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Mt. Pleasant Advocate Sep 17, 1904

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Array M
S€P19B04     $1
^''■■^a^*!
4  Large Bar of   I
PURE CASTILE SOAP;
for 55c. I
Mt.Pleasant Drugstore]
M. A. W. Co.
Burritt Block, Mount Pleasant.
'"'■*V---__- - _ -__«-
Mt
§ GO TO LEONA
$1 per year, Six Months 50c, Three flonths 35c, Single Copy 50.
Devoted to the interests of   Mt. Pleasant, Central Park, South Vancouver.
Established April 8, 1890;   Whole Number 223.
§ COFFEE PALA-I
I The Arcade or GrtuwMe -StMgic.
I For Light Luncfe
Baked Apples—like home—with Pw» Cfsfm.
Genuine Boston Baked Beans
Open from WiO a. ni., to 13 p. O.
Suuduy from Hum.  to it p. M.
JpflT- Subscribers    are    requested   to
report any carelessness in tho delivery
/ of "The Advocate."
Changes for advertisements should bo
in before Thursday noon to insure thoir
publication.
JIOUNT   PLEASANT,   VANCOUVER,    B.   C,    SATURDAY   Sept.,   17,  1904.
Uacal Items.
The McCuaig Auction nud Commission Oo.,-Ltd., next to Cnruoige Library,
Hastings Street, buy Furniture for Cash,
Conduct'Auction- Sales    and    handle
...— v      . . ..... ..ji,       uM.lt .1 IK 1 ll.ll
Bankrupt Stocks of ivery descript
Siitisl'iifiWiii guaranteed.   Phoue 101
ton.
1070.
jars running to tho Cemetery I
■Mrs. McKillop of Portage la Prairie,
i'-,:visiting tho family of Mr. R. Mills,
Ninth avenue.
fft  :o:	
Mr.'.Edgar Blooinfleld   of   Wilsou,
Seiltler & Bloonifleld,   returned  Mou-
dajjjHroui a six-weeks abseuco iu Atlin
f! and Dawson.
The opening of the new Mt Pleasant
Lo^ge, L. O. L., will tnke place ou Wed
nesday evening the 28th    Up to the
• present  over  40  members havo   beeu
secured.
 :o: j.
FOR RENT.—Seven roomed    house,
; 42 Thirteenth avenue, beautifully situated,   till :nn?.(-r:i   Improvements; apply
W. H. Wood, Sr., (JiJ Thirteenth avenne.
 :o:	
TliT Woman's Auxili ,ry nf Ml. Plens-
' nut Prcsbyteriiin Chnrch will meet on
S next Wt'iliicsdc.v ufteniiiou nt Ihe home
foflvirs. W."B Skinner, Eleveuth ave-
I nue uud Ontario street
NEW YORK DENTISTS.
We have shown that it is possible to do the very best Dental Work
ut rnoderat- pricos. We are not ouly willing to have our work compared with any other, but we invite those that are extremely particular to come aud consult ns on our painless methods which we will
gladly demonstrate to their entire
satisfaction. Samples of our work
are always on exhibition in our
parlors.
Since we have been in bnsiucss we
have never bad a single dissatisfied
patiout.
WE DO PAINLESS DENTISTRY
and  uso  only  tho   most  Modern
__■_■_■__£■ Methods. We toko JUSTIFIABLE
PRIDE in tho BEAUTY of the work done by OUR SPECIALISTS,
who nre GRADUATES AND PAST GRADUATES of tho Philadelphia Dental College and Moffit College of Porcelain and Continuous
Gum Work.
Wit CROWN, FILL and EXTRACT TEETH without the least particle of pniu. Tlie large increase noticed daily in onr practice is due to
the most urtistic and high-class work douo by our Specialists and without pain, Onr ten-year guarantee means thnt nil our work must be
done perfectly. If you have auy work to be done givo us a call and
you will flud that we do exactly as we advertize.
Gold Crowns $7.00 Porcelain Crowns $5.00
Gold Filling $2.00 and up Bridge Work $7.00 and up
Platinum Crowns $1.50 Silver Fillings... .$1.00
Cement Filling.. .$1.00 Porcelain Fills... $2.00 and up
Painless Extraotiug 60c Upper or Lower Set of Teeth $12
Sixth  Yesr, Vol.6, !*«•. 28.
., 1'«<■'.■
I
147 Hastings St., E.VanRourver'
mnsire tha f1-.tv.-r~>-,   t ;i  *•*•    »"•
Opposite the Cnruegio Library.
Office Hours: 8 a. in., to 9 p. m
Sundays 9 a. m.
Telephone 1586.
to 2 p. m.
Paints, Paints.   II  nrh   Hum of
tow is the timr fnr Paint:™       II        IUt   UUIllUI
Business
Now is the time for Painting.
We have the goods and will not be undersold.
Try   Us
J. A. f L E T T,
Mt.  PLEASANT  HARDWARE STORE.       Tel. 447
W. R. OWENS, Manager.
.1
TENDERS for the construction of
stone foundation for tho uew Mt. Pleasant Oddfellows' Hull will bo received
np to (! p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 20. Plans
aud specifications at W. R. Oweus',
2313 Westuiinstor avenue Thos. H
Mockny, Secretary.
Ladies will find II special  bargain  for
'tbem in Stark's Glnsgow Louse advertisement.     The advertisement  of  this
• firm iu the "Advocnte" will bo-found to
1 contiiiu h_ht.u1 lni.-gr.iU8.
Dublin Flowers, choice mixed, leench.
I Can cut over 3,000 per day Road
j Keeler's .advertisement in t!ii.-, i.a.ier.
f» Ou Fridny eveuiug uext Mr. R.
rBpnrliuf- will deliver his interesting aud
f i -struetive lecture on "The British
*L':npire."   (illustriited),   in   the  North
t_\rni Si'huol House,  Ninth  Al'iii road,
South Viiueonvcr.
(Ring up 1726 for all kinds of Miu.
Wood, [14 inches long), the Urouhurt
Liniibei' Co.'s Wood Yi:rd, Cambie
Street Bridge.   Gray & Uiggiuson.
Tho Chorus which was so snecessfiil
last season in tho production of the
Messiah, has been reorganized nnd had
a first practice Tuesday evening iu
O'Brien's Hull. As this excellent
Chorus hnd its birth on Mt. Pleasant,
the people on the Hill are much interested and wish it continued success. All
musicians ou ihe Hill should rally
uroiind and help to make it ns good as
last year.
:o:	
Mr. J. Jones of West minster road, is
. '.siting at Cloverdnle.
-_— :o-.—.	
Advortizo 111 the "Advocate."
On Monday evening the Epworth
League members elected Sir. H. H.
Stevens president of thoir society. Mr.
Stevens held tho office last year and
proved a most capable executive. On
Monday evening next there will be an
election for third vice-president, (Literary Department), made vacant by Mr.
Stevens' election as president.
 :o:	
On Tuosday evening about 9:30, Mr.
W. J. Allen of Twelfth avenue was
serenaded by tho Clarke Wallaco Fife
and Drum Baud. The visit of the band
was a complete surprise but like a good
Orangoman Mr Allen was not slow to
welcome the Brethren of the Order.
After being hospitably entertained for
an hour or so the baud departed, play-
iug the fiiuiilar L. O. L., music.
*   *o*	
Cut Flowbks, thousands of Asters,
Phlox, Stocks, and Verbenas, >5C per
doz.   Chas. Keeler, Dublin Specialist.
CROWN
FRUIT JARS
BOc per Dozen.
I    I       8    1       1      IP*1-?*""   2425   Westminster  Ave.
7 'Phone 322
* Is Now Ready.
As large and as varied a stock of 1 Jry Goods as one
would wish to select from. Latest in Fashionable
Goods.    Prices the most reasonable.    Call  and   see.
\    A. ROSS & CO., 30-34 Cordova St. *
Mrs. J. G. Keefer of Lansdowne ave-
Inne, is homo from the Hospital, convalescing from a severe illness. Nurse
Jesse Keefer was summoned from Sau
Francisco to attend her mother, aud
will remain a mouth iu Vaucouver,
■where she is so popularly known as a
|most capable nurse.
 :o:	
. R. H. Kueeshaw, well and favorably
J'tiiown ns a Magnetic Healer nnd
iMa.seuist, can bo consulted at 2S21
■ Westminster aveuue. Office hours; 1 to
|5 p.m. Nervous aud functional derunge-
Imenis a speciality. No medicine. No
Iknife.
We are ready for the
Pickling Season
White Wine Vinegar,       Malt and Cider Vinegar.
Pickling Spices,  and everything to  make" pickles.
Prices and Qualities Guaranteed.
1
J. P. Nightingale & CO.
Westminster & Seventh Aves.   Mt. P.easqnt.  Tel. 1360
EV Central fleat flarket I
Cor. Ninth Ave., & Westminster Rd.   Telephone 954.
Wholesale and Retail
Dealers in all kinds of Fiibsh and Salt Mbats. Fresh Vegetables nlways
oil baud. Orders solicited from all parts of Mount Pleasant and Fnirview.
Prompt Delivery.
Woodrow & Williams. FTAkNIaERb,e*
Has been greatly emphasized  since announcing
the  receipt    of   our    New   Fall   GoOmnttm
They   far    surpass   anything    we  have before
offered our patrons for all-round excellence.
Don't stand in front of the mirror and find fault
with yourself because you're not looking your
best—see what a difference a new Fit-Reform
Suit or Overcoat will make—for you know
September is the month the most particular
dressers put off the summer things.
FIT=REFORM.
-THOS.     FOSTER.
333 Hastings St.
Vancouver, B   C.
Mail   Orders   promptly   attended    to.    Self-mensuremeut Blanks
Samples sent ou npplicflttQU.
J
-%-»^^V^%.-»^*V1_^-.'%,-
A social gathering of the Congregation of Mt. Pleasant Mothodist Church
took place Thursday evening in the
chnrch, uuder the auspices of the Ladies'
Aid. There was a short program as
follows: anthem by the Choir, solo by
Mrs. Jas. MePhersou, recitation by Miss
Haw, recitation by Miss E. Hamilton,
dnot by Miss F.  Harford and Mr. H.
(■Harford. A very pleasant eveuiug was
passed by the large number present.
Excellout resreshments _ wero served
-luring the evening.
Mr. W. J. Allen of Twelfth aveuue, is
building n seven-roomed bouse, adjoing
his homo.
-:o:-
Mt. Pleasant School now has an
atteudaueo of between 900 and 1000.
•The atteudauce is 180 larger than last
term, nnd of this number 00 are
six-year-old children.
-:_:•
. Tbe Conservatives of Ward V., met
Thursday evening at Davis' Store, 164
Niutli avenue, for the purpose of organizing for the Dominion Election. There
will be another mooting at the same
place ou Mondny evening next.
IFOR SALE: 1 onk dresser, 1 oak
bedstead, 1 mattress (wool top), 1 set of
springs, 4 chairs, 2 rockers, 1 stand, 1
kitchen table, K lengths stovepipe aud
elbow, 1 Rinall oil-stovo. Ohonp for
cash.   Call at 1125 Ninth avenue, east.
Surprise Party.—The home of Mr. and
Mtb. G, Clayton Leonard, comer Bute
and Barclay, was the scono of a very
happy gathering ou Friday evening of
lost week.   The young friends of Misses
!Beulah aud Mina Leonard arrived unexpected but were mnde most welcome.
Games aud re freshmen Is made the evening a very enjoyable occasion. Presout:
Misses Klsio McLaren, Gussic Hewitt,
Mary aud Jnnotto Sinter, Gertio and
Allie Druniniond, Gertio aud Sadie
Ross, Alberta Braid, Bculuh and Miua
Leonard, Mnsfors Sydney Miller, Sedric
Wilson, Edward Teinplcton, Chester
Tnit, Arthur Loutitt, Loftus Moluues,
^. John Sinter nud Frank Gilmour.
Misses Jackson und Baxter assisted Mrs.
Leonard iu entertaiuiug the young
people.
- :o:—	
Amalganintiou Sale.—-Wo hnvo cut
off one- third of tbo prico on nil footwear.
Youths' Hand- made Shoo $1.45; Youths'
Shoes (broken sizes) $ 1.00; Men's Shoes,
regnlar|B, uow only 18.60; Meu's, regular $3 to $4 Shoe, now only $2 50.
R. Mills, 18 Cordova street aud 540
Granville street.
Amalgamation Sale.—All genuine
goods; new and stylish. We have simply
cut off nbout one-third of tho prices.
Lndios' $3 to $6 Shoes, now only f2 50;
Lndies' $2.60 to $8.50 Shoes, uow ouly
$1.60; Misses' Sine, only 95c; Boys'
School Shoes $1.90.
R. MILLS, 18 Cordova streot and
540 Granville stroet.
■:o:-
Miss Grace Stone eutertained a large
number of ber girl friends ou Tuesday
afternoon, nt tbo home of her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Stoue, Quebec
street. The occasion was her birthday
and she and her friends eclobrated it iu
a most delightful stylo.
101	
Mr. and Mrs. Ghas. Doering, occom-
pnhied by their daughter Miss Beatrice
Doering, como over from Metchosin on
Wednesday and ore stopping nt the
Hotel Vancouver for a few days. Mrs.
Doeriug's ninny friends tire happy to
know sbe is much improved   iu  henlth.
DOUGAN-PENGELLY.--.On Monday evening, Sept. Sth, the Rev. A. E.
Hetheriugton united iu marriage, nt the
parsonage, Mr. Clyde Dongan nnd Miss
Mabel Pengelly, daughter of Mr. A.
Pengelly of Eleveuth avenue. After the
ceremony the newly married couple left
for Gain bier Island, where they will
spend two mouths. Both are well-
known ou Mt. Pleasant and hnvo many
friends wbo wish them 0 long and happy
married life.
The City Grocery   rte.iver. groceries
every day on Mt. Pleasnnt;   'phone 2811
Tot. 28G.
Two
Witnesses
to the purity and superior quality of
butter— a healthy well- fed cow olid Belt—.
careful dairy maid. We conld easily pro-
don-more witnesses. All. onr ensto-un
would testify that our FINE BO ITER
is not to be excelled. Bat we lu pea simple
reminder will be sufficient. Of course ire
ure still Headquarters for Groceries. Wa
snpply them nt the lowest price at wll_i__
reliable goods can be sold.
CITY GROCERY CO...
Westminster Ave. A Prlneessi
S w wr w nr W1 WW WWWWWWWWm\
rings te
4?^
2321   Westminster   Ave.
Mt. Pleasant.
E. H. Peace,  Proprietor.
00 00 00
Wholesale and Retail
Dealer in Meats of
All Kinds. Tel. A1206
Vegetables and Poultry
iu season.
Prompt Delivery.
*J
.TW
By lelliug niercliiiuts they saw their
advertisements ill Tins Aijvocatf. our
readers will confer n favor and help the
paper greatly.
 :o:	
If you miss The Advocatk you miss
he local uows.
We will make
np n Ring for
I., you in any
r_ form you may
desire.
It is to bo
a Ring set
witli gems wo
will tell you exactly the weight
of tho gems, tho price of them,
and all about them before you
buy.
When wo make np a Ring wo
make 1111 entry of it iu onr books,
register its number, etc., and at
any timo in the future you cnn
get full information about it
And tho Ring will be backed by
"Troroy's" guarantee.
Whnt we soy it is, it is.
Trorey
THE JEWELER.
I Corner Hastings aud Grauvi.le Sts.
Official Watch Inspector 0. P. R
THE
BEER
With
Out
a
Peer.
Cascade
The Mt. Pleasnnt "Advocate" on sal.
Hi nl! the Newsdealers in the city,
THE ALEXANDRA
Elkctkolynik Parlou of Hairdressiug, Manicuring, Facial Massage and
Scalp Treatment for Lndies nud Gentle-
uieu. Superfluous hair, warts and
moles removed by Electrolysis.
Valuable information given to overy
ludy pidroii on "Bow to tuke euro of
yourself-"
Skin Food for building up tlie wasting
tissue. Orange Flower Creum to pro-
vent uud heal sunburn.
Madame Hummirkyh, 589 Granville
street.
Sensational
Hosiery Bargains
SFineC^HMTo'cM^ Lad,es'  Purc Wo0'  Extra
,..,,,,*^ASHMhRE HOSE, seamless aud full fashioned leg; regular
W83£gg3%ji ?KseUS^rd,iy<aT0,n0Ut * ^ "'^
3 Pairs for $1,66
Brewed right here iu Vancouver by men
of years and years and years experience,
and a brewery whose plant is the moot
perfect known to the Art of Brewing. Is
it any wonder that it has taken a place
in the hearts of the people which no other beer
can supplant ?    Doz., quarts $2.   Doz., pints %\.
Vancouver Breweries, Ltd-
Vancouver, B. C.       Tel. 4**9
For Sale at all first-class Saloons, Liquor Stores aud Hotel,
or delivered to vour house.
HiJHHi Hi Hi Hi Hi Hi IH Hi IH Hi Hi Hi Ik Hk
m
m
m
m
Brand New Neckwear
One Dollar sorts for 50c. Ludios' Linen Turnover Sets COLLARS aud
CUFFS, silk embroidered, plain white ground embroidered iu sky blue,
champagne und blue mixture, and black.
Regular $1.00, SATURDAY 50c
Stark's Glasgow
House -cws,0£
nciv   .Jl VM \.f
170 Cordova St.
Corner of Cambie strict
Ladies'
Mantles
We huve jnst opened 11 specinl
lot of Ladies' ('outs und Mn titles.
A big lot bought iu the regular
way, ns cheap aud us fashionable
as our judgment, could possibly
flud.
A big lot of Travellers'Samples,
bought at a large discount off the
regular prices, in sizes 82, 84, Hfl
and 88, which wo can nnd lire
colling nt the original cost. This
lot is being picked over every
day, und is selliug t'ntt, which is
Iho best proof Ihey tue extra
value.
A choice lot of Raincoats selling ut $5.00 each.
We have already  opened  -a
choice lot of Tweeds selling from
50c to$2.50. Worsteds and Lady's
Cloths nt special prices.
KENNEDY'S OLD
STORE
303 Hastings street.
McTaggart & Moscrop
Dralkhs in
HARDWARE
RANGES,
STOVES and
GRANJTEWARE.
PAINTS, OILS, GLASS,
3« Carrall SI.,     Vaiuouvcr, IJ.t.
Tompletoii Hlock.
Lawn Grass Seeds
Clover nnd Timoihv  Seeds,
Pratt's Poultry nud Animal Funds,
Pratt'_ Lice Killer,
llollv ciiick Food, Beef-craps, ku-.
FLtlUK  nnd FEED.
S. KEITH S^Sx- N,NT" ■"■""■ *
Ti'liph-n-   ir,a
WliSTMINSlliH KOAII.
FREE
KOR
Royal Crown Soap Wrappers
Rctnru 12 Royn! Crown Soap Wi-jipcta
mid we will send free your choice of M'
pictures.   Or for 26 wrappers choirw at
ISO books.   Hooks and picture
n p) ilieatiouj^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^—
The Royal Soap
Co., Limited,
V,\N( OUVt». B.C.
J3T Subscribers who fail to
get "The Advocate" on Snturday morning please notify
tliis office.    Telephone B1405
Full Line of Fancy and Staple
QROCERIE
Prices to OOl&pare  with nny.
J. P. HALDON
Cor.  Westminster tin,, A Dufferin i
VANCOUVER INDUSTRIAL
EXHIBITION & jLffle
Cambie Street Grounds
Auspices of Vancouver Trades and Labor Council.
One Solid Week
Monday Sept. 26 to Oct. 1st.
('mud Industrial  Esplanade,   Mercantile Exhibits,    Deuiou-trnttDf
Booths, Skill Tr.ule Contest.   Amnsomeut Attractions Furnished by
the Famous Na 1 Hiiium SOUTOTEN Cajinival Comp«nv    Tho Greafert
Kvent overbold in Hiitisli Columbia,
I'lYI. BIG FHK1. ACTS  h nfternoon  and evening.   21  New and
Novel Tent Exhibitions.   Moral, Amusing and _ns.rnet.ve,
Geo. Hartley, 1 >irector-Geucral.
G. N. Lee, Secretary.
F. Whiteside, Treasurer.
B«.tU_wtrter-1 Rooms 2 * 5, 431 Hastings „i.oot, west.    'Phone 1690.
..-S_-._-_.l_-. MOUNT  TLBASANT  ADVOCATE.
*ii+imii)mmmm^9i*amTkit1fot$i&$
ALICE of OLD
■ VINCENNES
ft.'.
By  MAURICE  THOMPSON  g
o*nM-ii nwfi to «- bowek-MEnftnL coxr/nnr
»HIH»»»»fflff
:r,'!???????f?_i
f
CHAPTER XVI.
JTATHEn BE_1-T's OLD BATTLE.
HE  room ln which  Alice wns
now  Imprisoned   formed  part
of the upper story of a building  erected  by   Hnmllton  In
one of the four angles of the stockade.
•It hud no windows and but two oblong
ortholes mnde to accommodate a smnll
wlvel  which  stood darkly   scowling
near the middle of the floor. Dny after
pay ber Ipnellness and helplessness bo-
amc more agonizing.   Farnswortb, it
'is true, did all he could to relieve the
Btrnln of her situation, but Hnmllton
nd nn eye upon what passed nnd soon
nterfered.   He administered a bitter
prlmnnd,  under which  bis subordinate writhed in speechless linger nnd
esentment
"Finally,   Cnptaln   Farnswortb,"  he
aid In conclusion, "you will distinctly
nderstund thnt this girl Is my prison-
not yours; that I, not you, will (11-
'ect how she is to ho held nnd treated,
and thnt hereafter I will suffer no In-
erferenco on your part.   1 hopo you
ully understand me, sir, nnd will gov-
rn yourself accordingly."
Smarting, or, rather, smothering, liner tho outrageous insult of these re-
nrks, Farusworth nt first determined
fling bis resignation at the governor's feet nnd then do whntever dospor-
te thing seemed most to his mood. Hut
soldier's training Is npt to cull 11 halt
fore the worst befalls In such n ease.
loreovcr,   In  the  present  temptation
'arnsworth bnd a special  cheek  and
Indrancc.   He bnd had n conference
lth Father Beret, ln which the good
.rlest bnd played the part of wisdom
slippers   and  of   gentleness   more
ovclike than the dove's. A very subtle
presslon, illuminated with the "hope
int withers hope," hnd eome of that
it.rvlcw, and now Fnrnsworth felt its
strnlnt. He therefore snluted Ilnmll-
formnlly and walked nwny.
'other Beret's paternal love for Alice—we  cannot  characterize   it  moro
nicely than to call It paternal—was his
Justification for n certnln mild sort of
corruption Insinuated by hiin Inlo (he
heart of Fnrnsworth. Ho wns a crafty
priest, hutjils. craft was always used
for li pobd pud. tlnmieslionnbly Jesuitic
wns -his. mode of circumventing  the
young' man's military scruples by o"-
fefjng blm n puff of fair weather with
which to sail toward whnt appeared to
he tho shore of delight,   lie saw nt a
glance that Farnsworth's love for Alice
was a consuming passion  in  n  very
ardent yet decidedly weak heart. Hero
was the worldly lever with which Father Beret hoped to raze Alice's prison
and free her from the terrible doom
with which sbe was threatened.
The first Interview was at Father
Beret's cabin, to which, ns will be remembered, the priest and Fnrnsworth
went after their meeting In the street.
it actually came to nothing, stive an
Indirect understanding but half suggested by Father Beret nnd never openly sanctioned by Cuptnin Farnsworlh.
The .talk wns insinuating on the part
"tf the former, while the latter slipped
evastrely from every proposition, ns if
not able to consider it ou account of a
curious obtuseness of perception. Still,
When they separated they shook hands
and exchanged n searching look perfectly satisfactory to both.
. The memory of that Interview with
tne priest was In Farnsworth's mind
Wben, boiling with rage, be left Hnm-
"It%°kn outrage!" he broke forth.
llton's presence nnd went forth into
the chili February nlr.  lie passed out
through the postern nnd along the
sodden nnd quenchy edge of the prairie,
Involuntarily making his way to
Father. Beret'B cabin. Ills Indignation
wns so grent Hint he trembled from
bend to foot at every Step, 'i'he door
of the place wus open nnd Falher
Beret wns eating a frugal meal of
scones and sour wine (of bis own ninke,
ho snld), which he hospitably begged tb
shnre with his visitor. A lire smo.-
dered on the hearth, and n Hat stone
showed, by the grease smoking over its
hot surfnee, where the cakes bad been
baked.
"Come in, my son," raid the priest,
"and try tbe fare of a poor old man.
It Is plain, very plain, but good." Ho
smacked his lips sincerely nud lingered
another scone. "Tnke some, take
sonic."
Farnswortb was not tempted. The
nctd bouquet of the wino filled the
room with a smack of vinegar, nnd
the smoke from rank scorching fut and
wheat meal did not suggest tin agreeable fenst.
"Well, well, If you are not hungry,
my son, sit down on the stool there
nnd tell me the news,"
Farnswortb took llie low seat without n word, letting his eyes wander
over the walls, Alice's rapier, tha
mule to thnt now worn by Hamilton,
hung In lis curiously engraved scabbard near oue corner.   The sight of It
i lnilnmed Farnswortb..
1 "It's an outrage!" he broke forth.
I "Governor Hnmllton sent a man to
Itoussillon place with orders to bring
blm the scabbard of Miss Roiisslllon's
sword, nnd be now wears the beautiful
weapon as If he bad come by It honestly.   Curse blm!"
".My  dear, dear son,  you  must not
soil  your  lips  with  such  language!"
Father Beret let fnll the hnlf of a well
i bitten cuke and beld np both bands.
\    "I beg your pardon, father.    I know
I ought to be moro careful  ln your
j presence, but—but—the beastly scoun-
' drel"-
"Hali! Doiieement, mon fi Is, douee-
ment." Tho old man shook his bend
and his finger while speaking, "Easy,
my son, easy. You would bo n fine
target for bullets were your words to
reach Hamilton's ears. Yoa nre not
permitted to revile your commander."
"Yes, I know; but how can n man
restrain himself under such ..bonduntile conditions?"
Father Beret shrewdly guessed that
Hamilton hnd been giving the captain
fresh reasons for bitter resentment.
Moreover, be wns sure that the moving
cause hnd been Alice. So, ln order to
draw out whnt ho wished to hear, he
said very gently:
"How ls the little prisoner getting
along?"
Fnrnsworth ground his teeth nnd
swore, but Father Beret appeared not
to hear. He bit deep Into n scone, took
a liberal sip of tbe muddy red wine
and added:
"lias she a comfortable place? Do
you think Governor Hamilton would
let me visit her?"
"It Is horrible!" Farnswortb blurted.
"She's penned up as If she were a dangerous boast, the poor girl. And tbat
d—d scoundrel"—
"Son, son!"
"Oh,,it's no use to try. I can't help
it, falher.   The whelp"—
"We can converse more safely and
Intelligently If we avoid profanity nnd
undue emotion, my son. Now, If you
will quit swearing, I will, ond If you
will be calm, so will I."
Fnrnsworth felt the sly Irony of this
.t/iiirdly vicarious proposition. Father
Iteret smiled with n kindly twinkle iu
his deep set eyes.
"Well, if you don't use profane language, father, there's no telling bow
much you tliii I. in expletives. What Is
your opinion of u man who tumbles a
poor, defenseless girl into prison nnd
then refuses to let her be decently
cared for? How do you express yourself nbout him'."
"My sou, men often do things of
which Ihey ought to be ashamed. I
heard of a young officer once who maltreated a little girl thnt he met nt
night in the street. Whnt evil he
would huve done, had not a passing
kind hearted man reminded liim of his
honor by n friendly punch in the ribs,
I dare not surmise.''
"True, and your sarcasm goes home
ns bard as your fist did, father. I
know thut I've been n sad dog all my
life. Miss Itoussillon saved you hy
shooting me, and 1 love her for It
Lay on, .father; I deserve more than
you can givo inc."
"Surely you do, my son, surely yon
do, but my love for you will not let mo
give yon pain. Ah, wo priests have to
carry nil men's loads. Our backs are
broad, however; very broad, my son."
"And your lists arc heavy, father;
mighty heavy."
The gentle smile again flickered over
the priest's weather beaten face ns bo
glanced sidowise at Farnswortb and
snld:
"Sometimes, sometimes, my son, a
carnal weapon must break the wny for
n spiritual one. Iiut wo priests rarely
have much physical strength. Our dependence ls upon"—
"To be sure; eertuliily," Farusworth
Interrupted, rubbing his side. "Your
dependence Is upon the first thing that
offers. I've bnd ninny n blow, but
yours was the solldest that ever jarred
my mortal frame, Father Beret."
The twnln began to laugh. There la
nothing like n reminiscence to stir up
fresh mutual sympathy.
"If your liilereostnlH were somewhat
sore for n time on account of a contact with priestly knuckles, doubtless
there soon set In n corresponding uneasiness In tho region of your conscience. Such shocks nre often vigorously alterative and tonic; eh, my
son ?"
"You Jolted mc sober, father, nnd
then I wus nslinmed of myself. But
whero does nil your tremendous
strength lie?   You don't look strong."
While speaking Fnrnsworth lenned
nenr Fnther Beret unil grasped his
nrm. The young man started, for bis
lingers, Instead of closing around a
dabby, shrunken old man's limb,
spread themselves upon n huge, knotted muss of Iron muscles. Wltb a
quick movement Fnther Ilcret shook
off Furnswoi Ill's hand and snld:
"I am no Samson, my son. Non sum
quails era in." Then, as if dismissing
n light subject for a graver one, ho
sighed nnd added, "I supposo there ls
nothing tbnt can be done for little
Alice."
He culled the tall, strong girl "little
Alice," and so sbe seemed to blm. He
could not, without direct effort, think
of lier as a magnificently maturing
womnn. Sho hnd always been bis
spoiled pet child, perversely set against
the holy church, but dear to him nevertheless.
"I enme to nsk that very question,
falher," said Fnrnsworth.
"And what do I know? Surely, my
son, you seo how utterly hopeless an
old priest Is agnlnst all you British.
And besides"—
"Father Beret," Fnrnsworth huskily
Interrupted, "Is Ihcro a plnee that you
know   of   any whero   In which   Miss
Itousslllon could be hidden If"—
"My dear son!"
"But, father, I menn It."
".Mean what?   Pardon an old man's
giow understanding.    What nre you
talking about, my son?"
Father Beret glanced furtively nbout,
then quickly stepped through the doorway, walked entirely around tho houso
and came in again before Farnswortb
could respond. Once more seated on
bis Btool be added Interrogatively:
"Did you think you beard something
moving outside?"
"No."
"Y'ou were saying something when I
went out   Pardon my interruption."
Farnswortb gave the priest n searching and not wholly confiding look.
"You did not Interrupt me, Fnther
Beret. I was not speaking. Why nre
you so watchful. Are you afraid of
eavesdroppers?"
"You were speaking recklessly. Your
words were incendiary; nrdcntla verba.
My son, you wero suggesting a dangerous thing. Your life would scarcely
satisfy the lnw were you convicted of
Insinuating such treason. What If one
of your prowling guajds hnd overheard you? Your neck and mine might
feel the baiter. Quod uvertnt doml-
mis." He crossed himself and in a
solemn voice added In English: -
"May the Lord forbid! Ah, my son,
we priests protect thoso we love."
"And I, who nm not fit to tie n
priest's shoe, do likewise. Father, I
love Alice Itoussillon."
"Love Is a holy thing, my son. Amnro
dlvlnum est et huinumim."
"Father Beret, can you help me?"
"Spiritually speaking, my son?"
"I mean can you hide Mile. Housslllon In some safe plnee If I take ber out
of the prison yonder? That's Just wbat
I mean.   Cnn you do It?"
"Y'our question ls n remnrknble ono.
Hnve you thought upon it from all directions, my son? Think of your position, your duty ns nn officer."
A shrewd polemical expression beamed from Father Beret's eyes, and a
very expert physiognomist might have
suspected duplicity from certain lines
about the old man's mouth.
"I simply know that I cannot stnnd
by nnd seo Alice—Mile. BoussIIIon—
forced to suffer treatment too beastly
for nn Indian thief. That's the only
direction there Is for mo to look nt It
from, nnd you cnn understand my
feelings if you will. Y'ou know that
very well, Father Beret. When a man
loves n girl be loves her; that's the
"whole thing."
The quiet, lnserutablo hnlf smile
flickered once more on Father Beret's
face, but be snt silent some time wltb
n sinewy forefinger lying alongside his
nose. When nt last he spoke lt was
In n tone of voice indicative of small
interest in what he wns saying. His
words rambled to their goal with the
effect of bnppy accident.
"There nro places in this neighborhood In which a human being would be
ns hard to find ns the Hag that you
and Governor Hamilton have so diligently and unsuccessfully been in
quest of for the past month or two.
Really, my son, this is n mysterious
little town."
Farnsworth's eyes widened and a
flush rose In bis swarthy cheeks.
"Hang the flag!" he exclaimed. "Let
it lie bidden forever. What do I care?
I tell you, Father Beret, that Alice
Itoussillon is in extreme danger. Governor Hamilton means to put some
terrible punishment on her. He lias n
devil's vindictlveiiess. He showed it
to mc clearly awhile ngo."
"You showed something of the same
sort to me, once upon n time, my son."
"Yes, I did, Father Beret, and I got
n loud of slugs ln my shoulder for It
from that bravo girl's pistol. Sho
saved your life. Now I ask you to
help mc save hers, or if not her life
what Is infinitely more, ber honor."
"Her honor!" tried Father Beret,
leaping to bis feet so suddenly and
with such energy that tho cabin shook
from base to roof. "What do you say,
Captain Fnrnsworth? Whnt do you
menu?"
Tho old man wns transformed, nis
face wns terrible to see, with Its narrow,' burning eyes deep under tho
shaggy brows, its dark veins writhing
Riiukeliko ou the temples and forebend.
llie projected mouth and chin, the hard
lines of the jaws, the Iron grny gletiin
from all the features—lie looked like an
aged tiger stiffened for n spring.
Fnrnsworth was made of right soldierly stuff, but he felt n distinct
shiver (lit along his back. Ills past
life had not laeked'tlirllling adventures
nnd strangely varied experiences with
desperate men. Usually he met Sudden
emergencies rather calmly, sometimes
with phlegmatic indifference. This
pnssionnto outburst on the priest's
part, however, surprised him and nwed
liim, while It stirred bis heart wilh n
profound sympathy unlike anything be
had ever felt beforo.
Father Beret mastered himself In n
moment mid, passing his hand over bis
face, ns If to brush nwny the excitement, sat down again on his stool. He
appeared to collapse Inwardly.
"You must excuse the weakness of
nn old man, my son," be said, In n
voice hoarse and shaking. "But tell
me what ls going to bo done with
Alice. Your words—what you said—I
did not understand."
Ho rubbed bis forebend slowly, as
one who has difficulty In trying to collect his thoughts.
"I do not know what Governor Ilumllton means to do, Fnther Ileret. It
will be something devilish, however—
something that must not happen," Bald
Farusworth.
Father Beret, like most men of stron..
feeling who hnve been subjected to
long years of trial, hardship, multitudinous dnngers nnd nil sorts of temptation, and who have learned the lessons of self control, had an iron will,
and also nn abiding distrust of weak
men. He saw Farnsworth's sincerity,
lmt be bad no faith In bis constancy,
although satisfied that while resentment of Hamilton's luiperlousiics..
lasted ho would doubtless remain firm
in bis purpose to nld Alice.
Ho listened in silence to Fnrns-
wortli's story. When lt eamo to nn
end bo began to offer Eome but half
relevant suggestions In tho form of
Indirect cress questions, by means of
Which ho gradually drew out n minute
description of Alice's prison, the best
wny to reach lt, the nature of its door
fiiBtenings, where the key was kept,
and everything, indeed, likely to be
helpful to one contemplating n jail delivery. Farnswortb was Inwardly delighted. Ho felt Father Beret's cunning approach to the central object and
bis crafty method of gathering details.
The shndes of evening thickened In
the stuffy cnbln room while tho con
versation went on. Father Beret presently lifted a puncheon in one corner
of the floor and got out a large bottle,
which bore a mildewed and faded
French label, and with lt n small Iron
cup. There was Just light enough left
to show a brownish sparkle wben,
nfter popping out the cork, he poured
n draft lu tbe fresh cup and In his
own.
"Wo may think more clearly, my son,
if we taste this old liquor. I havo kept
It n long while to offer upon a proper
occasion.   The occasion is here."
A ravishing bouquet quickly Imbued
the nlr.   It was itself an intoxication.
"The brothers of St. Martin distilled
this liquor," Father Beret added,
handing the cup to Fnrnsworth, "not
for common social drinking, my son,
but for times when a man needs extraordinary stimulation. It U said to
be surpassingly good because St. Martin blessed the vine."
The doughty captain felt a sudden
nnd imperious thirst seize his throat.
Tho liquor flooded his veins before bis
lips touched tbeTiip. He had been abstaining lately; now bis besotting appetite rushed upon him. At one gulp
he took In ill llery yet Binootb and
captivating.dial.. Nor did he notice
that Father Beret, Instead of joining
him In the potation, merely lifted his
cup nml set It down again, smacking
his lips with gusto.
There followed a silence, during
which the nrorantlc breath of the bottle Increased Its dangerous fascination.
Then Father Beret again filled Farnsworth's cup nnd said:
"Ab, the blessed monks little thought
that their matchless brew would ever
he slnped In a poor missionary's hut
on the Wabash! But, after all, my
son, why not here ns well as In sunny
France? Our object justifies any Impropriety of lime nud place."
"You are right, father. I drink to
our object.   Y'es, I sny, to our object."
In fact, the drinking preceded his
speech, and liis tongue already had a
loop ln it. The liquor, stole through
him, n mist of bewildering and enchanting influence. The third cup
broke bis sentences into unintelligible
fragments; the fourth made his under-
Jaw sag loosely; the fifth and Blxtb,
taken in close succession, tumbled him
limp on the lloor, where be slept'blissfully nil night long, snugly covered
wltb somo of Father Beret's bedclothes.
"Per casum ohllquum, ct per indi-
roctum," muttered the priest when be
had returned the bottle and cup to their
hiding place. "The end justifies the
means. Sleep well, my son. Ah, little
Alice, little Alice, your old father will
try, will try!"
He fumbled along the wall In the
dark until be found the rapier, which
ho took down; then he went out nnd
snt for seme timo motionless beside
tho door, while the clouds thickened
overhead. It was late when ho arose
nnd glided nway shadowlike toward
the fort, over wbicli the night huhg
black, chill and drearily silent The
moon wns still some hours high, but
smothered by tho clouds; a fog slowly
drifted from tb? river.
Meantime Hamilton nnd Helm bad
spent n part of the afternoon and evening, ns usual, at cards. Helm broke
off the game mid went to bis quarters
rather early for bim, leaTing the governor alone and In a bad temper, because Farnswortli, wben he had sent
for blm, could not be found. Three
times his orderly returned ln as many
hours witb tlie same report. The captain had not been seen or heard of.
Naturally this sudden nnd complete
disappearance, immediately after the
reprimand, suggested to Hamilton an
unpleasant possibility. What lf Farnswortli had deserted him?
Hamilton sat for somo time after
Helm's departure, thinking over what
he now feared was a foolish mistake.
Presently be buckled ou Alice'8 rapier,
which he bad lately been wearing as
his own, nnd went out into the main
area of. the stockade. A sentinel was
tramping to nnd fro at tbe gate, where
a hazy lantern shone. The nlgbt was
breathless and silent. Hamilton approached the soldier on duty aud asked
him If be had seen Captain Farns"
worth, and, receiving a negative reply,
turned about puzzled and thoughtful to
walk back and forth tn tbe chill, foggy
air.
Presently a faint yellow light nt-
trncteti his attention. It shone through
a porthole lu nn upper room of the
blockhouse at the farther angle of the
stockade. In fact, Alice was reading
by n sputtering lamp a book Fnrnsworth had sent her, a volume of Ron-
sard that be had picked up ln Canada.
Hamilton made bis wny ln tbat direction, at flrst merely curious to know
who was burning oil so late, hut after a
few paces ho recognized where the
light enmo from nud Instantly suspected that Captain Fnrnsworth wns there.
Indeed, be felt sure of lt. Somehow
be could not regard Alice as otber thnn
n saucy bolden, Incapable of womanly
virtue. His experience with the worst
clement of Canadian French life nnd
his peculiar cast of mind and character
colored bis impression ot her. lie
measured her by the women with
whom tho coureurs do bols and half
breed trappers consorted ln Detroit
and at the posts eastward to Quebec.
Alice, tumble to Bleep, had sought for-
getfiilness of her bitter captivity In
the old poet's charming lyrics. She sat
on the lloor, some blankets and furs
drawn around ber, the book on ber
lap, the stupidly dull lamp bunging bo-
Bldo her on n part of the swivel. Her
hair lay loose over her neck nnd shoulders and shimmered around her face
with n cloudliko effect, giving to the
features ln their repose a setting that
Intensified their sweetness nnd sadness.
In n very low but distinct voice she
was reading, with n slightly quavering
Intonation—
Mlfi-nonn., nllorm voir si la ro«_.
Que ce matin avolt dosclose
8a rube do pourue au soldi,
when Hamilton, after stealthily mounting the rough stnlrwny which led to
her door, peeped in through a space
between the slabs nnd felt a stroke of
disappointment, seeing nt a glance that
Farnsworlh was not there. Ho gazed
for Borne time, not without n sense of
villainy, while sbe continued her sweetly monotonous rending. If. his heart
had been ns hard ns the Iron swivel
balls that lay beside Allen ho must still
have felt n thrill of something like tender sympathy. She now showed no
truce of the vivacious saucinens which
had heretofore nlwaya marked bur fea-
IIInil had a cloudburst,
"Stop, sir; not another step!"
tures when she wns In his presence.
A dainty gentleness, touched with melancholy, guve to ber face nn appealing
look all the more powerful on account
of Its unconscious simplicity of expression.
The mnn felt an impulse pure nnd
noble, which would have borne blm
back down the ladder and nway from
the building bad not n stronger one set
boldly in tbe opposite direction. There
wns n short struggle with the seared
remnnnt of his better nnture, and then
he tried to open tho door, but it was
locked.
Alice heard the slight noise and
breaking off her rendiug turned to
look. Hamilton made another effort
to enter before ho recollected that tho
wooden key, or notched lever, that controlled the cumbrous wooden lock
bung on n peg beside the door. He felt
for It along the wall, and soon laid his
band on lt. Then again be peeped
tVrough to see Alice, who was now
standing upright, near the swivel. She
had thrown her hair back from her
face and neck; the lamp's Dickering
light seemed suddenly to have magnified her stature and enhanced her
beauty. Her book lay on the tumbled
wraps at her feet, and in cither hand
Bhe grasped a swivel shot
Hamilton's combative disposition
came to the aid of hia baser passion
when he saw once more n defiant flash
from his prisoner's face. It was easy
for him to be fascinated by opposition.
Helm had profited by this trait as
much as others had suffered by lt, but
ln the caso of Alice, Hamilton's mingled resentment and admiration were
but a powerful irritant to the coarsest
and most dangerous side of his nature.
After some fumbling nnd delay he
fitted the key with a steady hand and
moved the wooden bolt, creaking nnd
Jolting, from its slot. Then flinging tho
clumsy door wide open, he stepped In.
Alice started when she recognized the
midnight Intruder, and a secoud deeper look Into his countenance made her
brave heart recoil, while with a sinking sensntion her breath almost stop-
pefl. It was but a momentary weakness, however, followed by vigorous
reaction.
"What are you hero for, sir?' she
demanded.   "What do you want?"
"I nm neither a burglur nor a murderer, mademoiselle," he responded,
lifting bis hat and bowing, wltb a
smile not in the least reassuring.
"You look like both. Stop where
you are!"
"Not so loud, my dear Miss Roussillon. I am not deaf, and, besides, the
garrison needs to sleep."
"Stop, sir;.not another step!"
She poised herself, leaning slightly
bnckward, and held the Iron ball In her
right band ready to throw It nt him.
lie halted, still smiling villainously.
"Mademoiselle, I assure you that
your excitement ls quite unnecessary.
I nm not here to hnrm you."
"You cannot harm mc, y'ou cowardly
wretch!"
"Humph! Pride goes before n fall,
weneb," be retorted, taking a half step
backward. Then a thought arose In
his mind which added a new shade to
the repellent darkness of his countenance.
"Miss Rousslilon," he snid in English and with a changed voice, which
seemed to grow harder, each word deliberately emphasized, "I have como to
break some bad news to you."
"Y'ou would scarcely bring me good
news, Blr, and I am not curious to hear
the bnd."
ne was silent for a little while, gazing nt her with the sort of admiration
from which a true woman draws nwny
nppnlled. He saw bow she loathed
him, saw how Impossible It was for
him to get a line nearer to her by any
turn of force or fortune. Brave, high
headed, strong as a young leopard,
pure and sweet as a rose, she stood before blm fearless, even aggressive,
showing him by every line of ber face
and form thnt she felt her Infinite superiority and mennt to maintain lt
Her whole personul expression told
hlin he wns defeated, therefore he
quickly Bolzod upon a suggestion
caught from a transaction with Long
Hair, who had returned n few hours
before from bis pursuit of Beverley.
"It pains me. I assure you, Alias
Roussillon, to tell you what will probably grieve you deeply," be presently
added; "but I have not been unaware
of your tender Interest In Lieutenant
Beverley, and when I had bnd news
from him I thought It my duty to inform you."
,Hc paused, feeling with a devil's satisfaction the point of his statement go
home to the girl's heart
"The Indian, Long Hnlr, whom I sent
upon Lieutenant Beverley's trail, reported to me this afternoon that his
pursuit hnd been quite successful. He
caught his game."
Alice's voieo came to her now. She
drew ln a quivering breath of relief.
"Then ho ls hero—he ls— You have
him a prisoner again?"
"A part of bim, Miss Roussillon.
Enough to be quite suro thnt there ls
ono traitor who will trouble his king
no more. Mr. Long Hulr brought in
the lieutenant's scalp."
Alice received this horrlblo statement
In silence, but her face blanched and
she stood ns.If frozen by the shock.
Tho shifty moon glimmer nnd the yellow glow of the lamp showed Hamilton to whnt an extent his devilish cruelty hurt her, and somehow It chilled
blm as lf by reflection, but he could
not forego nnother thrust
"Ho deserved hanging, and would
have got It bad he been brought to me
alive. So, after all, you should be satisfied. He escaped my vengeance and
Long Hair got bis pay. You see, I nm
the chief eufferer."
These words, however, fell without
effect upon the girl's ears, ln which
was booming the awful, stormlike lonr
of ber excitement. She did not see
her persecutor standing there, ner
vision, unhindered by walls nud distance, went straight nway to a plnee
In tbo wilderness where, all mangled
nnd disfigured, Beverley l-iy dead. A
low cry broke from her lips. Sho
dropped the heavy swivel balls, and
then, like n bird, swiftly, with a rustling swoop, sbe went past Hnmllton
and down the stair.
FOr perhaps a full minute tbe man
stood    there    motionless,    stupefied,
amazed, and when nt length be recovered himself It was with difficulty that
he followed ber.    Everything seemed
to binder bim.    When ho reached the
open air, however, bo quickly regained
his activity of both mind  nnd body
j and   looked   In   all   directions.     The
clouds   were   breaking   Into   parallel
! masses with Btrchlca of sky between.
; The moon banging aslant against tho
I blue peeped forth Just In time to show
him "a flying figure which, even while
be looked, reached the postern, opened
lt mid slipped through.
Wfi.h but n breath of hesitation between giving the nlnrm and following
! Alice silently and alone be chose the
! latter. He was a Bwift runner and light
footed.  With a few bounds he reached
j the little gate, which was Btlll oscllhit-
I lug on its hinges, darted through and
i nway, straining every muscle In desperate pursuit, gaining rapidly In the
rncc, which bore eastward along the
course twice before chosen by Alice in
leaving the Blockade.
CHAPTER XVII.
A 11A1IC1I TUIIOUOII COLD WATEn.
ON  the fith  dny  of  February,
1779,  Colonel  George  Itogeru
Clark led nn army ncross the
Kaskaskia river and camped.
This wns the flrst step In his march
toward tho Wabash.  An army! Do not
j smile.   Fewer than 200 men, It Is true,
answered the roll  call when  Father
j Gibault lifted tho  cross and  blessed
< tbem.
It wns an army, smnll Indeed, but
- yet nn army, even though so rudely
; equipped that, could we now see lt bc-
j fore us, we might wonder of wbat use
i lt could possibly bo In n military way.
Clark knew when bo set out on bis
i march to Vlncennes thnt he wns not
1 Indulging n  visionary  impulse.    Tho
enterprise was one that called for rill
that manhood could endure,  but not
more.   Wltb the genius of a born lender he measured bis task by his means.
He knew his own courage and fortitude and understood the best capacity
of his men.   He had genius—that Is he
possessed the secret of extracting from
himself and from ills followers the last
refinement   of   devotion   to   purpose.
There was n certainty, from first to
last, that effort Would not flag at nny
point short of  the  topmost possible
strain.
The march before them lay bver a
magnificent plain, mostly prairie, rich
SB the delta of the Nile, but extremely
difficult to traverse. Tho distance, as
the route led, was nbout 170 miles. On
account of nn open and rainy winter
j all the basins nnd flat lands wero in^
undated, often presenting leagues of
water ranging in depth from n few
inches to three or four feet. Colonel
Clark understood perfectly the strategic Importance of Vlncennes as a post
I commanding the Wabash and as a
base of communication with the many
Indian tribes north cf the Ohio and
cast of the Mississippi. Francis Vigo
(mny his name never fade!) had
brought blm a comprehensive nnd accurate report of Hamilton's strength
and tho condition of the fort and garrison. This Information confirmed bis
belief thnt It would be possible not only
to capture Vlncennes, but Detroit as
well.
Just seven dnys after the march began the little army encamped for a
night's rest nt the edge of n wood, and
here, just after nightfall, wben the fires
were burning merrily and tbe smell of
broiling buffalo steaks burdened tbe
damp nlr, a wizened old man suddenly
appeared, how or froni where nobody
bad observed. He was dirty anj ln
every way disreputable In appearance,
looking like an animated mummy,
bearing a long Wile on his shoulder and
walking with the somewhat halting
activity of n very old yet vlvnclous and
energetic simian. Of course It wns Oncle Jnzon, "Onele Jazon sul generis," as
Father Beret bad dubbed him.
"Well, hero I am!" be cried, approaching the fire by which Colonel
Chirk and some of bis officers were
cooking supper. "But ye cau't guess ln
a mile o' who I nm to save yer livers
an' lights."
He danced a few stiff steps, which
made the water gusli out ot. his tattered moccasins, then doffed tils nondescript cap and nodded his scnlplcss
bend In salutation to the commander. -
Clark looked Inquiringly at him,
while the old fellow grimaced nnd
rubbed his shrunken chin.
"I Btnelt yer fut «-fryln' somepln'
like a mile awny, nn' It set my ln'ards
to grumblln' for a snack, so I Jes'
thought I'd drap In on yo an' chuw
whiles wl' ye."
"Your looks nro decidedly agnlnst
you," remarked the colonel, with n dry
smile. He had recognized Oncle Jazon after n little sharp scrutiny. "I
suppose, however, that wo can let you
gnaw the bones after we've got off the
meat"
"Thank 'ee, thank 'cc, plenty good.
A feller 'at's as hongry as I sm kin go
through n bona like a fecsh through
water."
Clark laughed nnd snld:
"I don't Bee nny teeth that you have
worth mentioning, but your gums may
bo unusually sharp."
"Ya-a-s, 'bout as sharp ns yer wit,
Colonel Clark, an' sharper 'n yer eyes,
n long shot. Ye ("on't know me, do
ye? Take emollier squint at nie, an'
Bee 'f ye kin 'member n good lookln'
mun!"
-'Yo:i have somewhat the appearance
of nn old Rcamp of the name of Jnzon
thai formerly loafed nro lind with a
worthless gun on his' shoulder, nnd
use J to run from every Indian he saw
I flown yonder ln Kentucky." Clark held? (
| out his baud and added cordially:
"How are you, Jazon, my old frlenb", J
and where upon earth have yon conioj
from?"
Oncle Jazon pounced upon the band
and gripped it in his own knotted fln-J
gcrs, gazing delightedly up into Clark's
bronzed and laughing face. -
"Where'd I come frum? I comefrun
ever'whercB. Fust time I ever goj
lost in all my born days. I've been '
trompin' round !n tbe water seemd
like a week, crazy as a pizeiied rat, noq
| a-knowln' north f'om south ner my
big toe f'om n turnip I Who's got some]
tobucker?"
Oncle Jnzon's story, when presently
he told lt, interested Clark deeply.*)
He and Kenton bad, with wise Judg-j
ment,._separated on escaping from t'y
Indian camp, Kenton striking out foil
Kentucky, while Oncle Jazon went toj
ward Kaskaskia.
Tbe Information that Beverley would
be shot as soon as he was returned i
Hamilton caused Colonel Clark serlousj
worry of mind. Not only the fact tha*
Beverley, who bad been a charming
friend and a most gallant officer, wat-f
now ln such imminent danger, but the
impression (given by Oncle Jnzon's acj
count) that he had broken his parole,
was deeply painful to tbe brave and
scrupulously honorable commander
Still friendship roso abovo regret, and
Clark resolved to push his little colli
iiinn forward all tho more rnpidlyj
hoping to arrive in time to prevent tb
Impending execution.
Next morning the march was resum-j
ed at tho break of dawn, but a swollen
stream caused some hours of dclny^
during which Beverley himself arrived
from the rear, a haggard and welrdlj
unkempt apparition. He had been foa
three days following hard on the ar-j
"Vive Zhorzh Vaslntonl"
jnj'a track, whleh ho came to farwestl
ward. Onclc Jazon saw him first in
tbe distance, and his old but educated
eyes made no mistake.
"Yandc_*s that youngster Beverley!"j
he  exclaimed.    "Ef  it  ain't I'm
squaT^.!"
Nor did he parley further on the sub1
Ject, bnt set off at a rickety trot tc
mcct and assist tbe fagged and exelti-T
young man.
Clark had given Oncle Jazon lilrj
flask, which contained a few gills of
whisky. This was the first thing bt
fcred to Beverley, who wisely tool!
but a swallow. Oncle Jazon was so|
elated he waved bis cap on high and
unconsciously falling Into French, yell!
ed in a piercing voice:
"Vive Zhorzh Vnsinton! VIr» 14
banulere d'Aliee Roussillon!"
Seeing Beverley reminded him ofl
Alice aud tho flag. As for Beverley!
tho sentiment braced him and tho bef
loved name brimmed bis heart will)
sweetness.
Clark went to meet them as they
came ln.   He hugged the gaunt HeuJ
tenant with  genuine  fervor of Joy]
while Oncle Jazon ran around then
making a series of grotesque caper
The whole command, bearing Onclei
Jnzon's patriotic words, set up a wild
shouting on the spur of a general lmj
presslon that Beverley came aa a met
senger  bearing  glorious   newi   fron
Washington's army In tb# east
It was a great relief to Clark when
he found out that bis favorite llcuten-j
nnt hnd not broken bis parole, but bad!
Instead boldly resnrrendered hlmself.f
declaring the obligation no longer bind-]
lug and notifying Hamilton of his in-j
tention to go away wltb the purpose!
of returning and destroying blm andl
bis command. Clatk laughed heartily!
when this explanation brought out"
Beverley's tender interest in Alice, butl
he sympathized cordinlly, for he hlm-f
self knew wbat love ls.
Although Beverley was half atnrvedl
and still suffering from the kicks and!
blows given bim by Long Hair and hlsl
warriors, his exhausting run on the]
trail of Clark nnd his band had not/
worked him serious harm.   All of tbi
officers and men did their utmost toi
serve him.    Ho was feasted without!
stint  nnd furnished with  everything!
that the scant supply of clothing on the)
pack horses could afford for his comfort   He promptly asked for an assignment to duty In his company and]
took his place with such high enthusiasm that his companions regarded blm J
with admiring wonder. None of them
save Clark and Oncle Jnzon suspected
that love for a fair haired girl yonder
ln  Vlncennes wns the secret of hit ,
amazing zeal and Intrepidity.
  XI%U.
(To be continued.)
Sliver Qnar-erM. ""*"
On nn American twenty-live cent
piece there are 13 stars, 13 letters In
the scroll held In the eagle's beak, 13
feathers ln ench of tho eagle's wings,
13 tnll feathers, 13 parallel lines In the
shield, 13 horizontal bars, 13 arrow-
beads and 13 letters in tbe word*
"quarter dollar."
I'lrnl Mnrqntn.
The title of marquis was first given
by Richard II. to Robert de Vere, earl
of Oxford, wbo was made Marquis of
Dublin ln 1380.
Winnipeg    Is    Canada's    half-way,
house between  Oceana.
I.n>ct of IninKlnntlon.
A Berlin bridegroom reported that
bo hnd swallowed his wedding ring.
He suffered Intense agony and vowed
ho was dying until his pockets were
searched for money to pay for a telegram, when tho ring wns found ln
tho lining of his waistcoat. He became well ln a few minutes.
7
/ ^tjttuSs
MOUNT PLEASANT  ADVOCATE.
 :■..,:-..	
MOUNT PLEASANT ADVOCATE
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
LIKE A MIRACLE.
==s   THE WONDERFUL  RECOVERY OF
THE PARACHUTE .MAN.
Bla Feelln_ra na He Soared Skyward
* and Flnnjred to Earth.
"Come on!   Tbe band's all ready!"
I was met wltb a roar of applause as
I ran down tbe hotel steps. The band
blared ln salute and tbe crowd opened
up for me as I hastened. The parachute was stretched out from the
straining balloon. As tbe man with
me snapped the hooks on the ring be
allowed nie where the rope hung nnd
told ine bow -to pull lt when cutting
loose. He was the excited one. I was
ln a semlstupor. A bitter Indifference
filled me as I looked at the ugly swaying monster which was to bear me to
effluence or death.
■  "Let her go!"
Witb a cleaving of the air and n rush
of sound like the coming of a cyclone
tbe balloon shot .iwnrd. I ran for tho
bar, grasped it and soared.
I tried to swing up on the bar, but
the rush of the nscent straightened ine
like an iron rod. I thought my nrms
would be pulled out. A sickness cnmo
over me, comparable to the effect of
the start made by n high speed elevator. Then tho motion became more
easy nnd I swung up on tbe bar. I
was accustomed to gazing down from
heights and I felt no fear ns I stared
nt the fading crowd. 1 could see tbem
waving hats and hands; could bear tho
bnnd playing; und wns conscious of a
pleasnnt dreamy sensation and of a
steady, easy rising from the ground.
I ventured to bend a "crab" and make
a few "uukle drops." It was as easy
as wben I wus only a few feet from
the ground. I glanced down again.
The crowd nppenred smaller and seemed to be walking nwny from me. I
had commenced to drift. Now was the
time to cut loose. I wished that I
might stay where I wns —taking
chances with that limp bag of a parachute did not loc't safe. But lt had to
be done.
I caught hold of the rope, braced myself on tbe bar and gave a short, hard
pull.
Whlsh—my breath left mel For the
first time fear—deadly fear—entered
my henrt. A Jerk that nearly unseated me, nnd I was again sailing pleasantly through space.
I ventured to essay a few additional
feats, as the ground seemed to more
closely npproach me, and then I commenced to calculate as to the manner
In which to strike the ground. Like
many other problems, lt settled Itself.
I struck It feet flrst in a cornfield, was
dragged along and scratched up nnd
enme to consciousness in the nrms of
my new mnnngcr, who wns alternately
cursing mc for getting killed nnd blessing mc for having saved his skin and
tbe $-S0.-Outing.       '
Feellaar Better.
Shc-So your ideal Jilted you? He-
Yes, but I am somewhat reconciled. I
have since learned that she married
hers.—Puck       . . '
Loaded  For Them.
"Eddie, do you know wbat happens
to bad little boys?"
"Yes'm; the bears cat 'em up."
"Then wby don't you try to be
good?"
"Huh! S'pose I nm afraid of bears?
Bay,  I got a toy pistol!"
Canada exported In 1008, $80,000,-
000 worth of forest products.
Canada hit's, it. is est hunted, a million srpiii-r.tV miles of standing timber.
('nfTnilu.; hns  llie largest,  white pine
ureas leftV ou  the continent.
BABY LAUGHS.
Baby laughs when mother gives
him Baby's Own Tablets; they tasfto
good and make him well and happy.
They are mother's help and baby's
every day friend. Guaranteed to
contain no opiato or harmful drugs.
Tbe tablets aid digestion, cure colic,
prevent diarrhoea, cleanso tho bowels,
allay teeth irritation, and cure
all tho common ills of Childhood.
No cross, Bleepless children in homes
whero Baby's Own Tablets aro used.
Mrs. R. Ready, Denbigh, Ont., Bays:
"I don't know what higher praise I
can givo Baby's Own Tablets than
to say that I would not be without
them ln the house. I have found
them ail that is claimed and keep
them on hand to meet any emergency." Sold by all medicine dealers
cverwhero, or sent by mail at 25
cents by writing Tho Dr. Williams'
Medicine Co., Brockvllle, Ont.
"gave the Mar-E."
The ancient use of a crosB Instead of
i signature was universal alike by
those wbo could and by those who
could not write. It was a symbol of
an oath from Its earliest associations.
On this nccount Charles Knight, in
his notes on "The Pictorial Shakespeare," expjains the expression "God
save the mark" (Henry IV.) as a form
of ejaculation npproaching to tbe f*rm
of un oath. Kelly, in his "Comments
on Scotch Proverbs," observes thnt tbe
Scots, when tbey used to compare person to person, used the expression,
"Save tho mark." Another explanation of tbo expression Is tbat in archery when nn nreher -hot well lt was
tbo custom to cry out, "God save tbe
mark"—that is, prevent any ono coming after to hit the same mark and
thereby displace the arrow. Ironically,
It wns said to a novice whose arrow
struck nowbero,	
Oberlln College.
Oberlln was the first-college ln the
world to admit women. One woman
wns graduated there in 1838 nnd six in
ISM	
Ifeeeaally Drove.
He—I don't understand your extravagance! Before we were married you
bad the reputation of being very cco-
uoiiilenl. She (sweetly)—Hut you forget, dear, that before wo were married
1 didu't huve tbo money.
La grippe, pneumonia, and Influenza often leave a nasty cough
when they're gone.
It Is a dangerous thing to neglect
Cure It with
iShiloH's    ^
Consumption
Cure •E„,0u,ng
The cure that la guaranteed by
your druggist,
Prices!
Be. SO. $1.
II
S. C. Waul A Co. **•
LeRoy, 1-.¥.. Toroolo. Can.
A NIPISSINQ MAN.
Htiiolcon With Fartlal Paralysis ne Wal
Unable to Uso Kltlier Right Arm or
Right Log.
Mr. John Craig, a well known farmer living near Kelts, Niplssing district, Ont., is another of the many
paralytics, who owes his present
good health and ability to go nbout
—if not life itself—to tho use of Dr.
Williams' Pink Pills. Mr. Craig gives
his experience as follows:—"But for
the blessing of Cod and the use of
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills I do not believe that I would bo alive to-day. I
was stricken with that terrible nlllic-
tion, partial paralysis, I had absolutely no power in my right arm or
leg. I was not ablo to sit up—in
fact if I tried to do so I would fall
over. I had to bo lifted like a child,
and my family and friends believed
death was very near. The doctor
told me that he could do nothing
for me, and that I was liable at
any moment to have another stroke
which would carry mo off. I was in
this deplorable condition when I was
advised to uso Dr. Williams' l'ink
Pills. I sent for threo boxes nnd bo-
fore they wero all used I could move
tho fingers on my band which haji
nithorto been absolutely numb nnd
powerless. You can scarcely imagine
my joy at this convincing proof thnt
tho pills wero helping me. From
this on I kept getting stronger and
tho control of my paralyzed limbs
gradually caine back until I was
again ablo to walk about and eventually to work. To my neighbors
my curo seems like a miracle, as not
ono of them ever expected to see nie
out of bod again. I gladly givo permission to publish the story of my
curo with tho wish thnt it mny bring
life and hope and activity to some
other sufferer."
The curo of Mr. Cruig gives additional evidence that Dr. Williams'
Pink Pills aro not an ordinary medicine, and that their power to euro
in all troubles of tho blood or nerves
places them beyond all other medicines. You can got theso pills from
any medicine dealer or direct by mail
at 50 cents a box, or six boxes lor
$2.50 by writing The Dr. Williams
Medicino Co., Brockvillo , Ont. Seo
that tho full name "Dr. Williams
Pink Pills for Pale Peoplo" is printed on tho wrapper around every box.
There nre men who look upon employers ns oppressors under all
circumstances.
When a young mnn works llis wny
through college he demonstrates ul
least his ability to get. a job.
Canada's   forest  products   totalled
811,(11111,0110 in 1003.
Ontario, h'us set apart nearly 7,000-
000 acres ns forest reserve.
Canada has 100,000 men employed
in the fishery industery.
Nova-*-*vCotin ranks first iu the fishery industoi'.v. New Brunswick second
and British Columbia third.
..Canada ranks seventh In the list ol
?fnnril lino nut ions.
Canada has a registered tonnage ot
7,000 vessels.
Canada has hnill. 7*>.  light houses,
stations nml light ships.
Canada    has     1,088      steamboats
under government inspection.
Canada lins 28 life-saving stations.
Cnnada'S  volume  of   li-nde  reached
$407,004,685 in 1908.
The Flrat Locomotive fn Iffalne.
The flrst locomotive used In the
state of Muine came from England,
having been built at the works of Robert Stephenson & Co. In the year 1835,
and made its flrst trip over the Bnugor,
Oldtown and Milford railroad on Aug.
19, 1837. This road was then generally
known as tbo "Veazle road," and tho
track was mnde of wooden rails
strapped with iron. The shackles used
to connect the engine nnd cars wero
made of three thicknesses of sole or
belt leather beld together by copper
rlyets nnd had a hole in each end bo as
to hook over ar. upright stationary pin
bolted or driven Inlo a rigid beam extending from the end of the cur. It Is
said tbnt for n time the engine wns run
ln opposition to a six ox learn employed by a Bangor lumber denier who
was not willing to pny the ratCB
charged on the railroad, nnd lt wns
not until the management of the line
came to what bo considered fair
charges that bo turned bla tralllc over
tolt
In   Nature's   Wmulerlnnil.
There Is but one Grand canyon. The
name should never havo been given to
leaser gorges. Tho very fact that thero
Is a so called Grand canyon In Colorado la misleading. "The Grand ennyon
of Colorado" does not sound much different from "the Grand canyon of tho
Colorado." Hence many peoplo confuse them.
•The canyon of the Colorado river,
whleh flows through Arizona, forms
tho boundary lino between that territory nnd California and then empties
Into the gulf of California.
It Is the grandest gorge In the world.
In it 3,000 of tbe wonderful gorges of
the Btate of Colorado could be burled.
With its tributaries, mmiy of which
have never yet been explored, lt would
reach, if all the canyons were placed
one nfter another, nearly around tho
world.	
The flrst steamer on tho Thames wns
the Marjory, In 1814. Tho Richmond
followed her n venr Inter.
Willing to Oblige.
"I may ns well tell you, young mnn,"
snld Miss Spooner'B father, "that I nlwnys close up the house and turn out
■II lights by 10 o'clock."
"Don't bother tonight, sir," replied
Jack Nervy. "I'll nlteud to that for
you." -
PRE-EMPTED BY BIRDS.
The Noddles Tbat Own Bird Key, lithe Golf ot Mexico.
Out In tho gulf of Mexico sixty-five
miles from Key West toward the setting sun rise half a dozen barren sand
bars from tho exquisite turquoise blue
waters. One of these, Garden key, is a
government fort and coallug station;
another ls the Loggerhead key, our last
outpost toward Cuba and Central
Amerlcn. Otber islets nre untenanted
save when tbe grent sea turtles crawl.
Ono nlone, Bird key, Is pre-empted by
tho birds. It would bo hard to find
a more desolate or isolated, region.
Though tho climate is warm throughout tbe year, It is not uutil May that
the feathered hosts arrive from the far
Bouth nt this sandy rendezvous. In the
van como tbe noddles, a few about tbe
1st of May and tbe rest within a few
days. A week later the sooty terns
pour in, nnd it is said that within a
week of tbelr arrival both kinds begin
to lay. At tho time of our coming
nearly nil the birds bnd eggs and were
devoting themselves to tbelr family-
cares.
To reach the buildings from tho little
landing place we bad to pass through a
tract of bushes, and hero It wns thnt I
saw tbo flrst nesta of tho noddles. Upon tho tops or In the forks of the bushes each pair bnd built a rather rude yet
fairly substantial platform of sticks,
only slightly hollowed, nnd upon each
one snt n dark gray bird. There was
something about these graceful little
creatures that instantly took me by
Storm, a caso of love at first sight Tho
noddy ls very much like a dove—except for its webbed feet—iu size, In
form, In tbe softness of its plumage,
the expression of Ita large dark eyes
nnd Its gentle, confiding ways. There
ls no wild affright as the stranger: approaches. Just n shallow of fear is evident, but the birds sit quietly on their
nests, hoping nnd trusting, and do not
fly unless approached almost within
arm's reach. Then they flit gently
nwny, alighting upon n neighboring
br.h until the Intruder has withdrawn,
when they return directly to their
charge. It seemed remarkable to find
birds so perfectly tame.
JUST ONE MORE
REMARKABLE CURE
PITH AND POINT.
When a friend tells you of Ida wrongs
he wants sympathy and not nn argument
Before a man's first bnhy Is a week
old ho knows more than he had ever
dreamed about
Speaking of "secret sorrows," lt Is a
good plan to keep thorn so, as telling
only multiplies tliem.
When n man wants to give you ndvlce you can't lose anything by listening, but you will muke nn enemy by
refusing.
A mnn occasionally breaks even.
When it comes to wall paper the wife
does tbe picking aud tbe husband does
the kicking.
Every ono should have saved up
enough money to take things a littlo
easier by the time tbe ago comes for
taking  a  nap  In   a  chair.
Trained Tortolaea.
Japanese mid Korean showmen ln
addition to their skill ns Jugglers and
acrobats display a truly marvelous
skill In teaching animals tricks. They
not only exhibit educated bears, spaniels, monkeys and goats, but also' trained birds and, what is the moro astonishing of nil, trick fish.
One of tho most curious examples of
patient training is an exhibit by nn
old Korean boatman of n dozen drilled
tortoises. Directed by his songs nnd
a small metal drain, they march ln
line, execute various evolutions nnd
conclude by climbing upou n low table,
tlio larger ones forming of their own
accord a bridge for the Bmnller, to
which tbo feat would otherwlao bo impossible. When they have all mounted,
tbey dispose IheniBclvos In threo or
four piles like bo ninny ulgtep.    .»_.
Blood aa a Tree Fertilizer.
For several seasons n very ancient
walnut, wltb long, gaunt boughs, carrying much dead wood, had beon struggling to live, but each year manifested
signs that Its life was fust disappearing. Tbo keeper In front of whose
house the tree stood took to slinging
the carcass of ench deer ho killed over
ono of Its boughs for dressing. During tho process all the blood dripped
on the ground and was absorbed. Tbe
following spring this tree put forth an
astonishing crop of leaves, and In less
than three seasons lt was making new
wood and showing all the vigor which
had characterized It thirty yenrs beforo. Its renewed youth was entirely
attributable to the fertilizing properties of the blood with which lt had
been so liberally dressed.—Country
Gentleman.
The Mississippi.
Generally speaking, tho slope of
rivers flowing into the Mississippi from
the east Is, on the average, about three
Inches per mile. Those entering It
from the west have an average descent
of about six Inches per mile. Tho nver-
oge descent per mile of tho Missouri
nfter lt leaves the mountains Is reckoned nbout a foot; tho Dcs Moines,
from Us source to Its conjunction with
the Mississippi about 7.3 Inches. Tho
entire length of the Ohio shows a full
of even flvo Inches. Tho Mississippi,
from tho mouth of tho Ohio to the
gulf, has a fall of about two ond one-
half Inches.
Lincoln',, Paaaea.
Lincoln's humor nrmod blm effectually against the importunate persons
with whom, as tho head of tbo nation,
be was beset nt all times.
During the civil wnr a gentleman
nsked him for a pnss through tho Federal lines to Richmond.
"I should bo bnppy to oblige >ou,"
said Lincoln, "If my passes were respected. But the fact Is, within the
last two yenrs I have given passes to
Hlchmond to a quarter of a million
men, nnd not one baa got there yet."
No Color llllnd Chinamen.
The Chinese are Iho only people free
from color blindness.
Mnlliieo Accessories.
George—1 lid you have n good time?
Oertle-Oh, lovely, lovely! George—
Was the play good? Gertio—No, but 1
had on my new lint and had n box of
delicious   cnramcls   with   mc.
Diabetes is again Vanquished by
Dodd's Kidney Pills.
Donat LaUamme, of St. Marguerite, Que.,
the Man cured—Further Proof or the
far -R-Aohlnff Power of the Great Kid.
aey Remedy.
St. Marguerite, Dorchester Co.,
Que., July 11 (Special).—That all
varieties and stages of Kidney Diseaso yield readily to Dodd's Kidney
Pills has been proven almost daily
for years, but when another victory
over- the deadly Diabetes Is scored
it is always worthy of mention.
Such a case has happened hero.
Donat Lafiamme ia tho man cured
and tho curo was quick as well as
complete. Speaking of his cure Dr.
Lafiamme says:
"For two years I suffered from Diabetes. I was attended by the doctor
but all hia remedies did mo no good.
Then I tried Dodd's Kidney Pills and
two boxea cured me completely."
What will curo Diabetes will cure
any Kidney disease is an old saying.
And no doubt remains that Dodd's
Kidney Pills will curo Dlabotes.
According to tho Cnpc Colony cun-
sns returns, tho population of the
colony is 2,40.,870, ol' whom onlj
575,102 nre white.
HINDOO FANATICISM.
Over 1,000,000 gallons ol milk nre
daily consumed in tlie City of New
Yorv.
I    was    cured    of    Bronchitis    and
Asthma bv MINAUD'S LINIMENT,
Mrs. It. LIVINGSTON.
Lot. 5, P.E.I.
I wirs cured ol u severe attack of
Rheumatism by MINAUH'S L1NI-
MI-NT.
Mnhone. Bny. JOHN MADF.lt.
I was cured of a severely Sprained
leg hy-MINAUIi'S LINIMENT.
JOSHUA VVYNACHT,
Bridgewnler.
(fills dressed in gaudy red, black
and white uniforms ure selling butter
and cheese in ihe streets of Berlin
for a new company.
Hinard's Lltiiment Cures Garget in Com
Lord Del am era has purchased 100,-
000 abres of land in East Africa, und
offers it froo to HO suitable settlers.
This would be n pleasant old world
if men would pay their debts as cheerfully as they pay grudges.
NOT A NAUSEATING KILL.— The ex-
oinient of a. pill in tho BUbstanco whig
enfold a the hifcr-jdienta and mukes up
tho pill mass. That-of Parmolee's Vfcjje
table Tills ia no compounded ns to pie
servo their moisture, and they eun b
carried into nny latitude without Impairing their BtrfUlglh. Muny pills, in ortle
to keep them from adhering, ure rolled in
powders which prove nauseuting to Uu.
tattle. I'ui'iiiek'e'H Vegetable l'ills nre 8
prepared thut they are agreeable to th
ra'ostraollcato.
Canada    exported    in    1008  nearly
§_>.), .;oo,ooo in manufactures-,
The  short nge  in  cotton  is  causing
nn  Industrial crisis in Spain,
Hinard's Liniment Cnres Colds, F,tc
Canada's exports for 1903 were
|225.849(724. Of this 58 per cent,
were tb (Jreut Britain and 31 per
cent.-to the United States.
There never was and never will be t
universal panacea, in one remedy, foi
ull ills to "which flesh is hoir—the verj
nature of many r.urntlves being BUOl
that were the germs of other and differently seated disease rooted in the system or tlie patient—what would relieve
one ill In turn would aggravate tht
other. We have, however, in (Julnhu
Wine, when obtainable iu sound, unadulterated state, a remedy fur many and
grievous ills, liy Hh gradual and judicious uso the frailest systems are led
into convalescence und strength by tht
influence which Quinine exerts on nature's own restoral ives. It relives th<-
drooping spirits of those wilh whom a
chronic stale of morbid despondency and
lack of interest in life is a disease, and
by trunquili/.ing the nerves, disposes to
sound and refreshing Bleep—Imparts vigor to the action of the blood, which,
being si i inula ted, courses through liu
veins, strengthening tho healthy animal
functions of tho system, thereby making
activity a necessnry result, strengthening tho frumo and giving life to the
digestive organs, which naturally demand increused sn list uncp—result, lm
proved 'appetite. Northrop &. J.ymun ol
Toronto have given to the public their
.Superior Quinine Wine at the usual rate,
and, ganged by the opinion of scientists, tho wine approaches nearest perfection of and in the market. All drug-
•ristrt  sell  It.
Canada's expenditure for 1003 wns
fni^noo.ooOj    estimated    for   1904,
tf.iO.l'OU "HO.
Canada's imports for 1908 were
$241,214,001. of ibis 2(1 per cent.
wns front Grant Britain, and .".I por
from ihe United States;
COURTEOUS REPLIES,
He got hln big snow shovel
And went out to olear tho wullc.
Bach friend who chanced to sat hia
Had to slop ti hit and talk.
-You're oleanlng off th© sidewalk!"
Tho first acquaintance suid.
"Why, no," ho smoothly uinm-ered,
"I'm now asleep in bed."
"Hello, you hnve to shovel!"
tVn- tho second friend's .i.ilute,
"Gurus not," he blithely murmured;
"I'm bluylng on n llute."
••You're -hoveling snow, nro youT"
The third mnn had to say.
"Bliuulil iliinii you'd see," he answered,
"I'm cutting In my hay."
The fourth nnd' fifth were Jolly.
"Alt. you've got your sltov.l outT"
To ciu-li he said politely,
"No; tt Ih a Waterspout."
To nil the lilaml lni|iilrera
111. words were calm and cool.
He thought thut they were crniy;
They swore he wus a fool.
Sunlight Soap will not injure
your blankets or harden them. It
will make them soft, white and
fleecy, ,B
Bell  Inflicted Tortures  ot Rell_rloas
Zealots ot India.
Self Inflicted torture by Hindoo zealots ls common In India. One man will
He upon his back, place a piece of soil
upon his lower Up, plant In It a mustard seed and not rise from his position uutil the seed bas become a plant
of size. Another will mnke his couch
upon spikes; a third walk with bis
boots filled with similar delights; yet
nnother keeps his bands clinched until tho nails grow through his palms
and out at tbe back of bis hands, while
others distort their legs and arms Into
atrophy. Tho extent to which Hindoo
fanaticism will go, or native belief extend, wns Bbown by a case reported ln
tbe Civil and Military Gazette of Lahore a year or so ago. Tbe natives of
Trevnndrum wero found worshiping ns
a god come among men a man wbo
bad taken up bis residence under a
tree on the bank of a river. For tho
first week or so ho ate a plantain and
drank somo milk twice or thrice a
week. Then bo gradually enlarged the
intervals, till after three or four
months be took no food at all, but
passed his time huddled beforo a fire,
Bcelng no one, bearing no ono. Exposed to cold nud wet, to heat and
dust, be sat thus without food for
threo yenrs, "wrapt iu divine contemplation." At the end of tbe three
years he died, never having spoken to,
or heeded, a soul from tbe time be
first appeared until tbo spirit passed
from his body.
Canada's fisheries havo yielded,
since 1804, $.'177,000,(100. Cod comes
first, to the value of $186,000,000,
salmon, $74,000,000.
Canada has 47 pulp mills.
Cnnada cfiportcd in 1903 over 53,-
000,000 worth of pulp wood.
Canada has the largest.pulp wood
forests in the world.
Canada's fishery industry produced,
n 1903, $22,000,000.
Canada exported- in 1903, nearly
812,000,000 worth of fishery products.
Brain Controls
Every Muscle
Injury to Brain op Nerves, Deficiency of Nerve Force
Mean Paralysis and Helplessness.
Dr. Chase's Nerve Food.
THE LADIES' TAILOR.
He Flourished In France Three Centuries Avo.
The ladles' tailor does not belong to
this century or to the last; 300 years
back he flourished ln France. The
court beauties employed him during
the reign of the last of the Valols.
Mme. de Scvlgne gives an elaborate description in one of her letters of a
gown mado for Mme. de Montespan
and mentions tho name of tbe tailor
Langlce, the son of one of the servants ln the household of Anne of Austria. Indeed, women were not allowed
ln those days to enter into competition
with men ln the production of outer
garments, even for their own sex. It
was Louis XIV. who looked favorably
on woman's work for her own sex
nnd granted letters pntent to the sempstresses to form themselves into n corporation, though lt was not made easy
for tbem, and they only, nfter all,
made up ladles' own materials, even
as far back as that. By the aid of the
poupeos which went the round of society exhibiting the passing mode3 Lo I
Roy found favor with the belles In
tho beginning of tbo seventeenth century, and when we see, as wo may
do now at the Crystal palace, even the
silk bodices that wero made then we
cannot but very much wonder that
they wero moro fitted for n tailor's
board than for feminine fingers, so
hard, so thick, so heavy wero they.—
London Queen.
Every muscle of the body controlled by tho will is connected with tho
brain, and overy muscular action is
originated by nervous force, generated in tho brain and transmitted
along the nerves to tho muscles.
When the nerves aro Injured or diseased, when there is a deficiency In
the supply of nervous energy, paralysis, locomoter ataxia or some
form of helplessness results because
tho brain has no longer control of
tho muscles.
It may bo weak heart action, Inability to digest food, failure of the
lungs to purify tho blood or impaired action of any of tho vital organs,
but the cause of trouble is with tho
tho nerves.
The restorative action of Dr.
Chase's Nervo Food Is soon felt
throughout the ontiro system, bo-
causo it restores tho vigor and vitality of tho nerves—fills them with
new nervo force tho vital power of the
body;   weakness,  nervousness,   irrita-
, bility, sleeplessness and low spirits-
disappear and new energy and
strength tako their place.
| Mrs. C. Corkey, 32 Maine street,
St. Johns, N. B. states:—"I had been
jin   very   poor   health   and   in   fact,
,when I began UBing Dr. Chase's
Nerve Food I had Just got up from
a bed of sickness, my nerves wero in
a bad stato, I was weak and could
not sleep. Now I am getting up In
years, and, of course, could not look
for immediate results, but must say,
that I havo been delighted with the
uso of this preparation as it has
done mo a great deal of good. I am
now able to sleep very much better,
my nerves are steadier and my,
strength is gradually Increasing."
Dr. Chase's Nervo Food 5p-cents A
box. 0 boxes for $2.50, at all dealers
or Edmanson, Bate & Company, Toronto. To protect you against. Imitations, thp protrait and signature
of Dr. A. W. Chase, the famous' receipt book author, aro on every box.
Ara   You    _Bullcffn|
If ao,   %*m»
EDDY'S IMPERVIOUS SHEATHING
Ths Boat  BwllcllrtK F>apor Made.
It Is very much stronger snd thicker thnn any other (tarred or balld-
Inff) paper. It ts impervious to wind, keeps out cold, keeps tn heat, carries no smell or odor, absorbs no moisture. Imparts no lasts or flavor ta
anything with which it comes In contact. It ls largely used not only for
sheeting houses, but lor lining cold storage buildings, relrlgerators. dairies, creameries, and all places where the object is to ksep an evea and
■nlferm temperature,  and  at ths earn, tiros avoiding dampness.
Writs sur Agents, TEES A PERSSE, Winnipeg, for samplss.
The E. B. EDOY CO., Limited, HULL.
At confederation 00 per cent, of
Canada's export, wus to the U.S. and
30 per cent to Groat Britain. In
1903, r>8 per cent, to Great Britain
and 31 per cent, to the  U.S.
A Useful Feature.
Two New York women went npart-
ment hunting nnd were pleasantly surprised to find nt the end of their first
day's search au apartment which
seemed to be exactly suited to their
needs. It was new, desirably situated
and Inexpensive — three rooms and
both, said Uie Jnnltress, all with out-
sldo exposure. The prospective tenants walked through the rooms, examining every feature.
"But where Ib the bathroom?" they
Inquired.
Tho Janltrcss pointed to an alcove
which was furnished with gayly colored hangings and an awkward looking
divan covered with pillows.
"There lt Is,'-' she explained. J'My
Inst tenants said It was In tho wny, so
they mndo a cozy corner out of It Of
course lf you want to uso it as n bathroom you can take the cover and pillows off the tub." '
DIAGNOSING PAIN.
IN FIELDS PAR OFF.—Dr Thomns'
Hjclectri. oil Is known ln Australia,
Houth nnd Centrul America iih well .8
in Camilla und the United Hliiles, anil
Its consumption intireasos each year, it
has mado ils own way and all thnt ncnl.
lo Im, done is to keep its name before the
public. Everyone knows that il is io be
had at any store, lor all merchants kri'p
Since confederation the exports
during 27 of the 37 years were greater to Great Britain than to the United States.
Canada's   revenue  quihtrupled since
confederation.
Canada's    volume   of     trado     has
doubled  in eight years.
Physical   Signs   Which   Dlstlmralsh
Rent From Assumed Suffering.
" 'How do you diagnose pain?' was
one of the questions put by the state
board the year I received my diploma,"
snld n young dentist "I wns rather
stumped at tho time, but I hnve since
learned thnt the query was a perfectly natural one. Tbe Idea ls to differentiate between real pain and nssumed
pnln. There are some peoplo so stoical
while In tho operating chair tbnt not a
sound escapes them, not even tbe suspicion of a grunt, though they may be
suffering severely. On tho other bnnd,
there are people, men and women nllke,
who try to givo tho Impression that
every touch of an Instrument Is torture.
"Bnt thero nro always physical signs
by which wo can distinguish between
tho real and the assumed suffering.
Beads of perspiration on tho forehead
Is one, and when tho pain ls not so
severe, but still keen enough to bs felt,
thero Is an Involuntary twitching of the
muscles ot the eyelid. Then wo know
It's the real thing and net accordingly.
Why, I have even known women to pre-
tend to fulnt nnd carry the bluff
through when they were not suffering
tho slightest pain."
Willing to ne Hnlf Killed.
Among tho depositors In an Akron
bank wns nn old fellow who wns quite
a mlRPr. A local physlclnn who wns
a great student of his profession sold
to tho old man ono dny: I'Jolin, I'll
give you $10,000 lf you'll let me cut
n certain vein. It will kill you, but
then you will have the $10,000." The
miser considered for n moment nnd replied, "Let mo think over that till tomorrow." Next dny bo called on the
doctor and snld: "I'vo figured that
thing out nnd I can't seo what good
the $10,000 would do me after I am
doad. But, sny, I'll let you hnlf kill
ino for $5,000."
Dell Thnt Ilns llang For a Century.
A snered bell In n town In north
China hns been kept ringing for a century. A tax for paying relays of ringers to pull Its ropo Incessantly dny and
night Is willingly paid by tho Inhabitants, for lt Is Implicitly believed by
tho benighted peoplo thnt whenever the
tonguo touches tho metal n devil Is
squelched forever. Thus It ls to the
public Interest, according to this superstition, to have ns muny of these objectionable spirits dons awny with as
is possible.
Canada's    trade    has    incrensed  91
per cent, in ten yenrs.
No one need tear cholera or nny summer I'liiniiliiiiit II' they have ti bottlr ol
llr. J. li. ICellogg's Dysentery Cordial
ready lor use. It correct- nil looseness
of the bowels promptly nnd Causes u
lieullhy und natural action. This is n
medicine 11.1ni>i.-.I for the young nnd old
rich and poor, und Is rapidly becoming
Hie iiuiHt, popular medicine for cholera,
dysentery, etc., in the market.
BLAIR'S GOUT AND
RHEUMATIC PILLS
THIS tiltlSAT E./III.I.SH IlKMBDY.
TESTIMONIAL from the lats SIH SAMUEL BAKER, the famous Nils Explorer.
"Newton Abbot, Devon. Dear Hlrs—I
have delayed my thanks as 1 wished to
test tho effect of Blair's Fills by a sufll-
clout Interval of time.
"For ten years 1 had suffered acutely
from Oout and life had lost its attraction owing to the uncertainty of health
and sudden visitations of the enemy
which prostrated nie for months, or weeks
according to the virulence of the attacks,
"lllalr's Pills havo rendered ms Immense
servico, as 1 no longer fear an attack
of Oout.
"For the last twenty months I have
been comparatively freo, as one or two
attempted visitations have been immediately stamped ont by ths assistance ot
lllalr's l'ills.
"Truly yours (Signed) Saml. W.Baker.
Lyman Sons & Co., Montreal and Toronto; The llolo Drug Co., Winnipeg; and
Martin, BoIo & Wynne Co., Winnipeg.
Many a candidate who runs for
office discovers thnt his opponent bus
a walk-over.
TIMID HERBERT.
Ue Failed lo Tell Amelia of Ills Lo**
For  Her.
Herbert stopped towing, ritenslbly
to rest.
"Amelia." lie snid with an elrborate
affectation of i iconceru Io ihe young
womun siltiiiK in the stern of the bout,
"there's n friend of mine Hint's bend
over heels—head over ears, I menn—In
love wilh u beautiful girl and as good
as she Is beautiful. He has known her
ever t. ninny years, nnd he bus been go-
lug to see her a long time, but he's too
big a coward—thut's what he says—to
ask her, you know, If"—
Here his voice trembled n little, and
ho paused to wipe his perspiring brow.
"Beautiful girl. Is she;" queried ihe
young woman, Idly dipping lier llngem
In the water nt the side of the ..int.
"Loveliest In the world-Unit's what
be snys, I menu."
"What's her name?"
"He'd—he'd rather not have hernamo
mentioned."
"Friend of yours, you Bay? Wbo Is
he?"
"Oh, I don't dnre (o tell you who be
Is.    He might not like It."
"Very much In love with her, Is be?"
"Clean gone. He snys It luulies hlin
fairly ache."
"And he's nfrald lo tell her so?"
"Yes. Ho—be says he can't gucsn
from Ihe wny she treats liim whether
ihe—er—likes hlin or not. He's a coward— thnt's what be Is."
"What arc you telling mo nbout blm
for?"
"Well, he—bo asked mo what I
thought he'd better do, nnjl 1 couldn't
advise blm. 1 suppose I-l'd be Just ns
big n coward ns he Is. Thnt's why I'm
asking you. Wli-whut do you think
he ought to do? Tell her and run tho
risk?"
"I nm sure I don't know."
Herbert gnsped, swallowed and
changed the subject.
"Isn't this water elenr?" ho said.
"You can see the sand nnd the stones
at the bottom.  How deep It Is, nnd yet
how transparent!"
"Yes," she snld. "So like you, Herbert!"
"Dear girl," he whispered fifteen
minutes Inter ns be stroked her pompadour caressingly! "bow did you know I
was telling you my oivn story?"
"Ob, you goose!"—Chicago Trlbunei
Canada's wealth Is .i-2.ii per hend,
against J.210 in England, X173 per
head   In   the   U.S.,   por   Sir Robert
Grillin.
Canada's manufacturers have nn invested capital of $500,000,000.
DeafncM Cannot Be Cured
•7 local applications as they cannot reach the
.Incojir- portion of the ear. Tli.ie ls only one
way to cure deafness, and thst 1, by constitutional remedies. Deafness Is caused by aa Inflamed condition of the mucous lining of ihe
Eustachian Tubs. When thl, tubs Is InHamsS
you have a rumbling sound or Imperfect hearing, and when It ta entirely closed. Deafness ls
the result, snd unless ths lntuunmatlon can bs
taken out and this tube restored to Ita normal
condition, hearing will b, destroyed forever;
nine cases out of ten are caused by Catarrh,
which Is nothing but an Inflamed condition of
Uie mucous surfaces.
Ws will give One H-mlrM Dollars for sny
case of Deafness (caused by catarrh) that cannot bs cured by Hall's Catarrh Curs. Send for
.lrculars, free.
T. J.  CHENEY & CO., Toledo, tt
Bold by al] drugglats, i.e.
Hall's Family Fills are the best.
Canada's volume of trade per hend,
In  1908 was SH7;  lHliH.S-O.
Cnnnda's net. public debt hi $201.-
000,000, 160 per hend. Canada's
public dihi. ut confederation wus
$75,000,000, ?2'J por head.
Miliar.'. Liniment Cnres Diphtheria.
In 1003 tho Unitqd stuteH bought
fn»m Canada good ft to tho vtrluc of
$1 por head ol their population.
Tho   Increase   "f   Canada's wtpbrt
trade in L902 wilh Uront llrilniii
nvi-r tin' United SUiti'M wns |4U,U0l),-
000; in I'm:., $57,000,000.
A SMM.I, I'll,I, HUT PoWKUni.-
They ilml judffe ot the powers of a I'ilt
!• v it?; Bite, would t'onsi'lur l>ariiii>l_.f'H
Voxolahla l'ills to be lurking.    It is   h lu
ili>  wonder  it rift   i>ilin.   wimt   ii   lackn
in hI/i' it iiniki'N u 11 in potency. The
romedien which it. carries nro i>ui up in
tin".' Mniiii doses, because they nre m»
powerful Mint unlv small doses ore required, rlii<' full strength of the ext.rt.ct91
in secured in thin form nnd do their witk
1 li'iniuuhly
Canada's   main   channel of export
trado Is now to Groat Britain.
fn 1!>m:. Oraal Britain bought from
Cannde goods to tha value of $8 per
head of her population.
Minar.'. Liniment Cures Distemper.
C'nnnda's    revenue    Iron,   nnfttonia
duties in 1908, ivni 187,000,000,
Canada's roveniie from excise duties
In  1008, uns $13,000,000.
De-ace-nitnnt  of  Malinm-neil.
A lineal descent of Mohammed lives
the life of n Kiiinll shopkeeper In Cairo,
1'ftypt.    The  fumouu uncestry  of the
tradesman is familiar throughout the
City nnd Insures good trade, especlnlly
among   the   tourists.    Tbe  shop   Is n
very  modest affair and tbe stock In
| trade ls uot lurgo.
Canada's lulnl revenue in IllllM was
186,000,000, estimated 1904, $71,-
000,000.
Levor'S \-'A (Wise lleml) lliHlnft'i'tant
Roan I'liuilcr dusted In Iho bath, mittens
tho water mul disinfects.
f'nmidn's exports hnve oxpunileil ia
fftTxltor  rutin  than   Ihe imports.
Cnnndn hns 18,000 miles of const,
line — 7,(10(1 being in British Columbia.
\rJ    IM    WI
v MOUNT PLEASANT ADVOCATE.
»**a'*****f***t*ff*ff
"' *  w + »
M_#_l#*»W#4__i»
••«•«««#*«*«••
'»■?-.-.*
*♦»♦♦•
k.»* • i,
.aaa-.i
ALICE of OLD
VINCENNES
to,
By  MAURICE  THOMPSON \\\
CawrUal U*M. W «- BOWEN-NEtttaL COMPACT
iii»frm»m»tt»\^'»»»»»»»»«»
1/ CHAPTER XVI.
J_-THEn BKJJltT'S OLD DATTI.E.
HE room in which Alice wns
now Imprisoned formed part
of the upper story of a building  erected  by   Hamilton  ln
one of the four angles of the stockade.
had no windows and but two oblong
ortholes mnde to accommodate a small
swivel which stood darkly scowling
'•near the middle of tho lloor. Day after
'.day her ^pBCliness and helplessness be-
'\caaie more .agonizing. Farnswortb, it
Is true, did all he could to relieve the
."strain of her situation, but Hamilton
'.bad nn eye upon what passed and soon
^'Interfered. Ho administered a hitter
-'.reprimand, under which his subordi-
• hate writhed in speechless anger nnd
presentment.
?»! "Finally, Captain Farnsworlh," he
said In conclusion, "you will distinctly
understnnd thnt this girl Is my prisoner, not yours; thnt I, not you, will direct how sho is to be held und treated,
end that hereafter I will suffer no ln-
-terference on your part 1 hope you
"fully understand me, sir, and will gov-
vern yourself accordingly."
ft) Smarting, or, rather, smothering, un-
Ider the outrageous insult of these re-
tfunrks, Farnsworlh at first determined
>io fling bis resignation itt tlio govern-
ijjr's feet nnd then do whatever desperate tiling seemed most to his mood. But
i Soldier's training Is apt to call a halt
cfore the worst befalls in sucli a caso.
iloreovor, In the present temptation
I'nrnsworth bad a special check and
hindrance. He had had a conference
vlth Father Beret, in which the good
•torlest bnd played the part of wisdom
_}n slippers and of gentleness more
Jovelike tbnn the dove's. A very subtle
npresslon, Illuminated with the "hope
lint withers hope," bad come of (hat
Ct.rview, nnd now Farnswortb felt its
Cstrnlnt. He therefore saluted Ilamil-
tjformally and walked away.
Father Beret's paternal love for Alice—we cannot characterize it more
nicely than to call it paternal—was his
Justification for a certain mild sort of
corruption Insinuated by him into the
heart of fnrusworth. He was a crafty
priest, but.Jiis. craft was always us.d
forli good end. tjnaiiestionnbly Jesuit le
wns -Ms. mode of circumventing the
youug' mtiii's military scruples by of-
feijil'g blm n puff of fair weather witb
which to sell toward what appeared lo
be the shore of delight, lie saw at a
glance thut Farnsworth's love for Alice
was a consuming passion In a very
ardent yet decidedly weal; heart. Hero
was tbe worldly lever with which Father Beret hoped to raze Alice's prison
and free ber from tlie terrible doom
with wliich sbe was threatened.
Tbe first Interview wns at Father
Bcret'p cabin, to which, as will bo remembered, the priest and Fnrnsworth
went nfter their meeting In the street.
it actually camo to nothing, save an
Indirect understanding but half suggested by Father Beret and never openly sanctioned by Captain Farusworth.
The .talk was Insinuating on the part
W the former, while tlie latter slipped
evasfreiy from every proposition, ns if
not able to consider It on account of a
curious obtuscness of perception. .Still,
When they separated (hey shook hand..
and exchanged a searching look perfectly satisfactory to bolh.
.The memory of lhat Interview with
the priest was in Farnsworth's mind
wben, boiling with rage, he left Ham-
"it's tin outrage!" he lirolic forth.
llton's presence nnd went forth Into
the chill February air. He passed out
through the postern nnd along tho
sodden nnd rjuenchy edge of the prairie,
involuntarily making his way to
Father. Beret's cabin. Ills Indignation
wns so great that he trembled from
bend to foot at every step. The door
of the place wns open nnd Father
Beret was eating n frugal meal of
scones and sour wine (of his own make,
ho said), which be hospitably begged lo
share with bis visitor. A firo smoldered on the hearth, and a flat stone
showed, by the grease smoking over its
hot surface, whero tlio cakes had been
baked.
"Come in, my son," cnid tbe priest,
"and try the fare of a poor old man.
It Is plain, very plain, but good." Ho
smacked bis lips sincerely nud lingered
another scone. "Take some, take
some."
Farnswortb was not tempted. Tho
acid bouquet of the wine filled the
room with a smack of vinegar, nnd
the smoke from rank scorching fat and
wheat meal did not suggest an agreeable feast.
"Well, well, If you are not hungry,
my son, sit down on the stool there
and tell me the news."
Farusworth took llie low sent without a word, lotting his eyes wander
over the walls. Alice's rapier, tbe
male to that now worn by Hamilton,
liung In Its curiously engraved scab-
hard near oue corner.   The sight of lt
inflamed Farnsworlh.
"It's an outrage!" he broke forth.
"Governor Hamilton sent a mnn to
Roussillon place with orders to bring
him Ihe scabbard of Miss Rousslllon's
sword, and he now wears the beautiful
weapon as if he bad come by It honestly.   Curse him!"
".My denr, dear son, you must not
soil your lips with such language!"
Falher Beret let fall the half of a well
bitten cake nnd held up bolh bands.
"I beg your pardon, father, I know
I ought to be moro careful ln your
presence, but—but—the beastly scoundrel"—
"Bah! Boucement, moil flls, douee-
mcnl." The old man shook his head
and his finger while speaking, "Easy,
my son, easy. You would be n fine
target for bullets were your words to
reach Hamilton's ears. You are not
permitted to revile your commander."
"Yes, I know; but how can n man
restrain himself under such abominable conditions?"
Father Beret shrewdly guessed that
Hamilton had been giving the captain
fresh reasons for bitter resentment.
Moreover, be was sure that the moving
cause had been Alice. So, ln order to
draw out what bo wished to bear, he
said very gently:
"How ls the little prisoner getting
along?"
Farnsworlh ground his teeth nnd
swore, but Father Beret appeared not
to hear. He bit deep Into a scone, took
a liberal sip of the muddy red wine
and added:
"Has she n comfortable place7 Do
you think Governor Hamilton would
let me visit her?"
"It is horrible!" Farnswortb blurted.
"She's penned up ns If she were a dangerous boast, the poor girl. And that
d—d scoundrel"—
"Son, son!"
"Oh,,It's no uso to try. I can't help
It, father.   The whelp"—
"We can converse more safely nnd
Intelligently If we avoid profanity and
undue emotion, my son. Now, If you
will quit swearing. I will, nnd If you
Will be calm, so will I."
Farnswortb felt the sly Irony of this', ^
t/iurdly vicarious proposition.  Father I '^m{'Governor" Hamilton "bave"so dill-
. '„re,t.Ti.1.Cid..V-i_tl1 a klndly twinkle lB ' gently   and   unsuccessfully   been   In
quest of for the past month or two.
siow understanding. What nre you
talking about, my sou?"
Father Beret glanced furtively about,
then quickly stepped through the doorway, walked entirely around the houso
and enme In again before Farnswortb
could respond. Once moro seated on
his stool he added interrogatively:
"Did you think you heard something
moving outside?"
"No."
"You were saying something when I
went out.   Pardon my interruption."
Farnswortb gave the priest n searching and not wholly confiding look.
"You did not Interrupt me, Father
Beret. I was not speaking. Why nro
you so watchful? Are you afraid of
eavesdroppers?"
"You were speaking recklessly. Your
words were incendiary; ardentla verba.
My son, you were suggesting a dangerous thing. Your life would scarcely
satisfy the law were you convicted of
Insinuating such treason. What If ono
of your prowling guapds hnd overheard you? Your neck and mine might
feel the halter. Quod nvertat doinl-
niis." Uo crossed himself and In a
solemn voice added In English: -
"May the Lord forbid! All, my son,
we priests protect those we love."
"And I, who am not fit to tio a
priest's shoe, do likewise. Father, 1
love Alice Roussillon."
"Love is n holy thing, my son. Amnro
dlvlnum est et hunianum."
"Father Beret, can you help mc?"
"Spiritually speaking, my son?"
"I mean can you hide Mile. Roussillon In some safe place If I tnke her out
of tho prison yonder? That's just wbat
I mean.   Can you do It?"
"Your question Is a remarkable ono.
Have you thought upon It from all directions, my son? Think of your position, your duty ns an olllcer."
A shrewd polemical expression beamed from Father. Beret's eyes, and a
very expert physiognomist might have
suspected duplicity from certain lines
about the old man's mouth.
"I simply know that I cannot stand
by and seo Alice—Mile. Roussillon—
forced to suffer treatment too beastly
for an Indian thief. That's the only
direction there is for ino to look nt It
from, nnd you cnn understand my
feelings if you will. You know that
very well. Father Beret. When n mnn
loves a girl he loves her; that's the
-whole thing."
The quiet, Inscrutable half smile
flickered once more on Father Beret's
face, but he sat silent some time wltb
n sinewy forefinger lying alongside bis
nose. When nt last he spoke lt wns
in n tone of voice indicative of small
interest In what he was saying. His
words rambled to their goal with tlie
effect of happy accident.
"There aro places in tills neighborhood in which n human being would be
ns bard to find ns tho flag that you
his deep set eyes.
"Well, if you don't use profane language, father, there's no telling how
much yon tkii k in expletives. What Is
your opinion of n man who tumbles a
poor, defenseless girl into prison nnd
then refuses to let her be decently
cared for? How do you express yourself about him."
"My son, men often do things of
which they ought to be ashamed. I
heard of n young officer once who maltreated a little girl that he met at
night in the Btreet. What evil he
would have done, had not a passing
kind hearted man reminded him of his
honor by a friendly punch in the ribs,
I dare not surmise."
"True, and your sarcasm goes home
as hard as your fist did, father. I
know thut I've been a snd dog all my
life. Miss Roussillon saved you by
shooting me, and I Iovo her for It
Lay on, .father; I deserve more than
you can givo me.
"Surely you do, my son, surely you
do, but my love for you will not lot mo
give you pain. Ah, wo priests have to
carry nil men's londs. Our backs nro
broad; however; very broad, my son."
"And your fists are heavy, father;
mighty heavy."
The gentle smile again flickered over
the priest's weather beaten fnce as ho
glanced sldewiso at Fnrnsworth and
said:
"Sometimes, sometimes, my son, a
carnal weapon must break the way for
a spiritual one. But wo priests rarely
have much physical strength. Our dependence is upon"—
"To be sure; certainly," Farnswortb
Interrupted, rubbing his side. "Your
dependence Is upon the lirst tiling thnt
offers. I've had ninny n blow, but
yours was the solidest that ever jarred
my mortal frame, Falher Beret."
The twain began to laugh, There is
nollilng like a reminiscence to stir up
fresh mutual sympathy.
"If your Intcrcostals were somewhat
sore for a time on account of a contact with priestly knuckles, doubtless
there soon set In n corresponding uneasiness in the region of your conscience. Such shocks are often vigorously ulterative and tonic; ch, my
son?"
"You jolted me sober, father, and
then I wns ashamed of myself. But
whero does nil your tremendous
strength lie?   Y'ou don't look Btrong."
While speaking Fnrnsworth lenned
near Father Beret and grasped bis
nrm. Tho young man started, for his
lingers, Instead of closing around a
flabby, shrunken old man's limb,
spread themselves upon n huge, knotted mass of Iron muscles. Wltb a
quick movement Fnther Beret Bhook
off Farnswoi Ill's hand and said:
"I am no Samson, my boh. Non sum
quails cram." Then, as If dismissing
n light subject for n graver one, bo
slglipd and added, "I suppose there ls
nothing that can bo done for little
Alice."
He called the tall, strong girl "littlo
Alice," and so she seemed to him. He
could not, without direct effort, think
of her as a magnificently maturing
woman. She had always been big
spoiled pet child, perversely set against
the holy church, but dear to him nevertheless.
"I came to nsk that very question,
father," said Farusworth.
"And what do I know? Surely, my
son, you seo how utterly hopeless un
old priest ls against all you British.
And besides"—
"Father Beret," Farnsworlh huskily
Interrupted, "Is there n place that you
know   of   anywhere   In which   Miss
Roussillon could bo hidden If"—
"My denr son!"
"Ilul, father, I uicnn lt."
"Meau what?   I'ardon an old mau's
Renlly, my son, this is n mysterious
little town,"
I'arnsworth's eyes widened and a
flush rose In bis swarthy cheeks.
"Hang tho flag!" he exclaimed. "Let
it lie hidden forever. What do I care?
I tell you, Father Beret, that Alice
Roussillon ls in extreme danger. Governor Hnmllton means fo put some
terrible punishment on her. He has a
devil's vindictiveiicss. Ho showed it
to me clearly awhile ngo."
"Y'ou showed something of the same
sort to me, once upon a time, my son."
"Yes, I did, Father Beret, and I got
n load of slugs in my shoulder for It
from thnt bravo girl's pistol. She
saved your life. Now I ask you to
helii mo save hers, or if not her life
what is Infinitely more, lier honor."
"Her honor!" cried Fnther Beret,
leaping to his feet so suddenly and
with such energy that tlio cabin shook
from base to roof. "What do you say,
Captain Farnswortb? What do you
moan?"
The old man was transformed, nis
face was terrible to see, with its narrow, ' burning eyes deep under the
shaggy brows, its dark veins writhing
snnkelike on the temples nnd forchend.
Ihc projected mouth and chin, the hard
Hues of the jaws, the Iron gray gleam
from all the features—ho looked like an
aged tiger stiffened for a spring.
Farnswortb was made of right soldierly stuff, but he felt a distinct
shiver flit nlong his bnck. Ills past
life had not lneked'thrllling adventures
nnd strangely varied experiences with
desperate men. Usually he met Sudden
emergencies rather cnlmly, sometimes
with phlegmatic Indifference. Tliis
pnssionato outburst on the priest's
part, however, surprised blm and nwed
blm, while lt stirred his heart with n
profound sympathy unlike anything be
had ever felt before.
Father Beret mastered himself in n
moment nnd, passing his hand over his
face, ns If to brush away the excitement, sat down again on his stool. Ho
appeared to collapse Inwardly.
"You must excuse the weakness of
an old man, my son," be said, In n
voice hoarse nnd shaking. "But tell
me whnt ls going to bo done with
Alice. Your words—what you said—I
did not understand."
He rubbed his forebend slowly, as
ono who hns difficulty In trying to collect his thoughts.
"I do not know whnt Governor Hamilton  means to do,  Father Beret.    It
will bo something devilish, however—
something that must not happen," said
Farusworth.
Falher Beret, like most men of stron.T
feeling who hnve been subjected to
long years of trial, hardship, multitudinous dangers and all sorts of temptation, and who have learned the lessons of self control, had an iron will,
and also an abiding distrust of weak
men. Ho saw Farnsworth's sincerity,
lmt he had no fnllh in bis constancy,
although satisfied that while resentment of Ilamillon':! luiperlousness
lasted lie would doubtless remain firm
in his purpose to nld Alice.
Ho listened in sllenco to Farnsworth's story. When lt camo to nn
end ho began to offer some but half
relevant suggestions In the form of
Indirect cross questions, by means of
wliich ho gradually drew out a minute
description of Alice's prison, the best
wny to reach it, the nature of its door
fastenings, where tho key was kept,
and everything, Indeed, likely to be
helpful to one contemplating a jail delivery. Farusworth was Inwardly delighted, lio felt Father Beret's cunning npproncb to the central object and
bis crafty method of gathering details.
The shades of evening thickened ln
the sluffy cabin room while tho con
versation wont on. Fnther Beret presently lifted a puncheon In one corner
of llie floor and got out a large bottle,
which bore a mildewed nnd faded
French label, and with lt a small Iron
cup. There was just light enough left
to show a brownish sparkle when,
after popping out the cork, ho poured
n draft iu the fresh cup and In his
own.
"Wo may think more clearly, my son,
If we taste this old liquor. I hnve kept
lt a long while to offer upon a proper
occasion.   Tho occasion ls here."
A ravishing bouquet quickly Imbued
tho nlr.   It was itself an Intoxication.
"The brothers of St. Martin distilled
this liquor," Father Beret added,
blinding the cup to Farusworth, "not
for common social drinking, my son,
but for times when a man needs extraordinary stimulation. It Is said to
be surpassingly good because St. Martin blessed the vine."
The doughty captain felt a sudden
nnd Imperious thirst seize his thront.
The liquor flooded his veins before his
lips touched the Tup. He had been abstaining lately: now bis besotting appetite rushed upon him. At one gulp
he took In lit llery yet smooth and
captivating droit. Nor did he notice
thnt Father Beret, Instead of joining
him In the potation, merely lifted bis
cup nnd sot It down again, smacking
his lips with gusto.
There followed a Bllence, during
which the aromatic breath of the bottle Increased Its dangerous fascination.
Then Fnther Beret again filled Farnsworth's cup and said:
"Ah, the blessed monks littlo thought
that thoir matchless brew would ever
he sloped In a poor missionary's hut
on tho Wabash! But, after all, my
son, why not hero ns well as In sunny
France? Our object justifies any Impropriety of time aud place."
"You are right, father. I drink to
our object Yes, I say, to our object."
In fact, the drinking preceded bis
speech, and his tongue already had n
loop ln it. Tbe liquor, stole through
him, n mist of bewildering and enchanting Influence, Tbe third cup
broke his sentences Into unintelligible
fragments; the fourth made his under-
Jaw sag loosely; the fifth ond sixth,
taken In close succession, tumbled blm
limp on tho lloor, where he slept' blissfully all night long, snugly covered
with some of Father Beret's bedclothes.
"1'er casum obllquum, et per Indl-
rectum," muttered the priest when he
hnd returned the bottle and cup to tbelr
hiding place. "Tho end justifies tlie
inenns. Sleep well, my son. Ah, littlo
Alice, little Alice, your old fnther will
try, will try!"
He fumbled nlong the wall ln the
dark until be found the rapier, which
ho took down; then he went out nnd
sat for seme timo motionless beside
the door, whilo tbe clouds thickened
overhenil. It wns late when bo arose
nnd glided away shadowlike toward
the fort, over which the night hung
blnck, chill-and drearily silent. The
moon was still some hours higb, but
smothered by tbo clouds; a fog slowly
drifted from tb? river,
Meantime Hamilton nnd Helm bad
spent a pnrt of the afternoon and evening, as usual, at cards. Helm broke
off the game nnd went to bis quarters
rather early for blm, leaving the governor nlone and in a bad temper, bo-
cause Farusworth, when he bad sent
for him, could not be found. Three
times his orderly returned in ns many
hours with .lie same report. The captain had not been seen or heard of.
Naturally this sudden and complete
disappearance, Immediately after the
reprimand, suggested to Hamilton an
unpleasant possibility. What lf Farnswortb had deserted blm?
Ilamillon sat for some time after
Helm's departure, thinking over what
he now feared was n foohsh mistake.
Preseutly he buckled on Alice's rapier,
which he had lately been wearing as
his own, and went out Into the main
area of. the stockade. A sentinel was
tramping to nud fro at tbe gate, where
n hnzy lantern shone. Tbe night wus
breathless and silent. Hamilton np-
proached the soldier on duty nud asked
bim if lie bad seen Captain Farns"
worth, nud, receiving a negative reply,
turned about puzzled and thoughtful to
walk back and forth in tbe chill, foggy
nlr.
Tresently n fnlnt yellow light attracted his attention. It shone through
a porthole ln nn upper room of the
blockhouse at the farther angle of the
stockade. Iu fact, Alice wns rending
by a sputtering lamp n book Farnswortb had sent her, u volume of Ron-
sard that he had picked up ln Canada.
Hamilton made his way in tbat direction, nt flrst merely curious to know
who was burning oil so late, but after a
few paces ho recognized where tlie
light came from ami Instantly suspected that Captain Farnswortb wns there.
Indeed, he felt sure of It. Somehow
ho could not regard Alice ns other than
n saucy holdcn, incapable of womanly
virtue. His experience with tile worst
clement of Canadian French life and
his peculiar cast of mind and character
colored his Impression of her. Ho
measured her by the women wltb
whom tho coureurs do hols and half
breed trappers consorted ln Detroit
nnd nt the posts eastward to Quebec.
Alice, unable to sleep, had sought for-
getfulness of her bitter enptlvlty In
tho old poet's charming lyrics. She snt
on the floor, some blankets and furs
drawn around her, the hook on ber
lap, the slupldly dull lamp hnnglng beside lier oh 11 pnrt of the swivel. Her
hnlr lay loose over her neck nnd shoulders and shimmered around her face
with a cloudliko effect, giving to the
features In (heir repose a setting tbat
Intensified their sweetness and sadness.
In n very low but distinct voice she
was reading, with n slightly quavering
Intonation—
Mlpnonne, nllons voir Bl la rose.
Quo ce matin avolt descloBO
6a robe do pourpe au solcil,
when Hamilton, after stealthily mounting the rough stairway which led to
her door, peeped in through n space
between the slabs nnd felt a stroke of
disappointment, seeing at a glance that
Farnsworlh was not thero. He gnzed
for some time, not without a sense of
villainy, while sho continued ber sweetly monotonous rending. If his heart
had been ns hard as the Iron swivel
balls that lay beside Alice ho must still
have felt a thrill of something llko tender sympathy. She now showed no
trace of the vivacious saiiciiiess which
had heretofore always marked ber fea-
Ulah hnd a cloudburst,
"Stop, sir; not another etep!"
turcs when she wns ln his presence.
A dainty gentleness, touched with mol-
uiieholy, gave to her face an appealing
look nil the more powerful on account
of Its unconscious simplicity of expression.
Tlio man felt an Impulse pure and
noble, which would bave borne hlin
buck down the ladder nnd away from
the building had not n stronger one set
boldly In tho opposite direction. There
was a short struggle with tlie seared
remnant of his better nature, and then
he tried to open tbo door, but lt was
locked.
Alice heard tbe slight noise and
breaking off her rendlug turned to
look. Hamilton made another effort
to enter before he recollected that tho
wooden key, or notched lever, that controlled the cumbrous wooden lock
hung on a peg beside the door. He felt
for It along tbe wall, and soon laid his
hand on it. Then again he peeped
t'arough to see Alice, who was now
standing upright, near the swivel. She
had thrown hor hair back from her
face and neck; tho lnuip's flickering
light seemed suddenly to have magnified her stature nnd enhanced her
beauty, ner book lay on tbo tumbled
wraps at her feet, and In cither hand
Bhe grasped a swivel shot.
Hamilton's combative disposition
came to the aid of his baser passion
when he saw once more a defiant flash
from his prisoner's face. It was easy
for him to bo fascinated by opposition.
Helm hnd profited by this trait as
much as others had suffered by It, but
ln the case of Alice, Hamilton's mingled resentment and admiration were
but n powerful Irritant to the coarsest
und most dangerous side of ills nature.
After some fumbling and delay he
fitted the key with a steady hand and
moved the wooden bolt, creaking and
jolting, from Its slot. Then flinging tho
clumsy door wide open, be stepped In.
Alice started when she recognized the
midnight Intruder, and a secoud deeper look Into his countennnce made her
brave heart recoil, while with a sinking sensation her breath almost stopped. It was but a momentary weak-
ucss, however, followed by vigorous
reaction.
"Whnt arc you here for, sir?" she
demanded.   "What do you want?"
"I nm neither a burglar nor a murderer, mademoiselle," be responded,
lifting his hat and bowing, with a
smile not in the least reassuring.
"You look llko both. Stop where
you a re I"
"Not so loud, my dear Miss Roussillon.   I nm not deaf, and, besides, tbe
garrison needs to sleep."
"Stop, sir;.not another step!"
She poised herself, leaning slightly
backward, and held tho Iron ball In ber
right hand ready to throw It at him.
He baited, still smiling villainously.
"Mademoiselle,   I   assure   you   that
your excitement ls quite unnecessary.
I am not here to hnrm you."
"You cannot harm me, you cowardly
wretch!"
"Humph! Trlde goes before a fall,
wench," he retorted, taking a half step
backward. Then a thought arose In
bis mind which added a new shade to
the repellent darkness of his countenance.
"Miss Roussillon," be snid In English nnd with a changed voice, which
seemed to grow harder, each word deliberately emphasized, "I have come to
break some bad news to you."
"Y'ou would scarcely bring me good
news, sir, and I am not curious to hear
the bad."
ne was silent for a littlo while, gazing at her with tho sort of admiration
from which a true woman draws nway
appalled. He saw how she loathed
blm, snw how Impossible it was for
him to get a line nearer to her by any
turn of force or fortune. Brave, high
headed, strong as a young leopard,
pure and sweet os a rose, she stood before blm fearless, eveu aggressive,
showing him by overy line of her face
and form thnt she felt her Infinite superiority and meant to mnlntaln lt.
Her whole personal expression told
hlin he wns defeated, therefore be
quickly seized upon n 'suggestion
caught from a transaction with Long
Hair, who had returned n few hours
before from his pursuit of Beverley.
"It pnlnB mc, I assure you, Miss
Roussillon, to tell you what will prob-'
ably grieve you deeply," he presently
added; "but I hnve not been unaware
of your tender Interest In Lieutenant
Beverley, and when I had bad news
from him I thought It my duty to Inform you."
He paused, feeling with a devil's satisfaction the point of his statement go
home to tlie girl's heart.
"The Indian, Long Hair, whom I Bent
upon  Lieutennnt Beverley's trail, re- |
ported to me tills afternoon that his
pursuit had been quite successful.   He
caught his game."
Alice's voice came to her now. Sbe
drew ln a quivering breath of relief.
"Then he is hero—he ls— You bave
him n prisoner again?"
"A part of blm, Miss Roussillon.
Enough to be quite sure that there ls
one traftor who will troublo his king
no more. Mr. Long Hair brought ln
the lieutenant's scalp."
Alice received this horrible statement
In silence, but her face blanched and
she stood as.lf frozen by the shock.
Tho shifty moon glimmer and the yellow glow of the lamp showed Hamilton to what an extent his devilish cruelty hurt her, and somehow it chilled
bim as lf by reflection, but ho could
not forego nnother thrust.
"Ho deserved hanging, and would
hnve got lt bad he been brought to me
alive. So, after all, you should be satisfied. He escaped my vengeance and
Long Hair got bis pay. You see, I am
the chief sufferer."
Theso words, however, fell without
effect upon the girl's ears, ln which
was booming the uwful, 'stormlike lonr
of her excitement. She did not see
her persecutor standing there, ner
vision, unhindered by walls uud distance, went straight away to a place
In tho wilderness where, all mangled
and disfigured, Beverley lay d.ail. A
low cry broke from her lips. Sho
dropped the heavy swivel balls, nnd
then, llko a bird, swiftly, witb a rustling swoop, she went past Hamilton
and down the stnlr.
FOr perhaps a full minute the mau
stood there motionless, stupefied,
amazed, and when at length he recovered himself it was with difficulty that
he followed her. Everything seemed
j to binder him. When ho readied the
! open air, however, bo quickly regained
his activity of botli mind nud body
j and looked In all directions. 'The
clouds wero breaking Into parallel
masses with Btreaks of sky between.
The moon hnnglng nshint against tho
blue peeped forth just In timo to show
blm n flying figure which, even while
he looked, reached tbe postern, opened
lt nud slipped through.
Wfib but a breath of hesitation between giving the nlarm and following
Alice silently and nlone he chose the
! latter. Ho was a swift runner and light
i footed.  With n few bounds be reached
! the little gate, which was still oscillating on Its binges, darted through and
nway, straining every muscle In des-
| perato pursuit, gaining rapidly in the
i race, wliich bore eastward along the
course twice before chosen by Alice in
leaving tbe Blockade.
CHAI-TER XVII.
A MAncii Tiiiioiraii colp wateu.
ON the Cth dny of February,
1779, Colonel George Rogers
Clark led an army across tbe
Kaskaskia river and camped.
This was the first step In his march
toward tho Wabash. An army! Do not
smile. Fewer than 200 men, it is true,
answered the roll call when Father
Glbault lifted the cross and blessed
them.
it was an army, small Indeed, but
yet an army, even though so rudely
equipped that, could we now sec It before us, we might wonder of what use
lt could possibly bo in n military way.
Clark knew when ho set out on his
march to Vincennes thnt ho wns not
Indulging a visionary Impulse, The
enterprise was one that culled for all
that manhood could endure, but not
more. With tlie genius of a born leader be measured his task by bis means.
He knew llis own courage and fortitude nnd understood the best cnpaclty
of iila mun. He hnd genius—thnt Is he-
possessed the secret of extracting from
himself and from his followers the last
refinement of devotion to purpose.
There was a certainty, from first to
I last, thnt effort Would not flag at any
j point short of  tho  topmost possible
flown yonder in Kentucky." Clark held j
out his bund and added cordially:
"How are you, Jazon, my old frlenb", ]
and where upon earth have you como,]
from?"
Oncle Jazon pounced upon the hand
nnd gripped lt ln his own knotted fin-J
gers, gazing delightedly up into Olark'sf
bronzed and laughing face. -
"Where'd I come frum? I come frun
ever'wbcres. Fust time I ever goj
lost In all my born days. I've l*_en(
trompln' round ln the water seems!
like a week, crazy as a plzened rat, no^
a-kuowln' north f'om south ner my
big toe f'om a turnip! Who's got some]
tobneker?"
Oncle Jnzon's story, when presently
ho told it, interested Clark deeply*)
He and Kenton had, wltb wise Judg-j
ment_.separated on escaping from t',1
Indian camp, Kenton striking out foit
Kentucky, while Oncle Jazon went to<
ward Kaskaskia.
The information that Beverley would
be shot as soon us he wns returned
Hamilton caused Colonel Clurk serious]
worry of mind. Not only the fact than
Beverley, who had been a charming
friend nnd a most gallant officer, watj
now ln such imminent danger, but the
Impression (given by Oncle Jnzon's ac^
count) that he had broken his parole-
was deeply painful to the brave and
scrupulously honorable commander
Still friendship roso nbovo regret, and
Clark resolved to push bis little coll
umn forward all tho more rnpldlyj
hoping to arrive In time to prevent tb
Impending execution.
Next morning tho march was resum-|
ed at the break of dawn, but a swollen
stream caused somo hours of delay;]
during which Beverley himself arrived
from the renr, a hnggard and welrdlJ
unkempt npparltion. He had been fol
three dnys following hard on the ar-j
strain.
Tbe march before them lay bver a
magnificent plain, mostly prairie, rich
as (ho delta of the Nile, but extremely
difficult to traverse. The distance, as
the route led, was about 170 miles. On
account of an open and rainy winter
all the basins and flat lands wero ln^
undated, often presenting leagues of
water ranging in depth from n few
Inches to three or four feet. Colonel
Clark understood perfectly the strategic Importance of Vlncennes as a post
commanding the Wabash and as a
base of communication with the many
Indian tribes north of the Ohio and
cast of the Mississippi. Francis Vigo
(mny his name never fade!) had
brought blm a comprehensive nnd accurate report of Hamilton's strength
nnd the condition of the fort nnd garrison. This Informntlon confirmed bis
belief thnt It would be possible not only
to capture Vlncennes, but Detroit as
well.
Just seven dnya after the march began tho little army encamped for a
night's rest at the edge of a wood, and
here, Just after nightfall, when the fires
were burning merrily and the smell of
broiling buffalo steaks burdened the
damp air, a wizened old man suddenly
appeared, how or froui where nobody
had observed. He wns dirty an^ in
every way disreputable ln appearance,
looking like an animated mummy,
bearing n long riflo on bis shoulder nnd
walking with the somewhat halting
activity of a very old yet vivacious and
energetic simian. Of course lt was Oncle Jnzon, "Oncle Jazon suI generis," as
Father Beret had dubbed him.
"Well, hero I nm!" he cried, approaching tbe fire by which Colonel
Clark and some of his officers were
cooking supper. "But ye cau't guess In
a mile o' who I am to save yer Uveri
an' lights."
He danced a few stiff steps, which
made the water gush out ot. bis tattered moccasins, then doffed his nondescript cap nnd nodded his scnlpless
head In salutation to the commander. •
Chirk looked Inquiringly at him,
while the old fellow grimaced and
rubbed his shrunken chin.
"I smelt yer fat a-fryln' somepln'
llko a milo awny, nn' It set my In'ards
to. grumblln' for a snack, bo I Jes'
thought I'd drap In ou ye an' chaw
wlttles wl' ye."
"Y'our looks nre decidedly against
you," i.'marked the colonel, with a dry
smile. He had recognized Oncle Jazon after a little sharp scrutiny. "I
suppose, however, that we can let you
gnaw the bones after we've got off the
ment."
"Thank 'co, thank 'ce, plenty good.
A feller 'at's as hongry as I am kin go
through a bono llko a feesh through
Water."
Clark laughed nnd said: .
"I don't see nny teeth that you bnvo
worth mentioning, but your gums may
be unusually sharp."
"Yn-a-s, 'bout as sharp as yer wit,
Colonel Clark, an' sharper 'n yer eyes,
a long shot. Ye don't know mo, do
ye? Take ernother squint nt me, an'
sec 'f ye kin 'member n good lookln'
man!"
"You have somewhat the appearance
of an old scamp of the name of Jazon
that formerly loafed around with a
worthless gun on Ids shoulder, and
iiscj. lo run from evei'y Indian he saw
"Vive Zhorzh Vatlntonl"
jny's track, which he came lo far west J
ward. Oncle Jazon saw him first ill
the distance, and hia old but educated
eyes made no mistake.
"Yandet"s that youngster Beverley!']
he  exclaimed.    "Ef  lt ain't I'm
squnw-J"
Nor did he parley further on the autl
Ject, btit. set off at a rickety trot to"
meet and assist the fagged and exciti^
young man.
Clark had given Oncle Jazon hli
flask, which contained n few gills of
whisky. This wns the first thing df
tared to Beverley, who wisely took
but a swallow. Oncle Jazon was bo|
elated he waved his cap on high and
unconsciously falling into French, yell)
ed ln a piercing voice:
"Vive  Zhorzh   Vnslnton!    Tire
banulere d'Aliee Roussillon!"
Seeing Beverley reminded   him   oa
Alice nnd tho flag.   As for Beverley!
the sentiment braced blm and tbe bef
loved name brimmed bis heart will
Bwcetness.
Clark went to meet them •■ they
enme in.   Ho hugged the gaunt lieu]
tenant with  genuine  fervor of Joy|
while Oncle Jazon ran around then
making a series of grotesque capersj
The whole command,  bearing Oncle
Jazon's patriotic words, set up a wild
shouting on the spur of a general lm J
presslon that Beverley came ts a messenger  bearing  glorious  news  fron
Washington's army in the east
It was a great relief to Clark when
he found out that bla favorite Heuten-1
nnt had not broken his parole, but had!
instead boldly resurrendered himself,]
declaring the obligation no longer blnd-j
Ing and notifying Hamilton of his in-i
tcntlon to go away with the purpose]
of returning and destroying blm and!
bis command. Clark laughed heartily*
when this explanation brought outT
Beverley'B tender Interest ln Alice, but!
he sympathized cordially, for be him-f
self knew what love is.
Although Beverley waa half starved!
snd still suffering from the kicks and]
blows given him by Long Hair and hlsl
warriors, his exhausting run on tbe]
trail of Clark and his band bad not
worked blm serious harm.   All of thi
oillcrrs and men did their utmost toi
serve him.    Ho wns feasted without]
stint nnd furnished with everything!
that the scant supply of clothing on the!
pack horses could afford for his com-]
fort.   He promptly asked for an ae-'
eignment to duty ln bis company and]
took his place with such high enthusl-1
asm tbnt his companions regarded blm j
with admiring wonder. None of them '
save Clark and Oncle Jnzon suspected
that love for a fair haired girl yonder
In  Vincennes wns the secret of his ,
■mazing zeal and Intrepidity.
(To be continued.)    '* '."*' ■'**!
——- ^ —««,   _>   -a
Silver  llnartera,
On an American twenty-five cent
piece there are 13 stars, 13 letters In
the scroll held In tbe eagle's beak, 13
feathers ln each of tho eagle's wings,
13 tail feathers, 13 parallel lines ln the
shield, 13 horizontal bars, 13 arrowheads and 13 letters in the words
"quarter dollar."
First Mrtro.nL.
The title of marquis was first given
by Richard II. to Robert de Vere, earl
of Oxford, who was made Marquis at
Dublin in 1380.
Winnipeg    is    Canada's    hnlf-wny
house ! 'tween  oceans.
Effect of InifiRlnnllon,
A Berlin bridegroom reported thnt
ho hnd swallowed his wedding ring.
Ho suffered Intense agony and vowed
be was dying until his pockets were
searched for money to pny ifor a telegram, when the ring wns found In
tho lining of his waistcoat. He became well in a few mlnutea.
7
3K
■__________■ •nam ■
MOUNT PLEASANT  ADVOCATE.
stnil ir'n'in- rnrsi
MOUNT PLEASANT ADVOCATE
VANCOUVER, B. 0.
THE PARACHUTE .MAN.
Hia Feelings aa He Soared Skrvrare
' and .'limited to Earth.
"Come on!   Tbe band's all ready!"
I was met wltb a roar of applause as
I ran down the hotel steps. The band
blared ln salute and the crowd opened
up for me as I hastened. The parachute was stretched out from tbe
straining balloon. As the man with
me snapped tbe hooks on tbe ring he
•bowed me where the rope hung and
toid ine how -to pull it when cutting
' loose. He was the excited one. I wns
ln a semlstupor. A bitter indifference
filled me as I looked at the ugly swaying monster which was to bear me to
affluence or death.
■   "Let her go!"
With a cleaving of the air and n rush
of Bound like the coming of a cyclone
the balloon shot upward. 1 ran for the
bar, grasped It and soared.
I tried to swing up on the bar, but
the rush of the ascent straightened ine
like irn Iron rod. I thought my nrms
would be pulled out. A sickness.came
over mc, comparable to tho effect of
the start made by a high speed elevn-
tor. Then tho motion became more
easy and I Bwung up on the bar. I
was accustomed to gazing down from
heights nnd I felt no fear as I stared
at the fading crowd. 1 could see them
waving hats nnd hands; could benr tho
band playing; and wns conscious of n
pleasant dreamy sensation and of n
Bteady, easy rising from the ground.
I ventured to bend a "crab" and make
a few "iiukle dropB." It was ns easy
as when I was only a few feet from
the ground. I glanced down again.
The crowd appeared smaller and seemed to be walking away from me. I
had commenced to drift. Now was the
time to cut loose. I wished that I
might stay where I was—taking
chances with thnt limp bag of a parachute did not loo* safe. But It hnd to
be doce.
I caught hold of the rope, braced myself on the bar and gave a short, hard
pull.
Whlsh—my breath left mel For the
first time fear—deadly fear—entered
my heart. A jerk that nearly unseated me, and I was again sailing pleasantly through space.
I ventured to essay a few additional
feats, as the ground seemed to more
closely approach me, and then I commenced to calculate as to the manner
In which to strike the ground. Like
many other problems, lt settled Itself.
I struck lt feet first In a cornfield, was
dragged along nnd scratched up and
enme to consciousness ln the arms ot
my new manager, who was alternately
cursing me for getting killed and blessing me for having saved his skin and
tho S_50.-Ou.lng.	
Feellatr Better.
She—So your ideal Jilted you? ne—
Yes, but I am somewhat reconciled. I
have since learned that she married
hers.—Puck            '
Loaded  For Them.
-   "Eddie, do you know whnt happens
to bad little boys?"
"Yes'm; the bears cat 'em up."
"Then why don't you try to be
good?"
"Huh! S'poso I am afraid of bears?
Bay,  I  got a  toy  pistol!"
LIKE A MIRACLE.
THE WONDERFUL  RECOVERY OP
A NIPISS1NQ MAN.
BABY LAUGHS.
Cnnndn ranks seventh in the list, of
"hiiiriliuie nation's.
Baby laughs when mother gives
him Baby's Own Tablets; they tas*te
good and mako him well and happy.
They are mother's help and baby's
every day friend. Guaranteed to
contain no opiate or harmful drugs.
The tablets aid digestion, cure colic,
prevent diarrhoea, cleanso tho bowels,
allay teeth irritation, and cure
all tho common ills of Childhood.
No cross, sleepless children in homes
whero Baby's Own Tablets aro used.
Mrs. R. Ready, Denbigh, Ont., says:
"I don't know what higher praise I
can give Baby's Own Tablets than
to say that I would not be without
thorn in tho house. I havo found
them all that is claimed and keep
them on hand to meet any emergency." Sold by all medicino dealers
everwhero, or sent by mail at 26
cents by writing The Dr. Williams'
Medicine Co., Brockville, Ont.
"Save Ihe Mark."
The ancient use of a cross Instead of
a signature was universal alike by
those who could and by those who
could not write. It was a symbol of
an oath from Its earliest associations.
On this account Charles Knight, in
bis notes on "Tbe Pictorial Shakespeare," expjalns the expression "God
save the mark" (Henry IV.) as a form
of ejaculation approaching to the ttrm
of an oath. Kelly, In his "Comments
on Scotch Troverbs," observes thnt the
Scots, when they used to compare person to person, used the expression,
"Save tho mark." Another explanation of the expression ts tbnt ln archery when nn archer shot well lt wbb
tbo custom to cry out, "God save the
mark"—that ls, prevent any one coming after to hit tho same mark and
thereby dlBplace the arrow. Ironically,
It was said to a novice whose arrow
struck nowhere.'	
Oberlln College.
Oberlln wns the first-college ln the
world to admit women. One woman
wns graduated there In 1838 and six in
ifttn.	
Necessity Drove.
He—I don't understand your extravagance! Before we were married you
had the reputation of being very economical. She (sweetly)-But you forget, denr, that before wo were married
1 didu't have tbe money.
La grippe, pneumonia, and Influenza often leave a nasty cough
when they're gone.
It is a dangerous thing to neglect.
Cr.ro it with
fthiloh's    ^
Consumption
Cure ■&$■"«
The cura that Is guaranteed by
your druggist.
Prices: S. C. Watto * Co. tOC
__c._0_|_.  LeRoy.H.Y..Toronto.Can.
Otrlokon With l'nrtiiii Paralysis He Was
Unable to Uso l.ltli.r l.lghl Arm or
night -.eg.
Mr. John Craig, a well known farmer living near Kells, Nipissing district, Out., is another of tho many
paralytics, who owes his present
good health and ability to go nbout
—if not lifo Itself—to tho uso of Dr.
Williams' Pink Pills. Mr. Craig gives
his experienco as follows:—"But for
the blessing of God and tho use of
Dr. Williams' Pink Pills I do not believe that I would bo alive to-day. I
was stricken with that tcrriblo alllic-
tion, partial paralysis, I had absolutely no power in my right arm or
leg. I was not ablo to sit up—in
fact if I tried to do so I would full
over. I had to bo lifted lileo a child,
and my family and friends believed
death was very near. The doctor
told mo that ho could do nothing
for me, and that I was liablo at
any moment to havo another stroke
wliich would carry mo off. I was in
this deplorable condition when 1 was
advised to uso Br. Williams' l'ink
Pills. I sent for threo boxes and before they wero all used I could movo
the fingers on my hand which ha.d
nithorto been absolutely numb and
powerless. You can scarcely imagine
my joy at this convincing proof that
the pills wero helping me. From
this on I kept getting stronger and
tho control of my paralyzed limbs
gradually caine back until I was
again ablo to walk about and eventually to work. To my neighbors
my curo seems liko a miracle, as not
ono of them ever expected to seo ine
out of bod again. 1 gladly givo permission to publish tho story of my
curo with tho wish that it may bring
life and hope and activity to some
other sufferer."
The curo of Mr. Craig gives additional evidence that Dr. Williams'
Pink Pills aro not an ordinary medicine, and that thoir power to curo
in all troubles of tho blood or nerves
places them beyond all other medicines. You can get theso pills from
any medicine dealer or direct by mail
at CO cents a box, or six boxes for
$2.50 by writing The Dr. Williams
Medicino Co., Brockville , Ont. Seo
that tho full nnino "Dr. Williams
Pink Pills for Pale People" is printed on tho wrapper around every box.
There are men  who look upon employers     as   oppressors    under   nil
circumstances.
When a young mnn works his wny
through college ho demolisl I'ute.s ut
least his ability to get a job.
Canada's   forest,   products   tulolled
80,(1(111,0(10 in  1003.
Canada exported in lilo.'l, 180,000,-
Ooo worth of forest products,
Cnnndn lu.s, it. is estimated, tt million BfljUarf miles ot standing timber.
('nnnda.-luis  the largest white pine
areas leftViui the coniiiu-nt.
Onturio..h'ns sot apart nearly 7,OOOOOO acres hs forest reserve.
Canada has 100,000 men employed
in the fishery iiulustery.
Nova-?jcol ia ranks first iu the fishery indiislcry. New Brunswick second
and British Columbia third.
Canada bus o registered toqnago nf
',000 vessels.
Canada hns Imill, 7154  light  houses,
stations and light ships.
Canada   hns     1,083      steamboats
under government inspect ion.
Canada hns 28 life-saving slut inns.
Canada's volume of  I rude  readied
$.'.7,ii('i-<,<>8.*> in 1903.
The First Locomotive fn "nine.
The flrst locomotive used In the
state of Maine came from England,
having boon built at the works of Robert Stephenson & Co. In the year 1835,
and made its first trip over the Bangor,
Oldtown nnd Mllford railroad on Aug.
19, 1837. Tills road was then generally
kuown as the "Venzio road," and tho
track was mndo of wooden rails
strapped with iron. The shackles used
to connect the engine nnd cars wero
made of three thicknesses of sole or
belt leather held together by copper
rlj'cts and bad n hole In each end so as
to hook over an upright stationary pin
bolted or driven into a rigid beam extending from the end of the car. It Is
said tbat for a time the engine was run
In opposition to a six ox team employed by a Bangor lumber dealer who
was not willing to pny tho rates
charged on tbe railroad, and It was
not until tho management of tho lino
came to what ho considered fair
charges that ho turned his tralllc over
tolt.
In   Nature's   Wonderland.
There ls but ono Grand canyon. The
name should never hnvo been given to
lesser gorges. Tho very fact that there
Is n so called Grand canyon ln Colorado Is misleading. "The Grand canyon
of Colorado" does not sound much different from "the Grand canyon of tho
Colorado." Hence many people confuse them.
•The ennyon of the Colorado river,
which flows through Arizonn, forms
tho boundary lino between that territory and California and then empties
Into the gulf of California.
It ls tho grandest gorge tn the world.
In lt 3,000 of tho wonderful gorges of
the state of Colorado could bo burled.
With ItB tributaries, ninny of which
have never yet been explored, it would
reach, If all the canyons wero placed
ono after another, nearly around the
world.	
The flrst steamer on the Thames wns
the Marjory, In 1814. The Richmond
followed her a venr Inter.
WIIIIliK   to  OIlllRC.
"I may ns well tell you, young mnn,"
said Miss Spooner's father, "thnt I always close up the house and turn out
all lights hy 10 o'clock."
"Don't bother tonight, sir," replied
Jack Nervy. "I'll attend to that for
you."   -
f   PRE-EMPTED BY BIRDS.
-The Noddles Tbnt tins nii-il Key, la
ihe Golf of Mexico.
Out ln tho gulf of Mexico slxty-flve
miles from Key West toward tho setting sun rise half n dozen barren sand
bars from tho exquisite turquoise blue
waters. One of these, Garden key, is a
government fort and coaling station;
another ls the Loggerhead key, our last
outpost toward Cuba and Central
America. Other islets are untenanted
save when tho grent sen turtles crawl.
Ono alone, Bird key, ls pre-empted by
tho birds. It would bo hard to find
a more desolate or Isolated, region.
Though tho climate is warm throughout the year, lt ls uot until May that
the feathered hosts arrive from the far
south at this sandy rendezvous. In the
van como tbe noddles, a few about the
1st of May and tbe rest within a few
days. A week later tho Booty terns
pour ln, and lt ls said that within a
week of their arrival both kinds begin
to lay. At tho time of our coming
nearly all the birds had eggs and wero
devoting themselves to their family-
cares.
To reach tbe buildings from the little
landing place wo hud to pass through a
tract of bushes, and here it was that I
saw tbo flrst nests of the noddles. Upon tho tops or In the forks of the bushes ench pair bnd built a rather rude yet
fairly substantial platform of sticks,
only slightly hollowed, nnd upon each
one sat a dark gray bird. There was
something nbout these graceful little
creatures tbat instantly took me by
storm, a caso of love at flrst sight. Tbo
noddy is very much like a dove—except for its webbed feet—Iu size, In
form, in the softness of Its plumage,
tho expression of its large dark eyes
nnd Its gentle, confiding ways. Thero
ls no wild affright ns the stranger: approaches. Just a shadow of fear Is evident, but the birds sit quietly on their
nests, hoping nnd trusting, and do not
fly unless nppronehed almost within
arm's reach. Then thoy flit gently
nway, alighting upon a neighboring
bnb until the intruder has withdrawn,
when they return directly to their
charge. It seemed remarkable to find
birds so perfectly tame.
JUST ONE MORE
REMARKABLE CURE
Diabetes is again Vanquished by
Dodd's Kidney Pills.
Donat r.iifiiuunie, of St. Marguerite, Que.,
tho Man cured—Farther Proof of tho
far Hennlilng Power of the Great Kid.
ney Kennedy.
St. Marguerite, Dorchester Co.,
Que., July 11 (Special).—That all
varieties and stages of Kidney Disease yield readily to Dodd's Kidney
Pills   has  been  proven   almost  daily
HINDOO FANATICISM.
for years, but when another victory
over- the deadly Diabetes is scored
' it is always worthy of mention.
Such a case has happened here.
Donat Lafiamme is tho man cured
nnd tho curo was quick as well as
| complete. Speaking of his cure Dr.
Lafiamme says:
"Por two years I suffered from Diabetes. I was attended by the doctor
but all his remedies did mo no good.
Then I tried Dodd's Kidney Pills and
two boxes cured me completely."
What will cure Diabetes will cure
any Kidney disease is an old saying.
And no doubt remains that Dodd's
Kidney Pills will curo Diabetes.
According to the Cape C'-lony con-
sns returns, tho population of the
colony is 2,40. ,870, ol whom only
575,102 are white
PITH AND POINT.
When a friend tells you of bis wrongs
be wants sympathy and not an argument.
Before a man's first baby Is a week
old he knows more than he had ever
dreamed about.
Speaking of "secret sorrows," it Is a
good plan to keep them so, us telling
only multiplies tbem.
When n man wants to give you advice you can't lose anything by listening, but you will mnke nu enemy by
refusing.
A man occasionally breaks even.
When it comes to wall paper the wife
does the picking aud tho husband does
the kicking.
Every ono should hnve saved up
enough money to tako things a littlo
easier by the timo tho age comes for
taking  a  nap  lu   a  chnlr.
Trnined Tortoises.
Japanese and Korean showmen ln
addilion to their skill ns jugglers and
acrobats display a truly marvelous
skill In teaching animals tricks. They
not only exhibit educated bears, spaniels, monkeys nnd goats, but also' trained birds and, what Is tho moro astonishing of nil, trick fish.
One of tho most curious examples of
patient training Is an exhibit by an
old Korean boatman of a dozen drilled
tortoises. Directed by his songs ond
a small metal drum, they march In
line, execute various evolutions and
conclude by climbing upon a low table,
tho larger ones forming of their own
accord a bridge for the smaller, to
which the feat would otberwlso bo Impossible. When they bave all mounted,
they dlsposo themselves In three or
four piles liko so many pjat-p.    ._*_.,
Blood as n Tree Fertiliser.
For several seasons a very ancient
walnut, with long, gaunt boughs, carrying much dead wood, had been struggling to live, but each year manifested
signs that Its life was fast disappearing. Tho keeper ln front of whose
house the tree stood took to slinging
the carcass of each deer ho killed over
ono of Its boughs for dressing. During tho process nil the blood dripped
on the ground and was absorbed. The
following spring this tree put forth an
astonishing crop of leaves, and In less
than threo seasons lt was making new
wood and showing all tho vigor which
had characterized it thirty years before. Its reueweil youth was entirely
attributable to the fertilizing properties of the blood wilh which it had
been bo liberally dressed.—Country
Gentleman.
The Mississippi.
Generally speaking, tho slope of
rivers flowing Into the Mississippi from
llie east ls, on tho average, nbout three
Inches per mile. Thoso entering lt
from the west have an average descent
of about six inches per mile. The average descent per mile of tho Missouri
after it leaves the mountains Is reckoned about a foot; tho Des Moines,
from Its source to Its conjunction with
tho Mississippi about 7.3 inches. Tbo
entire length of tho Ohio shows a fall
of even five Inches. The Mississippi,
from the mouth of tho Ohio to the
gulf, has a fall of about two nnd one-
half Inches.
Lincoln's Passes.
Lincoln's humor armed him effectually against tho Importunate persons
with whom, ns tho head of tlio nation,
he was beset at all times.
During tho civil war a gentleman
asked blm for a pass through tho Federal lines to Richmond.
"I Bhould bo happy to obllgo toil,"
snld Lincoln, "lf my passes wore respected. But the fact Is, within the
last two years I have given passes to
lllehinoiid to a quarter ot n million
meu, and not one bus got there yet."
No Color Illlnd Chlnnmen.
The Chinese are the only people free
from color blindness.
Mnllneo Accessories.
George—Did you have n good time?
Gci'tlc—Oh, lovely, lovely! George-
Was the play good? Gertie—NO, but I
bad on my new hat and had a box of
delicious   caramels   with   me.
Over 1,000,000 gallons of milk are
daily consumed in tho City of New
Yorw
I    wns    cured    of    Bronchitis    nnd
Asthma by MINARD'S LINIMI.NT.
Mrs. it. LIVINGSTON.
Lot. 5, P.E.l.
I was cured of a severe, attack of
Rheumatism by MINARD'S UNI-
MENT.
Mnhonn Bny. JOHN MADF.R.
I was cured of a, severely sprained
leg by;MlNAmt'S  LINIMENT.
••» JOSHUA WYNAOHT.
Br.dgowate.-i
Gills dressed in gaudy red, black
and white uniforms are selling butter
and cheese ill Iho streets of lleriiii
for a new company,
Miliar.'. Llilment Cures Garget in Cows.
Lord Delamo.ro 1ms purchased 100,-
000 acres of land in East Africa, and
offers it free to 50 suitable settlers.
This would be n pleasant old world
if men would pay their debts as cheerfully as they pay grudges.
NOT A NAUSEATING l'JI/L.— The ex-
dpient of a pill is Iho substance whig
enfolds thu ingredients and makes up
the pill mass. That-of Furntelee's Vdjje
table l'ills is so compounded as to pre
serve their moisture, and they cun h
carried into uny latitude without impairing their strtyt|jlh. Many pills, in ordu
to keep them from adhering, are rolled in
powders which prove nauseating to thi.
taste, i'urmelee's Vegetable Tills are s
prepared thut they are agreeable to th
most  aollcate.
Canada    exported    iu    1008  nearly
$29-^00,000 in manufactures.
The" shortage  In  cotton   is causing
.in  industrial crisis in  Spain.
Minari's Liniment Cnres Cold., Hit
Canada's exports for 3 0011 were
$225,849,724. Of this 58 per cent,
were   to   Groat   Britain and 31 per
cent,-to the United States.
There never was and never will be t
universal panacea, in one remedy, for
ull ills to "which flesh is heir—the ver\
nature of many curatives being micl
that were the germs of oilier und differently seated diseuse rooted in the system oT the patient—what would rellevt
one ill ln turn would aggravate tht
other, We have, however, in Quinint
Wine, when obtainable in sound, unadulterated stnto, a remedy for many and
grievous ills. By its gradual and judicious uso the frailest systems are led
into convalescence ami strength by tht
influence which Quinine exerts on nature's own restoratives, lt relives the
drooping spirits of thoso with whom 8
chronic state of morbid despondency and
lack of interest in life is a disease, and
by trunquili/.ing the nerves, disposes to
sound und refreshing sleep—imparts vigor to the action of thu blood, which,
being stimulated, courses through the
veins, strengthening the healthy animal
functions of the system, thereby making
activity a necessary result,' strengthening the frame and giving life to the
digestive organs, wliich naturally demand increased substuncp—result, im
proved appetite. Northrop & Lyman ol
Toronto have given to tho public Iheir
.Superior Quthine Wine nt tho usual rate,
and, trudged by the opinion of scientists, tho wine approaches nearest perfection of and in the market. All drug-
•fists  sell  it.
Canada's expenditure for 1003 was
$01,(10(1,000; Mtiinntcd for 10oi,
$00,000,000.
Canada's imports for 1903 were
$241,314,001. Of this 20 per cent,
was from Groat Britain, and III. por
from the United Stnl.es.
COURTEOUS REPLIES,
He got hia btg snow shovel
And went out to clear tho walk.
Each friend who chanced to i;_o hint
Mad to stop ;i bit and talk.
Tou're cl-anlnE off the sidewalk?"
The flrst acquaintance said.
"Why, no," ho smoothly answered,
"I'm now asleep In bed."
"Hello, you have to shovel!"
v.nri the second friend's salute.
"Queue not," he blithely murmured;
"I'm playing on a flute."
"You're nhovellng snow, aro you?"
The third man had to say.
"Should think you'd see." he answered,
"I'm Getting ln my hay."
The fourth and' fifth wore Jolly.
"Ah. you've got your shovel out?"
To each he Bald politely,
"No; It Is a WOterapaut."
To nil the bland Inquirers
Ills ivurils were t:..:m nnd cool.
He tliouj-rht that lliey were crazy;
They swore he was a fool.
Sunlight Soap will not injure
your blankets or harden them. It
will make them soft, white and
fleecy, .a
■elf Inflicted Tortures of Rellcloaa
Zealots ot India.
Self Inflicted torture by Hindoo zealots Is common In India. One mnn will
He upon his back, place a piece of soil
upon his lower lip, plant ln lt a mustard seed and not rise from liis position uutil the seed has become a plant
of size. Another will make his couch
upon spikes; a third walk with his
boots filled with similar delights; yet
another keeps his hands clinched until tbe nails grow through bis palms
and out at the back ot his hands, while
others distort their legs and arms Into
atrophy. The extent to which Hindoo
fanaticism will go, or native belief extend, wns shown by a case reported ln
the Civil and Military Gazette of Lahore a year or so ago. The natives of
Trevnndrum were found worshiping as
a god come among men a man who
bad taken up his residence under a
tree on the bank of a river. For tho
first week or so he ate a plantain and
drank somo milk twice or thrice a
week. Then he gradually enlarged the
Intervals, till after three or four
months be took no food nt all, but
passed his time huddled before a fire,
seeing no one, hearing no one. Exposed to cold and "wet, to heat and
dust, be sat thus without food for
threo years, "wrapt ln divine contemplation." At the end of the three
years he died, never having spoken to,
or heeded, a soul from the time he
first appeared until tbe spirit passed
from bis body.
THE LADIES' TAILOR.
He Flourished In France Threo Centuries Avo.
The ladies' tailor does not belong to
this century or to the last; 300 years
back he flourished ln France. Tbe
court beauties employed him during
the rclgn of tho last of the Valols.
Mme. de Sevlgne gives an elaborate description In one of ber letters of a
gown mado for Mme. de Montespan
and mentions tho name of the tailor
Langlce, tbe son of one of the servants In the household of Anne of Austria. Indeed, women were not allowed
ln those dnys to enter Into competition
with men ln the production of outer
garments, even for tbelr own sex. It
was Louis XIV. who looked favorably
on woman's work for her own sex
nnd granted letters patent to the sempstresses to form themselves Into a corporation, though lt wus not made easy
for them, nnd they only, after all,
made up ladles' own materials, oveu
as far back ns that. By tho aid of the
poupees which went tbe round of society exhibiting tho passing modes Le
Roy found favor with the belles ln
tho beginning of the seventeenth century, and when we see, ns wo may
do now nt tbo Crystal palace, even tbe
silk bodices that wero made then we
cannot but very much wonder tbat
they were more fitted for a tailor's
board than for feminine fingers, so
bard, so thick, so heavy were tbey.—
London Queen.
Canada's fi.shcrics havo yielded,
since 18C4, $'177,000,000. Cod comes
first, to the value of $136,000,000,
salmon, "-74,000,000.
Canada has 47 pulp mills.
Canada efiported in .1903 over ?3,-
000,000 worth of pulp wood.
Canada ha3 the largest .pulp wood
forests in the world.
Canada's fishery industry produced,
in 1003, $22,000,000.
Canada   exported- in 1903, nearly
12,000,000   worth   of   fishery   pro-
tlticts.
Brain Controls
Every Muscle
Injury to Brain or Nerves, Deficiency of Nerve Force
Mean Paralysis and Helplessness.
Dr. Chase's Nerve Food.
Every muscle of the body controlled by tho will is connected with the
brain, and every muscular action ts
originated by nervous force, generat-1
ed in tho brain and transmitted
aiong the nerves to tho muscle... .
When the nerves are injured or dis-,
eased, when there is a deficiency ln
the supply of nervous energy, paralysis, locomotor ataxia or somo
form of helplessness results because
the brain has no longer control of
the muscles.
It may bo weak heart action, inability to digest food, failure of tho
lungs to purity the blood or impaired action of any of the vital organs,
but the causa of trouble is with the
tho nerves.
The restorative action of Dr.
Chase's Nervo Food is soon felt
throughout the ontlro system, because it restores tho vigor and vitality of'tho nerves—fills them with
new nervo force the vital power of the
body;   weakness,   nervousness,   irrita
bility,   sleeplessness   and low spirits*'
disappear    and    new    energy    and
strength tako their place.
Mrs. C. Corkey, 32 Maine street,
St. Johns, N. Ii. states:—"I had bean
in very poor health and In fact,
when I begnn using Dr. Chase's
Nervo Food I had just got up from
a bed of sickness, my nerves wero in
a bad state, I was weak and could
not sleep. Now I am getting up in
years, and, of course, could not look
for immediate results, but must say,
that I havo been delighted with the
uso of this preparation as it has
done mo a great deal of good. I am
now able to sleep vory much better,
my nerves are steadier and my.
strength is gradually increasing."
Dr. Chase's Nervo Food 5p cents a
box, 0 boxes for (2.50, at all healers
or Edmanson, Date & Company, Toronto. To protect you against. Imitations, thp protrait and signature
of Dr. A. W. Chaso, the famO-W re-
I ccipt book author, aro on every box.
A Useful Feature.
Two New York women went apartment hunting and were pleasantly surprised to find nt the end of their first
day's search an apartment which
seemed to be exactly suited to tbelr
needs. It was new, desirably situated
and Inexpensive — three rooms and
bath, said the Jnnltrcss, all with outside exposure. Tbe prospective tenants walked through tho rooms, examining every feature.
"But where Is the bathroom?" they
Inquired.
Tho janltress pointed to an nlcove
which was furnished with gayly colored hangings and nn awkward looking
divan covered with pillows.
"There lt Is," she explained. J'My
last tenants snld It was ln tho wny, so
they mndo a cozy corner out of lt Of
course if you want to use it as a bathroom you can take the cover and pillows off the tub." '
DIAGNOSING PAIN.
Physical   Signs   Which   Distlnigrulsh
Real From Assumed Suffering.
"'How do you diagnose pain?' was
one of the questions put by the state
board the year I received my diploma,"
Bald n young dentist "I wns rather
stumped at the timo, but I have since
learned that the query was a perfectly natural one. The Idea ls to differentiate between real pain and assumed
pain. Thero are somo people so stoical
while in the operating chnlr that not a
sound escapes them, not even tbo suspicion of a grunt, though they may be
suffering severely. On tho other hand,
there are people, men and women alike,
who try to give tho Impression that
every touch of an Instrument Is torture.
"But there are always physical signs
by which we can distinguish between
the real and the assumed suffering.
Beads of perspiration on tho forehead
Is one, nnd when tho pain Is not so
severe, but still keen enough to b» felt,
there Is nn Involuntary twitching of tbe
muscles of the eyelid. Then we know
It's the real thing and act accordingly.
Why, I have even known women to pre-
tend to faint nnd carry tbo bluff
through when thoy were not suffering
tho slightest pain."
Wllllnor to ne Half Killed.
Among tho depositors In an Akron
bnnk was nn old fellow who wns quite
a miser. A local physlclnn who wns
n great student of his profession said
to tbo old mnn ono day: "John, I'll
give you $10,000 lf you'll let me cut
a certain vein. It will kill you, but
then you will have the $10,000." The
miser considered for a moment nnd replied, "Let me think over thnt till tomorrow." Next day bo called on the
doctor and said: "I'vo figured thnt
thing out and I enn't seo what good
the $10,000 would do me after I nm
dead. But, sny, I'll let you half kill
mo for $5,000."
Bell Thnt tins linn* For a Century.
A sacred bell In a town ln north
China hns been kept ringing for a century. A tux for pnylng relays of ringers to pull Its ropo Incessantly dny and
night Is willingly paid by the Inhabitants, for It Is Implicitly believed by
the benighted peoplo that whenever the
tongue touches the metnl a devil Is
squelched forever. Thus lt is to tbe
public Interest, according to this superstition, to have ns ninny of these ob-
jccUonnble spirits dona away with as
Is possible.
_■__-•   You    -Building: T
EDDY'S  IMPERVIOUS SHEATHING
Tho Bos*  Bulldlni
id«.
Tt U Tory much stmngar nnd thicker than any other (tarred or balld-
taff) paper. It in fmpervioui to wind, keeps out cold, keeps In heat, car-
rlts no smell or odor, abaorha no moisture, Imparts no taste or flavor te
anything with which it comes In contact. It is largely used not only (or
•he»tli)(r bouses, but for lining cold storage buildings, refrigerators, dnir-
lss, creameries, and all places where Uie object Is to keep aa eve* an*
• nlferm temperature,  and  at the same time avoiding dampness.
Writ* our Agents, TEES A PER68E. Winnipeg, Ur aamplee.
Tho E. Gl. EDDY CO., Limited, HULL.
At confederation 00 per cent, of
Canada's export was to the U.S. and
80 por cent to Groat Britain. In
1903, 58 per cent, to Great Britain
and 81 per cent, to the  U.S.
IN FIELDS FA It OFF.—Dr Thomas'
Eclectrlc Oil in known in Australia,
.South anil Central America nt* well t«
in Canada nml the United States, nml
its consumption Increases each year. Il
has made its own wuy nud all that ncedB
to b-a.donu iH to keep its name before the
public. Everyone knows that it is to be
had at uny store, for all men-hunts keep
it.
Since confederation the exports
durinp- 27 of the 37 years wen- greater to Great Britain than to the United States.
Canada's   revenue   quint rupled since
confederation.
Canada's   volume   of     trado     hat
doubled in eight years.
Canada's    trade    has    increased  01
per cent, in ten years.
No one need feur cholera or nny summer (-oiMi)liniit if they huve a bottle of
Dr. J, I), Kellogg's Dysentery Cord in
ready for use. jt coriwis ull looseness
of the bowels promptly uud causes a
healthy ami natural action. This is n
medicine adapted for tbe young nud old
rich and poor, and Is rapidly becoming
the most popular medicine for cholera,
dysentery, etc., in  the niurket.
TIMID HERBERT.
Ue Failed lo Tell Aniiilii of Ills Lot*
Fur Her.
Herbert stopped rowing;, ritenslbly
to rest.
"Amelia." lie snld with nn eliliornte
affectation of i lconcertl lo the young
womun Bitting in llie stern of the boat,
"there's u frli'inl of mine Hint's hend
over heels—heud over ours, I incnn—In
love Willi tl beautiful girl and as good
as she Is beautiful. He has known her
ever t j many years, nud he has been go-
lug to see her a long time, but he's too
big n coward—that's whnt he says—to
ask her, you know, If"—
Here his voice trembled n littlo, nnd
ho paused to wipe his perspiring brow.
"Bountiful girl, Is she'." queried the
young woman. Idly dipping her lingers
tn the water nt the side of the -Jilt.
"Loveliest in the world—Hint's what
be says, I mean."
"What's her name?"
"Hc'd-he'd rather not hnve her namo
mentioned."
"Friend of yours, you sny? Who Is
he?"
"Ob, 1 don't dare to tell you who hs
Is.   He might not like It."
"Very much In love with her, Is lie?"
"Clean gone. Ue says It makes liim
fairly ache."
"And he's afraid to tell her so?"
"Yes. He—he says be can't guess
from the way she treats him whether
she— er-llkes hlin or not. He's a cow-
■rd—thut's what ho Ib."
"What arc you telling me about him
for?"
"Well, he—bo asked mo whnt I
thought he'd better do, nu(l 1 couldn't
advise blm. I suppose I—I'd he Just us
big n coward ns he Is. 'flint's why I'm
asking you. Wh-whnt do you think
be ought to do? Tell her and run tlio
risk?"
"I am sure I don't know."
Herbert gnspi'd, swallowed nnd
changed the subject
"Isn't this wnter clear?" ho snld.
"You cnn see the sand nml the stones
at the bott&m. How deep It Is, and yet
bow transparent!"
"Yes," she said. "So like you, Herbert!"
"Dear girl," he whispered fifteen
minutes later ns he stroked her pompadour caressingly, "how did you know I
wus telling you my own story?"
'•Ob, you goose!"- Chicago Tribunes
RHEUMATIC PILLS
THIS (JKKAT _£.Vt!LlS« HKMBDY.
TESTIMONIAL from the late SIR SAMUEL IIAKEU. the famous Nile Explorer.
"Newton Abbot, Devon. Dear Sirs—I
have delayed my thanks as 1 wished to
test tho effect of Dlair's Pills by a sum-
clcnt interval of time.
"For ten years I had suffered acutely
from Gout and life had lost Its attraction owing to the uncertainty ot health
and sudden visitations of the enemy
which prostrated me for months, or weeks
according to the virulence ot the attacks,
"lllair's Fills have rendered ms Immense
servico, as I no longer fear an attack
of (iout.
"For the last twenty months I have
been comparatively freo, as one or two
attempted visitations have been Immediately stamped out by the assistance ot
lllalr's Fills.
"Truly yours (Signed) Saml. W. Baker.
Lyman Sons &. Co., Montreal and Toronto; The Dole Drug Co., Winnipeg; and
Martin, Jlolo & Wynne Co., Winnipeg.
Many a candidate who runs for
Office discovers that his opponent, has
a walk-over.
Canada's wealth is £2-10 per hend,
against _c_.no in England) £175 p$r
head   in   the   F.S.,   per   Sir Hobert
(Jriilin.
Canada's manufacturers have an invested capital of |500,000,000,
Deafness Cannot Be Cured
»r local applications aa they cannot reach the
dlifOMd portion of tbe tar. There li only ono
way to cure deafness, and that )• by constitutional remedies. Deafness la caused by an Inflamed condition of the mucous lining of tha
Eustachian Tube. When thin tuba la InSamtJ
you have a rumbling sound or Imperfect hearing, and when It Is entirely closed, Deafness ls
the result, anil unless the Inflammation can be
taken out and this tube restored to Its normal
condition, hearing will bs destroyed forever;
nine cases out of ten are caused by Catarrh,
which la nothing but an Inflamed condition of
the mucous surfaces.
Ws will give One Hundred Dollars for any
ease of Deafness (cauru-d by catarrh) that cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh Curs. Send for
Mrculars, free.
F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo a
Bold by all druKRlBts, l^c.
Hall's Family Pills are the best.
Canada's volume of trade per head,
in   1-fllOa was SH7;   lHU8,$4o.
Canada's net puhlic debt fs 9261,-
000,000, $50 per head. Cunnda's
public    debt    at    confederation    Wus
175,000,000, S'J'J per hepd.
Minard's Liniment Cnres Diphtheria.
In 1000 the UnltQd Stales bought
from Canada K'md* to tlie viiltn* of
$1  pec head of their population.
The increase of Canada's export
trade    in    C.Hi'j    wilh    Crcat   licit a in
v.t Ihe United States wns |4__.,U0O,-
000; in It)08, $57,000,000.
A   SMALT,   FILL   HIT   I-OWKItlTt..-
Thi'.v   that   judge,   of  Die   powers  m   u  pilt
by   i' H    kI/i>.    would    consider    I'm :."  ■
Vi-gelnlile l'ills to lie lurking It In H lit
lie wonder among |,|j|h. Whut il lacks!
iu Hl/e it makes up '" potency Tba
remedial which it curries are put up in
these small doses, because they nre mj
powerful llmt only mnnli doses are i»--
quircd, Tho full strength of the eitmct-y
Is Herurnl In this form und do tlu-n .. < ik
i bo roughly,
Canada's   main   channel of export
trade Is now to Groat Britain.
in 1008 Oroai Britain bought from
Cnnndn goods to tin- value of $0 per
hend of her population.
Minari's Liniment Cnres Distemper.
Cnnn<!u'H ri'vi'inii' Irofn cilRtonii
rlutlea in 1908, wns (37,000,000.
Cumula's revonuo from pxcIhq ilulii's
In 1008, mum 119,000,000,
DeM-enilnn-  of  Molininni-,1.
A lineal iii'Hi'ont of Mohammed Htm
the Ufa of a kiuiiII Bbopkwpor In Cairo,
Egypt Thu fiiniouH ancestry of the
tradesman in familiar thruiigiiiuit tho
city nud Insuru- good trndo, espoolnllJF
among tbe tourists. The sbop l« n
very inmli.it affair and the Block in
trade in not large.
('nniiiln'.s tnljil revonuo in I'.in.'l ivns
106,000,1    I'sliiniiii'il   1904,   |71,.
000.000.
Lover'*   V-/,   (XVIra   lli-nil)   IilHln'i'i'Unl
Nmip   r.nuliT  illlilrd   In   tlio  linlll,  Knf».i,«
tin1 water mul illnlnfi'i'tM.
Canada's oxports have aspandoffln
groator ratio than tho Imports.
('nnniln has 18,000 miles of const.
lino—7,000 bolng in ..rillst. Co-
lutnbla,
V^    N    U I
.   . . -.;:~-M*i5»l'*=i*"   •.   ■■"qJ5>_"'
Jit, Pleasant  Advocate.
(Eastablishcd Aprils, 1899.)
jMjbvs. R. Whitney, Publisher
<■QJ1-.CE: 2$ 2 5 Westminster aveuue.
fijfOLtW   OFFICE—80 Fleet street,
-London, E. C, England Where a
Jie ot "tke __d»ocate" is kept for
m*m*M.
Tel. B1405.
jjlub-crlption $1 a year   payable   in
Advance.
Scents a Copy.
jUotice. of Births, Marriages, and Deaths
published free of eherge.
i
For all City Advertizing, also South Vancouver Municipal advertizing
consult   The   Advocate.
Vancouver, B. C, Sept., 17, 1904,
•There ia a regretnhle characteristic
,of political campaigns, discreditable
-,alike to the intelligence of tho public
;sud some politioal organs iu whose
,/wlnuius it appeois. No mutter how
..nuimpeiiclinble a man's character may
.have been let him como out for office
.and he is represented as a most ignoble
itype. As the Dominion election will
,so soon bo on we will have n probable
.chance to see tho above statement
-verified. The majority of electors read
.('lily those journals which are their
party's recognized organs, It proves
,_iow few form opiuions fnr theinsejv
,bnt follow the loader. The following
-from an American journal will serve to
illustrate:
• " It is related of ft sucoeS-fnl caiidi
.date, who had received a severe hand
jling by the press, that nfter his installs,
ition the editor of a partisan juurunl expended various social courtesies, which
.were invariably declined. At a dinner
.where the two were guests the editor
reproached the official for his persistent
avoidance, he was answered in this
.wise: ' If what yon published iii regard
to me dnring the campaign was true, 1
,am uot fit to enter a decent home; if un
^rne, your course was au outrage whioli
.any decent man would resent.' If all
,c»ndidates sbonld refuse intercourse
with those who vilify them In order to
j defeat them politically, perhaps theso
.men of reckless utterance would learn
,to bridle their imaginations and their
pens and thoir tongues. "
"See When Your Lodge Meets
MONDAY.
■ '■Sbe 3d and 4th Mondays <,i the month
(Oonrt Vancouver, I. 0. P., meets at
fiP $•
TUESDAY.
Mt. Pleasant Lodge No. 19, I.O.O.F.
meets at S.p. 111.
THURSDAY,
VaiioOBver  (Jonneil   No. 21 la,   Can-
|tdinn Order of Chosen Friends meets
(tbe 8d aud .th Thursdays of tho month.
FRIDAY.
Alexandra Hive No 7, Ladies of the
1Moccabee8 holds its regular meetings on
(the 1st, aud Ud Fridays of the month
Woman's    )
Realm. j
TAn.oitro suits engage our Interest
almost exclusively at the moment
Materials representing tho smartest of
half season colors as well as weight of
fabric, have been delightfully chosen
for their delicacy and sobriety of tone.
It most satisfactory to find that Ihe
choicest of these nre of canvas weave,
not only iu the pule dressy tones, wliich
suggest wearing thein in the autumn at
Lenox and Tuxoiio, but those fit for
quiet conservative traveling, and genera)
runabout suits for country and town,
wearable far into December days.
Moss greens, Venetian reds, French
blues aud golden browns are all extreme
ly fit for street suits.
Linen and Wool Mixtures uro mottled in effect by reason of two shinies of
any given color, whether browns, blues,
cranberry reds or crimsons iu middle
tones, being alternately threaded white.
These nro youthfully pretty fabrics decidedly of the hnlf season type, and lint
at all as expensivt as the first-mentioned,
Braids and gimps ure Iho trimmings
suggested,-with sill; facings for relief.
Most attractive, though nol a novelty,
are cloths corded in half-inch stripes,
nutte their length, but some woven two
inches apart upon Burfaces of the same
color, mixed with white, but irregularly
as to tho size of thread, which is nt
times vory fine, again rather heavy.
These have a good wooly surface and
run upon middle Hues of color, as
mouse- grey ,cudct'bl ucs, dahlia-crimsons,
grey-purples and sitge-greeus. Another
effective nnd Jess heavy style of natto
colors, and ipiite novel, inasmuch ns the
nutte poiuts of the weaving lire seemingly Irregular in grouping, some of
them flattened and subdued, while
others are raised into more prominence
For instance, take these two lovely examples: One u surface of plain weaving in light gray with light beige, the
rest in wood colors, but both extremely
fine of thread. This mitre work is of
white, orange unil pale yellow, with
clouded gray and beige interposing
This gives 11 soft enameling of tone that
is chnrming. The second example is of
lavender gray nud pule violet finely
woven, while the untie portion involves
olive green, white, orange and a yellow
Clay tone that harmonizes.
jit.   PLEASANT  CHURCHES.
Baptist.
Sprailili mown-, belweun  WcsliiiliiAlui live
nli« mid Quelle, mrei-t.   SERVICES*! 11 11.111.,
Had 7;30p. m.; Sunday Si-iiniii Ht J:DO 11. m.
'it.*. A. W, McLeod, Putor,  lu_»Jdoju-u i«n
.IIIHill nvelum, t'a.t.
Methodist.
Corn, rof Nlm   and tVeilmlnnter nrenuc_.
HEEVICJvS ni lis. ui., a»d 7p. m.: Sunday
.H-liftil nnd nlbl. nun) _|SQ p.m. Kev. A. B.
H.tli-rliiKtuu, II. A., B. |i , Pastor.
I'lirsoiiuge l_;i Eleventh nvmiue, great,  Tulc-
one 1112(9
ybqa
Prehbyterian,
Junction ul WeKliniu.ter nvuiiti. nml Went
pilnnter rund. SERVICES nt 11 n. 111., nnd
J";"! p, mi: S'liuliiy School nt_:.'iu p.m. Kev.
tjeo.A. Wllmiii, 11. A.. Fnntor. Maim,corner of
Eighth avenue and Ontario street.  Tel. luoo.
St Michael s, (Anglican).
Vunitr Wcritu.ln.tcr rnad and Prluce Edward
.tree'.   HEin-lllEH nt 11 n. 111., nnil7::ill p.m.,
fluly i;,»i!iinnniini u: iiii-t :.. 1 siind-y,. In ouch
loath after morning Kayer, _d ami lth Sun-
i|»V»»Ha:m Sunday Si'hunl nt _::'.. p.m.
'Mr. "ii. 11. Wllnon. Hv.-n.i-.
Ue.lory S7_ Thirteenth aveuue, eaat,   Tele-
jflma »!«"•
Advbntihts.
(iilviiiil f.'hrlfltlnn I'hurvh (nel'lli <l,t.v .\.l
yuntlataj corner .Ninth hvciiiii' and U'oetmln
iter road. Servlvca 11 a. ln.. mul 7:8(1 p. in.,
juiul-y School nt Ida. m. VniniK peoplel'
S'ii-i'-iy nl i.gvui wiiii<i-i■■ nt Uhrl-tian Kiulvn-
ynr meelfl ti very Hmnliiy evening Hi ii: in o'clock.
Wayer-meetlug vVcdll-s-l„y njglitfal So'clock.
The Winter Cloth both mixed,
rough aud smooth, run iuto the following colors: red-browns, olive nnd moss-
greeus, as well us an invisible bottle-
green, ae dark blue, aster-purples nnd
stone-grays. The intermingling of
these colors with white, bluck, orange
and u vivid red give and nn endless
variety. None of the street cloths,
when in solid colors, has a glossy finish
uniess it has the short-haired zibeliue
surface. Another stylo of so-called
solid colored cloth has Iwo shades of
oue color in reality woven into outward
smoothness, but all the same hinting at
the under thread. Among midwinter
clolhs the very rough one nre greatly In
the fore, but slightly flecked iu white,
with two to three shades of out color
splashed through iu cross-line., of irregularity, ns zig-zags, besides cross-bars,
basket effects nud in some iustniiees a
complex plaidiug of white only upon
oue solid color, tlie while threads being
coarse and varying from lines of threads
in pairs to groups of five threads. Tho
most expensive of all these heavy
rough cloths, now selling at four dollars
per yard, is boucle in round spots,'
forming a corduroy si ripe, tlio raised
portion being of the lighter slnido of the
single color used. Brown and beige end
wood colors iu two shades lire the favorite tones.
Tailored Suits —Tho tendency in
clolh tailored suits is In return to closer,
fitting sleeves, and uo longer to attempl
Ihe large ones. As the coining winter
styles are lo lean strongly upon tlie
Directoire period,   there  is support  in
ir voir wa.vt to ummt
WHAT  AILS  VOU
(ho U. S. mall will brine yen the brst medical
edvlec lor only tn_ cost ol ivrillns;
iu-tvritth c"J r,*-:n,p_.
Telephone Numbers of Local fiinl-
slers and Doctors.
WJvD-Rav.o.^r. VVli-on,'Anglican).
Jnen—Rev. G. A. IVIlnon, (Prea.yterliin)
Rl-_.ll *.I. A. K. lletherlnpton, f Metnodlm)
JIHOft-"Tha Advocate."      740—Mt, Pleasant
Drug Store
Alalia leave Mt. I'Jeaiani 1'oMoh.i'. at II n in..
f*4 « P- m.
If you want to know what is
jiappeiling on Mt, Pleasant
jt-ead The Advocate—$i a
year, 5CV for six months.
Mntiy people owe tImir pie.senl good
lieallli lo (he fnct Hint tin y conntHed Dr.
Pierce hy letter, fiivitig him .ill pofs.blc in-
fol illation ftbOUt Iht'l'i toi;.lili« ui,,■-villi ilnpi'!,
etc., nnd received fn return prood nitdicni
advice which cos/ them nothing, Wriic lo
Dr, R. V. PiefCC, founder of Uie Invalid.!'
lintel ;ind Hurgioal Institute, Pudhln, N.Y.
Dr. Pierce bynotueana eon fin en binutclf
to prescribing bin well-known medicines.
jie it-'lld you. in the most com mnn •« uie
way what alii you. wlmt ynn OUglll to do.
what line of treatment should be followed
ont in your particular case, and Ifyourcasfl
does not Indicate Ihc need for tliis proprietary medicine, he tclla ynu plain I jt ard
frankly what you do need, and Uie lx-^t
possible method of Improving your health.
Im. Pierce treats many chronic cases at a
distance, through the mall and all you hnve
to do is to write him your sympUmin.
PDuring mv two venrsof mtrrird tile I hm*a
Dot liml gooa lnutth," wrltci Mr-*. Daily Btutl->
don], of (k»3 s tjaplanade Avenue, Leoveiiwortn,
Khiis. "I wn-; all inn-down, aiitl mv Iiusli.md
got me to write to l'r. Merce I Kiit nn early
reply telling me what Uie trouble wni. I commenced tnfeipjr i»r. Mi'Tff's Pavorlte Prescrip*
Hon, nnil nlno the 'Pleasant PellgjV ond now
can nay dial I feel like n new woman. I do nil
my work nnd do not feel tired oul like I used to,
I have tnkru cluhi liottlrt of (lit-' l'avurlte Pre-
»—!'i (•■■.! *   it mak™ otic Ifccl will am) itronj?."
Dr, Pieic-'i Pleasant Pelkls cine Ui^i-
;n." . and sick headache.
Ghoapect House Sn the City*
Bedroom Suites, ii pieccH $20.50
Carpet Squares, 3x3 $8 85
Onrpet Squares, 4x3 911.90
Bed  Lounges from $12.50
All kinds of Fnruiture kept ill stock.
Easy-time Payments arranged.
W. J. WATERS, Manager.
Grocery Depta
DO YOU WISH TO REDUCE YOUR
GROCERY BILL 10%V If so, let us
have your trade. OUR STOCK is
always fresli and we sell at tho
VERY LOWEST PRICES FOR CASH
Mail Orders promptly illled.
ORDER,YOUR PEACHES NOW—
$1mOO per crate.
5.T. Wallace
Westminster avenue & Harris street
Telephone 1266
Mail Orders Promptly Filled.
this re'utioii given to tho rumor of
almost a close slcevetfor cloth coats.
Material has, we know, much to do
with forms of garment!,. It is impossible to conceive of anything but a onat-
shapii sleeve for the new heavy rough
cloths jnst imported aud described. It
is also to be expected that three-quarter
coajs are to be continued in fashion iu
two-price suits, aud that shorter ones
will be in.vogue ns wol" It is yet too
early to arrive nt conclusions, but tlie
drift of news is towards last spring's
short coats beiug carried over into
winter models. But one may rest,
assured that there will be such a variety
of models that iill tastes will bo catered
to and all figures made to loo_[ their
best. Whether Eton coatp, like blouses
or scperiitu waists, aro to have such a
hold upon popular taste nud fancy as to
be entered for another season remains
to bp seen. So far there is no sign of
giving them up. Both are so necessary
Io each other, so convenient, so becoming, so smart looking, lhat it would not
be at all surprising to meet them once
more, but newly-fashioned nud trimmed.
In Directoire style Ihe change wrought
would bn very marked, us the sleeves
are tight-fitting, with deep frilled laces
at the wrists, lace jiibots, wide girdles,
giving a short-waisteii effect.
Rend tlie New York Dental Parlors
advertisement iu this paper, theu go to
New Vork Denial Parlors for yonr work
LOCAL   ITEMS.
Mr, S. Keith is building a HOx.O nddi
tion to his Feed Store for hay
Mrs. J. Irvine is spending a few days
with friends at Port Hauey.
Mr. Fred McClure, Business Manager
os "The World, ' is down from Matsqui.
It is reported that the wedding of a
former teacher ou Mt. Pleasnnt School
staff will take placo on th'i28th, nt 7 a.m.
 :o:	
Mr. J. 0.   MacMillau   of Thirteenth
avenue,    returued    last    week   from
Seattle, where he has been spendiug his
liolidnys,
 :o:
Miss Gertrude Wood's solo nt Mt
Pleasant Presbyterian Ohnroh ou Sunday eveuiug last, "Tlio Children's
Home," (Cowau), was vary effectively
sung and appreciated by her hearers.
Thk Advocate is always glad to receive
items of social, personal or other news
from its readers.    Send  uews items to
the office or by telephone, Bl40fl.
— :o:	
On Monday evening the meeting of
Ihe B. Y. P. U., of Mt. Pleasaut Baptist
Church was a departure from the
ordinary. Water melon, and lot of it,
was provided for the members.
The funeral of John Willis Wallace,
aged 2 years occurred ou Tuesday afternoon from 1 lllil Keefer street, the home
of tbe parents Mr. aud Mrs. S. T.
Wallace. Jnst a week beforo Mr. and
Mrs. Walluce lost thoir youngest child,
nud tliis loss of their sole remaining
child is  doubly   hard  to bear.    Great
sympathy is felt for the bereaved parents
 :o:	
Any oue having friends or knowing
of   strangers   visiting ou Mt. P.leasant
will confer a great favor by informing
"The Advocate."   Telephone B1405.
■ :o: .
Tho lecture on "Life in South Africa."
at Kui'X Church on Thnrsday eveuiug,
by Mr. Geo. McCuaig was appreciated
by thoso so fortunate as to be present.
Mr. R. Sparling, operated (lie lantern
uud the views made by Mr McCuaig
were very good. . After the lecture thu
ladies of the church served refreshments
and a pleasnnt social time was passed.
 :o:	
Daubing Classes for Adults and Children in Mason's Hall; Adult Class every
Tuesday evening, 8 to 10; Children's
Cluss every Friday evening, 7:110 to 9:30.
For terms apply to Mrs. K. Plewes, 818
Eighth aveuue, enst. Music supplied
for dnuees.
Argyle House
Bargains
Numerous
Thirty Packages  of Maunfaeturers  Samples  in  LADIES'   FLANNELETTE
GA-._.ii_NTS,  malting Iho largest qmiLtities aud lowest prices ever offered.
LADIES' FLANELETTE NIGHT-GOWNS, worth UOc for    .Do  each
TOO
'     4ffe
!)(!('.
'     OOc
$1.00
'      7no
(1.60
'   fl.OO
41.78
#2.1)0
'  11.88
'   tl "0
ff-_l25
'   $1.75
Children's Flnneletlo Sleeping Suits ur. half-price—worth $1.00 for 50o,
Lndies' Flnueletto Underskirts worth flOc for ..lie each.
•' " " "     00c   " 4fio     "
Ladies' Flnnclette Drawers and Corset Cover at the same Big Reductions.
Lndies' Flanelette Chemises, worth   40c for Hoc each
" •' " "        60c   " 400   "
00c  "   4-e   "
7fie   "   d0o   "
" " " "    (1.00  "    (iiie   "
■i .. ..     (I.J0   .,   7,-,-    ii
1 Cards of Safety Pius for 6c
II Pieces of Neeklie Ribbons, n good assortment
of colors, worth 20c for 10c a yard.
JS    maRNtFtt   4O0 Westminster Ave
•ji* nuniwcn, 0pDOsite Car_i*ae Libra,v.
Opposite Carnegie Library.
In A Garden.
The hollyhocks are gossippiug—
I watch them in the rain
II--nd down their lordly crimson heads
Ami lift thein up again.
I wonder what Iheir secret is.
l'lU'ehiiiice—and yet, who knows?—
Thoy whisper that the glad south wind
Last evening kissed ihe rose!
They nod nnd lean together; thus
I seo them as 1 pass,
And listen to  their language rweet—
TllOte gossips of the grass.
1 think I liiar I hem murmuring,
( Hut whn, pray tell me. knows?)
"Wo saw the west wind kissing her—
Oh, field;', tickle ro.o I"
—diaries llausnii TowtJe,
A Helping Hand.
Till you've vnlked nlone in darkness,
Fallen prone amid ihc thorns,
Till    you've    stumbled    in     light's
blackness,
And like dew on sunny morns
All your summer friends  have   vanished,
Yon cun never know the pleasure,
Tim surpassing royal treasure,
Of a helping human hand
—Iitiia T. Jones.
BIRTHS.
WOOD.—Born to Mr. nnd Mrs. W. H.
Wood, ,U\, Fiflh avonue, September
10th, a daughter.
DonaU).—Born to Mr. and Mrs. J. O.
Donald of Eleventh avenuo, September
I'ttli. a son
I'iiii i'.- Bom to Mr. and Mrs. Chas.
I'liilp. Ontario stroet, Sept. I8th, a son.
Truth.
Let there be many windows iu your
soul,
That all the glory of the universe
Mny beautify it. Not the narrow pane
Of one poor creed enn catch the radi-
uut rays
That   shine  from  countless sources.
Tear a way
The lilindsof superstition : let the light
Pour through fair windows, broad as
truth itself
And light as lieaveu.. .Time your ear
To all the wordless music of the stars
And to the voice of nature,  uud your
henrt
Shall turn lo truth nud goodne.s as
the plant
Turns to the sun.   A thousand unseen
hands
Reach dowu to help you  to their
peace-crowned heights,
And all the forces of the firmament
Shall fortify yonr strength.   Be not
nfraid
To thrust aslrio half-truths   ind grasp
the whole.
— Selected.
KKKLER'S
DAHLIA SHOW
iooo Plant- nnd 300 Varieties to select
from.   Thk largest coli.kction IN thb
PROVINCE,   Now is Iho lime to choose
yonr colors while iu bloom,  for spring
(limiting.
Also a choice lot of CUT FLOWERS
for sale at Wholesale Prices.
Chas* Keeler
DAHLIA SPECIALIST.
Note—-Street Cars pnss niy place.
27u4   Westminster Ave.    Mt. Pleasant
Kor Loral News Reu<| The ApyocaTK
City of Vancouver.
TENDERS WANTED.
TENDERS will be received by the
undersigned Up to Weduesday, September 21st, 1004, at noon, for the erection
of au addition to the Isolation Hospital.
Plaus nud specifications may be seen
at the office of the Health Inspector, on
Powell street, between the hours of
9 and 11 a. 111.
The lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.
THOS.'F. McGUIGAN,
OITY CLERK
Vaucouver, Sept. 16th, 1904
City  of  Vancouver.
ASSESSMENT NOTIOE.
Local Improvement Bylaw.
TAKE NOTICE that a By-law is
intended to be passed by tho Oity
Council for levying a frontage rate to
pay for cement walks to be constructed
ou Ihe following streets:
Alberui street, southside, Thurlow to
Burrard stroets.
Bute street, easlside, Davie to Couuix
streets.
Bute stroet. westside, Burnaby lo
Harwood streets.
Bute street, westside, Robson to lane.
Bute street, westside, Comox North
to lnuo.
Bi'oughton street, westside, Haro to
Barclay streets.
Eronghlon street, eastside, Barclay to
Comox streets.
Barclay street, sonthsido, Bute to
Thurlow streets.
Beach avenue, . uorthside, Bute to
Bidwell slreets.
Barclay street, northside, Chilco to
Park road.
Barclay street, northside, Burrard lo
Thurlow streets.
Cordova street, sonthside, Abbott to
Cambie streets.
Cambie streot, eastside, Cordova to
lano.
Cordova street, sonthside, Dunlevy
avenue to Jackson avenue
Curl avenue, eastside, Prior to Grove.
Dunsmuir street, northside, Hornby
to Riclnuds streees.
Harris street, uorthside, Dunlevy to
Jackson avenues
Heather street, eastside, Seventh to
Eighth avenues-
Heatley avenue, eastside, Princess to
Keefer streets.
Jervis street, westside, Robson to Haro
streets
Nelson street, northside, Denmnu lo
Gilford streets
Nicola street, westside, Pendrill to
Nelson streets.
Ontario street, eastside, Eighth to
Ninllt avenues.
Princess si reef-, southside, Heatley to
Hawks avenues.
Pendrill street, uorthside, Bute to
Nicola streets.
Peudrill street, uorthside, Thurlow to
Bnrrnrd streets.
Robson street, uorthside, Chilco In
Gilford streets.
Southwest Corner of Seymour and
Dunsmuir streets.
Thurlow street, westside, Pendrill to
Comox streets,
Thurlow street, westside, Harwood t
Pacific streets,
Thurlow streets, westside, Georgia
to Robsou streets.
Thurlow street, eastside, Barclay to
Nelson streets.
Eighth avenue, sonthside, Prince
Edward to Scotia streets.
Eleventh avenue, northside, Ontario
to Manitoba streets.
Eleveuth avenue, sonthside, Ontario
to Brewery Creek
Homer street, westside, Georgia to
Nelson slreets.
Eight)] avenne, uorthside, Granville
to Birch street.
Haro street, uorthside, Gilford to
Chilco streets.
Seventh uvenue, southside, Carolina
to Scott streets.
Aud that 11 statement showing the
lands liable to p,y the snid rale and the
names of the owners thereof, so far as
they can be ascertained from the Inst
revised assessment roll, is now filed in
the office of the City Clerk, and is opeu
for inspection during office hours.    Tin
estimated cost of the work is $	
of which $ is to be provided
out of the general funds of the Oity.
A Court of Revision will be held ou
the 17ih day of October, 190-1, ut 9 p. in.,
at the City Hall, for the purpose of
hearing cmplnittts against the proposed assessment or accuracy of the
frontage uiensuroincut or any other
Complaint which persons interested may
desire to make, and which is by law
cognizable by tho Court.
THOS. F   McGUIGAN,
CITY CLERK.
Vaucouver, B. C , Sept., 14th, 1904.
Some
5NAP5
at fluir's
Cream, 8 tius	
Milk, 8 tins	
Dairy Butter,  by tub	
Corn, Pens and Beans,  per tin
Cnnued   Raspberries	
Gal'on  Apples	
...25c
I
... 26c
.,. 20c.
...10c
... 15c
... 25o
Our Bread Better Thau Ever
W.D. Muir
RlNH   IH> 'PHONE 44-1.
Mt. Pleasnnt
New Fall
HATS
Latest in Fall and Winter
Millinery. Goods first-
class—at prices less than
down-town.
W. W. Merklev
BURRITT BLOCK
Westminster Avenue,  Mt. Pleasant,
New Shirts
ooocoo
|-^OW'S THE TIME  to get
first pick of (he New Styles,
and    to   get    a     Shirt   that's
"different."
This store has a reputation for
beiug a First-class Shirt Store,
but never before have we had
such a big stock of good shirts.
Imported nud Domestic Fabrics,
uew up-to-date patterns.
Our Shirts are noted for beauty
of form, fineness of finish, excellence of Materials and Perfection
of Fit.
Price for Colored Shirts—Soft or
Stiff Bosom—$1.00, $1.25, $1.50,
$1.75,12.00.
We invite you to eome and look.
OOOOOO   »'
- mm
mam
~mmm
iXk-'i"     "■    <>*'■>_. ^<\.*VrfY_l H_i.-a__.-r
■.^m<dm
l. LEES & CO./
THE   CASH  CLOTHIERS.
FLACK BLOCK.
2000003000000000090000909000000 OOOOCC
BUTTER
Every Housekeeper wants the best they can get.
Aud it will give us much pleasure to have you  cull and test our
stock.    We can safely guarantee   to satisfy   yon, 'both   as to
QUALITY aud PRICE.
A  full line of Fresh  Groceries.
Andrews Bros.,
§  2315 Westminster Ave. ' Phone 933.
OOOOOOOCCOOOOOOOOOCOO OOQOGOOO COOOOOOO ^0000009003000°
Jack's
Shaving
Parlor.
Westminster Ave., next Glasgow House
John  Gillmiin,  Proprietor.
Three Chains, and n first-class Bath
Room is run in connection with  the
Barber Shop—give this plaoe a trial
Jas. Carnahan.
CITY SCAVENGER.
Ortlen in-oinplly attended to,  hIkIiI   oi
dny.  Charge. nimleriUc.
Olliee: 37 Hastings street, west,
Tolephoue Number 479.
E. & J. IIARDV & CO.
Company,  Financial,  Press nud
Advertisers' Agents.
1)0 Fleet St., London,  E. G,  England.
Colonial Busiuess a'Specialty.
If you want a
SIGN
Ring   up
Dickens
Telephone   987
or  call  around  at  the  Sign
Works,    814   Homer   street.
In any cuse your wants will receive the
most courteous  and  careful attention.
Young Peoples Societies.
SUNDAY.
Loyal Workers of Christian Endeavor
meet at 15"uiiuntes to 7, every) Sunday
eveuiug in Advent Christian Church,
corner Niuth ave. and Westminster Rd.
MONDAY.
Epwortli   League of   Mt.    Plensnnt
Methodist Church mc.ts at 8 p. m.
B. Y. P. U., meets  in  Mt. Pleasant
Baptist Church ul S p. m.
TUESDAY.
The Y. P. S. C. E.j meets at S p. m
in Mt.Pleasas'int Presbyterian Church.
Before starting on 11 shopping tour,
liok i ver the advertisements in the
ADVOCATE.
COCIETIES
"""-Which Meet on fit. Plecsant
t. O. oTiT" m
Mt. Pleasaut Lodge "so. 19meetseverjl
Tuesdry ill H p. ill . iirOl'illfi'.lovn Hull]
Archer Block, Mt, 1 lei.sliut. I
Sojourning liriihreu cordially invited
to attend.
Nom.i: GmsT-O G. Kenny.
Kiicoiiiii Nn Skciiktaky—Thos^
Maebiy, Heather and Eighth avenue.
I. O. F.
Conn Vancouver JJ'.s:, Independent
Order of Foresters meets 'id and 4tliJ
Mondays of each mouth at 8 p. m.
Visiting brethren always welcome.
Ohiee Ranger—W. G. Taylor,
-.7 Kt'.fi'r Mii'i'i, l'lly.1
Recording Secretary—W. H. DeBou,!
."i7S Tenth hv.hiio, emt,]
Financial Secretary—M. J. Crehan,]
;tli Prlneus.slnlet, city.  Tel.filuNfo
LADIES OF THE  MACCABEEsT"
Alexandra Hive No. 7, holds regular]
Review   1st   and  ltd Fridays of   each]
uioulh iu I. O. O. P., Hall corner West-]
minster aud Seventh aveuues.
Visiting Ladies always welcome.
Lady Commander—Mrs. Fitch.
Lady Record Keeper—Sirs.   Mary   A.
Foote. ,'i!!9 Ninth i-.venue, east.
CANADIAN ORDER OF CHOSEN'
FRIENDS.
Vancouver Council, No. -21 In, meets
every M and 4th Thursdays of each 1
mouth, in I. O. O. P., Hall, corner '
S.ivenlh and Westmiuster avenues.
Sojourning   Friends always welcome.
W. P. Flewelling, Chief Couucillor.
Miss A. Chambers, Recorder,
___8 \V_stiiiiii.u>. itveniie.   Tel, 760.
60  YEARS'
EXPERIENCE
Trade Maims
Designs
Copyright* Ac.
An-onc ..ndliiR a sltotnh nnd doscrlptlon amy
qnfR-ly ti_-_r-niit onr oi'lninn freo whether nn
Invention is lirntinl'lypntentiible. (Vninuiiitr*-
I Ioiih ntrlctly ei ui ihii-iit IilI. Ilundhook on Petonte
sent. froo. Oldest ii.iMiey fur necnrliif patollti.
1-.iii-iit:, tukiMi 1 liruunli Munn A Co. receive
sinr/.tl notice, \,-li ln-iii ctiH.so, In the
Scientific Jftnericam
A hnndsomolr llltinf rntr.-tl w(-*klr. Y-»rj_e*t tftr-
colfitlnii i'f nn v M'icmnif Journal. Turinc.. |3 »
jrcir; four niouLlia, |L Bold by all newiaMWI.
gCo.3eiB-o.itwa., flew fork
Brunch Olllce, irfi K St- Wn-hln.ton, D.C.
£'%*+smsmsm^-vss%ymymv%, '%^^%^^-v-V-4^^%^'%*V»*%-V%'''
Opening fhe Cemetery
Extension
Commencing Friday, 16th September, cars will be run from Sixteenth
avenue to to the Cemetery. These cars will couneot with every alternate main line ROBSON STREET CAR. Robsou Street Cars will
tako the Hastings street route. Davie Street Cars will rnn as heretofore from Ninth avenuo via Powell, Cordova, Hastings, etc.
No TRANSFERS will be given to the Cemetery exteuslon curs. Au extra
fare Mill be charged
Powell-Pender Service
Commeucing on the lGth September, the Powell-Pender Cars will run
via Cordova street. Cars will leave the Pender streot terminus nt
5, 15, 25, !15, 45 and 55 minutes, after each hour. First ear (1:46 a. 111.
Lost ear 10:55 p. 111. Cars will leave Cedar Cove termiuns at 00, 10, 20,
DO, 40 and 50 minutes after ench hour. First car leaves (l:i'0 a. 111.
Last car 10:80 p ui.
British Columbia Electric Railway Company, Ltd.
,%-V%-V%^-«.-%^^%-%^*%'%%%-V«V%' -%**t^^*V%**»'*'V*'V%-%'%-*
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