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Mt. Pleasant Advocate Oct 29, 1904

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Array x< ___
If You Want   Up-to-date
TATJONERY
at right prices,  call
[t.Pleasant Drugstore!
i M. A. W. Co. j
itt Block, Mount Pleasant. J
A Snap in Toilet Soap.
Mt
$i per year, Six Months 50c, Three nonths 25c, Single Copy 5c.
Devoted to the interests of    Mt. Pleasant, Central Park, South Vancouver.
OCT 3 11904      ?T j
§ QO TO LEONARD'S
COFFEE PALAGE5
The Arcade or GranviSie Street
fFor Light Lunch
Baked Apples—liko home—with Pore Cream.
Genuine Boston Baked Beans
Open from 7:80 a. m., to 13 p. nl,
Sunday from 9 a. m.   to 12 p. ni.
\
Established April 8, 1899;   Whole Number 225.i- 12-°|1
flOUNT   PLEASANT,   VANCOUVER,    B.  C.,*;   SATURDAY   Oct., ao.  1904S
Sixth Year, Vol.6, No. 25- ~C?.<] 3
Subscribers are requested to
jort any carelessness in the delivery
j'The Advocate."
fhonges for advertisements should bo
efore Thursday noon to insure their
"...cation.
<ocal Items.l
Fhe McCuaig Auotion and Commis-
ti Co.. Ltd.,noxttoOarueige Library,
stings street, buy Furniture for Cash,
uduct Auotion Sales and handle
rupt Stocks of every description,
faction guaranteed.   Phone'1 WO.
there are a few mild cases of scarlet
ler aud diptheria in tho 301 District.
. J. Martin of Ninth avenne, who
I been confined  to her bed for two
iek with an attack of acute iudoges-
lu, is improving..
Follow the crowd and work for R. B.
|lis, the    first name on  the voting
Let it como out on top,
 :o: '——■        '
. T. Glenden Moody of the Now
6rk Dental Parlors, accompanied by
fs. Moody, made a business trip to
Ictoria this week.
IE AD Stark's Glasgow House offer
tt. Pleasant Women I   Do uot miss
-Monday morning oarly.
For the benefit of the travelling pub-
tho   B. C.  Electric   Railway   Com-
Iny has placed signs on the street cars
Ming their destination aud the routo
L4y  :ot	
jThe  Japanese    Consul,    Hon.   Mr.
lorikawa  aud  Mrs.    Morikawa have
sued iuvitatious for au "At Home" for
klnesday November 2d,  in  houor of
I Emperor of Japan's birthday.
Irs. W.  W.  Merkley   has received
bw shapes in all   tho   latest   slyhs iu
at*, Toqnos,  Tricot-, Directoire  and
[fcture Hats,   just opeued  yesterday.
|all und select one before they are .pick-
I over.
The    funeral   of  Percy    Alexander
Iugh, infant sou of Mr. nud Mrs. Chas
piiipkius of Thirteenth, 2r>4 Thirteenth
tenue, took place  Tuesday  morning.
([any sympathizing friends sent floral
Ipkcus.   Rev. A. W. McLeod officiated.
Fhe   funeral   arrangements    wero   in
Ihnrge of Armstrong & Edwnrds.
 :o:	
LVu-ttlgamatiou   Sale.—Wo  have cut
r ono third of the price ou all footwear.
tooths' Haud-nuido Shoe $1.45; Youths'
Jhoes (broken sizes) |1.00; Men's Shoes,
tegular "id, uow ouly $3.50; Men's, regu-
S   Inf.   Shoe,   now   ouly   . 2 50.
Mills, 18 Cordova  stroet  and  540
tj_.uville street.
Mr. aud Mrs. Martin have sold thoir
borne on Twelfth aveuue and rented Mr.
J. J. Gavin's cottage coruer Twelfth
and Quebec, for the winter. Mr. Martin
vill build ou his lots ou Westmiuster
avenuo in the spring
NEW YORK DENTISTS.
H0 PLATES
OUR REPUTATION AS PAINLESS DENTISTS is shown by the
DAILY INCREASE IN OUR PRACTICE. We have gaiued a worldwide reputation with onr latest discovery which, wheu applied to the
gums, teeth oan-be extracted absolutely painless. Our patients aro so
pleased with the results that they not only tell their friends, but personally bring them to our parlors that they may receive the same treatment. In this, way, together with the highest-classdentiBtry done by
our specialists, our practice has gradually increased until wo aro again
forced to enlarge our parlors.
By the use of our Double Adhesive Suction Chamiif.r wo aro able to
fit tho most difficult casts. Where other Dentists Fail We Meet
With Success. If your teeth drop wheu you try to eat with them, or
if you are afraid of them striking the pavement when you suoezo,
there is somethiug wrong; they do not fit. Our Double Adhesive
Suction Chamber overcome this difficulty and is Oua Own Invention
AND CAN NOT BE USED BY OTHERS.
Gold Crown, Gold Filling, Bridge Work aud all other Dental Work
done, painless, aud by specialists aud guaranteed for 10 years.
147 Hastings St., E.
Opposite the Carnegio Library. Telephone 1560.
Office Hours: 8 a. m., to 9 p. m.;  Suudays 9 a. in., to 2 p. ni.
Vancouver,
B. C.
_*_!*?
■m
WWW
!__jVote for Ellis, the Couservato  Candidate withont a Boss.
Mrs. Fnirbairu returned Monday from
a three mouths visit iu New Brunswick.
Sixteen uew members were initiated
at the regular mooting of the C. O.C F.,
on Thursday evening.
Any 0110 having friends or knowing
Of strangers visiting on Mt. Pleasant
will confer a groat favor by informing
"Tho Advocate."   Telephone B1405.
Just arrived at Mrs.   Merkley's   new
shapes and trimmings in Millinery.
Mr. Becker is buildiug a new house
ou the Brown road in the 301 District,
near Mr. Hamilton's.
Miss Irviuo entertained a number of
her young lndy frienbs on Saturday
afternoon last from 4 to 7. Music was
one of the pleasures of the occasion.
The City Grocery  do'ivers groceries
every day ou Mt. Ploasaut;   'phono 280
Trade Persuaders
For This Week
Halibut Prunes
Finnan Haddie Dry Salt Cod Sweet Spuds
Smoked Salmon Kippers Crab Apples
Another shipment of first-class Apples-
Our prices are always the lowest. Qualities the BEST.
J. P. Nightingale & CO.
Westminster & Seventh Aves.   Mt. Pleasant.  Tel. 1360
Read tho advisement of Stark's Glas
Igow  House in  today's    "Advocate'
■ Special bargains are offered Mt. Pleasaut
[buyers.
 :o:      .....
Mr. Chas, Netherby will open up a
I drag store in one of the now stores just
I bnilt by Mr. McCutoheon ou Wostmin-
[ ster avenue, near Ninth.   Mr. Nether-
by was Manager for Mr. J.W. Morrow's
I Mt. Ploasaut Drug Store for a whilo aud
J is well-known to Mt. Ploasaut citizens.
f The new drug store will be up-to-date
I in stock and fixtures, aud particular
1 attention will be given tQ filling presoip
tious carefully and promptly.   The uew
* store will open for  business   the latter
' part of next week
 :o:	
By telling merchants thoy saw their
advertisements in Thi Advocate our
readers will confer a favor and help the
paper greatly.
Special rates are to be given Settlers
along the route of the South Vancouver
tram line hy the B. C. Electric Company, beginning Novciubor 1st. See
advertisement in this paper. The spc.ial
rates are for Settlers, nud will eutitlo Ihe
holder to a continuous ride from any
point ou tho Cemetery Liue to auy point
on the Vancouver Railway System;
transfers mndo at Westminster aud
Sixteeuth avenues. Ten rides, good at
any timo, to be used by Sottler or his
household, 00c; fifty rides, good at any
time, but to be used during month of
issue only by party iu whoso name
issued, $2.50.
FOR RENT: a six-roomed house, 236
Niuth avenuo, between Westminster
avo. and Westminster road. Apply to
J. Mason, Real Estate Agent.
Tho Evangelist Meetings conducted
by Rev. E. H. Shanks and wife in the
Mt, Pleasant Baptist Church havo been
well attended this wock and have
awakened mnoh interest. The meetingi
will Ni continued for nnother week.
Sunday services will be held as follows:
10 a. m., a meetiug for prayer aud consecration; at 11 a. m., Rov. Mr. Shanks
will preach on "The Law of Christ" ;
8:80 p. ni , a Youug People's Rally at
which Mr. Shanks will givo an address
ou "Chains"; 7:30 preaching by Mr.
Shanks, solo hy Mrs. Shanks nud special
m«sic by the Choir.
 :_:•	
The opening Sooial took placo iu the
now Seacomo Road Sunday School Hall.
Soujh Vancouver, on Thursday evening.
A short program was given of music
and addresses. Mrs. Vermilyea sang
several solos whioh were highly appreciated, and address wore given by Rev.
J. F.Betts, District Chairman ; Rev. Dr.
Robson, W. J. Audrews, H. Harris, G.
Beaver and J. Frost. Refreshments of
excellent quality were served A eollee-
Hon was taken for purchasing au organ,
During the wiutcrSocial evenings will be
a monthly occurrence. Rev. Dr. Robson
will preach in the uew Hall Oil Sunday
tvpuinj- at 7;3V,
Four lnrgo potatoes weighiug seven
pounds were preseuted to "Tho Advocate," on Saturday last. They wero
grown on Mr. S Garvin's placo iu the
301 District, South Vnncouuer, nud wore
from a crop planted last May and were
not specially selected. That the soil is
oxceeingly productive is manifested by
vegetables uud fruits from South Van.
couver District.
 :o:———
Mr. R. Mills, tho wull-kuowu Shoo
Dealer, has closed out his Gauvillo
street branch, the stock being moved to
tho Cordova stroet store, whero one of
tho largest and best assorted display of
pods in this liuo iu Vancouver can be
und.
King's
H^irket
2321   Westminster   Ave.
Mt. Pleasant.
E. H. Peace,  Proprietor.
00 00 00
Wholesale aud Retail
Dealer in Meats of
All Kinds. Tel. A1206
Vegetables and Poultry
in season.
Prompt Delivery.
.'  N*-**8t_JB:i ___.
»JK
HEATERS
The season has arrived when yon will be
asking yourself: "Where shall I go to
find the best Heaters for the least
. . monoy."
Aslcyonr friends and (boy
will tell yon FLETT, Mt.
Pleasant, has tho best
you will find in the
city.
OUR PRICES
are always
right.
J. A. FLETT,
Mt. PLEASANT  HARDWARE
STORE.  Tel. 447.
W. R. OWENS, Manager.
Good Dairy Butter
20c per pound.
Creamery Butter
i=lb. prints 25c.
H. O. Lee,
2425  Westminster  Ave.
'Phone 322
EXTRA SPECIAL
r^ArnnTru a      _r»r_r^_--»i a i     in dress w
GOODS and
FURS
Ladies' Cloth, extra fine fiuish, 54-in. wide; regular |1.50, spacial for
$1.25 a yard. -Nun's Veilinub, special 30c a yard. White Luster, extra
fiue finish ; regular Hoc, special for.COc a yard
FURS.—Red Fox, largo size, special for $15: Muskrat Ruffs, collar
sbapo, l6ugt.il 82 iucbes, special $8; Sable Ruff, collar shape, six tails, 8(1
inches, special *S1 u ; Sable Ruff, extra fine quality, collar shape, four tails,
54 inches, special $18; Sable Ruff, 44 inches, 6 tails, special for $8; Sable
Ruffs, collar shapeS tails, special for $10.50: Oppossum Ruff, 72 inches, 2 I
large tails, special for $3.25. Also a large assortment of Ladies' Fur Col-
. larettcs and Children's Fur_ iu sets and single Ruffs and Muffs.
A     DOQ< _fc  fn      30,32 and ..4 Cordova St.
4     rV.   IV_V'*"*>_"> "__ V-V/..        ft Telephone 574. «*»
4^<5>*^*V-*'--t/^t'**/*fc-V**---. _/<a/<tk"-A'%/<Si_V-*/*V_'_-*.-i*-M%*\■%--
MOUNT
PLEASANT
Cor. Ninth Ave
Central rteat flarket
& Westminster R&V Telephone 954.
Wholesale and Retail
Dealers in nil kinds of Fkesh aud Salt Meats.    Frosh Vegetables always
on hand.   Orders solicited from all parts of Mount Pleasant and Fairview.
Prompt Delivery.
Woodrow & Williams. "Tanaoer.16
"MEET MB IN THE RED ROOM.'
If yon kuow any items of Mt.Pleasant
uews—Social, Personal or auy other
news items—send them in to "The
Advocate," or by telephone—B1405.
Mrs. Duncan and family h avo moved
from Fifteenth avenuo to Eighth avenue iuto her son's—Mr.Henry Duncan—
rosideuoo, next to Capt. Moran's home.
The Mt. Pleasaut "Advocate" on sale
at all the Newsdealers in tho city.
THE ALEXANDRA
Elkcthoi.ysis Paulou of Hairdrcss-
iug, Manicuring, Facial Massago and
Scalp Treatment for Ladies and Gentlemen. Bnperflii.us hair, warts and
moles reuioyed by Electrolysis.
Valuable Information given to overy
lady patron on "How to tako oaro of
yourself-"
Skin Food for building up tho wasting
tissue. Orange Flowor Cream to prevent and heal sunburn.
MaiiaMi; Ht'Mi'iniEYS, 58!) Granville
street.
There was a large attendance of young
peoplo at tho "Handicap" 'Social ou
Mondny evening at tbe Methodist
Parsonage, Eleventh avenuo. It was
uuder the auspices of tlie Epworth
League Social Committee and the head
of tho Social department, Miss G
Glover, deserves much credit for the
splendid program and tho pleasant
novelties introduced. Tho "haudirap"
feature proved amusing; the moment
oue used tho right hand it was tied up
by oue of the Committee. Tho program
was varied aud entertaining, tho following taking part: Miss Ethel Sim,
instrumental selection; MissesF.nudG.
Harford,"duet; Mrs. Chas. Keeler, recitation ; Miss Olive Armstrong and Miss
Ethel Flewelling, duet; Miss Minnie
Verge, snug; Miss Collius, recitation;
Miss Swift, song; Miss Stuwurt, recitation ; Mr. Joe. Mathers, recitation. Rov.
A. E. Hetheriugton gave un address of
welcome He wanted tho young people to feel free to visit tho parsonage
aud assured them they would bo
welcome; ue intended fo arrange to be
at home one evening a week specially
for callers. Refreshments were served,
and ti)jout 11 O'clock all went homo
well pleased with the cveliihg's enjoyment.
HALF PRICES prevail in Otto two
stores on many lines, and even the newest goods just received aro offered at
cost price. We must have room iu ono
store to do our business in future.
Early callers have tlio pickings.
R. MILLS. IK Cordova street and
540Granville strict
Mt. PLEASANT
WOMEN
Will Profit by These.
These Bargains for HONDAY are for
Mt. Pleasant folk ONLY, and the goods
at the prices wont last long—probably all
will be gone before night-fall. So you had
better come early.
The Biggest  Bargains We Have
Offered for a Long Time.   @   @
$ 1.25 Dress Goods 65c.
5(1 _U0-.es wide, Fluked Tweed Suitings—the season's most stylish
material for tailored costumes, skirts, etc. Regular price $1.25,
MONDAY ouly (I.e.
«■"-,_■- l*_||<v Xftf   21   inches   Tanioliue   Silks,   diiintv,   stvlisli
Wv»_ Olin- tUV,. uud  Berv__.c,lbUii     R_K..i,,r pnee (12c, MONDAY only 40c.
Pure Linen Towels, linll'-bloaelu'd,   size   17x31
inches.    Regular  price  85o,   MONDAY  ouly
12' i,u.
JUMPING
Ahead
of all our past recoods means we are
being recognized more and more every day
as the leading Clothiers and Tailors.
Suits,    Overcoats,    Raincoats and Trousers.
. Doing the largest business means doing
it right, in fact there isn't a store anywhere
better able to supply your needs without
charging too much. Of course you want a
fine assortment to choose from and this we
give you, coupled with style and novelty,
We never had so much worth your seeing.
Money back if dissatisfied.
FIT-REFORM-.
THOS.     FOSTER.
333 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B   C.
Mail   Orders   promptly   attended   to,
Samples sent on application.
Sclf-nicasuremont Blanks and
52______tt__U________B_l
FANCY
CHOCOLATES
Bought at a Snap. Sold at a Snap.
Regular  40c,  MOW 25c per pound.
The Citv Grocery Co.
Tel. 286.
Westminster Ave. & Prlnoesm Street.
THE
BEER
With
Out
a
Peer.
Cascade
& n? w -ff? fff fff fff fff fff iff fff fff fff m m nr in es
m
Brewed right here in Vancouver by  men ™
of years and years and years   experience, (tt ,.
and  a brewery whose plant  is the most -_• •
perfect known  to the Art of Brewing.    Is -^» f
£_: it any wonder that  it  has  taken a place _:§ ..'
"*""" in   the hearts  of   the  people  which   no- other beer
^ can supplant ?    Doz., quarts $2.   Doz., pints  ^|.      41 '.,
J Vancouver Breweries, Ltd. %f
^ Vancouver, B. C.       Tel. 429 ^.
Por Sale at all first-class Saloons, Liquor Stores and Hotel
or delivered to yonr houso
Tk'-ia Hi Hi Hi Hi Hi' in Hi iU Hi Hi Hi Hi Hi IH Hi K
25c Linen
Towels l2Kc.
Roller Towelling Half Price.
Pure Lineu Scotch Crash Roller Towelling,  HI inches wide.    Regular
llie, MONDAY only 8c.
Pure Linen Roller Towelling,  red border,   16 inches wide.    Regular
8c, MONDAY only 50.
Stark's Glasgow
HOUS€ 1% Cordova St.
A splendid collection of small -j!
Furs iu almost, every fur you
can think of. Iu tho proper
styles. We bave sold already
11 great quantity, which means
our prices must be right.
Corner ol (.uiibit- Street
Pull Line of Fancy and Staple
GROCERIES
Prices to compare with any.
J. t>. HALDON
Cor. Westminster ave., a Dufferin St.
Mr. Noble of Tenth avenue, is building a cottage on Eleventh avenue,
between Quebec street and Westminster
avenue,
-:o:-
Mrs. Dal/.ell and littlo daughters
returned Tuesday from a short visit to
Seattle
Mount
Pleasant
Fish Market
2811 "Westminster live. cor. Seventh ave
A 1.1, kinds OF Fresh. Smoked, Salt ami
Canned Fish for sale. Poultry and
Kggs bought and Bold Cainoin .. ason.
(llimnis left at the simp Prompt lv attended to.     I) tST & LAWRENCE, 1'mp.-.
Lawn Grass Seeds
Clover and Timothy  Seeds,
Pratt's Poultry and Animal Foods,
Prall's l.iee Killer,
Holly Chick Pood,  Beofsoraps, Ktc.
FLOUR and FEED.
Telcphi
wesTMINSTIIR KOAI).
We have ou Bale a beautiful display of ladies trimmed hats,wo
have made a choice, lot at the
very small price of (5.00. A
good variety to choose frmn at
to Plciily to) supply tio
demand for this week
at thu siieciul prico ol |*i.
DID IT EVER occur to ynu
to have a dressmakoi' minu.ai'-
tur.) your drosses who understands her business and cau give
you satisfactory lit and* finish
Without nny trouble whatever to
yourself, even if it costs a trifle
more, is a great saving to your
health as well as of ynur money.
Well if that part is char iu your
mind, let us advise you that we
have .just tbo dressmaker ynu are
looking for.
Till- OLD  KENNEDY  STAND
303 Hastings street.
McTaggart & Moscrop
DllAl.KHK IN
HARDWARE
RANGES,
STOVES and
GRANITEWARE.
PAINTS. OILS,  GLASS,
344 Cnrrall St..     Vancouver, B.C.
Templclon lilook.
FREE
FOB
Royal Crown Soap Wrappers
Return fi Royal Crown Soap Wrapper*
and we will send free your ehoioe of SO
pictures. Or for 25 wrappers choice of
1B0 books.   Books and pictnro lists on
application.
The Royal Soap
Co., Limited,
VANCOUVER, B.C.
AT—
Norton's  Grocery
Prices Auk. Right. COME nud
inspect our SNK'k of FRUIT,
VKl.ET A11I.ES & OROOER1ES
Westminster Hit,, and Walter St. (Ml)
Advertize in tho "Advecnte.'
J)iamonds
We carry the largest stock
of tlldso beautiful stones in
tbe province uud can therefore < ift'er yon a larger variety to select from and a
better valno than you can
get nuywhore else.
We can nnd will (five yon
honest expert advice in all
and every Irausuctioii you
have with us.
We are satisfied with it fair
profit, so tluit our prices are
always reasonable.
Trorey
THE JEWELER.
Corner 1!listings and GranvLW BU.
Official Watch Inspector O. P. R.
**•=
For Local News Road Thi ADV0C49 '
l*K*l.-.
■ft* '
....*_*■»»
•>**>
MOUNT I'LEASANT ADVOCATE.
ft
■
1
r
I
r
^
ii
t
The Crime of
THE HEIRESS OF GRAYSTONE HALL
w si a
By LAURA JEAN LIBBEY.
Author of "A Broken Betrothal,"  "Th
Cameron Hall," "Parted at theAlta
The
■truck
grent" clock' in the valley
the hour of midnight in
hoarse, clanging strokes; as the last
vibration diid away, out of tlie
very depths ol the I!lack Pool —out
of the inky waters—a face seemed to
guther slinpo—n jnuxi'w facie pootlnff
up at her. from over bet* shoulder in
the water .into'wliich sho gazed with
wide, terror-stricken eyes.
It was not the features of her
handsome lover,'Le Hoy Pierpont,
whose bride she was to lie on llie
following week, that sbe saw.
Like ono petrified, she was staring
down with frightened eyes into Ibe
face of Basil Sovornc, tbe man whom
sbe had detested at lirst sight.
The man whom Le Hoy lind culled
an evil genius, a modern Bluebeard .
llonnylin staggered back, threw up
her bands Willi a wild shriek, and
fell dowu iu the long gross in a dead
faint on tho very brink of the illaclt
Tool.
CHAPTER XXX,
When Bonnylin regained consciousness, she found herself supported
auainst the trunk of a tree; some
one wns bending over her, laving ber
face with the water of tho Black
Pool.
"Well, Miss Pare,' snid a harsh,
cold voice, "I nm glad yo see you
yourself ngnin. I thougbt you had
moro  stamina in  vour  nature  than
tt.   tnin*--.nt   the   ro-hfrti-m   ot  a       fllCC
looking   over  your   shoulder"—  this
very grloily.
Bonnylin     opened wide her great,
blue, velvety eyes nnd stared up into  tho dark,  grim,   haughty  face of
Basil Severno.
"I did    not know;  I thought — I
thought "      She stopped      short
in consternation and dismay.
"You thought 1 was a ghost, or
a ghoul, or something of the sort,"
he said Impatiently; "but I am neither the one nor tho other, Miss
Dare; my presence hero is most easily explained. Cutting across lots
home, I came across you quite by
accident. I had something to say
to you, something which I could not
find time to tell you during the
evening, as every moment of your
timo was so filled up; yet I had
come to Graystono Hall to-night for
the solo purpose of speaking with
von on an important subject, and
but for this opportune meeting, I
should have gono homo with the
words ■ unspoken. I must have approached you too hastily and frig.1-
tened you, for you fell at my feet
in  a     dead fulnt."
By this timo Bonnylin was quite
over her fright.
" What could you have of such
great Importance to say to me?"
she inquired, with all a young girl's
keen curiosity. "I will listen to
what you have to say now, if you
like;, that is, if it will not take you
too long to tell it."
"The sum and substance can be
told In a few simple Words,"
he said, leaning nonchalantly bnck
against the trunk of a tree, and
folding his arms deliberately ns he
gazed at her;' "you must break your
engagement with voung I'ierpont
without delay, for you can never
marry him."
"Sir!" cried Bonnylin, springing
to her feet and staring at him with
unfeigned astonishment that was
deepening wilh each breath into the
most intense anger; "you are either
a fool or a madman—or perhaps Intoxicated—that's tbo plain English
of it. Step out of the path and let
mu pass; I won't listen to such nonsense. If Le Hoy was bore he would
give- you n sound thrashing, ond
throw you into the pool in ihe bargain'".
"Sit down on that fnllinlog,"
said Basil Scvernc, frowning darkly;
"you shall not pass until you hear
what 1 have lo say."
"I suppose you would use your
strength to prevent me from going,"
ci led llonnylin, white to the lips
with anger.
"I shall if necessary," he replied,
calmly.
Bonnylin reflected a moment. Perhaps it would be best to pretend lo
comply with bis request by reseating
herself—lhat would throw him off
bis guard—and then she could spring
to her feet and dash past him.
Sbe sunk back on the mossy log,
eyeing him contemptuously.
"Well, now! what reason can you
offer us to why 1 shall not marry the
gentleman 1 love?" she demanded,
"T'or the simple reason fate has a
different husband in store for you,"
bo replied, advancing a step nearer
lo her.
"Fate is very kind to meddle with
my affairs," cried Bonnylin, ironically, cresting her golden bead and curling h(r„rcd lips scornfully, "but nil
tho same, when it comes to marrying, I'll be likely to suit myself.
Perhaps—as you know so much about
the matter—you can toll mo who
tho puny is, to whom Mr. Picrpont'a
placo should be given."
'.'.Fate showed you his face reflected with your own in tho Black
I'ool."
The idea was so ludicrous Bonnylin laughed aloud.
"What—not yourself?" cried tho
girl, fairly convulsed with laughter-
even though her words were tinged
with cutting sarcasm.
"Yes," ho replied; "when you hear
what I havo to tell you — here and
now—there will bo no hesitation, I
fancy; you will consent to be my
bride within the bout."
"Did ever a man havo such a wild,
mad fancy?" cried Bonnylin. angrily.
"Why, you might as well imagine
the night would turn suddenly Into
duy, that pool yonder Into seething
lire, and 1 from a sane person—well,
into an idiot. The days arc over
when men can force young girls into
marrying them."
*'I said you will marry me of your
own free will," replied Basil Sovornc, coolly. "Thero will be no coercion—no persuasion. After you have
heard all I have to sny you tnke
fat.; into your own bands—you can
answer nie yes or no—you will see
lhciip .is method in mv mildness, u»
jr-Jm call if."
'There Is nothing yon could tell
me—nothiie. under tbe high heavens.
ib.it would influence mo to give    up
m.v lover, and marry a man 1 hate-
yes, you may as well know the    ex
act truth—1 hated you from the first
moment I saw you. Why, I would
ns soon think of killing you as of
marrying you—so there!"
"You would as soon think of killing me, would your* he repeated
hoarsely, "Then let me tell you you
would not lie tbe first Dare whose
hand would be stained with human
blood, and who was destined to face
the gallows!"
Bonnylin sprung to hor feet in tho
wildest terror.
"Surely she wns in the presence of
an escaped maniac," she told herself, and like a startled fawn sho
uttomptod to dash headlong past
liim; but he anticipated her movement, and reaching suddenly forward, grasped both of her fluttering,
slender wrists.
"I must force you to listen to me,
since It must be so," he said sternly,
even haughtily.
And, standing thero under the
trees on that fatal Ilallow-o'cn, Bonnylin Hare listened to tho strangest,
most startling revelation that ever
fell from mortal lips.
He had long since dropped her
wrists, but tho girl made no attempt
to fly; sho stood before him transfixed with honor, like an image
carved ln stone, scarcely breathing
in her intense excitement and anxiety to catch every syllable he uttered.
"J havo finished now, Miss Dare,"
bo concluded, "and now I stand
bore waiting your decision. Iteiiiem-
bor, I wish it plainly understood I
uso no coeroion; I do not attempt to
force your inclinations in any way;
I simply say, will you marry me—
yes, or no?"
"For the love of Heaven give me
time to thinkl" cried Bonnylin wildly and incoherently. "My brain is
dazed—I am going mad, mad, madl"
"Will an hour's time suit you?" he
asked.
"Yes," answered Bonnylin, wildly.
"Oo, leavo me; give me an hour to
think; and remember, if you come
back and find mo dead, it is your
words that have killed me."
"What if I had not told you—what
then'.'" ho demanded.
Sho shivered liko a tender flower
in a winter blast.
"It is best—that—I—know 1" she
inswerod, with a wild'sob.
He glanced at. his watch by the radiant white light, of tho moon.
I will be bnck in one hour," ho
said; and turning, he left her, walking rapidly away.
As (ho echo of his footsteps died
away on the dead leaves, poor Bonnylin flung herself face downward on
the grass, uttering the wildest cries
thut ever welled up from a torn and
bleeding heart.
"(Ih, God, if I could hut die!"
she moaned, piteously. "Oh, Le Roy,
my love, my darling—llie other half
of my very soul—tho Ood whom I
thought so just has parted you and
mc. Heaven teach me how to llvo
without you. I cannot, bear tho
thought—oh, I cannot benr ltl How
can the flowers bloom, the sun givo
light, nnd the world move on, and
we. who love each other so well,
walk in different paths? Oh, Ood,
send me death and end it all, for il
I live I must be this man's bride; ho
knows there is no need to coerce or
persuade—Ood pity mc—he knows J!
dare not refuse. You will curse mo,
darling; I shall shrink beneath tho
hot blast of your scorching words,
uttering no retort. Each word will
be n dagger thrust; the pity of it is
thnt they will not kill  mo, and end
It. all."	
The moments came and went, dragging their slow lengths by.
At lust the hour was up.
Slowly,   like  tho knoll  of      death,
Bonnylin  heard Basil Severnc's    returning footsteps.
lie diel not see her at first, and
stood motionless as ho entered tho
glade.
"She is not here," he said grimly
to himself.
Then he saw something golden a
little further on, on which the moon
was shining, and he knew sho had
not fled as ho had at first expected.
Slowly she rose to her feet and
confronted him. and for a moment
they stood gazing steadily into each
other's fnce.
"Your answer. Miss Dare," he said
calmly.  "Muy I hope It is yes?"
"You know it is yes!" cried tho
girl, storinily and recklessly. "I will
marry you; but, remember, I will
kill you sooner than be forced to live
with you, and then kill myself."
Ho merely smiled at tho awful
threat, remarking it was like tho
futile of tho pretty white kitten who
Uttomptod to slay the. fierce lion, and
met a cruel fate for its audacity.
"But come," ho said, wrapping her
In the thick cloak and veil she hnd
thrown oil, "my horse and carriage
urn close at hand. We have a long
ride before us."
Without remonstrance, Bonnylin allowed him to lift her into tho vehicle.
The terrible ride was over at last,
and Basil Scvernc drew rein before a
small stone chapel in the heart of a
deep wood.
"This is the lady, reverend sir,"
Bonnylin heard Scvernc say, nnd she
knew by that they had been expecting ber.
The white-haired minister bowed
gravely, and they took their places.
Five minutes more und tho cruel
fetters that bound Bonnylin Bare to
Basil Severno were securely forged —
the fatal words wero uttered which
made her bis bride.
"Now, Mrs. Severno," snid her husband, ns ho helped her again into
the buggy and picked up tho reins,
Minting grimly to see how she shrunk
in horror from tho title, "I will
tell .Nou my plana for tho future as
we ride along.
"Vou shall go back to Oraystono
Hall to-night and pass the next three
days thoro as usual, preparing ln thu
interim for an extended tour abroad.
"Vou can keep our marriage a secret until I come for you, if that
soils you best, or divulge it if you
care to do so. This Is Monday
night. You may expect me ut Oraystono Hull 'fhuif.il.iy morning,"
No answer fell from the bride's rigid  "no
"Bo you hear fne, Bonny!!.'— Mrs.
Severno?" he asked grimly,
Bonnylin bowed her beautiful golden head in silence. By this time Ihey
had reached the dark, covered bridge
that spanned the deep, wide, rock-
bedded river.
As Basil Severno guided his horse
into the shadow of the dark portals,
Pomething tall and dark sprung from
the bushes that skirted tlie roadside
at that lonely spot —a tall figure
wearing a It nr cloak, autl whose face
was covered by a black crape mask,
and at that instant Severne's horse
was hurled bnck on its haunches,
and the command, "Haiti"' was thundered out hoarsely.
In a trice Severno lied grasped his
whip nnd sprung from tbe vehicle,
and the next instant a terrific encounter ensued, mingled with such
frightful curses mid imprecations
that the terrified girl's blood ran
cold in her veins. Soon • it became
apparent to her that they wero
snuggling on the very brink of the
bridge; one moment more autl, rocHeu
in each other's embrace, Ihey had
crashed through the railing and
went down togeihor—down into tho
dark waters below.
For one awful moment Bonnylin
fairly held her breath.
Oreat Heaven! neither rose again.
No doubt tbey had lieen caught,
locked in each other's deadly cm-
brace, between the jaws of llie huge
rocks in the river bed.
Even in the widoning dribs had
died away now that had marked the
spot where ihey went down.
Bonnylin clutched the reins wilh a
wild, terrified cry; then thoy fell
from her nerveless grasp.
Freed for the moment of all control, the fiery blnck horse darted
forward, dashing headlong over the
bridge, up tho serpentine road, whirling and trashing down the valley,
through bushes and brambles, swifl
as a lightning Hash—too swift for the
revolution of the wheels of Ihe buggy
it was dragging after it; too swifl
for the terrified girl who was clinging to the dashboard to utter a prayer.
A great sycamore tree stood nt the
cross-roads.
Bonn/lin was conscious that it
loomed up tall and dark between her
and the moonlight.
The next inslnnt there was a frightful collision, a crash, and a tearful
blow on the head.
The black horse, freed from his
burden, dashed madly on toward the
mill pond, and went over the brink
of it. Tho carriage, crushed into
fragments, lay In the roadside, and
a motionless figure, clad in blue
tullo, lay apparently lifeless under
the sycamore tree, her stark face and
staring eyes turned up to the night
sky.
CIIArTElt IV.
there
in
At Oraystono Hall tho merriment
went on long nfler Bonnylin had
stolen away.
At length tho guests noticed hor
protracted absence and began commenting upon it.
Half an hour ago Miss Rochester
had called Le Roy Pierpont r side
and disclosed to bim Ibe startling
fact that Miss Bare was nowhere to
be found. Ho had quitted the ballroom without attracting nl tuition,
nnd together they ransacked the oil
house from cellar to garret, tic gar
den, park and orchard, but
was no trace of Bonnylin.
Mr. Pierpont had grown white
the lips.
Ho looked at Aliss Rochester
keen alarm.
"Can you get me a lantern?" ho
asked hoarsely. "I am going down
tho road to search for her. When
tho hour comes for tbe breaking up
of tho party, make some excuse for
Bonnylin's absence; jour woman's
wit will suggest what to say."
Silentiy the lantern was brought,
and with a nameless foreboding at
his heart, Le Hoy I'ierpont hurried
away.
For long hours ho searched, calling
loudly on the name of Bonnylin; but
only the wierd echoes among tho
trees answered him.
In tlie gray dawn of tho early day
he reached the cross-roads marked
by the old sycamore tree, fully ten
miles from Grnystone Hall; and
there, among the debris, he found
her—that slander, rigid figure, still
robed in the sky-blue tullo, and the
dark cloak wrapped around her.
With a mighty cry and a bound bo
was nt her side.
"Ob, my darling! my darling!" ho
cried out sharply.  "She is eleiul!"
But no; placing his hand
frantically over her henrt, he found
lhat it still fluttered feebly.
Ood had spared ber to bim; she
was not dead.
Lifting her In his strong arms as
though she had been an infant, ho
bore her to a clear, rippling brook
closo by, and proceeded lo lave her
faco and her littlo while hands.
After fully an hour's labor he was
rewarded by seeing the lovely bluo
eyes flare open.
One glance into that beloved face,
and she threw up her whilo hards
with a piteous, heart-rending cry:
"Oh, Le Hoy, Le Hoy, it was n
horrid dream, wasn't it?" sho murmured, cowering closo to blm and
clinging to blm with a frantic grasp;
then she sprung from his arms and
looked nt blm wllb wide, frightened
eyes, and face as pule as lt would
ever be in death.
In a flush memory had returned to
her, nnd with the shock she went oil
into another dead faint more alarming than the first.
At that moment, a farmer's wagon
rolled leisurely up Ihe road. Mr.
I'ierpont hailed the farmer, and a
few words sufficed to explain the situation, and ho willingly consented to
go out of his way to convey Miss
Bare back to Oruystone Hall,
"Ho not question her about this
escapade when she comes to," continued Lo Hoy, no he placed her in
Miss Rochester's nrms. "No doubt
she will tell us all about it in her
own good time. She was evidently
riding along that road, for 1 found
her amidst the debris of broken carriage wheels."
SI range to say, nonnylin had had
a most miraculous escape from Injury, the long, thick grass having
(leadened tho fall. No bones were
broken, tho tender skin even was not.
bruised.
Yet for three days Miss Ilochcstor
forced her to keep her couch.
"You look as pulo as a ghost
child," she declared, wondering vaguely why tho doctor's medicine did
her no good. "This Is Friday," she
went on, "and you have forgotten,
dear, next Monday is your wedding-
day—this white faco won't do at
nil."
A bitter cry that quite upset Miss
liochcstir's nerves fell from Bonnylin's lips.
"Thero will  r", nn woddinir."      ol,-.
moaned, turning her faco to tho wall.
Had tbe girl gone stark mad?
Miss     Rochester    looked  at     her
aghast.   .
Suddenly Bonnylin sprung to her
feot. with a startied cry.
"Fridny,"  she  whispered    sharply;
"did you say lo-elay was Friday?"
Miss Rochester nodded.
Bonnylin's features worked convulsively.
"He—my terrible foe—must have
found death beyond all doubt in the
dark waters," sho muttered below
her breath, "for he Btiid bo would
come for mo Thursday," end witb
the thought caine another, his death
made her free.
"My darling, whal excites you so?"
asked Miss Rochester, curiously, as
she wrung her littlo while hnnds together and commenced to pace tho
floor hurriedly.
"Nothing," muttered Bonnylin,
faintly.
"Ho much has happened since you
have been 111, dear," Miss Rochester
went on, hoping to divert her attention; "you remember Mr. Severno,
the tall,, dark gentleman who was at
your llullow-e'en party? Well, he,
too, met with a serious accident that
night—ay, I may say a fatal one.
Two days later bis dead body, terribly mutilated, was found in the
bend of the river; he was identified
by his linen handkerchief, which
bore his name in full slumped upon
it, which was found clutched tightly
in bis hand.
"But a truce to such sad subjects.
I must, speak lo you of graver
thin'Mi," declared Miss Rochester,
taking Bonnylin's whito hands ulTcc-
tionatcly. "Now, tell me, dear, why
you persist in refusing to seo your
lover from day to day? Boor Le Hoy
is almost heart-broken over it, ho
cannot understand you. ls your heart
changed toward him?"
Bonnylin     shook her curly   golden
head, uttering u sobbing:
"No."
"I wondered if it could be," smiled
Miss Hochestcr, "for up to the time
of the Hallow-e'en party you seemed
;o fond Of bim.
"Ho came over from the village
twice a day to see you," che wont
on. "I haven't the heart to send the
poor fellow away again to-day; you
must reo him, Bonny, darling. I cannot understand why you refuse."
Long nfter she bad left Bonnylin,
tho girl sat at tbe window with
tightly clasped bands and white face.
"Why not sec him?" the still small
voice in ber heart whispered; "and
why not lit your contemplated marriage with him proceed? The horrible
I arrier lhat rose up between you for
.no short hour has boon swept nwny
by lb' hind of fate. Marry your lover nnd lo happy. Unless you divulge
that midnight sacrifice yourself, be
will never kniw of it. Mow can you
;i e ti'ia up? Think what life would
hi! ti you through Iho long years
lh.it lie in the future without hiin.
Would it not Le a living death?"
♦♦♦♦♦♦*« ♦♦♦*♦>♦* » *«»♦«♦♦♦*
.... Its opinions command   as   much   re-.
WESTERN CANADIAN  CSIT0R5. \ITti*]^^* LiSifwiS it
*" j upright and  it iwmight in bis  views,
.1   fearless   in   uttering and   defend-
tlieiu.   The Obroniclo;   in   these
A series of art c!c_ deecr bi.>_
their lives,'tiicir aims and
their influence.
No. £**.-
R. Q. _V.eGiJ2_.1
of the Mordun Chronlc.e.
ing
of
respecls. ls a faithful reflection
ils ciiitor, being a vigorous and ath-
lel.hic champion and exponent of
Western I idealism, and a centre of
inllui-nee to the parti' it supports
Newspaper  men   in   the    V
„•♦♦♦♦♦«♦* >,*•***■>** »♦♦♦♦♦♦»
ewspt
'I
  t   have
lick    lo     recognize   Mr.    Mc-
/.'illBhls anility, and  the \V.  I'.  P. A.
Last year   elected   him ita first vice-
president.     In  tho local   politics   of
his district, he is a tower of strength.
Ho  is  secretary of the  Liberal associations for both tho provincial   and
federal   constituencies,   nnd   was    tho
first  president  of  the Morden Young
i Men's  Lilieral   Association,    for    tho
founding of which ho wns chiefly rc-
| sponsible].     Ho is a ready and   con-
| vincing  platform  speaker,    nnd    has
■ done yeoman service for the   Liberal
party in recent campaigns.
!    Though he has been  a resident   of
i Morden  only  three  years,   his  follow
townsmen,    at    the    last    municipal
! election,   returned    Mr.    McCuish    as
j alderman by acclamation—a striking
: tribute to   hia   known   public spirit
I and   personal  popularity,    Ills   interest  in  all  forms    of   athletics   con-
, tlnuoB,    despite    Increasing   demands
on   his  time.    Mr.   McCuish   is  socro-
I tary   of  tho  Morden  Turf  Club,    tho
| leading sporting  institution   in    tho
town,  nnd of football,  lacrosse   and
; other  games  be   is  a  foromost    supporter.
Mr.  McCuish  is  unmarried—as yet.
This,   however,   is   understood   to   be
a fault that time—a very short timo
I—will   cure.     Recently   reports hnvo
I been circulated to the olTect that   in
m^^^m^^^^^^^^^^mmmmmmm,    ! "lc   middle  of   September   Ihe  editor
 ; j of    the    Chronicle    will    hie    himself
In many respects, the editor of the   ™st'  ftm'   *•%•- :_** _.W:"- "°,t rctU1'1.
,.     ,       ,.,,        , ,_. - ,    , alone.     Mr.   McCuish    has    been    at
Morden   Chronicle  ls  typical  and  re- J lmlch p,_ins   t()    dony   th(!Sl,  _.„__.„_.,_,
K. (!. Mccmsn
Editor nnd  Proprietor   of
den Chronicle.
Ihe   Mn
prescntativo of tho breadth of vigor
of western Canadian journalism. Ho
touches life at many and varying
angles. In the range of his sympathies and Interests, and in tho variety of bis activities, he is tbo human counterpart of tho "wideflung,
fenceless prairies," in wliich his
youth and young manhood havo boon
passed.
"It would bo a thousand times
moro Utter then death!'.' sobbed
Bonnylin. "Oh, no, no, no, como
what may, I cannot., live without
you, Lo Hoy, (lulling; I cannot givo
you up! Let the marriage go on. I
will carry tho horrible secret down
to tho grave with me!"
And the marriage did go on; a
week from thnt fatal llnllow-e'cn
night a dozen pretty bridesmaids
wero robing  fair  Bonnylin  in       her
bridal tlrets.
*        »        •   '    .        •        *
It was nn Intense surprise for Mrs.
Pierpont when she received tbe intelligence of her handsome son's marriage.     ,f
She had never even been informed
of his engagement., and now he bad
been married  quite  two  months.
Sho fluttered down to the library,
whero sbe had left her lovely guest
half an hour before, with the open
letter in her hand.
Miss India Margrave, the dark-
eyed beauty whom Mrs. Pierpont
had set her henrt on Le Hoy marrying, and who was her guest for the
holidays, was deeply engrossed over
tho pn<goa of a letter to which sho
was just signing her name.
Ere she hurriedly seals nnd despatches it—for the obliging postman
outside Is wailing for it—wc will
take a peep at its contents:
"Bear Mamma," it commenced ;
then broke abruptly into tho vital
subject uppermost in the writer's
mind.
"The holidays arc over, and still
Lc Hoy Pierpont does not put in an
appearance; nor has bis mol her
heard from him for over two
months; and yet he knew I was
coming here. Another girl would
be disheartened by this lack of interest on his part, but not so
your daughter India. 1 havo vowed
this handsome sou, hoir to the Pierpont millions should bo mine, and I
would wade through a .sea of raging
fire to gain the ultimatum. Nothing shall stand between us!
"I think I must have been mad,
yes, mad, when I engaged myself
to Richard Harcourt, tho poverty-
stricken lawyer of our village, a
year ago; many a timo I have regretted It. Yet I nm afraid— yes,
afraid— to break with him. I almost think ho would have murder in
his heart if 1 told him all was
over forever between us. 1 wish
he wero well out of my way at any
cost.
"I received a bitter letter from
blm yesterday, in wliich ho said,
'I will never give you up, India ;
never—so help mo Ood! 1 have
heaid you are going to Mrs. Lincoln's ball on the 20lh of this
month. I, the struggling village
lawyer, could never hope for au
entree into that, fashionable society,
but mark you, India, I shall find
mv way somehow into tho conservatory. Meet mc there at the stroko
of ton, India. 1 shall bo standing
in the dense shadows of those tall
magnolias at the left of tho entrance near tho fountain. Fail mo
if you dare! for then and thero
wc shall have a final settlement. You
must settle nil this sickening doubt
bv taking me to your hostess, and
introducing me ear your affianced
husband.' I would die sooner than
do that," India wrote. "I repeat,
I shall never bo safe while that man
lives I"
A moment after India had BCaled,
and handed the letter to the postman, Mrs. Pierpont fluttered into
room still clutching the open missile.
"I have had such startling news,
IndKi," she said, sinking into a
sent. "Le Hoy is married! He has
been wedded for over two months,
and writes me ho will be here wilh
bla bride b.v the time this letter
reaches  us."
India Margrave sits bolt upright
in her Chair, lier faro grows pale,
nnd her bands clutch Iho. ebony and
o'd table for support; Ihe world
ins to whirl around her, nnd the
i hine  lo trrow  dark
(To be Continued )
Mr. McCuish, liko the great bull*'of
western  Canadians,   halls   originally
from Ontario, being born near Bark-
hill,  in April, 1877.     Of   the   older
province,   however,  he has no   early I parcel
personal  recollections,    for   bis   par- I
eats came west while he was yet an in- i
fant, settling near Morden.    It was at
the public  school of  this  prosperous
town that   Mr. McCuish received   his
elementary     education,     going   from
thence   to   Manitoba   College,   Winnipeg.     From   tho   university   to   tho
country  school   teacher's   desk is   in |
Manitoba  a   natural—almost   an   in- I
cvittiblo—step, and Mr. McCuish was I
next   to   be seen us a rural   school- \
master   near   MacOrogor.      But,   ns
wilh many nnother,   he   found   that j
tho   material   rewards   held   out   to |
tho   teachers   of   youth    wero    not j
such as to  tempt hiin  to remain   in j
the profession.   And, in any enso, ho
had other ambitions.   When a school
boy  in  Morden   bo   bail been an almost  daily  visitor nt the    Chronicle
office, nnd the Binoll of the news ink
and  the  attractive variety  of newspaper work had marked out for liim
his   career.     He   came  to  Winnipeg,
and secured a positron on the repor-
torbil  stall of the Tribune, llis natural   liking  for  athletics    made    tho
.porting   column  bis   chosen    sphere,
.nd ere long be was placed in charge
of   that   department.    And,   in   tho
days  of   Mr.   McCuish's  control,    the
.porting  columns of  the Tribune,  in
raciness,    in    brightness,    In    Impartiality    and    in     reliability,     would
bear  comparison   with   those  of  any
newspaper anywhere.     Tbo fact that
the Tribune's competitors were morning   papers   gave   them considerable
advantage, since most athletic events
same off  in the afternoon   or   evening,  but  this handicap  Mr.  McCuish
mnnngvd   lo   mure   than compensate
for,    by    the    maimer   in    which   he
handled his news, and not infroquent-
ly he secured a  number of Important
"beats"    and    "scoops"  on his competitors.    There was widespread   and
sincere    regret    among all  sportsmen
in     Winnipeg     when     Mr.    McCuish
Stopped  up  from bis position on  the
Tribune   lo   become   tbe   owner    and
editor of  the paper in bis obi town. ,
The  wishes expressed  for his success I B"tB.
among    those    wbo    knew    him—and
who didn't—were equally hearty and
general.
This wns Soplennber. 1901, when
Mr. McCuish was but 24 years of
age. The paper he had purchased
was one that enjoyed a reputation ns
wide us Western Canada. It was i
one of the oldest papers In Ihe West, I
having been founded in lilKII, and it
had bad the good forliiiin to be controlled by a man of much force,
breadth, ability and common sense—
Mr. .1. F. (lalbrailh. nae of the
pioneer publishers of the province.
Among newspaper men in tho West
the Chronicle was regarded ns perhaps the best printed and edited of
nil the papers printed outside the
cities. Hence Mr. McCuish hud no
easy mnn to follow, for the newspaper standard in M.rden was high.
Ills success, therefore, is all the
more striking, for it is Indubitable
thut tbe Chronicle is to-day, ia all
respecls, a stronger paper thrfn when
he assumed control. Its circulation
is larger, Its make-up is better, and
and Its advertising patronage ls
than   threo   years ngo,   and
but his very obvious efforts in this
direction havo only succeeded in
giving tbem greater currency and
more general belief. In default of an
admission of his guilt by tho de-
lendaiit, we feel somewhat diffident
about, offering congratulations. Nevertheless, we do so, anil with the utmost sincerity unel bearliuess, voicing in this regard, we feel assured,
the feeling of Mr. McCuish's hosts of
pcrspnal and professional friends. If
Mr. McCuish still persists that these
congratulations are misplaced, we
trust that he will return them, bill
do not believe we will ever bave to
pny  express charges on the returned
WEST AFRICAN CANNIBALS.
They    Cultlvntc    Their    Fields,   bat
Plow Fully Armed.
An interesting story Is told by the
commissioners who have been engaged
for the last eighteen months In fixing
tho Anglo-German frontiers In west
Africa between the town of Yoln nud
Lake Tchad.
The reglcn traversed is littlo known
owing to the hostility of the tribes.
The Fulaiii villages wero found quite
friendly, but beyond Lau, a large town
on the Benin, there lies a mountainous
region inhabited-by pngnns who in
many cases are cannibals.
They were found to be a most Industrious people, wbo cultivated their
fields with a good deal of method. In
most cases, says Renter, they were
practically naked, but were always
armed. Even when nt work ln the
fields plowing they carried a full kit of
spears, sh! Ids and poisoned arrows.
The arrows are much dreaded, for
they are lipped with a deadly poison
extracted from vegetables and from
dead bodies. This Fs carried in Bniall
bottles, and when fresh lt proves fatal
in a few minutes.
These people nre adepts at grime
stalking and disguise themselves as
birds nnd animals in order to approach
tbelr prey.
Tbey are smaller than tho Fulanl,
being often quite dwarfish, nnd they
live In lliinsy grass huts perched ln
inaccessible nooks among the mountains.
At Kuka the sheik of British Bor-
nii rode out lo greet Colonel Jackson
nt the head of lltui horsemen nnd a
large number of men on foot. Ho was
accompanied by a band and dancing
Ills people cnrrled enormous spears,
and aoine wore old armor, while the
horses were caparisoned with housings
liko those of the crusaders.
The survey has proved that existing
maps are to a lare,o extent inaccurate
and has placed the boundary further
to the cost, (bus enlarging the British
sphere.—London Express,
THE SNIPE'S DRUMMING.
A Naturalise* Theory ns to Hen- ihe
Sound  1- Produced.
It ls disputed whether the snipe's
drumming—a curious noise, suggestive
of a miniature thrashing machine—1»  -
made b.v tbe bird with its wings or by
its  tail  or  by  both  wings  and  tail.
Some  recent observations  incline  me •
strongly to believe thnt the tall p'sys, .'
nt any rate, the more Important part.
During tlie performance tbe bird flies
at a great height round and round In
a wide, sweeping circle.    Al intervals
ho makes a sudden and rapid descent,
holding bis wings partly Hexed and his
tail spread to Its full extent.   The outermost tail feather on either side points
outward at n greater angle thnn those
adjoining it, so that when the bird la
watebod through a good field glass daylight shows between It and the next,
and,  If I  am right  In  my  view,  the
drumming sound is due to the rush of
nlr against this Isolated feather.   Tho
snipe's tall feathers seem so puny that
It Is at  first difficult to believe that
they can produce so great a result. Rut
lf nn outer one be taken -It is slightly
selinlter shaped,  Willi the outer  web
much   reduced — nnd   swung   rapidly
through  the nlr tbe drumming  noise
may   be  distinctly   heard,   though   It
seems  but a  vu-y  faint  echo of the
loud, throbbing hr.m that startles one
when  It suddenly descends from an
ethereal height, and the small bird ls
descried, hardly more than a speck to
the naked eye, circling round  In wild
career  and. now  nnd  then   swooping
headlong downward and thrilling the
nlr with his weird mimic—London Nature.
THE LITERARY DETECTIVE.
nin  Hunt  In One That  Adda Spirt- to
Ills  -trading'.
There Is n certain type of literary
man who seems content to take little
part In the struggle of letters beyond
| keeping nn eye on bis contemporaries
nnd pouncing down on them every now
nnd then lo accuse tbem of having
given a meaning to such and such a
word which that word should not possess. It is strange that the number of
these literary detectives ls not larger,
for there are few more fascinating occupations than this. It lends a spice
to one's reading. The dullest book becomes ns readable as tbe most deftly
written novel. Certain words have taken to themselves meanings ln the
course of time which they have no
right to possess. "Phenomenon" Is a
very hardened offender. To uso this
word as meaning something "strange"
Instead of something "that appears
and is visible" Is to Insure arrest at the
hands of the detective. Lately the
word "temper" bas been exposed, v S
Through long Impunity It has come to
Imply bad temper, whereas, if It had
Its rights, It should mean just the reverse. Wc strongly advise every one
who desired n never failing source of
amusement to read the next novel he
takes up wltb tbo eye of the detect; re.
Starting with tbe easier words, liko
"phenomenon," the novice may go on
from strength to strength until before
long nothing can escape bim. Tbe exercise, moreover. Is not only ii pleasure,
but a duty.—London Globe.
greater
The only lawful claim to place a
cockade on Ihe hut of a servant
arises oul of the fait of bis muster
being in llis Majesty's service.
Why Windmill* Rurncd no—ii.
Of the production of lire b.v tbe friction of wood against wood windmills
of Hie old const ruction gave on a large
scale some disastrous examples. When
the force of Ibe wind Increased the
miller was obliged to bring each of Ihe
sails In succession to the ground In order to unclothe It, but when sudden
squalls came ou this was Impracticable, and the mill In extreme cases ran
away—Unit Is, could not be slopped.
Everything was now done to Increase
the grip of the wooden brake round (be
great wheel on Ihe driving shaft, and
water was poured copiously over thein,
but In spite of all this Haines would
sometimes burnt out from the Intense
friction and lie mill be probably
burned down as Ibe result. The bountiful niacbliieiy of the modern Windmill, by wbicli tlie miller controls the
action of the anils from the Interior of
the building, has reduced this danger to
a minimum.—Notes and Queries.
Teacher:   "Wbat  part of   spot
•ch   is
the wortl   'egg'?"  Boy:   "Noun,
sir."
"What   is   its gender?"   "('an'
1   say.
sir,   till   it  Is batched."   "Well,
then.
my bid. you enn't tell me the
rase?"
"Oh, yes, sir—the shell."
go
Mod, ration is Ihe silken siringrunning tht'OUgll Ihe penrl chain of all
Ihe virtues.
A fireproof chimney made entirely
ot paper huts been erected in llreslau,
Prussia,   li. is fifty feel   in height,
One reason why the little .lapanese
soldier can mnrch I wenly-five miles n
day witb a burden of one hundred
pounds is Unit his lung-power, and
hence bis whole physical system, is
developed by habitual deep brealb-
ing-
Visitor: "Bo you have nny diflirul-
ty in getting servanls?" Ilosless:
"None whatever. We've bud ten
different  ones in the last  month!"
New Koiiko Route.
A meeting was recently held nt tho
Soi'bomic In Paris in honor of Cnptnln
L'Enfnilt, the African explorer, who
has found a new road Into the Interior
of tbat country which, lt ls claimed,
will altogether supersede the present
Kongo route. The aim of his mission
was to find a moans of communication
between the Be-none and the Logout)
nnd to seo If lt was possible for a
barge leaving tho mouth of the Niger
to reach Lake Tchad by following a
water route—that is, tlio Niger, Be-
none, Mayo-Kohl, Tonbdrl, Logono nnd
Clmi'l. Captain L'Enfant carried along
with blm n sleel barge, taken over in
sections, and successfully accomplished
tlio Journey. Ho says the route can
easily bo made navigable, shortening
the time of the Kongo passage to sixty-five dnys and reducing tho cost of
carrying merchandise from ?J00 to
IflOO per ton. The link of communication between the Niger and Lake
Tchad being thus discovered, n solution bas been afforded of one of the
greatest African problems.
To Weed Out Baronets,
A permanent tribunal for tho Investigation of all now claims to baronetcies
nnd all existing doubtful ones has
been suggested.   The proposal conies
Spondiillx.
As n slang name for money "spondn-
llx" has Ils origin in the Greek word
spondulos, n shell. Shells of a certain
species wore once used as money, both
ln Greece and Egypt. ,
Dorax.
As used by physicians, borax not
only softens but pilrillos wnter, bonis
ulcers and bolls, relieves bruises,
sprains nnd burns, allays inflammations nnd prickly bent, Is useful In catarrh and acidity of the stomach and
ns nn antiseptic In typhoid fever, cholera and smallpox.
Klult .limit'*   If.
The following Is an extract from the
manuscript dlnry of King James II.
of England, preserved In the Imperial
library of Pails: "1 did not retire from
Ibe buttle on l!.e Rhyme from a sense
of fear, but that I might preserve to
tho world a life that I felt was destined
lo future greatness."
Combs,
Combs are found In the earliest known
graves.
Men   Only   Allowed.
Maiwatchln, on tho borders of Rui-
sin, Is the only city in (lie world peopled by men only. The Chinese women
are not only forbidden lo live In this
territory, but even lo pass Ihe great
vviill of Kulknii and eater into Mongolia.
Itoytil   runt Iiucn.
Members of Ihe court of KingChnrlM
II. of I.nglniid- were Innocent in some
of tbelr aiiiui'.emciils, if not In others.
Among their favorite guinea wen
"blind man's bull'" and "bunt tbe slip-
per."        	
Snail l-.htlul. Sheep.
The excellent quality of the Southdown mutton Is said lo be due to tbo
fact thnt life sheep eagerly devour the
snails which abound on the pnstu.es.ln
the early morning. These snails are
the cause of tho rich succulence characteristic of the mutton raised in tbe
south of England.
1'ortuyiiir.H Colonies,
V.'hon I'ortt:;;::! was annexed to Spain
most of the colonics belonging to tbe
former were tilfeen b.v the bitter, but
were soon conquered I1!' Hie Dutch,
The Flrni  Wooden Bridge.
Tlio llrst wooden bridge, so fnr as
known, was the Subllclnil bridge at
Rome, built in the seventh century.
Breechlondlnjr Gan*.
The breechloiiding gun Is not, ns
many persons believe, nn Invention of
modern times. There is on view, In tho
shop of a Dublin gunsmith, a breech-
loading riflo tbat was offered to the
British war office at tho closo of the
eighteenth century. It wns rejected, lt
is said, because lt took too much nni-
iminltlon. MOUNT PLEASANT ADVOCATE.
_-*!.—tiaiu,**:
IOUNT PLEASANT ADVOCATt
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
A GLASS OF WATER.
Ren to   Drink It and tha Kff.ct- lt Will
^Produce—Moilti- Operandi and the
Solenc- or thu Tiling.
flrink a glass of water when    you
|t out of bed in the morning. Nc-
i mind the size of  the glass.      Let
water be cold if you will.    Some
[oplo  prescribe  hot  water,   but that
l*t necessary.  You may have wash-
. your face already and relished the
Ipcricnce.    You'may have    taken   a
lid   plunge   into  the  tub     and     do-
ghted ill  tho    shock nnd  its    renc-
Tho brink    use of the tooth-
Jush  has  left  your  mouth  clean and
breath    sweet.       But your-    are
Liy still.     Brink a glass    of   cold
liter  and  enjoy  tbo     sensation     of
ling clean inside.    All  that    is lux-
__ic/us     in   tho  cold   bath     cleansing
outside is artificial.    That which
|ould   prompt the glass   of   water
Bt sleeping is natural.    As n test,
(.1     the    nine-year-old       protestnnt
iiiim-.t  his morning scrub    of    cold
(ater    tlmt lto    may    escape    it by
linking half a pint of the fluid. He
tl jump at tho opportunity.
Sleep   lias  drawn  upon   tho     water
the blood, and the instinct of the
sntil   under  natural  conditions     is
1 replenish  the circulatory     system
(til   distend  the  blood vessels nncw.
he  food  In  the stomach  which  had
much     to do    toward    inducing
k'cp    has    disappeared,    leaving    a
Jicous  substance  in the alimentary
fiinl.      Yet  man  would     wash    his
Ve and  leave theso half-clogged ca-
Jils do the duties of another day.
[Brink a glass of cold water in the
"imo of cleanliness.     It becomes one
the shortest and easiest of toilet
flies.    It Is swallowed in a second,
nil lu five    minutes    it    has passed
^iih tho stomach, taking with it tho
gging secretions of tho alimentary
lets.    It has left behind the stimu-
that   goes  with  cold  water,   and
filling tbo arterial system to the
f.rnial it puts a spur to the circula-
m that has grown sluggish in the
kt. It is one of tho greatest of
iakeners and ono of nature's own
{umlauts.
Dii-ink a glass of water beforo
eakfast, another beforo luncheon
Jd another before dinner. Water is
best, cheapest and pleasantest
fcdlcine.
RELIC OF PARNELL.
|_k_t Presented by City of Edinburgh
Now lu Pawnshop.
Tlicro ia in tho window of a pawn-
lip in South London, among a
of unredeemed pledges, a
cr casket, which recalls the most
Lthetic political tragedy of our
|mes, says The London Daily News,
is surmounted by the thistlo; It
ties an imposing coat of arms; and
fraved upon it is the legend: "Cas-
presented by the Corporation of
Knburgh nlong with Burgess Tick-
conferring tho Freedom of the
Jty on Charles Stewart Parnell,
fiq., M.P., July 20, tHS'l."
i'hiil, touching roll* of Parnell lies
|fore for sale. Beside it is a label
Jt'.ing that tho price asked is __50.
flhatting recently in the lobby ol
House of Commons witb Mr. T.
O'Connor, M.P., one of our repro-
Intattvcs mentioned Ibis unhappy
freuiustnnce, nntl " V. IV' put for-
|ard the suggestion that tbe casket
[flit to be bought for the Irish na-
.11.
'.Someone wrote mo a letter about
-"  said    Mr.   O'Connor,   "evidently
"ping that. I would be tbe purchas-
. 'jilnl  ull I could reply was that it
a most Interesting relic of Peril,  and  I   wns sorry  to hear what
happened    to  it,  but I had not
money to enable me to   buy    il.
is,   indeed,     nn  Interesting    relic,
fid one's heart is touched to know
at it is lying in that place. I'm
.1 quite sure in what way it could
dono, but I th'nk that such a relic
jifler all—ought to belong to the
[jsh nation. It is pitiful to see
ch things scattered as the sport of
I.le;  and  of this    at  any    rate,    we
in rest assured, that  In    years    to
.me such n relic would be treasured
|l' those wbo will conic after us."
l.aHt-i-u l'uiioml Kites.
fSomo curious details havo Just
uiii'tl Paris concerning tlie funor-
ceri'inonies of Norodom, the late
Bug of Cambodia. Immediately af-
yv death the body was placed on a
Cd of stale, whilo cannon boomed
warn llie popilitco to shave their
(cads. Next day the body was cin-
almcd, according lo ancient cus-
Thc face was covered wilh a
[old musk studded wilh diamonds
pul other precious stones. On the
ad   was  placed   the ancient crown,
Iutl    even    tbe slippers   on the fO-t
listened   wilh  rare jewels.   Then tbe
idy   was  plnced   iu  a  kneeling posture and incased iu an upright i.healh.
gold und wus seated up in a nins-
tve casket ol solid gold. Thus it
ill remain in the throne room, with
i/es praying night miu day un*
llie completion of the sanctuary
which the body will bo cremated.
Jnly after this ceremony will the
ew king be crowned,—I or.don tllobe.
ft Certainly Mm, Odd.
J,i'be  Buke of l.tixhurgho hns In his
■astle at Kelso i. number of fine family porl raits.
Some of the renins at Kelso aro
thrown o, en to the public on certain days. Tbe Bike sometimes tells
Bf a remark thai he once heard a
anger tnul-e while looking through
{these  rooms.
,    llie    stranger had  baited     benenth
i'wo paint bigs thai hung sido by side.
Fl'he.y     were portrpIts of    the    third
Luke and bis son, but the father had
■ been   painted     in   his childhood,    tho
gcon  In  his old uge
it   was    thin     that  perplexed    tho
rstranger.  lie studied tbe    portrait a
long time.   Then he suid:
"Is It possible that this gentleman
[was an old man when bis father wai
.born?"
Summer Croup
A croupy couuh ls 0 dangorous tiling
for the little folks ln miiininir time. The
fo—ir that accompanies It ls liable to
causa serious lllno-s.   (live them
Shiloh's
Consumption
C-ure Kn.cLung
It li pleasant to take, will enn tbem
quickly and liss ao unpleasant aftor
olf-ota.
Al»H_ug(lsls,_o, Htosr._ 11.00 a bottle.
       401
A DANGER TO BABY.
Doctors hnvo preached Against the
Bo-cnlli'd soothing medicinea for
years, hut they uvo. Rtill uh.hI nlto-
getlicr too much. The fnct that \.\wy
put chihlreu (o sleep is no sign thnt
they nre helpful. Ask your doctor
and he will tell you that you have
merely drugg-ed your little one into
insensibility — that soothing medicines ..nro dangerous. If your little
one needs a medicine give it Baby's
Own Tablets, and you give it a medicine guaranteed to contain no opiate or harmful drug1. You can give
theso Tablets just as siifcly to anew
horn infant ns to the well grown
child, and they will cure all the
minor ills of childhood. Mrs. J*. M.
(J.ljnn, llellhaven, Ont., says: "Since
I gave iny little ono 11aby's Own
Tablets there has been a marvellous
change in her appearance, and she is
growing1 splendidly. You may count.
me always a friend io tho Tablets.."
Ask your druggist for this medicino,
or send 25 cents to tho Dr. Williams' Meriieino Co., Brockvllle, Out.,
nnd get a box by nuiil post paid.
What is 1 ho difference between a
bolupiet of flowers and the "bouquet" of wine?—One makes a.nosegay,  nnd tho other a gny nose.
Wilson's Fly Pads are the beat fly kill-art"
mndo.
Why ought pawnbrokers be good
choss players?—Because they nre always handling "pawns."
We havo no hesitation in saying thut
Pr. J. it. Kullmrir'H Dysentery Cordial
in without doiilit tht. best inwiirine over
Introduced for dysentery, diarrhoea,
t'holoru, unil ull summer complaints, sou
Sickness, et-ct It promptly j-'J.'-jh rebel
und nt'ver fails to effect a positive
cure. Mothers Hhould never be without
ii bottlu when their children uro teething.
A clergyman at Ring Sing recently
prefaced his remarks to the prisoners by saying that he was "glad to
seo so large a number present.  "
CllK/VT TiriNtlH FltOH. 1.1TTU*.
CAUHKN O HOW .—It takes vory littlo
to derange t.ho stomach. The cause may
lm slight, a cold, liouu'tliinu; cuiHi or
drunk, anxiety, worry, or some other
Kimi'lu cause, Hut if precautions ho not
taken, this simple cause niav have most
serious consequences. Many n chronically debilitated constitution to-day owes
its destruction to simple causes not
dealt with in tune. Keep the digestive
npnarntus iu healthy condition and nil
will bo well. Parmelee's Vegetable Pills
uro better than any other for tlio purpose.
Why is an author looking for writing fluid liko a coroner discharging
tho duties of his olllce?—Decauso he
is holding nn ink quest.
ANAEMIA-POOR BLOOD.
IleaducheH, DlzzlneBH, Heart Palpitation and Consumption Vol lows.
Anaemia — watery lilood — is a
Iroacherous trouble. It steals insidiously from slight symptoms to dangerous disease. The thin, watery
blood shows itself nt first in pnle
lips, wan fnco, breathle-ssnoss, heart
palpitation, lost appetite. If the
trouble is not checked and cured
consumption follows; coughing, spitting, clammy night sweats, a totnl
breakdown and death. What the
anaemic sufferer needs is more blood
—more strength. And there is nothing in the whole wide world will give
how blood and iww strength so surely and so speedily as Dr. Williams'
l'ink IMlls. Every dose helps to send
new, rich, red blood coursing through
tho system, bringing strength to
weak lungs and all parts of the body.
Thousands testify to the truth of
those statements, among them Miss
Enerino Vilandro, St, Germain, Que.,
who says: "White ntlending school
my health began to give wny. The
trouble came on gradually and the
doctor who attended mo said it was
duo to OVorstudy, and that a rest
would put me right. But instead of
getting hotter I ffl-OW weaker. 1 suffered from headache nnd dizziness,
and at night I did not sleep well. T
wus troubled with pains in the back,
my appetite left mo and 1 grew pale
us a corpse, Kinully I became so
wenk'l was forced to remain in bed.
As the doctor did not help mo any, I
asked my father to get me Dr. Williams' l'ink PillS. Meloni l had used
two boxes there, was an Improvement,
uud when 1 had taken a hnlf dozen
boxes I was again in perfect health.
I behove all weak girls will find new
health, if  they will   take  the pills."
Anaemia, imligostion. heart trouble,
rheumatism, kidney trouble, nnd tin
special ailments of women nre all
due to poor blood, ami are all cured
>y Dr. Williams' Pink Pills. You can
get these pills from any medicine
dealer, or by mnil, post paid, nt 50
cents a box, or six boxes for $11.50,
by writing the Dr. W-lllinms' Medicine Co., Jlrockville, Out.
The o..ly lawful claim to plnco n
cockade on tho hat of a servant
arises out of tho fact of his muster
being in IDs Majesty's service.
Norvowsness, Dyspepsia, Indigestion, and kindred allm.-uts, tuko
wing* bjoforo the healing ijkU-llUoH of South
American Nervine.. Thomas floskltls, ol
Durham, Out, , took his preachor's urt-
vlco, followed directions, and was cured
perinunontly of tho Won't form of Ner-
vous Prostration and Hyspepsln. lio has
reconnnondod ft to others with uratlfylritf
results.  It's a tfreat nerve builder.—19
lei mo on laud sown with wheat bus-
tens (he maturity of tho crop. Professor Johnston snys tho samo is
true of nearly all cultivated crops.
Hinard's Liniment Core. Colds. Etc.
Certain albuminoid, mucilaginous,
and saccharine vegetable juices make
excellent sympathetic inks; nmonv
the best are the juices of lemon, orange', apple ami pear.
Mluii'i LIdIm! Cutis Gareet ii Con
Tito Lesson of tlio Hour.—Sixtv sec-
ontls mako a minute, sixty minutes
mnko an hour;
Ijivor's Y-/, (Wi-o lleiull Disinfectant
Miiitp Powder dusted In tlm hath softon.
thu water unil ili-infot'l-. I1H
Sartorlnl inversion.
"1 expected to find thut suit done,"
Rioi'tiii'il tho customer.
"Oh, well, here's tho other suit dun,"
w.ld the tailor, who was it low wac,
anil who had a bill lu his linnd.
THREE CENTURIES.
Annapolis Royal's Celebration During th*
\Ye-k Ending June SO—Somo Canadian History Restated.
Seven years ago tho City of St.
John's celebrated with appropriate
ceremonies nnd festivities the 400th
anniversary of John Cabot's landing
on the coast of Newfoundland. During tho week ending June 25, Annapolis Royal, in Nova Scotia, ami
St. John, in New Brunswick, rendered similar honors to the memory of
JJc Monts nnd Champlain, who MOO
years ago explored tho shores of tlio
Hay of Fundy, nnd gave the, history
of Acadia a beginning. JJuring most
of tho contury intervening between
the events thus commemorated.
North America hud been neglected.
Distracted by the Reformation nntl
religious wars, tlio enterprising nations of - Europe had not much
thought for colonization, especially
in tho latitudes north of Mexico. It
is truo, adventurous mariners who
had friends at court were enabled to
mako voyages to tho Atlantic Coast
of this continont. From England
came Sebastian Cabot, John Cabot's
ion. Several years later came Ver-
razzano from France. In I!.!)'- Jacques Cartior began his voyage from
St. Malo. Flshormen and fur traders kopt up somo connection with,
this side of tlio Atlantic, but tho era.
of colonlzatiiin did not begin till tho
opening of tlie 17th century.
Chauvin had mado threo unsuccessful attempts to establish tho lur
trado at Tadousnc, whero tho Sag-
uenay empties into tho Lower Kt.
Lawrence. Tho Winters proved too
sovcro for him. When ho died Aymtir
do Chastcs, who had fought against
tho League and won tho friendship of
Henri IV., obtained from that King
a monopoly of tho North American
fur trado. He formed a company, to
which wero admitted the principal
merchants of tho West ports, who
had been associated with Chauvin, ur
had cngagpd in the fur trade on their
own account. Samuel do Champlain
had just returned from tho West Indies. A placo on tho expedition was
offered to him by his friend de Chastcs. To Tontgravc, who had been at
Tadousac with Chauvin in 1000, was
given tho command. Dut do Chastcs
was not destined to bo more successful than his predecessor. Pontgravo
and Champlain wont to the St. Lawrence in 1603. Tho commercial results wore disappointing, and when
they returned tho first news they
heard was that do Chastcs was dead.
Piorro du Guast, Sieur do Monts,
Gcntleman-in-Ordinary of tho King's
Chamber, and Governor of Pons, succeeded to tho monopoly held by do
Chastcs. His patent gave him power to colonize Acadia, a region dc-
Ilned as extending from the 40th to
tho «Gth degree of north latitude.
Over this vast extent of continent ho
had vice-regal powers. Ho preserved
do Chestes' old company. To obtain
settlors for his projected colony ho
was authorized to impit'ss Idlers and
tramps, and many a vagabond was
forced on ono or other of the two
vcssols with which Do Monts put to
sea in 1604. Catholic priests and
Huguenot ministers took passago
with them. Duron do Poutrincourt
and other noblemen accompanied De
Monts, Pontgravo and Champlain.
Do Monts sailed from Havro do Grace
OB April 7, 1604. Pontgravo, ln com-
iiiniiil of the second vessel, followed a
fow days later. Between tho Cal-
vinist ministers and tho Catholic
clergy on board there was much con-
trover. iy and some fighting. Ko, at
all cicnts, wo are told by Chain-
plain, who has left an account of this
voyago, and of tho subsequent explorations and attempts at settlement.
Liko Pontgravo and Champlain, Do
Monts had some experience of the
St. I_awronce. Ho had been with
Chauvin at Tadousac, and tho hardships sulli'i'i'd at that place warned
him awuy from it. Ho steered further south, hoping to And there a
milder region. His first landing placo
was what ls now called Liverpool
harbor, on tho south-cast coast of
Nova Scotia. Ho was joined further
down tlio coast by rontgravo, who
hod seized four Basque fur traders
found trespassing. Tho southern
Shore of Nova Scotia was rounded,
nnd tho oxploration of the Day of
Fundy was begun. Poutrincourt was
captivated by tho beauty of Anna-
polls Basin, with Its narrow entranco
and wido land-locked expanse. Ho
asked and obtained a grant of it
from De Monts. Poutrincourt called
his possession Port Itoyal. It held
that namo till tho place was captured by a British expedition from Massachusetts in 1710, after which it
was called Annapolis—tho City of
Anno—ln honor of tho Queen then
reigning over the United Kingdom.
In tho present nuino, "Annapolis
Hoyal," a part of tho old ono survives. It Is not, known on what day
Do Monts entered the basin, but tho
peoplo of Annapolis adopted Juno
21 as a very closo approximation to
tho date, and their tercentenary celebration was accordingly begun on
Tuesday.
It is known, * however, that ths
Itlvcr St. JoTin was cntored by Do
Monts on St. John's Day, and named by  Champlain accordingly.
Dating its beginning from 1005 Annapolis Itoyal can claim to be tho
oldest settlement in Canada, and tho
second oldest ln North America, St.
Augustino, ln Florida, nlono exceeding it ln ago. It ls three years
older than Jamestown, tho llrst permanent settlement In Virginia, and
It is sixteen yenrs older thun Plymouth, tho colony founded by the
Pilgrim Fathors In Massachusetts.
Not till three years after ho had
helped to CBtabllfih tho Port Royal
colony did Chainpl-in found tho   old
City ol Quebec.
— . )
04 Years ol Fonny Post.
It is now 04 years since tho penny
post-go wns established, and tt may
interest thoso who were not born
then to know thnt previous to that
timo (1840) lt took ls. 2 l-3d tot
post a letter from London to Kil-
mltrnock.
For cramps from chill apply n mu»-
lard poultice over seat of pain.	
In tho flame Spirit.
Lnrry—I sent Maude n garter snitke
In alcohol for n joke. Harry What
did she do? Lorry—Oil, she returned
It ln the same spirit ln which It wm
sent.—Princeton Tiger.
Your Liver
Is it acting well? Bowels
regfflar? Digestion good? If
not, remember Aydr's Pills.
The kind you have known all
your lite.     .r..!..i-..or,,.i_.-,.ii. «.■_•.
.Want your moustache or beard
la beautiful drown or rich black? Use
BUCKINGHAM'S DYE
--    -    .....   a ,<t\     HAI..1IU.  n    II
JBWt_-
% T. U-U-j* •**■, Mt-tm'*. H  H-
CORE THE HOST
EXTREME CASES
Stone  in  the  Kidneys  Cannot
Stand Before Dodd's Kidney
Pills.
Mr. 8. A. Caaaldy, or Ottawa, Permanently
Cured aftor Years of Buffering by tbe
Great Canadian Kidney Remedy.
Ottawa, Ont., Aug. 22.—(Special).
While all Canada knows that llodd's
Kidney Pills are tho standard remedy for all kidney Complaints, it may
surprise some people to know they
curo such extreme cases as Stone ln
the Kidneys. Yet that is what they
have ilone right hero kt Ottawa.
Mr. S. A. Cassldy, the (nan cured,
ts the well-kiiown proprietor of tho
Bijou Iluld on Me^calf street,' and
in n,n inteiTvlew He sp.ys: "My friends
all know that I hayo been a martyr
tji Stono In thp Kfdpoys for yaftrs.
Thoy know that bgsidijs consulting
the bost doctors in the city and trying overy medicine I cpul^l think of
I was anah'le to get fetter.
"Somo timo ago a friend told me
Dodd's Kidney Pills woultl cure me.
As-a last resort 1 tried thc?n, and
they havo cured rap.
"T could not i-imgl..-1 more severs
suffering than one endures who has
Stono in tha Kidneys, and I feel tho
greatest gratitude to Dodd's Kidney
Pills."
If the disease is of the kidneys, or
from tho kidneys, Dodd's Kidney
Pills will cure lt.
If n man be gracious to strangers,
it shows that he Is a citizen of the
world, and that his heart is no island cut oft from other lands, hut a
continent that joins them.
InoOfc-V-1 for tteiirsem ->nors.
Ho Wto ctft-n-rs let breiA fast will
be abl to rnitk* eX-lise* ".hat "Uicy
(iiii nfi Hear thnmuelveS culled" in
tho fubre, u'nd housemaids)' knuckles
will -tsapc a sore ti'i-1 at the hands
of untitling risers, for door knockers nr.(no\v fastened to up-to-date
bedrooi doors, says Tho London
Daily i^iil. They uro not only exceeding! useful, but very qunir.t and
ornamciVtl, being exact replicas in
bras- ilia smaller size of the famous Irliaia Sanctuary knocker.
This kn'ker with its gargoyle head
dates fnji the Norman times, when
it was » privilege of the church to
protect ffeitives ut her portals. The
fugitivo Id only to knock, and at
any houiijf the duy or night tho
door woUJ be opened to him by tho
porter wl^ dwelt in rooms ubovo.
The mom|t ho was within tlio
church a ^11 would announce that
soma ono wl taken sanctuary. Ha
was robedlin a blnck cloth gown
with St. tthhert's yellow cross upon tho leftihoulder, ami wns taken
to a room,, where he was kept ln
safety for trty-seven dnys.
No man can seo thnt In another
which is tho true man. The animal
tnnti m. can pcrccire; but that which
is carried within—tho soul—no man
can see.   Wo soo tho l/ody and we In
Taking Persons.^-I*6Iice_nsn.
Much of the biliousness and gout
which come untler tho notloo of the-
mod'citl profession ls duo td the close
^^nnil stifling condition of our atmos-
fer thut the mind is by whut it works phere—in other words, to the want
out inlo distinct or" visible condi- of proper veirtilution. and chiefly to
lions. an insuiliciency ot air inlets.
TROUBLE WITH
THE KIDNEYS;
Ailments of the Most Painful Nature Result—Prompt
Cure Gomes With the Use of
Dr.Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills
Wilson's Fly Pads will olear your home
of files.
What is the -.ifforunco between n
man In a 'bus and ono in passion?—
One rides in a stage, nnd the other
strides ln a rage.
Kidney  Duty-it is th- partiouin.
function of th* kidneys to filter out
poisons which j)t\RH through them Into
tho blood. When the kldnuyfl are dl-
seaued they cannot do thoir whole duty,
and should havo the hetu and -strength
that South American Kidney Curo will
afTord lit any and all forma of kidney
disorder.   It relieves in A hours.—li
This is how a pious French priesl
gave out an announcement of a procession that was to take pluce on
tho next day: "If it ruins in the
morning, tho procession will take
placo In the afternoon; and, if it
rains in tho afternoon, tho procession will take placo in tno morning."
IT  NIOKDS   NO  TKSTlMONIAL.-lt   i.s
a f_,-iiii.i'iiii-i--' in ItHoIf. lf U'-itinmiiinlH ure
required they could lie furnished hv the
IhouHaudK from all no■■!.•■ and conditions
of men ln widely dlfl.rent places. Many
medlcineH are put forth ovory year wliich
have but an ephemeral oxlt.tei.c-- unil then
tiro hoard of no more. Dr. Thomas' Ec-
lectrlc Oil has grown in ro|Uitation every
day  since it  first  made Itt.  appearance.
For Pen ny-n-T .iners. — A balloon
ascent should always be described in
inflated language.
Those   Worrying   PilesI-p-fe
application of Dr. Agnew's Ointment
will givo you comfort. Applied every
night for thrfee to nix nights and a cure
Is effoctcd in tho most, stubborn ruses of
111 I in I, llleedlng, or Itching Pile... Dr.
Agnew's Ointment cures Ec/oimi and all
lt.rl.iiig and burning ekln diseases. It
nets Mk* iinii.ii;.    115 cents.—15   •_
Exemption from enro is not Mftppi-
ness; on the contrary, a certain -degree of care is essential to pron\le
enjoyment. »    f
 1      ■■■___. ii i >
Minard's Liniment Cures Distemper.
Impatience dries the hluod    sooner
thnn nffo or sorrow.
Wilson'* Fly Pads are sold by all Druggists and General Sores.
The hcffiiinini. of faith is action;
nnd he only believes who strutrrles—
not he who merely thinks a question
over. _______________
Dr. Agnew's Cure for the Heart
acts directly and quickly, .tltaulatee
tlitf heart's action, stops inn-t ucute
pain, dispels ull sfffns oi w.itkii.~», Muttering, sinking, Hiimthtiiliig, ur palpitation. This wonderful cure is the sturdy
ship which ii.rile- the hcurt-sick patient Into the haven of ili,l[>tlit mill
fierfect health, (lives relief in ni'ij.t acuta
tirins of ii.art disease In Do inlnul.u.—11
Limit your wants. Tho "must" is
hard; antl -et solely by litis "must"
enn we show how It is with us in our
inner man. To live according to caprice requires no peculinr powers.
I was cured of Acute Bronchitis by
MlNAllD'H I.IN1M1.NT.
J. M. CAMPBELL.
liny of Jstunds.
1 wns cured of Facial Noi-i'algln b.v
MINAUD'S LINIMKNT.
WM. HAN1F.I.H.
Sprlnghlll, N. 8.
I wus cured of Chronic Rheumatism
by MINAUD'S LINIMENT.
0120,  T1NHU.Y.
Albert Co.', N. D.
lie was bound tn be accurate, nnd
so he ileenicl it prudent to describe
the wouuin'fi costume thus: "Sho
wore nn ele..nnt. suit of something;
or other cut bins, nntl trimmed endwise."
AN l.Nli TO BILIOUS lll.AHAl'111-.—
IliliiiUHiii'SH, which in caused li" excessive
liilu lu Ihc Stomach, ium a niai-keil el
feet ou the nerves, anil often iiimilft-HtH
Itmilf hy severe hemlm-liy. 'llils Is the
iiuiHt ill-t ri'HHlntt litiiulii.lie line i'"n have,
There are lit'iiilurlies from cplll. from fe-
vi'., iiiiil from other causes, hut the most
excruciating of all Is the IiIIIouh hi-nil-
uclii-. I'armi-leo'H Vcff-tallte IMlls will
rure It—cure It nlmiiHt immediately. It
will iliHiipiieiir ,m hooii an the I'ilht nper*
ale. There Is notlline mirer In the treatment of IiIIIouh headache.
When Hoys Tuke the Hod Meekly —
At lishinu; liiiie.
A Bill Norw-t I-" Si'l:'..; s.
A rather humorous case hno   rome
beforo the Dopn.tll I of the Interior
respecting n Norwi'«iun who came to
tha Immigration agent at St. l'aul.
Tho man, whoso name is Gilbert-ion,
gave his age as 7.'I, autl fllnleil thnt
he wns on his wav to Wetuslilwin l»
tulie up n hniiiirtiiiil, so thnt he
could iniil n a h"tne for his mother
mIiiisd nge wns Kill, 'Iho ludy Is Hold
In ho luile nml Hearty nml nble lo
tuVe  enle  of  a  Inline,   nml   Clll.elisnll
iiltnnell is n r-nn who v. 'II not i.e
'"'en f_.r    inure    than _.". j'eri'J   ill
rilUf rapl,_ on Cotton.
A man In 'aino has recently completed a pious for photographing in
Indelible ink in cotton cloth. Tho
process Is ijd to bo. exceedingly
simple, tho Unitizing, toning and
sizing being die, at tho same time
with one solu^n. Ibo sensitizing
medium will |pp for u long time
unless exposed , the light. When
the sensitized dth is exposed to tho
light in a priii^g frame only a few
seconds of sunl)it arc required to
print the outliniof the imago; which
develops fully tin vigorous print in
clear water. Tlicolor is a solid engraving black, t by a simple toning process beljo the prints are
dried tan ho c.ngetl to a warm
brown, black otjopla. Theso colors
nre fast and wibtand washing with
soap.
 a	
Visited 1-nani-iit Tower.
During the lii.-liseal year 12,709
persons visited lo tower of the
House of ('omui's in Ottawa, and
registered. FrcyOritnrio there were
7,1140; from Ohec, 8,685; from
Nova Scotia, 8 from New Brunswick, 68; from tish Columbia, 5a,
from Trinco Edjrd'Island,  8; from
From every pnrt of tho broad land
come letters of recommendation for
l'r.  Chase's Kidney-Liver l'ills.
They iicein l^p he well suited to
the needs of ninny peoplo, who ob-
t'niil n6 bune.ll from ordinary kidney
itiedlc'InoB.
Whdn you wait to think of tho
ho_n_s of cures they nre muklng it ls
no wonder they havo such an cnor-
-npus sal..
Mrs. Caswell Reid, Orrvlllo, Mus-
koka, Out., writes:—"For nearly
twenty years I was troubled with
kldnoy disease, and have recently
been completely cured by using threo
boxes of Dr. Chaso's Kidney-Liver
Pills. I havo tried a great many
remedies, but never seemed to get
anything to do mo much good until
I used these pills."
Mr. John Ooarin, an old resident
of Thorold, Ont., states: "I-'or twenty years I Was badly olTlictod with
kidney troubles, Indigestion and
bladder derangements. During thut
timo I was a ercat sufferer, and had
Manitoba,   02;
Territories,    78
States,     1514
823.
the Northwest
from tho United
nd     from    Europe,
.'.
Wilson's Ply Pat Three hundred limes j
cheaper than Bt'c.jper.
 .il   i    ,.    .
Suites to tho loot,—Bridal Trolls
seaux.
[to get up six to twelve times nightly to   pass   water.    I   tried different
I doctors   nhd   used all sorts of inedi-
'clues to no uvuil.
".''iiiaUy I began using Dr. Chaso's
Kidney-Liver Pilhi and soon found
relief. Thus encouraged I continued
to use these pills, and after having
taken twolvo boxes was again In perfect health and vigor. I can sleep
undisturbed, tho pains In my kidneys
and buck aro gone, and I am feeling
well and strong. I consider Dr.
Chuso's Kidney-Liver Pills a great
boon to suffering humanity, and had
I known about them when I was
a young man could have escaped suffering all tho bost years of jny
life." ' • '
Dr. Chaso's Kldney-LiVor Pills,
one pill a dose, 25 Cents a box, at.
all dealers, or Edmanson, Bates &
Company, Toronto. To protoct you
against imitations, tho portrait and
signature of Dr. A. W. Chase, the .
ruinous receipt book   author, arc uu
overy box.
FARMERS will find it to their advantage to consign their CHAIN to
ROBERT MUIR & CO., Winnipeg
WHO  pay   highest  prices  and  make prompt rctnrns.   Advances made on
consignments.    Correspondence  solicited.    Established   1886.    Reference—
Union Bank of Canada.
J>o You Want SB
II Mb *|l» Utf(riljfyll ^Is /our Mln-.s soil *II
HANDLl VOttl IHIPMIMTt  *
JUS OKMH TO * ..thill. FI.M
nVI-E AKD MMFUl AfrUTIM
_l-ca<! ou ('<in„i(lni_m_ts.
illhl-lUfD CnUIX rn.l_le.-10.
, ...-.-AWT IK WIS-l.
0raln Exohange, Winnipeg.
will c-fdeaver to five Mi^factlei.
Ityfonnico: Union IliinJ- of Osnade.
K
I'M'l.ltill  SlilX LINIMENT
Hemoves all liu soft or cutlouseil
lunilis anil lilemis from horses, hlooil
spavin, curbs, splp, rlnghono, Sweeney,
stllles, sprains; uB soro and swollen
throat, coughs, ^ Savo $50 by the
use of ono hottl-Warranted the moat
wonderful Illcmlefuro over known.
Cruel.—Fair » (during nn inter-
vul in tho vals "You're very fond
of iliiiieing, rf't you?" Drown:
"Vans, I go itir It a good deal."
Fair Ono: '"wonder you don'l
learn!"
Titers Is more C-h ln this section of the
country than all ir diseases put Uselhcr,
and until the last ;yeara was supposed to be
Incurable. Tor a it many years doctors pro-
noun, -il It a loealeaao and proscribed local
remedies, and by tfatitly Tailing to curs with
local treatment ponced II Incurable. Science III-. (H-ovdn crn lo bo a conetHutl.nn]
diseaso and BisrS rrfcuf.es constitutional
treatment Hairrfarrb Cufe, manufactured
by V. t. Che-^y A. Toledo, Ohio, Is Ihe only
-.nstltatlolial cu. Ine mtrtoa It fe ptken
Internally hi ddseim 10 ijreps to a teaspoonful It acts 4.rcciln the bk_dd nnd mucous
mirfs-es oi the sift- They offer One Hundred Dollars for apse It falls to c*e. Bend
for ojrculais a_i_tlrnonl_3s.   Addrlss
>. IHBN-lt A CO., Teleds. O.
gold by all drujs. fto, .    <.   -
Hall's Family tare the best.      A
lt is snid I a tablespoonful of
turpentine mu to a pail of water
will disinfect! cesspool instantly,
unil in tho sirh.'imhcr will prove
a powerful alinry ngninst germs
and bad odor.
MARCHWELLS GRAIN CO.
Grain |n car lots bought on track or sold on commission. Reasonable
advances made. Prompt returns. Correspondence solicited. Reference:
Any hank fn Winnipeg.
ROOM 414,  GRAIN  EX.  ID-DO,,  WINNIPEG!.
EDDY'S" rMPERVIOUS SHEATHING
Th» Bast:   _B.L--lc.lr.a_  F»mr»m»r Made.
It Is vary much stronur and thicker than any ether (tarrsd er halld-
laff) paper. It ts Inperviout to wind, keeps out cold, keeps tn beat, carries no small or odor, absorbs no moisture. Imparts ne taste or flavor ta
anything with which lt come* ln contact, lt Is largely used not ouly far
Sheeting houses, put for lining cold storage buildings, refrigerators, dallies, ireamerlss, and all places where Uie objsct Is to keep aa avea aad
aalfarm temperature,  and  at the same time avoiding dampness.
Writ* eur Agents, TEES * PEIISSE, Winnipeg, far sampisa.
The E. B. EDDY CO., Limited, HULL.
Minard's Unit Core. Diplitlerli
 u, — — ■ -
Toucher. "Vi part, of speech Ih
tho word  'eKfj Hoy:   "Noun,  sir."
Whal. is iwider?-^ "Can't say.
sir, till it islchcd." "Well, then,
my lad, you $ tell mo the ctisoV"
"Oh, yefl., sir-3 Hhell."
WilRon'R Fly b tho original and only
genuine,   Avoidkp imitntiona.
It ia tho t«' of a blade that
must be the \i of a good sword,
ami not tho f_jif_; of the hilt or tho
richness of tlwiltii.ir.l; ho it is not
his grundour (l possesflionfl that
maUtf a mail dderahle, hut Intrinsic merit.
TIhiip nevor *!und nevof will he a
untvumal punii' hi one remedy for
nil ills to wiil«hh Ih heir—the very
nature of iniicumtlvpH being mun
thut were tho fit of other nml dlfler-
ftitly Huutdtl ilhi. rooted In the h>h-
ti-m  of  tho pin—whut  would  relieve
oik.     ill     ill     tlUould     h|:kih\uIi-   the
othor We hu howevbr, in Uuiuluo
WiiiM   when   ohtulo   lu   i-diiihI,   unuilul-
i in a i ml stiii i', ine-ly fur muny und
i: 1'ii'vi'iin lllfi       In Ki'udual    unil    jiult-
ClOUfl     IIM!       tllO      iViL       HyHlrlUH       Ull'     l"(l
Into    rniivuldsruuiul     iii I ini|_.l li    hy     1 hi:
Influence whit-hinlno uxertH on nn-
iiiic'i. own ri'Hiivcn it relloveH the
• IroopiiiK HplrltuKhoBo with whom n
'■hioiiic  nl ul n  (if-Md  doHpondoncy  und
lliek    Of    ilttl'ei'l    (ii    |h   U    ilii-euse,    Mill
hy trunquill/hitf, nor von, dUpoueH to
hi i ui id und r.-fri'i Hle>vp—iuipurtH vIk-
of to the u« i >f tho blood, which,
bein-j" Bttmulntenureei through tho
voina, nt reriKthet t lu. heulthy anhniil
Him t limn of Iho.im, thereby mukiiiK
activity a nocer roMult, HtruiiKth-
t'liln*.: tho fjumol rWIiik life to the
digestive organaiefa naturally demand incre.iHedl>Htnnc«—reHult lui-
liroved appetlle. ttluop A, I.yinun ol
'Joronto have kIi(> tho public their
NuoMilor Qulnfuoe ,,t tho uminl rati
and, Kiiagcd by i opinion of mirn
MhIr. tho wfuo i)U<heH nouroMt i»er
rectlon of any hi mnrkot. All drug-
tiihlti ueh  it.
Krskine puzzled tho wits of his acquaintance by Inscribing On a lea-
chest the word.s"Tu doces," H was
some t'imo before thoy found out Iho
wit ot this literal translation—
"Thou teachest."
Wilson's Hy Pads. Ono 10 cent packet
has uctually killed ft bushel of flies.
Very Natural Philosophy.—"Why
does litfiituinij- so rarelv strike in
the samo placo?" asked a Hoard-
school teacher of the new boy in the
class of natural philosophy. "Oh,"
said    th-e    boy,      "because    it    never
needs to!"
BLAIR'S GOUT AND
RHEUMATIC PILLS
Tine (_u*at #J5EB3fi
Tl.l_m.MO.fIAL Irom the late 81ft HAU-
U1.I/ HAKKl't. the famous Nile (Uplorar.
"Newtoo Alil'oL. (icvon. lWr Sirs—I
have delayed my thanks aa I wished to
test the eQTcct of lllalr's l'ills by a suBP
rluij interval of tlino.
'For leu years 1 had suffered acutely
un Gout and life had lost Its attrae-
'0  otylttf  to   the  uncertainty of health
riio principal controa for tho tnntui-
facturo of coral ornaniciitn aro Up-
noa, Naples, Loghorn, and MarBcll-
h'H. At l_oghorn moro thun it thousand vioin.ii aro employed in the
manufacture of coral bonds for neck-
laces, etc.
Wu double till ovilH of onr Into
hy tlwi'lliin. on \- __ scratch lo--
loini's ii woiiikI; i|;hl nn injury; it
lost an Insult, null pnrll n (treat
danger, and a sf. sickness of ton
otitis in death bnotilng apprehensions,
To make a ^ood coatjng for tnr-
pniilins, ttiltl twelve ounces of lioes-
wux to one gallon of linseed oil and
boil well for Iwo hours. Kirst prime
the canvas wilh this mixture, and
then use it Instond of plain oil for
mixing  the paint.
Teatliijf n Itnxor.
Tlm t-eniioink'iil young mnn took his
razor to one of the host barbers In
town In be honed. ItetUI'lllOS to get It.
lie found It ready for hiin.
"I'll warrant tlmt edge," snld the
barber,
"it does look pretty sharp," suid iho
IUI1II, nnd lie lie^nn In feel uf (he rilge
will) his thumb.
"Hut 1 won't warrant it if you do
thnt." declared the barber, "it's the
worst IliinJ you could possibly ilo. Yon
might heller cut .vour list lit. with It
than run your linger across the edge
once, or shave with it for u mouth.
There's nothing like knowing n thing
or two." the barber added.—Uxchaiiga
1 from Oout and  life had  lost Its attrae-
> tloo owinff to tha uncertainly of health
. and    sudden    visitations    of   ths enemy
which prostrated ma for months, or weaks
accordlnK to the virulence of the attacks
"Tllalr's nils have rendarad me immense
service,   aa   1   no   longer   fear  an   attack
of flout.
"For the last twenty months I have
been comparatively froe, as one Or two
attempted visitations have heen lmmed-
iatoly s.'ampod out by ths assistance at
lllnlr's Pills.
"Truly yours (Signed) Saml. If. Ilaker,
Lyman Sous A Co., Montreal and Toronto; The Hole Unix Co., Winnipeg; aa4
Martin, Hole A Wynne Co., Winnipeg.
A Novel Nlpht riock.
A novel ni).lit clock of I'rofessor
Ilirth of Munich contains an electric
'limp which litrhlu up when a hiltton
is pret.Mi'il und wlilih Ihroun un enlarged .'ilnidow of llie tliul upon Ihe
■oiling. '1 hough ihe shadow has tho
lizo of a rhiil'chi clock tho greatly
iiiiigunied hu.ii.s and figures ate
slitup and distinct.
Sinn ...
"The Impudence of lli.it younc brother of mine!" exclaimed Mrs. Nagger,
"lie just lold me 1 wiiu no chicken
when I married you."
-" Well."—rciilicd    her   iiiisrinniilhelle
liiislninil,   "Hull's   true   enough.     You
weren't a chicken, wero you."
"No,  I  was u   goose."
A littlo Sunligltoap will clean
cut glass and a. articles until
they shine and Mc. Sunlight
Soap will wash tr things than
clothes. a
(lade It Il.-lef.
Dr. John Kerr, In his bonk of memoirs, recalls a number of humorous
Scotch stories. For exiunple, there I.,
the story of the "iirginuentntively
tipsy" Boot, who, calling on the minister mid being told to go home anil return the next day v . n he was sober,
replied, "Mun, minister, when I'm sober I dlnnn cure for religious conversation." Then there Is the story nbout
Thomas Thorp, who died leaving his
fortune to u poor relative on condition
thnt n headstone with Ihe inline of the
said Thomas Thorp nnd a verse of
poetry be creeled beside the grnvo.
Costing so much n word I i chisel letters ln the stone, the poor relative ordered that the poetry should bo brief.
Upon bis refusal lo approve on account of their too grent length th*
lines
Here lies tho enra*--
Of Thomas Thorn,
the following wns finnlly offered and
accepted:
Thorp's
_.__.   Corps*.	
Why Is It that Ayer's Hair
Vigor does so many remarkable things? Because it is a
hair food. It feeds the hair,
puts new life into it. Tlie hair
Hair Vigor
cannot keep from growing.
And gradually all the dark,
rich color of early life comes
baqk to gray hair.
MWb*B I flnt moil Ayer*i H»lr Ttfor toy
hatrwfta «bout til niiiy Hut now It Is m ul.-*
rich blark, ft-id ft* tlif*:k ■■ I could wUh.N
— Jtltbt. Hriu.f  Ki.Hrr_-_Niiri-r.fi, Tutcuuibl-
11.00 ft boltl*.
All 'lnigfl..li._
fO.   -a
i.o. iTsnro.,
..on,.!!,    Mutt.
Gray Hair
VI/    N    »_•    No    495 m
.''•''■V   -•
r
I
U
MOUNT PLT2ASAKT ADVOCATES*
^mTmJAi\**VtmMpma
W
■
I
4
i-'j
VI
1
The Crime of Hallow-E'en:
THE HEIRESS OF GRAYSTONE HALL
[«. a a
By LAURA JEAN LIBBEY.
Author of "A Broken Betrothal,"  "Tht Heiress of
Cameron Hall," " Parted at the Altar," Etc.
The
Struck
hoarse
great' clock in the valley
ihe hour of midnight in
clanging strokes; as the last
vibration died nway, out of the
very depths of the Pluck Tool —out
of the inky waters—u face scorned to
.father shape—n roan'** faco puurjnff
up at her. from over her shoulder In
the water .into' which site gazed with
wide, terror-stricken eyes.
it was jpot tho features of her
handsome lovor'Lo J toy Plcrpont,
whoso bride she wns to be on the
following week, that she saw.
Like ono petrified, she wns staring
down with frightened eyes Into Uie
face of Basil Sovornc, the man whom
she luttl delesli'd nt lirst sight.
The man whom I.e Hoy hud called
nn evil genius, a modern Bluebeard .
llonnylin staggered back,  threw up
her  bunds  with  a    wilti   shriek,  ami
fell down in the long grass in a
faint on the very brink of the
Tool.
CHAPTER HI.
dead
Black
I.
k
When Donnylin regained consciousness, she found herself support oil
against the trunk of a tree; some
one was bending over her, laving her
faco with the water of tho Black
Tool.
"Well, Miss Bare,' snid a harsh,
cold voice, "I am glad yo see you
yourself again. I thought you hud
moro  stamina in  vour  nature  than
to   ftiliitfonn   the  reflection   ot  a      fnce
looking  over  your  shoulder"—  this
very grimly-
Bonnylin opened wide ber great,
blue, velvety eyes nnd stared up into tho dark, grim, haughty face of
Basil Sovornc.
"I did    not know;  I thought — I
thought "      She  stoppctl      short
in consternation nnd dismay.
"You thought I was a ghost, or
a ghoul, or something of the sort,"
ho said Impatiently; "but I am neither tho one nor the other, Miss
Daro; my presenco here is most easily explained. Cutting across lots
home, I came across you quite by
accident. I had something to sty
to you, something which I could not
find time to tell you during the
evening, as overy moment of your
timo was so filled up; yet I had
come to Graystono Hall to-night for
the sole purpose of speaking with
von on an Important subject, and
hut for this opportune meeting, I
should have gone home with the
words ■ unspoken. I must have approached you too hastily and frightened you, for you fell at. my feet
in  a     (lend  fulnt."
By this timo Bonnylin was quite
over her fright.
" What could you have of such
great Importance to say to me?"
she inquired, with all a young girl's
keen curiosity. "I will listen to
what you have to say now, if you
like;, thnt is, if it will not take you
too long to tell it."
"The sum and substance can bo
told ,'ln a few simple words,"
he said, leaning nonchalantly back
against tlie trunk of a tree, and
folding his arms duliberntoly ns he
gazed ot her;' "you must break your
engagement with voung Pierpont
without delay, for you can never
marry him."
"Sir!" crietl Bonnylin, springing
to her feet and stnring at him with
unfeigned astonishment that was
deepening wilh each breath into tho
most intense anger; "you nre either
a fool or a madman—or perhaps Intoxicated—that's the plain English
of it. Step out of the path and let
me pass; I won't listen to such nonsense. If Le Boy was hero he would
give, you a sound thrashing, and
throw you into the pool in  ihc bar-
LMli'l'".
"Sit down on that fdllin log,"
said Basil Scvernc, frowning darkly;
"you shall not pass until yott bear
what 1 have to say."
"I suppose you would use your
Strength to prevent me from going,"
died Bonnylin, white to the lips
with ungcr.
"I shall if necessary," he replied,
c.ilmly.
Bonnylin reflected n moment. I
haps it woultl be best to pretend lo
comply with his request b.v reseating
herself--that woultl throw him off
his guard—and then she could spring
to her feet and dash past him.
She sunk back on Iho mossy log,
eyeing  him  contemptuously.
"Well, now! whut reason can you
offer ns to why I shnll not marry the
gontlcman 1 love?" she demanded.
"For the simple- reason fate has   a
different husband In store for you,
ho replied, advancing a step    nearer
lo her.
"Fata is very kind to meddle wilh
my affairs," cried Donnylin, Ironically, cresting her golden bead nnd culling hi r. red lips scornful ly, "but all
tho same, when it comes to marrying, I'll be likely to suit myself.
Perhaps—as you know so much about
the mutter—you can loll mo who
Iho party Is, to whom Mr. Piorpollt's
place shotiltl be given."
'.'Fata showetl you his face reflected with your own in the Bluck
Pool."
The Idea was so ludicrous Bonnylin laughed aloud.
"What—not yourself?" crietl tho
girl, fairly convulsed witb laughter—
oven though her words were tinged
with cutting sarcasm.
"Yes," he replied; "when you hrar
what I havo to tell you — hero and
now—thero will bo no hesitation, I
fancy, you will consent to bo my
bride within the hour."
"Bid ever a mnn hnve such a wild,
mad fancy?" crietl Bonnylin. angrily.
"Why, you might ns well imagine
the night would turn suddenly Inlo
duy, that pool yonder into seething
lire, nntl I from a sime person—well,
into an itliot. The days nre over
when men cun force young girls into
marrying them."
*'I said you will marry mo of your
own free will," replied Basil So-
vorne, -coolly. "There will be no coercion—no persuasion. After you have
henrd all 1 havo to say you tnke
fate into your own hniifls—yoll cnn
tthswor nie yes or no—yoll will see
i here i:; method in iny mildness, us
you cull it."
"There is nothing you could tell
nie— nothing under the high heavens
ih.it would Influence me to give     up
my lover, ancl marry a man - hate—
yes, you may as well know the ox-
act truth—1 hated you from iho first
moment I saw you. Why, I would
ns soon think of killing you as of
marrying you—so there!"
"You would us soon think of killing me. would you?" ho repeated
hoarsely. "Then let me tell you you
would not lie the first Bare whose
hand would be stained with human
blood, and who was destined to face
the gallows!"
llonnylin sprung to her feet In tho
wildest terror.
"Surely she wns in Ihe presence of
nn escaped maniac," sbe told herself, nnd like a startled fawn sho
nttomplod to flush headlong past
him; bill he anticipated her movement, and reaching suddenly tor-
ward, grasped both of her fluttering,
slender wrists.
"I must force you to listen to mc,
since It must be so," he said sternly,
even haughtily.
And, standing thero under the
trees on that fatal Ifallow-o'cn, Bonnylin Bare listened to the strangest,
most stnrlling revelation that over
tell from mortal lips.
He had long since dropped her
wrists, but the girl made no attempt
to fly; sho stood before him transfixed with horror, like nn Image
carved In stone, scarcely breathing
in hor intense excitement and anxiety to catch every syllable he uttered.
"1 hnvo finished now, Miss Daro,"
ho concluded, "ami now I stand
here waiting your decision. Remember, I with it plainly understood I
uso no coeroion; I do not attempt to
forco your Inclinations in any way;
1 simply say, will you marry me—
yes, or no?"
"For the iovo of Heaven givo me
time to think!" cried Bonnylin wildly and incoherently. "My brain is
dazed—I am going mad, mad, mad!"
"Will an hour's time suit you?" he
asked.
"Yes," answered Bonnylin, wildly.
"Oo, lenvo me; give mo an hour to
think; and remember, lf you come
back nnd find mo dead, it Is your
words that have killed me."
"What if I had not told you—what
then?" ho demanded.
She shivered liko a tender flower
in a winter blast.
"It is best—that—I—know!" she
answered, with a wild "sob.
He glanced at his Watch by the radiant white light of tho moon.
"I will be back in one hour," ho
said; nntl tinning, he left her, walking rapidly away.
As the echo of his footsteps died
away on tho dead leaves, poor Bon-
"Bo you honf file, l-onnyll.i— Mrs.
Severno?" he nsked grimly.
Bonnylin bowed her beautiful go)il-
en head in silence. By this time tbey
had reached the dark, covered bridge,
that spnnned Ihe deep, wide, rock-
bodcl.d river.
As Basil Severno guided his horse
into the shadow of the dark portals,
.omcthing tall anil dark spi'iinr from
the hushes that skirted the roadside
at that lonely spot—a tall figure
wearing a lcn_f cloak, and whose fnce
was covered by a black crape mask,
and at that instant Severno'- horse
was hurled back on ils haunches,
rmd the command, "Haiti"' was thundered out hoarsely.
In a trice Sovornc bad grasped his
whip and sprung from the vehicle,
and the next instant a terrific encounter ensued, mingled with such
frightful curses nntl imprecations
that tbo terrified girl's blood ran
cold in her veins. Soon it became
apparent to her lhat they were
Btiutgjjllng on the very brink of the
bridge, one moment moro ann, ir.ci.ca
in each other's omhrnce, they had
crushed through the railing and
went down together—down Into tho
dark waters below.
For one awful moment Bonnylin
fairly held her breath.
(treat Heaven! neither rose again.
No doubt Ihey bad Ireen caught,
locked in each other's deadly embrace, between the Jaws of tlie huge
rocks in the river bed.
Even in the widening circles had
died away now that hnd marked the
spot where they went down.
Bonnylin clutched the reins with a
wild, terrified cry; then they fell
from her nerveless grasp.
Freed for the moment of all control, tho fiery bluck horse tlnrled
forward, dashing headlong over tbe
bridgo, up tho serpentine rond, whirling and crushing down tbe valley,
through bushes nnd brambles, swifl
us a lightning flash—too swift for tho
revolution of the wheels of Hie buggy
it was dragging after it; too swifl
for the terrified girl who was clinging to the dashboard to utter a prayer.
A great sycamore tree stood at the
cross-roads.
Bonn/lin was conscious that il
loomed up tall nnd dark between her
and the moonlight.
The next. Instant there was a frightful collision, a crash, und a tearful
blow on tbe head.
The black horse, freed from his
burden, dttshetl madly on toward the
mill pond, and went over the brink
of it. Tbo carriage, crushed into
fragments, lay iu the roadside, nntl
a motionless figure, clnd in blue
tullo, lay apparently lifeless under
the sycamore tree, ber si ark face and
staring eyes turned up to the night
sky.
nylin flung herself face downward on
the grass, uttering the wildest cries
that ever welled up from a torn and.
bleeding heart.
"Oh, God, if I could but die!"
she moaned, piteottsly. "Oh, Lo Hoy,
my Iovo, my darling—Ihe other hnlf
of my very soul—the Clod whom I
thought so just has parted you and
me. Heaven teach me how to livo
without yon. I cannot bear tho
thought—oh, I ennnot boar ltl How
can the flowers bloom, the sun givo
light, and the world move on, and
we. who love each other so well,
walk in different paths? Oh, Cod,
scud me death and end it all, for if
I livo I must be this mnn's bride; ho
knows thero is no need to coerce or
persuade—Cod pity mc—ho knows I
dnro not refuse. You will curse mo,
darling; I shall shrink beneath tho
hoi blast of your scorching Words,
uttering no retort, Each word will
bo a dagger thrust; the pity of it in
that thoy will not kill  mo,  nnd end
It. till."     	
Tho moments came and went, dragging their slow lengths by.
At lust the hour was up.
Slowly,   liko  tho  knell  of      death,
Bonnylin  heard  Basil  Severne's    returning footsteps.
lie did not seo hor at first, and
stood motionless as ho entered tho
glutle.
"Sho is not hero," he said grimly
to himself.
Then he snw something golden a
little further on, on which the moon
was shining, and ho knew sho had
not fled ns ho had at first expected.
Slowly she rose to her feet and
confronted him. und for a momout
they stood gazing steadily into each
other's face.
"Your answer. Miss Bare," he said
calmly.  "May I hope it is yes?"
"You know it is yes!" cried tho
girl, stormily nnd recklessly. "I will
marry you; but, remember, I will
kill you sooner thnn be forced to livo
with you, nntl then kill myself."
Ho merely smiled at the awful
threat, remarking it was like tho
fable of the pretty whito kitten who
attempted lo slay tlio tierce lion, and
mot h, cruel fate for Its audacity.
"But come," ho said, wrapping hor
In the thick cloak and veil sho had
thrown oil, "my horso and carriage
are close at hand. Wc have a long
ride  before As."
Without remonstrance, Bonnylin allowed him to lift her Into tho vehicle.
Tho terrible ride wns over at lust,
ami Basil Severne drew rein beforo n
small stono chapel in the heart uf a
deep wootl.
"This is the lady, reverend sir,"
Bonnylin henrd Scvernc say, and sho
knew by that they had been expecting her.
The white-haired minister bowed
gravely, and they took their places-
Five minutes more uud tho cruel
fetters that bound Bonnylin Bare to
Basil Severno wero securely forged —
the fatal words wero uttered which
mado her bis bride.
"Now, Mrs. Sovornc," said her husband, ns ho helped her ngaln into
thu buggy and picked up tho reins,
smiling grimly to nee bow sho shrunk
in horror from tho title, "I will
toll you my plana for tho futuro as
we ride along.
"You shall go back to Oraystono
Hull to-night and pass tho next three
days there as usual, preparing ill tho
interim for an extended tour abroad.
"You can keep our mtirrlagc a secret until I come for you, if that
suils you best, or divulge it lf you
lure to do so. This Is Monday
night. You may expect me nt Oraystono Hall Thursday  morning."
No answer fell.from the bride's rigid  lino
CIIAPTEH IV.
At Oraystono Hall tho merriment
went on long nfler Bonnylin had
stolen awny.
At length the gnosis noticed h.r
protracted absence and begun commenting upon it.
Half an hour ago Miss Rochester
had called Lo Hoy Bin-pent, rsitle
and disclosed to him the stnrlling
fact that Miss Bare was nowlure to
lie found. Ho had quitted tho ballroom without attracting nlUnlion.
nntl together they ransacked the oil
house from cellar to garret, the garden, park and orchard) but there
was no trace of Bonnylin.
Mr. Pierpont had grown white lo
the lips.
He looked at Miss Rochester in
keen alarm.
"Can you got me a lantern?" ho
asked hoarsely. "I am going down
tho road to search for her. When
tho hour comes for the breaking up
of tho party, make some excuse for
Bonnylin's absence; jour woman's
wit will suggest what to say."
Silently the lantern was brought,
nnd with a nameless foreboding at
his heart, Lo Koy I'ierpont hurried
awny.
For long hours ho searched, tailing
loudly on the name of Bonnylin; but
only tho wicrd echoes among tho
trees answered him.
In the gray dawn of the early dny
ho reached the cross-roads marked
by the old sycamore, tree, fully leu
miles from Oraystono Hull; and
there, among tho debris, bo found
hor—that Blonder, rigid figure, slill
robed ln the Sky-blue tullo, and tho
dark clonk wrapped around her.
With a mighty cry and a bound he
was nt her side.
"Oh, my darling! iny darling!" ho
cried out sharply.   "She is iletid!"
But no; placing his hand
frunllcally over her heart, he found
that it still fluttered feebly.
Ood had spareel ber to him; she
wns not dead.
Lifting her ln his strong nrms as
though sho had been an infant, ho
bore her to a clear, rippling brook
close by, and proceedeel to lave her
faco and her littlo white hands.
After fully un hour's lubor ho was
rewnreled by seeing the lovely bluo
eyes flare ojicn.
One glance into that beloved face,
and she threw up her white hands
with a piteous, heart-rending cry:
"Oh, Lo Hoy, Lc Hoy, it was n
horrid dream, wasn't It?" sho murmured, cowering closo to blm anil
clinging lo him with a frantic grasp;
then she sprung from his nrms uud
looked at him wlib wltlo, frightened
eyes, nnd ftioo as palo as It would
ever be in death;
In a Hush memory had returned lo
her, nntl with the shock she went oil
into nnother dead faint more alarming than the llrst.
At that moment a farmer's wagon
rolled leisurely up iho rood. Mr.
I'ierpont hulled the farmer, nnd n
few words sufficed to explain the situation, and ho willingly consented lo
go out of his way to convey Miss
Dare back to Ornyston. Hull.
"Bo not question her about this
oscapado when sho o6mcs to," continued Lo Hoy, uo he placid her In
Miss Hocheslcr's nrms. "No doubt
sho will tell us all nbout it ln her
own good time. Sho Was ovldontly
riding along that road, for I found
her amidst the debris of broken enr-
riago wheels."
Strange to say, Bonnylin had had
a most miraculous escape from Injury, tho long, thick grass hnving
deadened the fall. No bones were
broken, tho tender skin even was not
bruised.
Yet for threo days Miss Hochesto''
forced her to keep her couch.
"You look ns palo us a ghost
child," sho declared, wondering vaguely why thu doctor's ln.dii.no did
her no gootl. "This Is Friday," sho
wont, on, "and you have forgotten,
dear, next Monday is your wetlding-
day—this white face won't do ut
all."
A bitter cry that qui to upset    Miss
Rotlicstir's  nerves  fell  from  Bonnylin's lips.
"Thero will  I-- no weddimr."      sho
moaned, turning her faco to tho wall.
Had tile girl gone stark mad?
Aliss     llochestci'    looked  at     her
aghast.   .
Suddenly Bonnylin sprung to her
feet, with a stai'lied cry.
"Friday,"  sho  whispered    sharply;
"did you say to-day was Friday?"
Miss Rochester nodcted.
Bonnylin's features worked convulsively.
"He—my terrible foe—must have
found death beyond all doubt ill tbe
dark waters," she muttered below
her breath, "for he ttnid ho would
come for mo Thursday," end with
tho thought caine another, his death
made her free.
"My darling, what excites you so?"
asked Miss ltochcstcr, curiously, as
she wrung her littlo whilo hands together and commenced to pace tbe
floor hurriedly.
"Nothing," muttered Bonnylin,
faintly.
"So much has happened since you
havo been Ul, dear," Miss Rochester
wi nt on, hoping to divert her attention; "you remember Mr. Severne,
tlie tall,, clark gentleman who was at
your Hallow-e'en party? Well, he,
too, met with a serious accident thnt
night-ay, I mny say a fatal ono.
Two days later bis dead body, terribly mutilated, was found in the
bend of tho river; he wns Identified
by his linen handkerchief, which
bore his name In full stumped upon
it, which Was found clutched tightly
in bis hand.
"But a truce to such sad subjects.
1 must speak lo you of graver
Ihin.B," declared Miss Rochester,
taking Bonnylin's white hands ufl'oc-
tionately. "Now, tell me, dear, why
you persist in refusing to sec your
loVer from dny to day? Poor Lc Hoy j
is almost heart-broken over it, ho
cannot understand you. Is your heart
changed toward him?"
Bonnylin     shook ber curly   golden
head,  uttering a sobbing:
"No."
"I wondered if it could be," smiled
Afiss Rochester, "for up to the time
of the Hallow-e'en party you seemed
io fond of him.
"Ho camo over from the village
twice a day to seo you," sho wont
on. "I haven't the heart to send tho
poor fellow awny again to-day; you
must see him, Bonny, darling. I cannot understand why you refuse."
Long nfter she had left Bonnylin,
the girl sat al the window with
tightly clasped hands and white face.
"Why not see him?" tho still small
voice in her heart whispered; "und
why not lit your contomplnted marriage wilh bim proceed? The horrible
I ..rrior that rose up between you for
.n. short hour has been swept nwny
by th' html of fate. Marry your lover nnd I o happy. UiiIobs you divulge
that midnight sacrifice yourself, he
will never Kniw of it. How can you
;i e h'm up? Think what lifo would
ho, to you through Iho long years
Hint lie in the future without bim.
Woultl it not te a living death?"
I WESTERN CANADIAN  EDITORS. 1
A series of art c'.es descr bing
their lives, their aims and
their Influence.
R. Q. MeCU5_.l1       j
of tho Mordon Cbnm.ce.       <
»<♦♦♦♦•♦♦« !.♦♦«»♦->■»> »•••««+>
Of
Its opinions conimond as much re-
spe-t us ever. Mr. A'cOitiSh is a
strong party man, a Libera] who is
upright and downright in his views,
und f.'nrless in uttering and defending them. Thfl Chronicle, in these
respects, is a faithful reflection of
its editor, heing a vigorous and ath-
lethic champion and exponent of
Western I localism, nnd a enntro of
influence to the parly it supports.
Newspopcr men itt the West have
boon quick lo recognize Mr. Mc-
/'uish's uoility, ami the W. 0. B. A.
last year elected him its first vice-
president. In the, local politics of
his district, be is a tower of strength.
Ho is secretary of the Liberal associations for both the provincial and
federal constituencies, nnd wns tho
first president of the Morden Young
Alen's Liberal Association, for the
founding of wbicli he wns chiefly responsible, lie is n ready ami convincing platform speaker, and has
. done yeoman service tor tho Liberal
j party in recent campaigns.
Though he hns been  a resident
j Morden  only  three years,  his fellow
| townsmen,    at    tho    last    municipal
| election,   returned    Mr.    McCuish    as
alderman  by acclamation—a striking
; tribute to   his   known   public spirit
and   personal   popularity,    ills  interest  in  all   forms   of   athletics   con-
! Unties,    despite    increasing   demands
' on  his  time.    Air.  AlcCuish  is secro-
j lory of  the Morden Turf  Club,    the
lending  sporting  institution    in    the
| town,  and of  football,  lacrosso   and
; other  games  he  is  a  foremost    supporter.
j    Mr.  AlcCulsh  is unmarried—as yot.
' This,   however,   is   understood   to   bo
a fault that time—a very short timo
—will   cure.     Recently   reports havo
been circulated to tbe effect that   In
the middle  of  September  tho editor
of   the    Chronicle   will   bio   himself
east,  and   that   he   will  not return
nlone.     Air.   AlcCuish    has    boon    at
much pains   to   deny   those rumors,
but  his  very   obvious  efforts  in  this
direction     bave    only   succoetled   in
giving   them   greater   currency   and
more general belief. In default of an
admission   of   bis   guilt   by tho   de-
^  lenelnnt,    we  feel  somewhat  dtflldont
his activities,  ho is tho hu-  about offering congratulations.   Nevertheless, we do so, nnd witb the. ttt-
ll. (I. McCTJISII,
Editor and  Propriotor
den I'hro
tbe   Mnr-
,icle
In many respects, the editor of tho
Morden Chronicle ls typical ami representative of tho brendth of vigor
of western Canadian journalism. Ho
touches lifo at many and varying
angles. In tho range of his sympathies antl interests, and in tho variety of      	
man counterpart of tho "wldoflung,
fenceless prairies," in which his
youth nnd young manhood havo boon
passed.
"It would be a thousand times
uioro litter than death!'.' sobbed
Bonnylin. "Oh, no, no, no, come
what may, I cannot live without
you, Lc Hoy, thirling; I cannot givo
you up! Let the marriage go ou. I
will carry the horrible secret down
to tho grave with mo!"
And the marriage did go on; a
woek from thnt fatal Hallow-e'en
night a dozen pretty bridesmaids
wero  robing  fair  llonnylin  in       her
bridal dre.s.
•        _        •   '    »        «        *
It was an Intense surprise for Airs.
Pierpont when she received the intelligence of her handsome son's marriage.     ,f
Sho had never even been informed
of his engagement, nnd now he bad
been  married  quite  two  months.
She fluttered down to the library,
where shu bad left her lovely guest
half an hour before, with the open
letter in her hand,
Aliss India Alurgruve, the dark-
eyed beauty whom Airs. Pierpont
had set her heart on Lc Hoy marrying, antl who was hor guest for tho
holidays, was deeply engrossed over
tho pages of a letter to which sho
wets just signing lier name.
Ere she btfrricdly seals nnd despatches it—for the obliging postman
outside is waiting for it—wo will
take a peep at its contents:
"Bear Alumina," it commenced ;
then broke abruptly into Iho vital
subject uppermost in the writer's
mind.
"Tho holidays are over, nnd still
Le Hoy I'ierpont eloe'S not put in an
appearance* nor has his mother
heard from him for over two
months; and yot he knew I was
coining here. Another girl would
be disheartened by this lack of interest on his part, but not so
your daughter India. 1 have vowed
this handsome son. heir to iho Pierpont millions should ho mine, nnd I
would wndc through a sea of.raging
firo to gain tho ultimatum. Nothing shaii stand betwoen us I
"I think I must havo boon mad,
yes, mad, when I engaged myself
to Richard Harcotirt, the poverty-
stricken lawyer of our village, a
year ago; many a timo I havo regretted it. Yet I nm afraid— yes,
afraid— to break with him. I nlmost think ho would have murder in
his heart if 1 told him all was
over forever between us. I wish
ho wero well out of my way nt nny
cost.
"I received a bitter letter from
blm yesterday, in which ho snld,
'1 will never give you up, Intlia ;
never—so help mo Ood! 1 havo
heard you are going to Mrs. Lincoln's ball on the 20th ot this
month. I, the struggling village
lawyer, could never hope for au
entree Inlo thai, fashionable society,
but mark you, India, 1 shall find
mv way somehow inlo tho conservatory. Aleet me there at the stroko
of ton, India. 1 shall bo standing
in tho dense shadows of thoso tali
mai.noliiwi at the left of tho entrance near tho fountain. Fail mo
if you darel for then and thero
wo shall have a final settlement. You
must settle nil this sickening doubt
bv taking me to your hostess, and
introducing mo ns- your affianced
I husband.' I would die sooner than
! do that," India wrote, "I repeat,
I shall never be safo while tbat man
lives I"
| A moment after India had sealed,
and handed tho letter to the postman, Mrs. Pierpont fluttered into
room still clutching the open missile.
"I have had such startling news,
Intlhi," she said, sinking into a
sent. "Le Hoy is married! Ho has
been wedded for over two months,
und writes me he will he here with
his bride by the timo this letter
reaches us."
India Alargrave sits bolt upright
in her chair; lier face grows palo,
anil her hands clutch the ebony and
gold table for support; tbe world
Beams to whirl around her, nnd tho
aun-hlna  lo grow  thick
(To bn Continued.)
Mr. McCuish, liko tho great bulk" of
western Canadians, hails originally
from Ontario, being born near Turk-
hlll, in April, 1877. Of tho older
province, however, he has no early
personal recollections, for bis parents came west while ho was yot an infant, settling near Morden. It was at
the public school of this prosperous
town thnt Air. AlcCuish received his
elementary education, going from
thonco to Manitoba College, Winnipeg. From tho university to the
country school teacher's desk Is in
Manitoba a natural—almost an Inevitable—step, and Mr. McCuish was
next to be seen as a rural school-
muster near MucGrcgor, But, as
wilh many nnother, he found that i
tho material rewai'ds held out to |
the teachers of youth were not |
such ns to tompt him to remain in |
the profession. Ancl, in any caso, ho
had other ambitions. When a school
boy in Alortlen ho luiel been an almost daily visitor at tho Chronicle
office, and the smell of the news ink
and the attractive variety of newspaper work had marked out for him
his career. He came to Winnipeg,
and secured a position on tho rcpor-
torinl staff ot tho Tribune. His natural liking for athletics made tho
-porting column his chosen sphere,
find ere long he was placed ill charge
of that elepartment. And, in the
day*, of Air. McCuish's control, the
sporting columns of tho Tribune, in
raciness, in brightness, in Impartiality antl in reliability, woultl
bear comparison with thoso of any
newspuper anywhere. The fact that
the Tribune's competitors were morning papers gave them considerable
advantage, since most athletic events
_amc off in tho nfternoon or evening, but this handicap Air. McCuish
ninnngvd to more thnn compensate
for. by the manner in which he
handled his news, and not infrequently he secured a number of important j inaccessible
"beats" and "scoops" on his com- j tains.
potftors. There was widespread antl j
sincere regret among nil sportsmen
in Winnipeg when Mr. McCuish
stepped up from bis position on the
Tribune to become, the owner and
editor of the paper in his old town.
The wishes expressed for his success
among those who knew hlin—and
who didn't—were equally hearty and
general.
This wns Septmti'ber, 1901, when
Mr. AlcCuish was but 24 years of
nge. The paper he had purchased
was one that onjoye-el a reputation as
wide us Western Canada, lt
one ol the edelest papers in the West,
hnving bi-en founded in 1 "HO, nnd it
had hud the good fori unil to be controlled by a mun of much force,
brendlh, ability nnd common sense—
Mr. .1. I-'. (Inlbriiilh. one t>f tho
pioneer publishers of the province
Among newspaper men in the West
the Chronicle Was regarded as perhaps the best printed ami edited of
nil the papers printed outside tho
cities. Hence Air. McCuish had no
easy man to follow, for the newspaper standard   in   M.rdon wns high.
llis success, therefore, is nil tho
more striking, for it is Indubitable
that tho Chronicle is to-day, in all
respects, a stronger paper th^n when
he assumed control. Its circulation
is larger, its mnko-np is better, and
and Its advertising patroriago is
greater than   threo   years ago,   and
most sincerity and heartiness, voicing in this regard, we feel assured,
the feeling of Mr. McCuish's hosts of
personal and professional friends. If
Air. AlcCuish still persists that these
congratulations are misplaced, wo
trusl that, he will return them, but
do not believe we will ever have to
pny express charges on tbe returned
parcel.
WEST AFRICAN CANNIBALS.
They    Cultlvnte   Their    Fields,    bnt
l'linv Fully Armed.
An interesting story is tol.l by the
commissioners who hnvo been engaged
for tbo Inst eighteen months in fixing
the Anglo-Germnn frontiers in west
Africa between the town of Yoln nud
Lake Tchad.
The ri'glrn traversed is little known
owing to the hostility of the tribes.
The Fulani villages wore found quite
friendly, but beyond Lau, a largo town
on the Benin, there lies a mountainous
region Inhabited-by pagans who In
many cases ure cannibals,
Tbey were found to bo a most Industrious people, who tlltlvilted their
fields with n gooel deal of method. In
most cases, snys Renter, thoy were
practically naked, but wero always
armed. Even when nt work in the
fields plowing they carried n full kit of
spears, sh! Ids nnd poisoned arrows.
The arrows nro much dreaded, for
tbey nro tipped with n deadly poison
extracted from vegetables and from
dead bodies. This is carried In small
bottles, and when fresh it proves fatal
lu n few minutes.
Those people nre adepts nt grime
stalking nnd disguise themselves n t
birds and animals ln order to approach
their prey.
Tbey  nre smaller than tbo Fulani,
being often  quite dwarfish,  nnd they
live  in  Iliinsy grass  huts perched In
nooks among the  moun-
THE SNIPE'S DRUMMING.
A Naturalist's Theory as to How the
- .Sound   Ib  rrodncetl.
It Is disputed whether the snipe's
drumming—a curious nolne, suggestive
of a miniature thrashing machine.—la
mnde by the bird with Its wings or by
Its  tail or by  both  wings mul tail.
Some  recent observations incline  uie
strongly to believe that the tall plays, .
nt uny rnte, the more Important part.
During the performance the bird files
nt a great height round nnd round In
u wide, sweeping circle.    Al Intervals
ho makes a sudden and rapid descent,
holding his wings partly Hexed nnd bis
tall spread to Its full extent.   The outermost tail feather ou either side points
outward at a groa       ■ ■ ,|e than those
adjoining it, so Hint wb_.t the bird Is
watched through a good field glnsH daylight shows between It nnd the next,
nnd,  if  I  am  right  in niy  view,  tbe
drumming sound is due to the rush of
nlr ngninst this Isolated font hor.   The
Rnlpe's tail .oath    « seem so puny that
It Is at  first tlKllcnlt to believe lhat
tbey can produce so great n result. But      *
If nn outer ono be taken—It Is slightly
sclmlter shaped,  with the outer  web
much   reduced— nnd   swung   rapidly
through the air the dniiiiiiilng noise
mny  bo  distinctly   beard,  though  It
seems but n  very  faint echo of  tbe
loud, throbbing liiTin thnt startles one
when  It suddenly descends from an
ethereal height, nnd the simill bird is
deserli'd. bni'illy more than a speck to
the naked eye, circling round In wild
career  and   now   nnd  then   swooping
headlong ilownwnrd nntl thrilling tbe
nlr wilh bis weird music.—London Nature.
THE LITERARY DETECTIVE.
Ills  Hunt  Is One Thnt  Adds Spice to
Ills  Head 111 E.
There Is a certain type of literary
man who seems content to take little
part in the struggle of letters beyond
keeping an eye on bis contemporaries
and pouncing down on them every now
and then to accuse them of hnving
given n meaning to such nnd such a
word which that word should not possess. It is strange thnt the number of
these literary detectives Is not larger,
tor thero nre few more fascinating occupations than this. It lends n spice
to one's rending. Tlie dullest book becomes ns readable as the most deftly
written novel. Certnln words hnvo taken to themselves meanings In the
course of time which they hnvo no
right to possess. ''Phenomenon" Is a
very hardened offender. To use this
word as meaning something "strange"
instead of something "that appears
and ls visible'' Is lo insure arrest at the
bauds of the detective. Lately the
word "temper" has been exposed. (
Through long Impunity It has come to
Imply bad temper, whereas. If It bad
its rights, it Bhould nie.'in Jnst the re-
verso. Wc strongly advise every one
who desires a never failing source of
amusement to road the next novel he
takes up with the eye of the delect;re.
Starting with the easier words, like
"phenomenon," the novice may go on
from strength to strength until before
long nothing can escape him. The exorcise, moreover. Is not only n pleasure,
but a duty.—London Globe.
At Kuka the sheik of British Bor-
mi rodo out to greet Colonel Jackson
nt the head of 'MO horsemen nnd a
large number of men on foot. Ho was
accompanied by a bnnd and dancing
girls.
Ills people carried enormous spears,
nnd some wore ohl armor, while the
horses were caparisoned with housings
.like those of tho crusaders.
Tho survey has proved that existing
maps are to ti large extent Inaccurate
nnd has placed iho boundary further
f*1s I to the east, thus enlarging tho British
sphere.—London Express,
The only lawful claim to place a
cockade on Ihe hat of n servant
arises out of Ihe fact of his muster
In'ing in His Majesty's service.
Teacher:
"Whnt
part.
of   speech
it
tho word
'egg'?"
Boy:
"Noun.
,  sit
"Wbat.   is
its   gender?"
"Cnn'
1    Bl
i.V
sir,  till it
is hat
chod.'
'  "Well,
thi
'11
my Intl. you cnn'1
toll
me the
rase
?'
"Oh, yes,
sir—the
• shell
Moderation is (he silken string i
ning through Ibe pearl chain of
the virtues.
A flreprdnf chimney mndo enlirely
ot paper Ikis been erected in Dreslaii,
Prussia.   It is fifty foot in height,
New 1-oiifxo Itotiti'.
A mooting wus recently held nt tho
Borboiuie In Purls iu honor of Cnptnln
L'l.nl'niit, the African explorer, who
bus found a new road Into the Interior
of thnt country which, It Is claimed,
will altogether supersede the present
Kongo roile. The aim of bis mission
wns to find n means of communication
between tho Ik-nemo nnd the Logons
and to seo If lt was possible for a'
barge leaving tho mouth of the Niger
to I'eaeli Lake Tchad by following a
wnter route—that Is, tbo Niger. Be-
none, Mnyo-Kobl, Tonbdrl, Logono and
Chiu'l. Cnptnln I.'Enfiint carried along
with hlin n steel barge, taken over In
sections, nnd successfully accomplished
the Journey, lie snys the route can
easily bo mndo nnvlgnblo, shortening
the time of the Kongo passage to sixty-five dnys anil reducing the cost of
carrying moi'Chnndlso from $100 to
IflOO per ton. Tho link of communication between tho Niger and Luke
Tchad being thus discovered, n solution has been afforded of one of the
greatest African problems.
why Windmills Darned Down.
Of the production of lire by the friction of wood ngninst wood windmills
of the old construction gave on n large
scale some disastrous examples. When
the force of tho wind Incrensed the
miller was obliged to bring ench of the
sails In succession io the ground in or-
der to Unclothe It, but when sudden
squalls t'liiiie on this was Impracticable, and the mill In extreme cases run
nwny—lhat Is, could not be slopped.
Everything wus now dune to Increase
the grip uf the wooden brake round the
groat wheel on Ihe driving shaft, nnd
water wns ponrtsl copiously over them,
but In spite of all Ibis llnn.es would
sometimes burst out from the Intense
friction nnd the mill be probably
bnriicd down ns Ibe result. The beautiful macliiner.v of tlio modern windmill, by whle'.i the miller controls tho
action of the sails from the Interior of
the building, him reduced this danger to
a minimum.—Notes nnd Queries.
King .Iuiih-h II,
The following Is nn extinct from the
manuscript diary of King Jnmes II.
of I'nglnnd, preserved III the Imperial
library of Paris: "I did not retire from
the battle on lie llovne from a sense
of fear, but that I might preserve to
tlie world a lilt- Hint 1 bit was destined
to future greatness."
One reason why the lit tie Japanese
soldier can march iwenly-live miles a
day with n burden of one hundred
pounds is tbnt his lung-power, and
honeo bis whole physical system, is
tlevelopeil by liahiluul deep breathing.
Visitor! "Bo you have any difficulty in getting Servants?" Hostess:
"None whatever, We've -hud ten
different   ones in the last   mnnlh!"
To Weed Ont Ilnronets.
A permanent tribunal for the Investigation of all now claims to bnronetcles
and all existing doubtful ones hits
boon suggested,   The proposal conies
Sieiiidiillr.
As a slang name for money "sponeln-
llx" has its origin In the Greek word
spondulos, n shell. Shells of a certnln
species wore once used its money, both
In Greece nnd Egypt,
Combs,
Combs nre found In the earliest known
graves.
Men  Only  Allowed.
Mniwnteliln, on the borders of Rut-
sin, Is llie only city In (lie world poo-
plod by men only. The Chinese women
uro not only forbidden to live In this
territory, but even lo puss Ihe grent
well of Kallum nnd enter Into Mongolia.	
Hoyul I'liNthnes.
Members of Ihe court of King Charles
II. of England1 were Innocent in some
of their iliiuuieinclits, If not In others.
Among their favorite giuiios wers
"blind mini's bill." nnd "hunt the slip-
per."	
Snnll  l-hdiifr Sheep.
The excellent quality of the South-
down mutt(tl) Is Haiti In be due to tho
ff.gt that the sheep eagerly devour the
snails which abound em the pastures-In
- tho early morning. These snails are
the cause of tbo rich succulence characteristic of (lie milt Inn raised in the
sou iii of England.
Ilornx.
As used by physicians, bornx not
only softens but purifies wnter, bonis
ulcers and bolls, relieves bruises,
sprains and burns, allays Inflammations nntl prickly heat, ls useful In catarrh nnd acidity of the stomnch antl
ns an antiseptic ln typhoid fever, cholera and smallpox.
rorfnr-Mil's C'lilnnlcN.
V.'licn Poi'tiig::! was annexed to Spain
most of Ibe colonies belonging to the
former wore taken by the latter, but
were soon conquered by the Dutch,
The  First  Wooden Drldae.
The first wooden bridge', so far aa
known, was the Buhllclnn bridge at
Rome, built In tho seventh century.
Ilreeehlonilliiir Gnus.
The breeehlondlng gun Is not, as
mnny persons believe, an Invention of
modern times. There Is on view, ln tho
shop of a Dublin gunsmith, a brcech-
loadlng rifle that wns offered to the
British wnr office nt the closo of the
eighteenth century. It was rejected, lt
Is said, been use It took too much ammunition. '
MOUNT PLEASANT ADVOCATE.
WUNT PLEASANT ADVOCATL
VANCOUVER, B. O.
A GLASS OF WATER.
[fen to   1)1 Ink   It   am! the I'll..-.Is It Will
i Produce—Moelu. Operandi and the
Science of the Tiling.
firink a glass of water when you
|t out of ben! in the morning. Ney-
f mind the size of  tlie glass.      Let
Eo wnter lie cold if you will. Some
ople prescribe hot wnter, but thnt
i't necessary. You may have wash-
ytiur face already and relished the
Iperience.    You may havo    taken   a
Id   plungo  into  the  tub    and    do-
it'hted In  tho    shock nnd  its    roac-
Thc  brisk    uso of tho tooth-
lush  hns   left  your  mouth  clean und
fo  breath    sweet.       But your,   nrs
\ty still.    Brink a gluss    of   cold
liter  and  enjoy   tho     sensation     of
Ling clean inside.    All  that    Is lux-
|iifus     in   the  cold   bath     cleansing
outside ls artificial.    That which
_iuiihl    prompt  the  glass    of    water
la- sleeping Is natural.    As n test,
the    nine-year-old       protestant
kuinst his morning Scrub    of    cold
fiter    that ho    may    escnpe    it by
Unking hnlf a pint of the fluid. Ho
TH jump ut Ihe opportunity.
Sleep  bus drawn  upon  the    water
the blood, and thu instinct of the
■mill   under  natural   conditions     is
1 replenish the circulatory    system
[-tl  distend   the  blood  vessels nnow.
ho food in tho stomuch which bud
much     to do    toward    Inducing
kep    hns    disappeared,    leaving    a
"[icons  substance   in  the  alimentary
anal.      Yet  man  would     wash    his
Ve nnd  leave these half-clogged ca-
jils do tho duties of another day.
[Brink a glass of cold water In the
|imu of cleanliness.      It becomes ono
the shortest and easiest of toilet
Mies.    It is swalloweil in n second,
hei  iu five    minutes    It    has passed
|>ni tho stomach, taking with it tho
gging secretions of tho alimentary
liis.    It hns loft behind tho sliinu-
that  goes  with  cold   water,  and
filling  the arterial  system  to  tho
truuil it puts a Spur to the circulu-
iii  Hint  lias grown sluggish  in tho
ht. It is ono of tho    greatest   of
takeners  nnd   ono  of  nature's  own
Enitilnnts.
Irink    a glass    of    water    beforo
nkfnst,    nnother beforo    luncheon
M   nnother beforo dinner.   Water ls
best,    cheapest    and  pleusantest
hdicinc.
A DANGER TO BABY.
RELIC OF PARNELL.
|sket Prosented by city of Edinburgh
Now lu Pawnshop.
I'hero il In the window of a pawn-
lip in .South London, among a
S-^"i- of unredeemed pledges, a
Ver cusket, which recalls the most
Jtlhotic political tragedy ot our
_piies, Roys Tho London Daily News,
is Burmountod by the thistle; It
ins an Imposing cont of arms; und
prayed upon it is tho legend: "Oaf-
presented by the Corporation ol
Knburgh along with Burgess Tick-
conferring tho Freedom of tho
Sty tin Charles .Stewart Parnell,
Bq., Af.P., July 20, IHHO."
k'hut touching relie of Parnell lies
Poro for sale. Besielo it is a label
fling that the prico nskeel is __..U.
''butting recently ln tho lobby ol
House of Commons with Air. T.
P O'Connor, M.P., ono of our repro-
Intutives mentioned this unhappy
frruinstuncc, and " I'. P." put for-
[iird the suggestion that the rnsket
[.lit to be boughl for the Irish na-
>n.
'Somoon'o wrote mo a letter about
said     Air.   O'Connor,   "evidently
tiping that  I would he the purchas-
___,__Uut nil I could reply was that it
a most Interesting relic of Par-
|l,   and   1   wns sorry  to  benr  whnt
happened    to It, but I bad not
money to onnblo mo lo   buy   it.
is,   Indeed,    nn  Interesting    relic,
id one's heart Is touched to    know
il   it   is  lying in  thnt  place.    I'm
I quite sure in whnt wuy it could
dono, but I th'nk that such a relic
trier all—ought to belong to tin)
_ysh nation. It is pitiful to see
pch Ihings scattered as the sport of
Lie; nntl of tliis at nny rato, we
rent assured, thnt iu    yours    to
sme such n relic woulel ho treasured
§V those who will come after us."
Kaslorii I' iinoral lutein.
[Some    curious    details    havo just
ached Paris   concerning the funor-
e-ereinoiiies  of   Norodom,   the  late
Bug  of   Cambodia.    Immediately   uf-
|r death the  body  was placed  on a
ed  of  state,    while  cannon  boomed
warn the pop'llaco to shave their
Wid...    Next dny  tho body  wus   em-
Iulinetl, according to ttneient cus-
jm. The face wns covered with n
)ld musk studded with diamonds
Lid other precious stones. On Ihc
end   was  placed   tbo undent crown,
iul    even    the slippers    on  tho fe.t
Istcnod   wilh  rare jewels.   Then tho
uly   was placed   in  u  kneeling  pos-
[tire and incused in an upright shouth.
goltl unel was sealed up in n mns-
}vc  cusket  ol   solid  gold.   '1 bun     it
II remain In the 1 hi one room, with
i.os praying night nnd tlay un-
thc  completion   of  tho  sanctuary
which the hotly will bo cremated,
[niy after this ceremony will tho
ew king Im! crowned.—London (lloliei.
It Coiluliily Was Dili),
.The Duke of lloxbiirgho hns in his
fani le nt Kelso n uuiuber of fine, flimsy portraits.
Some of the rooms nt Kelso nro
pii'owu o; en to the public on cor-
days, The Bite sometiiues tells
ht a  remark  that   he once    henrd    a
ranger make while looking through
j_)tcsc  rooms.
'the stranger had halted beneath
fwo paintings thai hung side by sido.
pl'hey     were portraits of    tho    third
uko and his son, l,ut tho falher had
Il i  painted    in  his childhood,   tho
fBoii  in  his ohl uge
It   wns    this     that  perplexed     tho
[Btranger.  lie studied the    portrait a
.mil? time.   Then In: suid:
"Is it possible that this gentleman
'was nn old mun when his lather was
_borh?"
Summer Croup
A croupy o-ttgh ls a dang-roti. thing
for tho little folks in summer time. The
_o»or that an.-in panic lt In Hauls to
cause serious lllnoas.  OlT* them
Shiloh's
Consumption
Cure Kn.cLung
It is pleasant to UKe, will ours Ibem
qiiluUy and has ao nnploasaat after
offtt-U.
At all .Irn.itl.U, lie, 60o ud 11.00 a bottle.
 MS.
Doctors hnvo preached ngninst Ihe
so-called -nothing medicines for
years, but they are still useil altogether too much. The fuct thut tlwy
put children to sleep is no sign thnt
they aro helpful. Ask your doctor
and he will tell you that you have
merely drugged your little one into
insensibility — that soothing medicines ._uro dangerous, lf your little
one needs a medicine give it Baby's
Own Tablets, unci you give it a medicine guaranteed to contain no opiate or harmful 'drug. You cnn give
these Tablets just us safely lo a new
born Infant ns to the well grown
child, and they will cure ull tho
minor ills of childhood. Mrs. J. M.
(lilpin, Bellhnven, Out., says: "Since
I gave my littlo one Baby's Own
Tablets thero hns been n marvellous
change in her appearance, ami sho is
growing splendidly. You may count,
mo nlways a friend to tho Tablets."
Ask your druggist, for this medicino,
or send 2.1 cents to the llr. Williams' Medicino Co., Brockville, (Int.,
nntl get a box by mail post paid.
Wbat is tho difference between a
botitpint. of flowers and tbe "bon-
epiet" of wine?—One makes a.nosegay,  nnd tho other a gny  nose.
Wilson's Fly Pads are the host fly killor,>
mndo.
Why ought pawnbrokers be good
chess players?—Because thoy nro always bundling "pawns."
We have no hesitation in uuylng thut
llr. J. li. kelloi.ir'H Dysentery Cordial
is without doulit the best inedii'Iiie over
hit rodiit-i-il for dysontory, diarrhoea,
cholm-n unil ull summer complaints, sen
-l.kiics-, etc. It prumptly gives rclicl
tend Sever fails to offset u positive
cure. Mothers should never be without
(i bottle when their children nro tet-'llt-
lng. 	
A clergyman nt Sing Sing recently
prefaced his remarks to the prisoners by saying thnt he was "glad to
see so lnrge a number present.  "
CItKAT THINGS KHOM LITTLE
OAUHKH (UtOW—lt takes vory little
lo derange the Btomach. Tho i-nuso inuy
ho Hliglit, a eolil. -oiiiotliiug eaten or
drunk, anxiety, worry, or Homo other
Kim|ilu cause', ilut if precaution- ho not
tiikt-n, this -Inililo t-a. so iiniv hnvo most
Bei'lou's consequences. Many a .hronli'iil-
ly delillltatiHl constitution to-elny owes
its tlcul nn I inn to siniplo causes not
ilciilt with in tbno. Keen tho digestive
nniiarnlu- iu healthy condition mul all
will lm well. l'nrmt'lpo'.H Ve-et-teililo Pills
aro hotter than any other for tho purpose.
Why is an author looking for writing fluid like n. coroner discharging
Ihe duties of his office?—Because he
is holding tin ink quest,
ANAEMIA-POOR BLOOD.
IIcndneheH,  Dizzim-HH, Heart Palpitation mul Consumption Follows.
Anaoraia — watory blood — in n
troachorous trouble. It ptoals insidiously from oljffbt symptoms to dnn-
goroufl (1180080, Tlm I bin, watery
blood flhowa itself at first, in palo
liim, wan face, brnithlc-fiftnof.fi, lu-ari
palpitation, lost appetite, If the
trouble is not chocked und cured
consumption follows; COUffMttff, spitting, dummy bight Kweats, a total
breakdown and death. What the
anaemic stltTerer needs is more blood
—moro strength, And there is nothing in the whole wide world will rIvo
now blood ami now strength ko surely and so npoodtly as Dr. Williams'
l'ink l'ills. Evory dose liidps to send
new, rich, rod blood coursing through
tho system, bringing strength to
u'cuk lungfl and all parts of the body,
Thousands testify to the truth of
these statements, among thein Miss
Knerlne Vilandiv, Ht. Germain. Quo.,
who says: "While nttonditlg school
my health began lo give way. The
troublo came nn gradually aad tin*
doctor who attended me said it was
duo to ovcrstudy, and that a rest
would put nie right. Hut, instead of
got ting better I urww weaker. I suf-
fored from head.,c he and dizziness,
and at night 1 did not sleep well. T
was troubled with pubis in the back,
my appetite left ine and 1 grew pale
as a corpse. Finally I became so
weak'I was forced to remain in bed.
As the doctor did not. help me any. I
asked iny father to get me Dr. Williams' Fink l'ills. lloforo 1 had used
two boxes there was an improvement,
and when! 1 hud taken a half dozen
boxes I Was again in porfoct health.
I beliovo all weak girls will find new
health if they will  take the pills."
Anaemia, Indigestion, heart trouble,
rheumatism, kidney trouble, nnd tin
special niliupnts of women nre nil
duo to poor blood, and are all cured
by Dr. Williams' Pink Fills. You can
get these pills from any medicino
denier, or by mail, post paid, at, 50
cents n box, or six boxes for 82.50,
by writing the T>r. Williams* Medicine Co., ibockville, Out.
The o.ly lawful claim to place a
Cockatle on the hat of a servant
arises out of tho fact of his muster
being in His Majesty'^ service.
NorvoNftness,   Dyspepsia,   In-
digestion, aud kiml.i-d nilm.-ntt., Uko
wing* tfofore the healing ijtaiilltloH uf South
American Nervine. Thomas IloHkliia, ut
Durham, Ont., took hit) preachor'H nri-
vlco, followed directions, and was cured
I>« in ut nun tiy of tho Workt form of nervous I'rostrution and I>ynpepn_n. liu lnui
recommondod ft to others with firatlfylriK
results. It's a tfrcat norve huil.fnr.~-12
LI mo on land sown with wheat hastens the maturity of the crop. Fro-
fessor Johnston snys tho same ls
true of nearly all cultivated crops.
Ita-1! Liniment Cures gift, Ktc
Certain nlbutninoid, mucilaginous,
nnd saccharine vegetable juices mako
excellent sympathetic inks; nnionp
the best, tire the juices of lemon, orange', apple nntl pear.
Miliar.'. LlDlMt cura Gar_e! li Con
Tho Lesson of tho Hour.—Slxtv seconds make a minute, sixty niinules
ninke an hour:
Ijpvor's Y-/, (Wise Hcatl) PiBlntortittit
.Soup Powder dil-trd In the Imlli, -ottrtis
tho  \M,l it  und  lil-in.ot-tH. US
Sartorial inversion.
"I exp'eetcd to find tbnt suit done,"
shinned tho customer.
"Oh, well, here's the other suit dun,"
sr-ld the tnllor, who wns n low wag,
and who bad a bill ln his hand.
tn th* Same Spirit.
T.nrry—I sent Minnie a garter ennko
In alcohol for n Joko. iiqrry—Whnt
did she do? I.nrry—Oh, sho returned
It In the same spirit In which It wus
sent.—Prlncoton Tiger.
THREE CENTURIES,
Annapolis Boys!'. C-1-bmrloii  During th*
Weak Kiullng: June ra-Soino Cnn-
•ellan Rtatory in»t»t.d.
Soven years ago tho City of St.
John's celebrated with appropriate
ceremonies and festivities the 400th
anniversary of John Cabot's landing
on the coast of Newfoundland. During tho week ending June 25, Annapolis Royal, in Nova Scotia, and
St. John, in New Brunswick, rendered similar honors to tho memory of
De Monts and Champlain, who 300
years ago explored the shores of tho
Day of l''undy, and gave tho, history
of Acadia a beginning. During most
of tho contury intervening between
ths events thus comnieinorntod.
North America bud boon neglected.
Distracted by the Reformation anil
religious wars, tho enterprising nations of . Europe bad not much
thought for colonization, especially
in tho latitudes north of Mexico. It
is truo, adventurous mariners who
had friends at court were enabled to
mako voyages to tho Atlantic Coast
of this continent. From England
camo Sebastian Cabot, John Cabot's
ion. Several years later cumc Ver-
razzano from France. In lf>_;4 Jacques Cartior began his voyage from
St, Malo. Fishermen nnd fur traders kopt up somo connection with
this side of tho Atlantic, but tho era
ot colonization did not begin till tho
opening of tbe 17th century.
Chauvin had made threo unsuccessful attempts to establish tho fur
trado at Tadousac, where the Sag-
uenay empties into tho Lower St.
Lawrence. Tho Winters proved too
severe for hiin. When ho died Aymar
do Chastcs, who had fought against
tlio Leaguo and won the friendship of
Henri IV., obtained from that King
a monopoly of tho North American
fur trado. Ho formed a company, to
which wero admitted the principal
merchants of tho West ports, who
had boon associated with Chauvin, #r
had engaged in tho fur trado on their
own account. Samuel do Champlain
had Just returned from tho West Indies. A placo on tho expedition was
offered to him by his friend do Chastcs. To Tontgrave, who had boon at
Tadousac with Chauvin in J lion, was
given tho command. But do Chastcs
was not destined to bo more successful than his predecessor. Pontgravo
and Chumplain wont to tho St. Law-
renco in 1603. Tho commercial re-
sults wero disappointing, and when
they returned tlio first news they
heard was that do Chastcs was dead.
Piorro du Guast, Sicur do Monts,
Gontlemati-in-Ordinary of tho King's
Chamber, and Governor of Tons, succeeded to tho monopoly held by do
Chastcs. Ills patent gave him power to colonize Acadia, a region defined as extending from the 40th to
tho 40th degree of north latitude.
Over this vast extent of continent ho
had vice-regal powers. He preserved
do Chcstes' old company. To obtain
settlors for his projected colony ho
was authorized to impress idlers and
tramps, and many a vagabond was
forced on ono or other of tho two
vessels with which Do Monts put to
sea ln 1004. Cuthollc priests and
Huguenot ministers took passage
with thorn. Duron do Poutrincourt
and other noblemen accompanied Do
Monts, Pontgravo and Champlain.
Do Monts sailed from Havre do Grace
oa April 7, 1004. Pontgravo, In command of tho second vessel, followed a
fow days later. Between the Oal-
vlnist ministers and tho Catholic
clergy on board thero was much controversy and some fighting. Ko, at
all events, wo nro told by Chain-
plain, who has left an account of this
voyagu, and of tho subsequent explorations and attempts at sol tie-
ment.
Liko Tontgravo and Champlain, Do
Monts had some experience of the
St. lAwronce. Ho had been wilh
Chauvin at Tadousac, and tho hardships suffered at thut placo warned
him awuy from It. Hu steered further south, hoping to find there a
milder region. His first landing placo
was what is now called Liverpool
harbor, on tho south-oast coast of
Nova Scotia. Ho was joined further
down tho coast by rontgravo, who
hnd seized four Basque fur traders
found trespassing. Tho southern
Shore of Nova Scotia was rounded,
and tho exploration of tho Bay of
Fundy was begun. Poutrincourt wns
captivated by tho beauty of Annapolis Basin, with its narrow entrance.
and wido land-locked expanse. Ho
asked and obtained a grant of it
from Do Monts. Poutrincourt called
his possession Port Royal. It held
that namo till tho place was captured by a British expedition from Massachusetts in 1710, after which it
was called Annapolis—tho City of
Anno—ln honor ot the Queen then
reigning over tho United Kingdom.
In tho present namo, "Annapolis
Royal," a part ol tho old ono survives. It is not,known on what day
Do Monts entered tho basin, but tho
people of Annapolis adopted June
21 as a very closo approximation to
tbo date, and their tercentenary celebration waa accordingly begun on
Tuesday.
It is known, * howevor, that ths
River St. John was entorod by Do
Monts on St.. John's Day, and named by  Champlain accordingly.
Dating Its beginning from 1005 Annapolis Royal can claim to be tho
oldest settlement in Canada, and the
soconel oldest ln North America, St.
Augustino, in Florida, nlono exceeding it ln nge. It ls threo years
older than Jamestown, tho first permanent settlement In Virginia, and
it is Bixteen yenrs older than Plymouth, tho colony founded by the
Pilgrim Fathors in Massachusetts.
Not till three years after he hud
helped to establish tho Fort Royal
colony did I'hampiVln found tho   old
City of Quebec.
—~________». >
64 Yenrs ol Fenny Post.
It is now 04 years since tho penny
postago was established, and it mny
interest thoso who wore not born
then to know thnt previous t» that
timo (1840) it took ls. 2 1-Sd tor
post a letter from London to Kilmarnock.
For cramps from chill apply n milliard poultice over seat of pain.
Your Liver
Is lt acting well? Bowels
regfilar? Digestion good? II
not, remember Ayer's Pills.
The kind you have known all
yOUr Hie. *.0..-j-rOo..Lo-rel..___M.
Want your moustache or beard
la beautiful Drown or rich black? Use
BUCKINGHAM'S DYE
yiTfr on^
CURE THE MOST
EXTREME CASES
Stone   in   the   Kidneys  Cannot
Stand Before Dodd's Kidney
Pills.
Mr. 8. A. Cas-lily, or Ottawa, Permanent!],
Onroil nfler Years of Suffering by tbe
Great Canadian Kidney Beuieriy.
Ottawa, Ont., Aug. 22.—(Special).
While all Canada knows that Dodd's
Kldnoy Pills aro tho. standard remedy for all t-ldnoy'Coinplaints, It may
surprise somo people to know they
curo such oxtr«p-e cases as Stone ln
the Kidneys. Yet that is what they
have clone right hero in Ottawa.
Mr. S. A. Cassldy, the plan cured,
ts the well-known proprietor of the
Bijou H__Ud on Met^cnlt street, and
in an interview he ^nyS: "My friends
all know that I have been a martyr
Ch Stono ih the Kjdnoys for yofirs.
Thoy .mow that besides consulting
tho bost doctors in tno city and trying overy medicino I could think of
I was ona'ie to got better.
"Soma timo ago a friend told me
Dodd's Kie.ney Pills Would cure me.
As-a last resort 1 tried thei'n, and
they have cured rap.
"T could not ini-ginc more severe
suffering than ono endures who has
Stono in tho Kidneys, and I feel tha
greatest gratitude to Dodd's Kidney
Pills."
If tho disease is of tho kidneys, or
from tho kidneys, Dodd's Kldnoy
Pills will cure lt.
If a man be gracious to strangers,
it shows that ho Is a citizen of the
world, and thut his heart is no island cut nit' from other lands, but a
continent thut joins them.
Wilson's Fly Pads will olear yonr home
of flies.
What is tho difference between n
man In a 'bus and ono in passion?—
Ono rides in a stage, antl tho other
strides ln a rage.
Kidney Duty.-it i. th. p-rti-iiiai
function   of   ths  kidneys    to    Alter    out
?ol.ons which pnss through them - Into
ho blood. When the kidneys are diseased they cannot do thoir whole duty,
and should havo the help and strength
that South American Kidney Curo wilt
afford in any und all forms of -kidney
disorder,   lt relieves ln tl hours.—14
This is how a pious l'Vench priesl
gave out uii announcement of a procession that wus te> tako place on
tho next day: "If It rains in the
morning, tho procession will toke
plnco in the aftornnetn; and, if it
rains in tho afternoon, tho procession will tnko place in tho morning."
IT NKKllH NO TKHT1MON1AL.—lt ls
a guuranti'u In ItHolf. lf Ic-lliitoninltt aro
required thoy could lie furrd-hed hv the
thousand- from ull sorts anil t-onditloii-
of men in widely dirfori'lit places. Muny
medicines uro put forth evory year which
have' hut an ephemeral existence und then
uro liourd of no moro. Dr. Thomas' Kr-
iectrl- Oil has trrown In reputation overy
day slnt-e it  llrst  mado Its appearance.
For I'eiin.Y-n-l.inors. — A balloon
ascent should always be described ln
inflated  language?.
Those   Worrying   Piles!    o >e
application of Dr. Agniiw'ii Ointment
will rIvo you comfort. Applied overy
nlglit for tlii'cii to six nifrlits and a cure
Is elToctuil In tho most -lublmrn runes of
llllnil. .Heeding, or ltdilug Piles. llr.
Aprnew'u Ointment iiiimi Ktvmu and all
ItrtiliiK ami burning stein diseases. It
mis like.magi..   115 cents.—1..   -,
IOxempt-o.1 from enro is not h**U>pi-
ness; on the contrary, a certnln ete-
greo of card ls essential to pi-oui^te
enjoyment. ,    t
> t'
Miliar.'. Liniment Cons Distemper,
Impatience dries  tbo blood    sooner
than ago or sorrow.
Wilson's Fly Pads ore sold by all Druggists and Qeneral Sores,
The beginning of faith is action;
and bo only believes who struggles—
not ho who merely thinks a question
over. _____________
Dr. Agnew's Curo for the Heart
acts directly and quickly, stimulates
ths hoart's action, stops most acute
pain, dispels till sfgns of weakness, ljut-
torltlg, slaking, snrutherlng, or palpitation. This wonderful cure in tho sturdy
ship which carries the heart-sick pa-
ttout  Into   tha    haven    of    radhent    and
fierfect hoalth. Cllves relief la urost acute
nrm. ot heart dlseaeo In 30 minutes.—11
Limit your wants. Tho "must" is
hard; and -ot solely by this "must"
can wo show bow it is witb us in our
inner man. To live according to caprice requires no peculiar powers.
I was cured of Acute Bronchitis by
MINAUD'S LINIMENT.
J. M. CAMPBELL.
Bay of Islands.
1 wns cured of Fticiul Neuralgia by
MINAUD'S LINIMENT.
WM. HAN1ELS.
Hpringhill, N.  S.
I wus cured of Chronic Ithcuinutisin
by MINAUD'S LINIMENT
GEO. TING-BY.
Albert Co., N. B.
He was bound to bi accurate, and
so ho daohiod It prudent to describe
the woman's costume thus: "Sho
wore nn elegant suit ot something
or other cut bias, ami trimmed endwise."
AN KNI) TO BILIOUS Hl-AIIAl'lIl.-
Blflousnuss, which Is caused li- exe.„_lvu
liilo ln tbo stomach, lias a marked client on the nerve-, anil often manifests
Itself by severe headache. This Ih the
most distressing h-uilorhe one run have
There uro hoailiirln-s from cold, from la-
vi-., nnd troll! other causes, hut tbo inoHt
excruciating of all Is tbo IiIUhuh Iii-iiiI-
uclie. I'ariiie'li'o'H Yoei'tulile Pills will
CWre lt —cure It almost immediately. It
Will lllsappoar as soon as tho 1'llln operate. There Is nothing surer in the treatment of bilious headache.
When Boys Tuke the Hod Meekly.
At fishing time.
Aged Norw. .tan S-l:l.-rs.
A rather humorous caso ho. come
beforo tho Ikqinrtment of tho Interior
respecting n Norwegian who ouine to
tho Immigration agent nt f.t. Paul.
Tho man, whoso name is Ollbertaoil,
gnvo his ago ns 7J1, nnd 'Stated that
ho wns on his wnv to Welasliiwln I*
tuleo up a homestead, so that ho
could malo a homo for his mot her
whoso npe wns Hl.'l. The lady Is said
to ho liu In nhd ffenrtv nnd nble lo
tnke cure of a home, and Cill.ortson
himself Is n mnn ivhn v,,|,| not he
'"'en f-.r    mora    thun to j-eel'S   ill
Bern]
surf*-"|i ot Ote syiltftl.   Thoy offer Ope Ilun.l
red Dollafs -Of Sny ct—« It (tails IP o] '
for circuit!- anil t-fthm-ill-is.    Afl<"
t. 1. (Ill BNBY 4 CX).
Sold by all (JruriiiiH ns. &
Hall's Family fills are the best      .\
lt Is said that n tablespoonful of
turpentine aeldnel to a pall of water
will elislnfect a cesspool instantly,
Hint In tho slik chamber will prove
a powerful auxiliary against germs
and bad odors.
1    X-noVts-V* for Reefr'o—n Dunn,
Uo Jato ceWsTH ;<7 brtiai fast wttl
be a lila to make oxidises that "they
did nni Hoar thnruselvcs nulled" in
the lm.re, aiid huiiNcmnftlK, knuckles
will escape a sore trlul at the hands
of unwilling risers, for door knockers are now fastened to up-to-elato
.bodroolli doors. Bays The London
ilni'v Mail. They uro not only ex-
c,-eT*r-Bljr useful, but very quaint, and
ornai^Wal, heing exact replicas in
lira! si* in a smaller size of the famous . Durham Sanctuary knocker.
Ti.i.-, fenocker with its gargoylo head
dates from the Norman times, when
it was tie privilege of the church to
protect fugitives ut her. portals. Tho
fugitive Jiud only to knock, and at
any hour'of the duy or night tho
door would be opcnc_ to him by tho
porter who dwelt in rpoms above.
The moment ho was within tho
chti-ch a hell would announce that
somo ono had taken sanctuary. lio
was robed In a black cloth gown
with St. Ciithbert's yellow cross upon tho loft shoulder, and wns taken
to a room, where he was kept ln
safety for tlilrty-seven days.
rhotof raplis on Cotton.
A man in Maine has recently completed a process for photograplilng In
indelible ink on cotton cloth. Tho
process is naid to bo exceedingly
simple), tho bcnsltizlng, toning nnd
sizing being dono at thu same time
with one solution. Iho sensitizing
medium will kejcp for a long timo
unless exposed to the light. When
tbo sensitized cloth is exposed to the
light in a printing frame only a fow
seconds of sunlight are required to
print the outlines of the image, which
develops fully tii n vigorous print in
clear water. The color is a solid engraving black, —it by a simple ton-
ing process beforo tho prints aro
dried can bo cliunged to a warm
brown, black or sopla. Theso colors
arc fust and will stand washing with
soap.
Visited Parliament Tower.
During tho last fiscal year 12,709
persons visited tho tower of the
House of Commons In Ottawa, and
registered. Frrfin Ontario thero were
7,04(1; from fi.olioo, 2,Oil..; from
Nova Scotia, 81; from New Brunswick, 08; from llrltlsh Columbia, oH;
from Trinco Edward "Island, 8; from
Manitoba, 02; from tho Northwest
Territories, 78; from tho United
States, 11314 and from Europe,
825.
=__=;
No man can soo thnt In another
which Is tbo true man. The nnlmnl
man he can perceive; bnt that whieth
Is oaiTroel within—tho senil—no man
can sets. Wo see tho hodtrt and we infer thut tho mind is b.v whnt it workout into distinct or" visible conditions.
Taking I"ursol_s.^-IJollceihon.
Much of tho biliousness and gout
which come under the notliw of the
medical profession lu due io the closs
und stilling condition of our atmosphere—in other words, to the want
of proper veurtilutlon. and chiefly to
an insufficiency of air inlets.
TROUBLE WITH
THE KIDNEYS.
Ailments of the Most Painful Nature Result-Prompt
Cure Comes With the Use of
Dr.Chase's Kidney-Liver Pills
Wilson's Fly Pails.   Three hundred limes
cheaper than sticky paper.
Suites to tho Sweet,—Bridal Trolls
seatix.
From every part of tho broad land
come letters of recommendation for
l)r. Chase's Kidney-Liver l'ills.
Thoy sceln to bu well suited to
yio noods pf many peoplo, who obtain no beneJlt from ordinary kidney
itiei II cities.
Whdn you wait to think of tho
ho-Ts of cures they nro making it Is
no wonder they havo such an cnor-
mpUB sard.
Mfs. Caswell Reiel, Orrvlllo, Mus-
koka, Out., wrllos;—"For nearly
twenty years I wits trembled with
kldnoy disease, and have recently
been completely cured by using threo
boxes of Dr. Chaso's Klclney-Llvor
Pills. I have tried a great many
remedies, but never seemed to get
anything to do mo much good until
I used these pills."
Mr. John Ooarin, nn old resident
of Thorold, Ont., states: "Kor twenty years I Was badly aljllctod with
kidney troubles, indigestion and
bladder dprangonionts. During thnt
time I was a great sufferer, and had
to got up six to twelve times nightly to pass water. I tried different
doctors and used all sorts of medicines to no avail.
"-'-Wily I bogan using Dr. Chaso's
Klelney-ljvor Pills and soon found
relief. Thus encouraged I continued
to uso those pills, and nfter having
I n lo-n twelvo boxon was again in perfect health and vigor. I can sleep
undisturbed, tho pains in my kidneys
and buck ure gone, antl I am feeling
well and strong. I consider Dr.
Chaso's Kldney-Llver Pills a grent
boon to suffering humanity, and had
I known about them when I was
n young man could have ogcavped siif-,;
fering all tho bost years of juy
I life."
Dr.    Chaso's    Kldney-LiVor     Pills,
one pill a doso,  25 Cents a box,   at.
all dealers,    or    Edmanson,  Bates &
Company,   Toronto.    To protect ybu
against imitations,  the portrait and
! signature of   Dr.  A. W.  Chase,    the
' famous receipt book   author, are' oh
'overy box. .        ....
FARMERS will find it to their advantage to consign their CHAIN  to
ROBERT MUIR & CO., Winnipeg
WHO pay highest prices and make prompt rctnrns. Advances made on
Consignments. Correspondence solicited. Established 1880. Reference—
Union Bank of Canada.
RE
KNUMS1I  SP.VYIN   MNIMKNT
Uemovps all haid, Rt.ft or culloumMl
liiiiiiiM ami tliemi:'!ii\H from horses, blood
spavin, curbs, Hplinta, rin-jrhonu. nwecuuy,
nt ilinn, hpniiti.i; cures Hore uinl swoll.m
throat, coughs, etc. Havo $50 by thu
uso of on. hot tic Wui i,i ul i'il thu most
wonderful  lilcmisli (luro uver known.
Cruel.—Fair One (during nn interval In tho vulsi-): "You're vttry fond
of dancing, aren't you?" Hrown:
'Viuih, 1 go in for lt u good deal."
Fair Ono: "I wonder you don't
learn!"
Ther* la more Cntarrh In thl- lecttun of the
country  than all other dluuea put ttcether,
and until the lost fvw years was supposed to he
Incurable. For a (treat many years doctors pro-
nounct.il It a local disease and prescribed local
remedies, and by constantly falling to curt with
local treatment, pronounced It Incurably. Hci-
ence has $rov_n catarrh io Ira a tonftttuMalta)
dlsca-A nnd thstcfore riftjutrea constitutional
treatment Haul's Catarrh Cute, fliannfactut-ed
by P. J. ChcficV A Co., Tt»]c.1o, Ohio, |s the only
-■onfllitMtloi'nl tul*u on tne mtirKoa It fa taken
Internally In ddscfi front 10 tirOps to m teaspoonful. It sefs mrtttly on the btodd ant) mucoui
 _ __._. __...r_.*_     *.._.■ Aw** fin,, Hum.
H's Liniment Cnres Dipfatketo
Tencher, "What part of speech in
the  word   'egu''."   Hoy:   "Noun,  Blr,"
'What i.s itb tfrmler'?* "Can't Bay,
sir, till it is hatched'." "Well, then,
my lad, you can't tell me the COSO?"
"Oh, yOB4 sir—the shell."
WIlRon'a Fly Pads; the original and only
genuine,   Avoid cheap imitations.
It is tho temper of « hlntlo that
must he the proof of a good sword,
and not the gilding 6f the hilt or the
richness of tlh- HcaUbard; ho it is nut
his grundmir und possessions Unit
mnke u man entisidcrahlo, but intrinsic merit.
There never u»h uud novel will ho a
ii n I viii hiiI panajre*. In one remedy for
nil ill:, to whirl- llonh 1h lielr—tho very
no tars    of    muny   turn lives    being  such
hut   were  tho  JteniiH  of  other   nml   dllTer-
•ntly   'ii'iiti'il   .U-ii'iiM'H   rooted   In   thu   h>h-
em   of   the   put lent— what   would   relieve
mo    ill    i"    turn    would    u-^Kiavate  the
other       We    hu\e,    however,   In   Uuiniue
Win**   when   obtainable   In   i.oun.l,   unadul-
,orated   stut.o,   u   lomedy   for   many   and
-riuvouH ills.      Jiv its gradual   and    pull
ions   uao    the    .fnileat    syHlemH    ure  ind
ni i>   f'lii'Mili'KcHi,. <t  and   Htrniifcih   by   th>:
idiot nre    which   ijuintuo   uxerle   on nature's  own   raHLonitlvufl.      lt   rello\en  tho
-oopirig   spirits at -thoso   with   whom   u
roidc  lit ii it- of T   rtdU  despondency and
lack   of  intrest  iu  life  is  a  liiM-itM-,   and
by   t niNipiill/.iiiK   'liu   nerves,   disposes   to
uinl   aud   relrcN Mik   hli-vp—Imparts   vl|f-
i-    to    the   act)un of tho blood,    which,
■ing    st iinulatfii     courses    through    tho
■iii-s.    hi ri-|i-rtlui_ ,ii|.    | lm   In-iili by   animal
functions of  the system,   thereby  inaklnx
activity    a    noce-Muy    result,      strengthening   Uiu   fniinit  und   giving   lifo   to   the
digestive    organs    w tilth     naturally      ilium ud     Increased    Huhstftnce—result    improved  appetite.     Northrop   &.  l.ymnn  ol
Toronto  havo given   to  tlm  public    their
Huoerior Qulnlno ttlue at  the  usunl   rate
and,   ganged    by    tlm    oidnion    of    scientist h,   tlie   wlno   i< i'in oiirt.i-.i   nearest   perfection of any In tlio market.      All druggists  ai-l.   It.
We douhle all the evils of our fate
hy dwelling on fiem; u scratch he-
coines a wound; ii slight an injury; a
jest, an insult, n small peril a great
danger, and a slight sickness often
emls in death h> brooding apprehensions.
: TO HANDLE YOUR SHIpMtHTI
I YOU" GRAIN TO A MLtAILC FIRM
__-!■_ Mffr   .*	
\il    T (jl LI     If Cl-lX    fftOMPT IE1VI0E AND OAREFOL AfTlMTION
t, Bb dtd^slj^jtd ^Is/oar husfneaB snjl wty.qtdCAvar to give sAdpficllos.
Ciph S'lv^trfcod ou (^)iiKJeuiuout3. t^foreace: Uuiou Jhinjc of Gonads.
iwjpt &XA^iAoHm\D OUAJS C0UUI6SI0N     m\***m ******   ■■■%, ■  Hk. ■  ■ Jmmr
prttln Exohongc, Winnipeg. ^"^ * ^^ *        mm ^ ^^
MARCHWELLS GRAIN CO.
grata (u car lots botiKlit on track or .sold oi
idem i.hkIc.     rrouipt returns,     t'orrosponel
Any _ank In Winnipc')..
ROOM  414,  OllAlN  EX
or .sold on conimltmlon.   Hi-iihoiiuIiIo
• ■nr,'   solicited.    Itiifoielnco:
ni.DO.. WINNIPEG.
Ar*   Vou   Bulldln/. T      If  so,   us*
EDDY'S IMPERVIOUS SHEATHING
Th* -Bas.  Bulldlne Pap*r Mad*.
It I. -»ry much itronr.r »nd thlck.r tha. uy «tk*r (Urr«l ar timtld-
tnf) p.p.r. It la lmpervlotti to wind, ...p. out cold, kMpl tn haat, ear*
rl.i no amall or odor, abaorba no molatura, Imparta n. tn.nu or flavor ta
anythlnK with which It come. In cont.1%. 11 li lar(.lr aird ant only lar
•h.atlnir. bouaea, but fnr UnlnK cold atorana tiullilinita. rafrlR.ratora. dalr-
Ua. .raainarlM, and all plaraa wher. tli* olii.rt ta to k«p aa avaa aad
aalfaru tamptratur.,  and at tha lama lima avoiding; dampnaaa.
Writ, aur ArjenU, TEES - PERS8E, Wlnnlpag, far aamal.a.
Tha E. B. EODY CO., Llmitod, HULL.
Erakino pUKzled Du* wlt.s nf his no
qualntctnco by Inscribing on n lea-
chest tlio words"Tii doces." H wns
.some Minn before llii'.v found etut tin1
wit   erf    (his    literal   translation—
'Thotl   ti'ue-'lu-.st."
Wilson's  l:ly Pads.   Ono 10 cent packet
has uctunlly killed u Uusltol of flies,
Very Nntnrul Philosophy.—"Why
dens li^htninfr ko rarolv strike1 in
the same place?" asked q Board-
school ti-nt'llt't' eif tin* now hoy In I In-
cluss of natural philosophy, "Oh,"
sniel tlm hoy, Vbecause it nover
nefels toi"
The principal centres for I he- manufacture of t-eireil ornaments aro < l*•-
nou, Nttpli-H, Loffhorn, unel Marseilles. At Leghorn moro thun u thousand w-onit'ti aro employed, in tin-
manufacture of coral beads for necklaces, etc.
To iiiuki! it good eon liner for tnr-
paullns, nilel twelvo ounces nf bceB-
wux to ono gallon of linseed oil and
hoil well for twto hours. First prluio
flu' canvas with   this   mixture,   und
thou uso ii  Ihmu-uiI of plain nil   for
mixing  the paint.
Ti-siIiijc n itn. nr.
The pconnnile'itl young 111:111 tnnk his
uxor to 0..1' of  the-  lirst  barbers   In
town lo he honed,   Ubtui'iilng tn got it,
he found It ready for hiin.
I'll   iriiri'iint  thnt   edge,"   snld   the
barber,
"It lines look pretty sharp," ' lei the
iiiiin, nntl he Iipkiiii lo feel of . . e.l^e
wilh his thtiinl).
"Hut I won't wnrriint It lf you do
Hint," declared the bnrbor. "It's tho
worst thing you could possibly do, You
inlj'ht better cut your nails wit'., it
lliiin run your linger across the edge
ouee, or slinvo with It for 11 montli.
There's  nolhlu;; like knowing it  lUlllg
or two," the Darbor added.—Uxclianga
BLAIR'S GOUT AND
RHEUMATIC PIUS
Tl^TlMOIflAL from  Ihe Uie SIR SAMUEL llAKEJt.  the faruoue Nile ^xnlorer.
"Kewloo   Atiimt,   Dfvoa.   Dear   Sire—t
have delayed  my  thanke ae  1  wiehed  to
tent tlio ftjoct of  lllaii-'e I'llle by a euBi-
rlfiij  Interval of tiino.
"For  ten  yean   I   had   euOered   acutely
I from  (Jout and   life  had   lost  Ita  attrae-
1 tloo  oiviiiL'  to   the  uncertainty  of  health
. and    Binlil.'ii    viAltatlone    of   Uie  enemy
which pruf.uiiti.-il me for months, or weeks
according to the virulence of the attacks.
"Blair's Pills huve rendered me Immense
service,   as   I   no   longer  fear  an   attack
of   '.out.
"Kor the last twenty months I have
been comnarnlively free, as one Or two
attempted visitations have been Immediately -I'mniMiii out by the assistance of
Lllalr's I-ills.
"Truly yours (Signed) Band. W. Baker.
I.yiimn Sous A, Co., Montreal and Tor*
onto; Tlm Hols Drug Co., Winnipeg; aad
Martin, Hole 4 Wynne Co., Winnipeg.
A Novel NlfM Clnok.
A nowl ni«lit clock Of IVrtfpssor
fTJrtli of Munich rcntnJn.i an oloctrlc
'anip which llj^hlil up when a Imltuti
in prm-flod and ulU<h (lii-Mi.n nn pn-
'ul'ROd tiluidnw (<f tin' dial upon the
■idling. 'Jliough iho shadow litis tho
li/o   nf a church   cluck tlm grmlly
inugtuded    lui.n.H    (tod     1ij.uivm    aio
shuip uud distfnett
SllHI'-f.
"Tho impadoncc <ir tbnt younc broth"
or of mine!" exclaimed Mit. Nagger*
"Ho J. st  told   uie   1   win.  no chlckou
when i married jrou."
"Well." iv[i|i..| her uiiHympnthi'lIc
luislmud, "lliat'H Tnio ciiniiKiu You
wcri'ii't a chicken, wero you?"
"No,  1  WQ1 n  goose*"
' A Httle Sunlight Soap will clean
cut glass and other articles until
they shine nnd .parkle. Sunlight
Soap will wash other things than
clothes. *•
tl.de It ll.l.f.
Dr. John lierr. In his book of memoirs, recalls a number of humorous
Ki'iitih Htnrh'M. Kor exitiiiple, there ti
the utory of the "argumontutlvely
tipsy" Beot, who, calllnR on the iuIiiIh-
tcr and belni; told to go home and return the next rtii.v v . n he wiih sober,
replied, "Mun, inlnlsit'i', when I'm sober I dlnna enre for rellgloUB tiinvi'iHii-
tlon." Then there is the story nbout
Thomas Thorp, who died leaving bis
fortune to n poor rolatlvo on condition
thnt a bendstoiic with the namo of the
■aid Tlmnins 'J'liorp nnd u verse of
poetry be erected lieslele the grave.
Costing so much n word I i chisel letters in the stone, tbo poor relative ordered thnt tbo poetry Hliotilil ho brief.
Upon his refusal to approve on nccount of their too great length th*
lines
Her. llwi th- enrp
Of Thomas Thorp,
tb* following \vnn finnlly ofTered and
aeeepted:
Thorp".
_.__.    Curina.
Why is it lhat Ayer's Hair
Vigor does so many remarkable things? Because it is a
hair food. It feeds the hair,
puis new life into it. The hair
Hair Vigor
cannot keep from growing.
And gradually all the dark,
rich color of early life comes
back to gray hair.
- Wh.n I flr.1 u._- Ayar-i Hair Vlaw lay
h.lr win about all gray. Hut now It I. a uk-a
rich lilu.k, an- a. tlifck a, I cmil- wl.li
JAtul. Hi'ba.i  Kl.urraMiri--. TuKuuibla
Ala.
iTMro.,
II 00 a linltla.
AjMnjifUlj.
(. o. a. .- _—
.,*-ll,    Mh„
Gray Hair
MV    N    \J    No    49S
v -.
■\
-.-*_
___i_a
c
\
I
i
i" i
f\
V>!
II ■
I
lit. Pleasant  Advocate.
t Et-tablished April 8,1899.)
MRS. R. Whitney, Publisher
'*)ri-_CH: 26-T> West minster avenne.
•Esoxnoi   Okkiok—80 Fleet street,
l.uiieton, R, C,  England Where it
'He of "Tbe Advocate" is kept for
Vleiton.
Tel. B1405.
•Htibneription $1 a year   payable   in
Advance.
.   3 cents a Oopy.
*_f otices of Births, Marriages, aud Den His
published free of charge.
For all City Advertizing, also South Vancouver Municipal advertizing
consult   The   Advocate.
Vancouver, B. C, Oct.,  39. 1904.
BftroRK another issue of the "Advocate" is published the Electors all
ovor ths Dominion ot Canada will hnve
declared tlieiir choice of men wbo aro to
go to the National Capitol to make laws,
decide on —ensures for Canada's weal
or woe, It ls most urgent that every
man entitled to a vote should realize it
a responsible duty to cast that voto for
men who are statesmen, not for politicians who would sac.i'ilice their country's
: good for personal gain or through personal t.m.r' . What Canadians waut is
reprcsei. .ative.s who are conscieu tious
and   willing to    serve    their country
1 through patriotism even nt self-sacrifice.
. Just mi tbo soldier fights for his native
,,and ou tbe battle field, sacrificing self,
should honorable    men   serve    their
.country in ber legislative halls.
We believe   the  Conservative policy
favorable   to  Canadian   interests   and
1 their protection, and feel coiifielenI thut
November ltd, will see the dawn of
increasing prosperity  for  the country
1 and  tbe election  of . a Conservative
. Government.
1TI1* Conservative party have proven
1 themselves the trae frionds of tho work-
■ Ing people by establishing Experiment nl
. farms, a Government Burouu at
1 Ottawa    whioh    gives      employment
to hundreds of printters
ifrom all parts of Ciiuatln, Inter-
(Colonial Railway, eto., etc., eto.
It is timo for a change.
The Conservative Rail)'.
On Tuesday eveuiug a very large
number of the Electors of Mt. Pleasaut
attended the Conservative Rally in
Mason's Hull, aud wore fully repaid by
hearing the speeches. Tlio nndieuce was
attontivo throughout nud no interruptions or unruly behaviov occurred, such
as frequeutly happens at a political
gathering.
Mr. A. H. B. Macgownu, M. P. P.,
was the first speaker and dealt with the
organization work of the Conservatives
locally and spoke on the Grand Trunk
Pucilie coutraot, showiug that it must
under the tonus remain a private
owned couocrn bb long aud longer as
tbo youngest person present were ulive.
Mr. R. Cussiely, K. C, of Victoria,
wus the next speaker, autl gnve a splcud'
id speech ou the questions of the campaign. He described bow the Liberals
had assumed the Conservative policy
siuce coming iuto power, autl illustrated
the weakness of the Liberal party by
the wuy its strongest unel most able
men had left it—Mr. Tarte, Mr. Blair
and Mr MoDougall the Auditor—and
said Mr. Blair's resignation and silenco
spoke louder limn words lu etnideiiiua-
tiou of the Laurier Covorninout.
Mr. Ellis, who was introduced as the
uext M. P. for Vancouver, wus received
with loud cheers. lie dealt at some
lougth with the transportation problem,
reminding his hearers that the Grand
Trunk P tciflc wus the lust link betweeu
East aud West that they could forgo for
the next titfy years, and if the plan of
the Government was carried out thoy
Would be bound by it to the interests of
stockholders aud not to those of the peo
pie. He theu went nt length into the
details of the con tract. Ho was not
going to admit that governments-could
not operate railways successfully. Ho
noticed tliut municipalities could control
their public utilities to tlie sutisfaccion
of the ratepayers, nud be bud heard no
complaint because the City of Vnueou
ver owuetl its water-works system autl
operated it. The. railway qnestiou wns
a most importautuut one, aud it was
going to turn out tho Laurier Govern
ment on November 8&,   (Cheers).
Mr. C. M. Woodworth of Duwsou,
was tlio lust speaker, and suid ho would
only huve a "heiirt-to-he,irt tak" with
them for a few minutes. He cougrntu
luted the present Government on its
ability to look after its own. Thoy
uegleetcel the fisheries, they left the
lumber industry to shift for itself, and
they took uo notice of the sottlers along
tho line, but the'y oared for their owu,
Their style 01 running elections in tho
Yukon wns original and effective.
FURNITURE
Easv Time Payments.
We carry a nice liue of Furniture to
suit all classes. Bed Lounges, Bedroom
Suits, Rockers, Oilcloth, Linoleum,
Stoves, Window Shades, etc. Cash or
Easy Pnyuients.   No interest
LOCAL   ITEMS.
oharged.
I
■
iflx.   PLEASANT  CHURCHES.
Baj-tint.
.M_v_-ntli avenue, b_twe.11 Westminster ave
Mline unit Quelle. Blruel. HKHV1CKS al II u. in.
un.nS 7:30 p.m.; Suoelay School at -iill) p. in
|_BeV.*,A> W. Mi'ieexl, I'li.lin. H.nlile'llre' 1611
..Jilltli avenue, ea.t.
Mbthodi.it.
.i:,iri|i'rnl Slut    nml HtaKtmllUler avenues,
.MBUVII.'KH hi 11 a. in., ami 7 fi. in.; Hun.liiv
L.'liehe>'>l anil Bible Oi.it -Hill p.m. lie'v. ... h
.J'elh.rlngtou, B. A., H I)., I'n.lnr,
. Pier.uiiHKi' I'-ll K)i'V,;t,lli itve'iini', went. Te'le-
, phouu IU'.isi
-Presbyterian.
function ol Wu.tlillD.ler aveuue snd West-
^mlnmer road. SKimrjis m ]i ii. in., mul
_'-• :ao p, m,; Sunday School at3:SO p.m. Uev.
''iy.n'..\. Wilunii, II. A.. Pastor. .IiniM'i-nrtier nt
.Kijfhtli avenue and Ontario Hlreet.   Tel. It—..
St Michael k, (Anglican).
(t'onu'r Weatnllll.lur rotui nun I'rluee lCilwiinl
J»r.**"< SKHVIi'KS ul 11 h. in., iimliilUl p.m.,
.'Inly Horn—union li-l mul lid HiindayK 111 i'hi-Ii
month after morninii priiyi'r.'id nnd -itli Bun
itiyi ni hn. in, Sumlny BellOOl ni S|Sf
.Bev. ii. II. Wlls.ui. lteitnr.
Reetory -72 Thirteenth avenue, cast
.ptlOBS B1799.
ACVRNTISTS.
. Advuui Chrimlsi) I'huritli (uoi7l)i dny A,).
/«.Ol).l.J uortier Ninth avenue alnl Wi'stniln
aler road. Nervine* 11 h. ui., and 7::ui p.m.,
.Sunday -rhool at 10 a.m. Young people.'
_Soeletyi,I Loyal Worker* 0/ Ohrlltlsn I'll'lt'it-
'.for meeta every Slin4syavepftjEj.t0;4.o'olo.l,
,Trayer-meellu|t Wednuadny nlght-at HoYloi-k,
A Hallowe'en Frolic.
p.
Tele
-•.Young Peoples Societies,
SUNDAY.
Loyiu     ,>rkers of Christian Endeavor
aleut nt 15 minutes to 7,  every  Sunday
•veiling iu  Advent Christian Church,
FOrner muoi nvo. turf. Vfrmimtiisti.' no,
MONDAY.
•      r
.-Epworth   League of   Mt.    Pleasnnt
Methodist Church meets at 8 p. 111.
.j>. V..P. U,, meets in Mt. Pleasant
j/Uptist I'limreli at 8 p. m.
TUESDAY.
-The Y. P. S. 0. E,, meets ut 8 p. 111
Aa Mt.Plea«»iiaut Presbyterian Church.
*See When Your Lodge Meets
MONDAY.
The 2d and lth Mondays of the month
fiowtf "Vtfn.'onyi'r,  I.  0.  P.,  meets ut
Jp m,
TUESDAY.
^U.'PlBn»nut Lodge No. 1ft,  I.O.O.F.
weets at 8 p. in.
r THURSDAY.
i Vancouver  Council   No.  31 In,   Canadian Order of Ohosen Friends ninelK
Jlli-MmI illi Thursdays of the mouth.
\» FRIDAY.
Alexandra Hive No 7, Ladios of the
Jlureiibeoii holds1** regulnr meetings on
ih* 1st, nml Hei Fridays of the month
'Tis the night when the spirit of mis
chies breaks loose
And the spirites nud the spooks join
in plnyiug the deuce.
This is the night of all the year when
the grown-ups can lay nsitle dignity liko
nu uncomfortable garment uud join
with tlie youngest in nn old-fashioned
Hallowe'en frolic.
Mtiny nre the charms b.v menus of
wbicli one may consult tho oracle 011
this one' night of all tho yeur nnd have
perfect faith iu the result, for however
niisehievons the Hnllowe-eu sprite's mny
bo ouly good spirits roum tho earth on
that night.
Tho Three Bowl Test is warrantod to
foretell tho sort of time one may '00k
for iu Iovo affairs. Three bowls are
placed upon the table one of which is
empty, the second filled with meal nuel
tho third with elonr wnter. One after
the other the young men are blindfolded
and led toward tho tnblo being advised
on the way to plaoe their right baud in
whichever howl they may select. Of
course the selection of the empty bowl
indicates a forlorn bachelorhood while
the oue who dips in the meal will marry
a willow and tho baud that selects tho
bowl tillod with water will marry a
maiden fair. Cliungo the positions of
the bowls after bliudl'oldiiig each one
The time-honored Floury Fate must uot
be omit ted or 1 lie frolic will not seem
complete.   Form some pastry flour into
THE ATTRACTIVE GIRL.
Much has been written about "the American girl" ami hrr reasons for being .ire.
ciuiiK-nlly the moPl
attractive   R-irl   in
the world.     In
.    bringing  up glrla
SSSfeu wothcrn   can't   be
_f?-"ftwft too  careful   to   let
a their daughters de-
■;* vclop all their nut-
J^pr   liinil   wwh   subscrilK.     for   THE.
^$>yUtJ4Tj£ oul-y *J for W uiontlis,
ural charniM to the
utmost.
Tlie crucial epoch
of a woman'-* life
Ih the change from
muide n h ood   lo
womanhood.     It
u., ,  ■    ■■ , .  involve* the whole
a •^'*v##£_!v\\   •)('lly )l,ul nwnife»ta
*>^il  V-Xr4\»   itscff in lhc nerv.
OUt disposition nt this time.
Nervous or sick women «re afforded the
opportunity of a lifetime,  (or  the  uiakrrs
of Dr. Pleree'a Favorite Prescription now
offer jf5_w reward for women wVo ennnot
be cured. Hacked np hy over a thn.. of a
century of remarkable and uniform cures,
a record such as no other remedy for the
diseases and weaknesses peculiar to women
ever attained, tlie proprietors of Dr. Pierce's
Favorite Prescription now feel fully warranted In offering lo pay $500 in legal money
Of tho United States for any case of Len-
CO'rrliea; Female Weakness, Prolapsus, or
Falling of the Womb, which they canuot
cure. Alf they ask is a fair and reasonable
trial of their means of cure.
•'I cannot praise your medicine highly
enoiiRli," writes Mrs. Jennie Hippenliamcr, of
Hunlertown, Indiana. "1 began inkiug Dr.
Pierce's I'nvorih. Prescription nud took it steadily for r-i» months. I was not once sick at stomach, never vomited once. Took the ' Favorite
Prescription' three times a day and when in
severe pnin took nn extra teaspoonful of nicdi-
cinr which checked the pnin. a felt pleasaut all
the time and did not get nervous as 1 used to,
When my baby girl came last August she wa*
healthy. She'i* noiv eleven months old. Am
thirty-eight yenrs old and never got through so
easily in all inv life. Why should women suffer
when they cnii get through so easily? I am
able to do quite it washing and ironing which I
could not (Io for eight years before."
As a tonic for women who ore nervous,
sleepless, worn-out aud run-down, "Favorite Prestriptiou " i* unequaled.
For constipation, the true, scientific cure
is Dr. Pierce's Pleasant Pellets. Mild,
harmless, yet sure. No other pill catt
Compare with them,
Grocery Bept.
Sonp, toilet,  2 boxes  J 5n
Soap, Brown Windsor, 25 cukes,.... 2   ic
Milk, Empire, 8 tins  t- {5c
Rolled Outs, Brackman &K01*— 25c
Apples, splendid cookers, per box, f 55e
Flour, Hungarian  I 1.60
S.T. Wallace
Westminster avenue & Harris si  reet
Telephone 12.0'
Mail Orders Promptly Fillot I.
ft loftf by pressing it into ft nn>l ■! after
ni-sinn in it a riuK and u, tliinib) e Turn
out of tlie mold just before tl ie party
nrrives, rind tlicu dunug tho eveniug
oaeh lady is to eut a slice from , the lotif.
Whoever cuts tho sliee ennta iuiug tho
ring will be married before the uext
year or at lenst have nn offer of
marriage, while Ihe one win i fluel. the
thimble is doomed to single 1 .lesseduess.
lu some cuses a very tiny toy wash
board has been used in at ich a lout
indicating the ocoupatiou t ir vocation
of the oue who draws it froo    i the flour.
Ring Cross is always an iuterestiug
game, in this cuse rings of pc tpeorn beiug
provided beforehand, Strir g the popcorn and tie the ends togctl icr to form
rings. Pass one to eaoh i nan or boy
who will uame it for the pel sou he desires for a partner in tlie ol ,1-fashioned
Virginia Reel (or Sir Roger tie Ooverly
as it is sometimes called) wl lich is to be
danced just before supper is     served.
As each person steps iuto positiou to
throw the ring over a stick wliich hns
been placed upright at oue eud of the
room he announces the ui'.m e bestowed
on his particular ring. If . tiecessfiil in
throwing tlio ring over tl ie stick the
lHdy named is his partner, b at if lie fails
'Some oilier mny choose her i mme if he
wishes to de) so. Immediate! ly when the
rings have been tossed ettol i oue takes
his partner nud tho piano so' lutls a lively. When the dance ends t he partners
I'emliiiite their march to tlio e     lining table
,1      IL'.      ________,]   ||„l ■ Ull II L'CT
A concert was given by the   Choir of
Mt. Pletisnut Presbyterian Church ou
Thursday evening, the attendance was
fair. The program was nu uuusnlly good
I one and greatly enjoyed by those pres-
j sent, and was as follows:   Miss   Gertie
(iWood   and  Miss  Kineh,   piano duet;
\T__Jr. H. 0. Kendall,   solo;  Miss Maggie
Ross, solo;  Mri,. Dicbsou aud Miss G.
1 Wood, duet; Mr. Lister, solo; Anthem
uj   the  Ohoir;    Mrs.   Dickson,   sOlo;
Quartet by Miss Wood,  Miss Ross,  Mr.
Kendall and Mr. Geo: Wood,   tho encores were frequent uud   well deserved.
*Mr. Keudtill.s siugiug was  greatly   eu-
joyed, he possesses a rich and   musical
bass.   Miss Maggie  Ross  is  always a
favorite, aud her  sweet soprano voice
was henrd to advantage   in   her  selections, aud she receive'd most emphatic
eucores.   The  gathering  was  iu   the
nature of a fnrewejl to ths old church,
and the pastor gave a historical Bk-teh
of the Mt. Pleasant Presbyteritin Church
from its beginning to the present time.
It wns started in 18S8, in 1SU0 a Mission
uud iu 1892 organized as a church with
a membership of 04 and Suuday School
of 200.    At present the membership of
tho church is 2BI and the Sunday School
over 400.   The first services in tho new
builtliiig will bo held on  Sunday  Nov.
(lth. the pastor will be assisted morning
and eyoning by Rev. J. S. Henderson of
New Westminster. Monday evening the
Rev. Dr. Frust of  First Church will
deliver a lecture', and ou  Tuesday  evening a congregational "At Home" will
bo held.
City of Vancouver.
PUBLIC NOTICE.
PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given
that the Court for the Revision of the
VOTERS LIST will be held daily up to
November 1st, from 10 a.m., to 12 noon,
aud from 2 to 4 in the afternoon, and
from 7 to 9 in the evening, to give all
applicants au opportunity to be heard.
THOS. F  McGUIGAN,
CITY CLERK
Vancouver, B. 0., Oot., 26th, 1904.
MUNICIPALITY   OF   SOUTH
VANCOUVER.
NOTIOE.
Tho Fire-arms By-law is nowiu force
which enacts that
" No person under the age of 18 years
shall fire off nny gun, fowling piece,
riflo, pistol or fire-arm within the limits
of the District of South Vancouver."
The penalty for infraction of above is
a fine not exceeding fifty dollars or one
month imprisonment.
By order.
William 0. Walker, C. M. C.
South Vnuconver, Oct. 18, 1904.
SOUTH
VANCOUVER
PALITY.
MUNICI
TENDERS WANTED.
TENDEUS WANTED for clearing,
grading and ft'uciug West Vaucouver
School Gouutls, coutniuiug oue acre of
land. Apply to Secretary, J. BRYANT,
corner Westminster aud Nineteenth
avenues.
NOTIOE.
The Municipal Hall will be open ou
Tuesday aud Friday mornings only till
the out door work of tho Assessment is
dono.
William 0. WALKER, C. M. C.
South Vancouver, Oct 18, 1904.
ite'
Read the New York Deutnl Parlors
advertisement iu tliis pnper, theu go to
New York Deutnl Parlors for your work
Read "The Advocate" for local news.
The Ar.vocAi'R is always glad toreceive
items of social, personal or othor news
■from its readers. Send news items to
tl>e office or by telephone, B1405.
Subscribers who fail to
get "The Advocate" ou Saturday moruiug please notify
this office.    Telephone B1405
Arg iyle House
Sc >me Big
0
rgrams
m
HIS HONOUR the Lieutenant-
Governor in Council has been pleased to
direct the publication of tho undermentioned tariff of tolls to be paid by all
persons using the Fraser River Bridge
at New Westminster.
Adults, each way *-05
(Or eight tickets for 25c.)
Children over S A under 12, each way 02
Siugle rig or waggon, loaded or unloaded, iucludiug driver, each way,.
(Or 8 tickets for *l.j
Double rig or waggou, empty, iucludiug driver, ench way	
(Or 8 tickets for .1.)
Double rig or waggon, loaded, including driver, each wny  20
(Or 6 tickets for fl.)
Cordwood and shingle bolt waggon,
iuelueliug driver, round trip	
Milk, vans, round   trips	
(Or 12 rouud trip tickets for $1.)
Saddle horse and rider, each way—
(Or 12tiokots for$l.)
Cattle, horses, pigs, sheep aud calves,
per head, each way	
By Command.
FRED'K. J. FULTON,
Provincial Secretary.
Provincial Secretary's Office,
29th September, 1904,
IS
15
10
05
The Wholesalo Stores.are del
stock-taking, nnd we tue pacl
can sell thein tit Wholesale Pi
Wrnpporettes, worth 12J_.c an     il !5c for 10c a yard.
ring thoir odds and ends at a big reduction before
nug npthese job lines nlmost every elny,  so that we
ice-s.
Flannelettes, 5 pieces of creun
" 0     "     "       "
White Sheetings, plain and tt
Ladies' Natural Wexil Ceimbin
Ladies' Sample 1
Ladies' Sam pi
Ladies' Sk
Many other Bargains to inter
i nnd 8 pieces of cardinal, worth !2'_c for 10c ft yd.
"2  "      15c       '   12}_o   "
illed %M yards wide, worth 80c for 25c a yard.
ttions worth $2.50 for $2 00 each.
,Vt«)l Mitts, worth 25c for 15c a pair.
25c for
aoe "
850 "
50c "
15c
20c
25c
IJoe
e Ready-to-wear Dress Skirts.
irts, worth  $0.Oil for $4.50 each.
$(1.50 "  *4 .*">
" "      $7.00 "   $5.00
$8.00 "   $0.00
"    $10.00 "   $7.00
■st you—call and inspect them.
400 Westminster Ave.
Opposite Carnegie Library.
CERTIFICATES OF IMPROVEriBNT.
where supper is served.
After supper all gather i
firo iii the darkened room
stories nuel songs are in oreler
Let the last gitmo of tha
the oue which will dotermini
in whioh one is to be man
twelve 'candles naming each
lighted for the different mol
year nnd placing   them   on
Blintlfolel I'lich girl turn her
times nnd then lot her walk
nntl blow out one of the cfti
it up in her hand close to th
blowing it out.   If the  oai
expire titter being blown thi
girl will not be married
Hallowe'en     It It expiree »'
she will be inarriod In Iho I
ihe mouth for  wtjich   the
named,     This  sometimes
allowing throe minntes fo
blow out nil  tho caudles
nro sti'l lighted at llie cud
represent I hei   number  of
must wait beforo tho  hap;
lake-place.
As the guests depart the
give to eneh of the men I
mounted in silver which'
lock so long as Ihey carr
To each of the girls a tit
ding cake   may   bo   giv
instructions written   ot
which it is wrapped.
Turn yonr shoes town)
Tic yeiur garters ou y<
Put this cake beiie'ntb
And you will dream 0
round the
and then
ovening bo
i tho month
led,   Light
ono as it is
iths of the
the   table.
about three
to tho table
dies taking
e table and
:dlo  fails tn
tio times tin:
before  next
ou  the  first
anio year in
candle was
played    by
.' tho girl  to
those which
of  llmt time
months sho
ly event cau
hostess should
. rabbit's foot
will bring good
y thein about,
y bit of wed-
cn with these
.   tho paper in
d the streot
>ur feot
your heqd
f him you'll wed.
A WOMAN'S VERSION OF THE
VAMPIRE.
(With Apologies to Kipling.)
NEWCATLE MINERAL CLAIM.
Situate iu the Now Westmiuster
Miuing Division of District of New
Westminster. Where located.—Britannia Mountain, Howe Sound.
TAKE NOTICE that I, Annie Austin,
Freo Miner's Certificate, No. 1.1861,
intend, sixty days from tho dute hereof, to apply to the Mining Recorder for
a Certificate of Improvements, for the
purpose of obtaining n Crown Grant of
the above claim
Aud further tnke notico that action,
nueler Section 87, must bo commenced
beforo tho issuance of such Certificate of
Improvements,
ANNIE AUSTIN.
Dated this 20th day of October 1904.
Lee's
Guaranteed
CLOTHING.
OOOOOO
' Pf^HERE IS only one brand of
' * Men's Clothiug that is absolutely exclusive. There is ouly
one Store on earth that sells it,
and we control nil the territory
ou this side of Jordan.
Our business existence depends ou
the gooduess of Lee's Guaranteed
Clothiug. We take every human
precaution to have it perfect. Wo
select the cloths and have them
mado up by the host tailors that
money can hire—tailors who have
every device aud convenience that
cau aid them in perfecting their
work—every appliauco that cau
save loss of time or wnsto of
materials Tho result is a fair
price for Clothiug that has beauty
of form, fullness of finish, aud
perfection of fit. Suits $12.50,
$14.00, $15.00, $10.00, $18 00,
$22.00, $25.00. You are iuvited
to come and look.
OOOOOO
A. E. LEES & CO.,
THE  CASH  CLOTHIERS. ELACK BLOCK.
30OOOOO0e»0OCKrf-*3CrOO©CraO00OCKX>O OOOOC
Wl A MTPn FRESH EGGS for which
W /Vl^l 1 CiL' We will pay the highest prices.
IN STOCK
A good assortment of Staple  aud  Francy   Groceries,
Fruits and Provisions at lOWestCash Prices.
A trial order solicited.
Andrews Bros.,
2315 Westminster Ave. ' Phone 935.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCOCOOOOOOOOOOOC
Jack S    U,V     Parlor.
Westmiuster Ave., uext Glasgow House
John Gillmnu, Proprietor.
Tkrkb Chaiks, and a first-class Bath
Room is run in connection with  the
Barber Shop-give this place a trial.
Jas. Carnahan.
OITY SCAVENGER.
oritur, promptly attended to, night  or
ilny.   llhttrKeis iniHlorHle'.
Office: 37 Hastings street, wost,
Telephone Number 4it).
E. & J. HRROV & CO.
Company,  Financial,   Press nud
Al.VF.RT18l.Rg'   AUF.NTS.
30 Fleet St., London, E.G., England
Colouial Business u Specialty.
COCIETIES
*-^Which Meet on HI. Pleasant
Telephone Numbers
slers and I)
1I17..-K-V. Q, 11. Wilson
limn—Kev. II. A. Wilson,!
_U_.9~R-V, A.K. H.thei
]|U0i-"Tht! Advocate).''
of Local Mini-
ii tors.
.(AnglteiHn).
(I'rt'sby'ti'i-liiii).
Ingtou, (Metuo-lst..
■'A f.ol there was, and she lowered her
pride
(Even as you and I)
To a bunch of conceit ln a masculine
hide—
We saw tht faults that could not be
denied
But the fool saw only his manly aide
(Even us you and I).
Oh. the love she In id on her own heart's
grave
With the cure of her head and hand,
IlelongH to the man who did not know
(And now she    knows   that he never
could know)
And did  not, understand.
A fool there was, and her best she gave
(Even hs you and I)
t)f noble thoughts, of gay nnd grave
(And till  were accepted as due to the
knave)
But the fool would never her folly save
(Even itpr you and I).
Oh, the stabs she hid, which the Lord
forbid
Hnd ever been really planned,
She took from the man who didn't know
why
(And  now  she knows  he never  knew
why)
And did not understand.
The fool was loved while the game was
new
(Even as you and I)
And when lt was played she took her
cue
(Plodding along as most of us do)
Trying to keep his faults from view
(Even as you and I).
Antl it Isn't the ache of the heart or Its
break
That stings like a white-hot brand-
It Is the learning   to   know that she
raised a god
And bent her head to kiss the rod
For the  man  who could hot understand."
BUTTER I
BUTTERI
IS ON THE ADVANCE.   Buy now.
1 carry tho Finest Creamery Butter
at 25c a pound. Iu quantities for less
money.
A largo stock of APPLES on hand from
75c a box, aud up.
3-ft   Evaporated Peachos 25c
Royal   Crown  Soap, 0 bars 25c
Extra Fiue Eggs,  por doz 80c
Sardines,   per  tin   ... 10c
2 large tins Pork-and-BeauB 25e
Gallon Jar uf  Chow Obow 90c
Extra Fino Ham ant Bacon, also
Cookod Ham for lunches.
WmDm Muir
If you want a
SIGN
Ring  up
Dickens
Telephoue  987
or  call  around   at   the  Skin
Works,   814   Homer   street.
Iu any case your wants will receive the
most courteous and careful attention.
I. O. O. V.
Mt. Pleasant Lodge No. HI meets every'
Tuesday at 8 p. m , in Oddfellows Hull
Archer Block, Mt. Pleasnnt.
Sojourning brethren cordially invited^
to attend.
Nom.F. Guano—O. G. Kenny.
R f.coRuiNei    Secretary—Th os.
Maekny, Heather and Eighth aveuue.
.  ' t 6.F.      *
Court  Vnncouver  1888,  Independent
Onler of Foresters meets 2d and 4thj
Mondays of each month ut -. p. in.
Visiting brethren always welcome.
Chief RANGER— W. G. Taylor,
__7 Keeler .iree-t, clty.i
Rf.oohdino SECRETARY—W. H. DeBou,!
.17S Tenth HVtBW, e'-»\. ^
Financial Secretary— M. J. (.rebuts.,j
„ii Prince"utrijot, e'lty. Telephone
~LTra__i~OF THE~MAC(IABEEST
Alexandra Hive No, T, holds ngnlafl
Review 1st and "it Fridays of each,]
month in I. O. O. V., Hallcuruer Westminster and Seventh avennt'S.
Visiting Ladies always wclcemie.
Lady Commander—Mrs. Fitch.
Lady Record Keeper—Mrs,   Mary   A,
Feiote, 889 Niuth avenue, east.
7WI
-Ml, 1'lenHnut
IlruR Stores
Ring up 'phone 448.
Mt. Pleasant
New
MILLINERY
In Trimmed nnd
Readv-to-wear.
Also Children's Hendwenr iu
endless varieties.
BIoubcs,   Wrappers,   Dress   Skirts,
Underskirts.   Full lino of Ladies'
nud Children's Hosiery.   Children's   Bearskin  Coats,    very
reasonable   We have everything kopt   in a flrstclnss
Dry  Goods  Storo,
W. W. lierklev
BURRITT BLOCK
Westminster Avenue,  Mt. Pleasant.
KEELER'S
DAHLIA SHOW
1000 Plimts nnd 300 Varieties to select,
from. The largest collection in the
province. Now is the time to choose
your colors whilo iu bloom,  for spring
planting.
Also a choice lot of CUT FLOWERS
for sale at Wholesale Prices.
Chas. Keeler
DAHLIA SPECIALIST.
Note—Street Onrs pass my placo.
2784 Westminstor Ave.   Mt. Plensont.
CANADIAN ORDER OF ChOSEN.
FRIENDS.
Vancouver Council, No. 211a, nieetsl
every 2rt and 4th Thursdays of each!
mouth, iu I. O. O. F., Hall, cornerf
Seventh and Westminster avenues.
Sojourning  Fritntls always welcome, |
W. P. Flewelling, Chief Councillor,
Miss A. Chambers, Recorder,
•_-.S Westmlnstcr-vi'iiuc.   Tel. 760,
If you waut to kuow what is
happening ou   Mt.   Pleasant
read The Advocate—$i
year, 50c for six months.
BO  YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Marks
Designs
Copyrights Ac.
1 Aiiyonn sending a _k-tch nnd d-BCrlptliin m_.
' t nlckl. iwcortuln onr oplnl'in free, wli-th.. nn
iivcnllon l.prohnblrn.ti.'riliiblc. Cotnm-iili-*.
.loinutrlctlyconnd-ntlu). H-ndbookon I'ot.nU
•out froo. oldest niioiicy for jocurlns jmtoiit..
I>iit„nts tnleon liinniK- Muuil A to. rec.IT*
•prefol mitlcc- without chn~ira, In the
Scientific American.
A hnndsnm. ly lllnstretod SHUT,   i'"™.!'.'}': I
?iS_^«m?ap»fi&i
MUNN & Co.3B,D""h-»- New York.
Brine- Offlo.. -M V St.. WMhlnilon. D. C.
Before starring on a shopping tour,
look over tho advertisements in the
ADVOOATr..
If you miss Thb ApVOCATF. you miss
ho local news,
%.<*%<%%'%'%.-%>*%-**-%** 'V^%^-%*%'%^^•^,V%''»**-*V*^**'',
Special Tram Rates
For Residents  in South Vancouver Along
Cemetery Extension.
Vancouver, SPECIAL
issued,    beginning
To actual Residents in South
Settlers' Tickets will be
November 1st, 1904.
W Ridos, good at any timo,  to bo used by Settlor cuius household  -»**'•
BO Rides, good nt nny time, bnt to bo used during
month  of  issue ouly by  party   in   whoso   name
issued  9X.OO
These tickots ontitlo Settlers to a continuous rido from any point on
the Cemetery liue to nuy point ou tho Vancouver Street Railway
System. Transfer made-at the corner of Sixteenth and Woe minster
avenues. TICKETS FOR SALE AT Westminster Ticket Office
only, in Vauconver Depot.
British Columbia Electric Railway Compony, Ltd.
4
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