc 1'rlcon.
JiJOB'L'   VAL.UK   IN
PHOTOS
Klnr('Vi'l.iiMKT|.'.IIS.rnilllr.vrl|.». InStiirk,   '
'■' lOHlOU'Si'  r,ft VICTOIUA THKSCKNT
.ltihinli.il lllcok, Ciimniarrial BtrMt, Niiniiltnu.        LU.VUVXVO - i'V Nmialian, B, C,

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