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The Morrissey Mention Nov 9, 1916

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Array The Morrissey Mention
OFFICIAL ORGAN "E" AND "H" COMPANIES 107th EAST KOOTENAY REGIMENT.
Number   Fourteen
FERNIE, B.C., NOVEMBER 9, 1916.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
VISCOUNT BRYCE
FOR LEAGUE TO
PRESERVE PEACE
London, England, Saturday—With
reference to the speech made by Viscount Grey at the Foreign Press Association gathering on Monday, Vis-
H count Bryce in a letter to the Times
writes: "Are neutral nations prepared
to undertake and fulfill the responsibilities which the formation after the
0 war and after the treaty of peace, of
1 a permanent league of peace would
impose upon each of those who had
joined in this ?
"The question is, of course, special-
[ly important as regards the greatest
[of the neutral nations, the nations
Sfrom whose statesmen the suggestion of such a league, agreeing in
principle with what Mr. Asquith said
two years ago, has now come.
!'No one can venture at this mo-
nent to predict what the opinion or
iaction of the people of the United
iStates may be after the war has end-
ffed, for it is only then that the ques-
Ition can arise in a practical form, but
fl wish to point out the immense im-
fportance of the declaration made by
|Mr. Wilson and Mr. Hughes as the
Ileaders of two great American parities. Both have declared that Am-
ierica can no longer maintain her old
^policy of isolation. Both have described in clear and strong terms the
■interest the American people have
fin the prevention of war and the
J duty which lies upon it as a peace-
lloving people to do its utmost for
[securing the safety of the world in
{future by a permanent combination
(for the restraint of aggression and
(the preservation of a general peace.
JNo dissent from these views has, so
{far as I know, come from any responsible quarter in America. It is
(the one point mentioned in the presidential election on which no disagreement has arisen.
"Ought not these declarations    to
Ibe welcomed by the public opinion of
Jthis country as they have been wel-
Bcomed by Lord  Grey?  Do they not
J suggest that as soon as the end of
Kthe    war comes    in sight we should
■'endeavor,    in  conjunction  with    the
^distinguished     statesmen    who    are
IJIeading the movement in America, to
[[consider how such a league of peace
Bshould be formed and what its func-
gtions should be ?
"The obstacles are great, but the
Egain, if they were overcome, would be
linestimable. If the risks of war and
Rthe preparations for war are to be in
jJEurope for the next 30 years what
Ijthey have been for the last 30, dark,
^indeed, is the prospect for mankind,
jln the establishment of such a peace
(league as Lord Grey agrees with Mr.
•Wilson and Mr. Hughes in desiring
■lies the best hope that some permanent good for the future may come out
lof the suffering and horror of the
Ipresent."
A CANADIAN IN CHINA
FIRST WHIST DRIVE
The first whist drive in Morrissey
Jamp this winter, in aid of the Canadian Red Cross, took place last
Thursday evening in the New Recreation Room and was well attended.
Major Shaw, Lt. and Mrs. Abbott and
A. McLaine took part. In all there
,vere 34 present. Eight tables were
jitni^ied and everyone had a good
jme. No one had to be driven; all
followed a good lead. One table had
i severe list to starboard. The list of
winners is as follows:
First prize for ladies, a china cake-
plate— Mrs. Sergt. Ross.
First prize for gentlemen, an ash
tray from the Celestial Kingdom —
Corpl. Sanders.
The booby prize went to Mrs.
Sergt. Hamilton, a book on how to
play whist by one Hoyle—presented
with the compliments of Mr. McLean, druggist, Fernie.
Europe is not the only country that
can boast a war. China has one on
her hands most of the time and yet
people say the Chinese are not warlike. The writer was privileged to
see some of the fighting during Revolution days five years ago, and if
numbers and treachery count for
anything, the Mexicans have nothing
on the Chinese when it comes to
scrapping. I was at Hankow when
the government cruisers sailed up to
bombard the rebel batteries behind
the city. The very next day the
same ships with, the same crews sailed up and took a few shots at the
government troops across the river.
Still it is not all opera bouffe as
the pathetic scenes in the Siccawei
hospital testify. I saw scores of
shattered men there, mostly coolies
who enlisted because both sides offered three times as much money as
could ordinariily be earned. Orientals
are strong on promises, and the
fact that their pay checks were seldom cashed did not render the promises much less alluring. For were
there not rich yamens to loot and
shops too? One ragged regiment
passed through a village street where
straw hats were made and emerged
completely outfitted as to headgear.
And the shopkeepers counted themselves lucky to have kept their heads.
Vast numbers of the unemployed
have joined the various guerilla chiefs
and have been forced more by force
of circumstances than by inclination
to become soldiers. The ordinary native regards a soldier very lightly. In
fact one gentleman said to me: "Venerable sir, these men are called 'Protect the Country Army,' but I should
call them 'Injure the Country Army."
There is a proverb which says: "The
locusts die when an army has passed
through." This refers to the progress of an armed force in times of
peace.
On one occasion I had two soldiers
for an escort in a dangerous part of
the country. Looking out of the door
of my cabin on the little boat, I saw
them unmercifully beating an old
man on the shore. I rushed out and
ordered them angrily to desist. They
came with most injured faces and
said reproachfully, "We were only
getting him to help pull the boat so
that you could get on faster." They
thought me a most absurd master to
prevent them serving my own interest.
Letters from China now speak of
no less than six armies in the field
in Western China. East and north the
country iis overawed by the Capital.
But the outlying provinces bordering
on the savage fastnesses of Central
Asia are still in a state near to an-
anarchy. Still even now the respect
for etiquette is strong. One "general"
besieging a city was prevailed on by
a foreigner resident there to agree
to let the enemy evacuate the place
four hours before he entered. After
much palaver and more bowings and
an amount of promises that would
have done credit to the Kaiser or to
B.C. politicians, the terms were
agreed to by both sides, and strange
to say, were carried out. If one
wishes to see "The Biirth of a Nation" in real progress, all one has to
do is to watch the struggle for democracy now convulsing that huge
nation, China.
—Contributed by A Fernian.
DISTRICT ORDERS
DOUBLING  UP
A sure sign that business at
Fernie is not decreasing is the fact
that both McLean's drug store and
Wm. Barton, musical instruments
and Singer sewing machines, have
found it expedient to double their
store capacity. The enlarged stores
are already doing a good business.
Lieut. J. F. Christie, 11th Regt.,
is granted leave of absence for four
weeks, with effect from 1st Nov.,
1916.
It is notified that the 244th Batt.
C.E.F., is to be permitted to recruit
anywhere in Military District No. 11,
with the exception of the Kootenay
Districts (from Crow's Nest to and
including Nelson, Trail, and Rossland.)
107th East Kootenay Regiment
(supernumerary) G. B. Thomson, is
permitted to resign his commission.
To be provisional Lieut> (supernumerary) Bishop Arlington Wilson,
gentleman, 1, 16, 16.
G. Sisman, Captain.
For A.A.G. i|c Administration M. D
No. 11. (Absent on Duty.)
FRED W. L. MOORE, Major,
A.A.G., i|c Administration,
M.D. No. 11.
DAILY ORDERS
Taken on strength :
No. 251, Pte. Yerbury, H.
No. 252, Pte. Dawson, P.
No. 11, Pte. Murray, John.
No. 253, Pte. Hardy, Eli.
No. 254, Pte. Doyle, Pat.
No. 255, Pte. Hopkins, Geo.
Promotion, No. 24, Corp. Brown, E.,
to  be   Company  Quartermaster  Sergeant, vice Company Q.M. S. Lambkin, promoted Regimental QQ.M.S.
C. JE. SHAW, Major,
O.C. "E" Co., 107th E.K.R.,
HONESTY REWARDED
A corporal of the guard that accompanied the prisoners of war from
Lethbridge to Morrissey Camp on
Tuesday last, after washing his
hands at the barracks, left a gold
ring in the washroom. Later he returned to look for it and it was
gone. The prisoner of war employed in the barracks kitchen found it
and returned it to the owner. To
mark the appreciation of his honesty he was given a small donation
and thanked by the visiting guardsman.
MORE  PRISONERS  OF WAR
Sixty-nine prisoners of war arrived
in Morrissey Camp on Tuesday last,
from Lethbridge Interment Camp, under escort of the 25th Battery, Military   District   No.   13.
STILL IN DOUBT
The election returns for President
of the United States is in the balance. Wilson is given 232 electoral
votes and Hughes 239, leaving the
following States in doubt: California, New Mexico, North Dakota,
Washington and Idaho.
154TH, 170TH, 172ND,
ARRIVED IN ENGLAND
SAFELY FROM CANADA
THE RECREATION
ROOM   COMMITTEE
Morrissey Camp
Pte. Alec.   McCormick,  107th  E.K.R.
Private McCormick was born in
Torrance of Campsie, Stirlingshire,
Scotland, and was a corporal in "E"
Co., 4th Batt., Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders, for six years. He
was present at the big review at
Edinburgh when over 200,000
troops marched past King Edward. The most famous volunteer
regiments in the Empire were present, including the London Scottish,
The Highland Light Infantry Band
played the march: "Bonnie Laddie,
Highland Lassie." Pte. McCormick
and family have been in Canada for
six years. Their home is in Fernie,
B.C.
At a meeting held on Nov. 4th,
Pte. H. C. Henthorn was elected
Secretary in place of Sergt. Cecil
Minton, resigned; and Private H.
James,  Treasurer.
Lance Corpl. Meek and Corpl.
Gordon Ross resigned from the
committee and the following were
elected: Ptes. Smith, Whalley and
Addison.
The Secretary was instucted to
obtain prices of dominoes, and Pte.
R. Stuart to buy cchairs for the
Recreation Room, in Fernie. Sgt.-
Major Minton was requested to ask
the Quartermaster for old blankets
for the tables.
FROM  CASTLE MOUNTAIN CAMP
TODDY
When the guards from Castle
Camp, Banff, arrived in Morrissey
this week with some prisoners of
war for internment here, a dog
named Toddy accompanied them.
Toddy's kind mistress has asked
that her faithful companion be sent
to her at the coast, and Major
Sha/w has given Toddy an honorable discharge and he will be sent
home under the especial care of a
C.P.R. conductor, having earned the
good will of one and all while a
member of the 107th for a few
days.
On Saturday last Sergt. J. Craig,
103rd Calgary Rifles, stationed at
Castle Mountain, with Privates G.
Lunt, Tom Faulkner, R. Burke, E.
Smith, Bob Oldham and nine prisoners of war arrived at Morrissey
&Camp from Castle Camp,
Banff, Alberta. Pte. Lunt has one
son, Sydney, in an hospital in Eng-
France. He is a private in the 5th
Kings, Liverpool, the Earl of Derby's regiment. Another son is a
member of the 137th Batt. C. E. F.,
Albertans. Private Lunt is a great
musician and his home is in Calgary,
and was for 14 years in the Territorials. He was a most welcome vis-
tor.
The Kelowna theatre was burned to
the ground last week.
SMASHING TRENCHES FROM THE SEA
Guns on British Monitor vessel on Belgian coast co-operate with land artillery. TWO
THE   MORRISSEY   MENTION
NOVEMBER 9, 1916.
The Morrissey Mention
Official organ "E" and "H" Companies
107th E.K.R.
Head Office: Fernie, B.C.
Mentioner, Manager.
Private Randolph Stuart
Subscription  ONE  Dollar  Per  Year
Overseas, Six Shillings
U.S.A., 150 Cents
(OR 15 YEARS FOR A TEN SPOT)
Subscribers     wishing      addresses
changed please notify Mention office.
P. 0. Box 830. Telephone 33
November  9,  1916
SUNDAY IN CAMP
We hear no Temple bell, we hearken to no Cathedral chimes, unless
they be the sweet echoes of far distant peals in the land where we were
born, be it England or her Sister
Kingdoms, or in the other Provinces
of the Dominion. The Kirk, the Parish church, and the Chapel today are
calling thousands to their services in
the Old Land, and here in the far
west we attend the same services,
reminding so many of the old folks
toiling up the village street to the
tune of the old bells, the younger
generation going happily to the altar
or the shrine, the children, unmindful
of the shadows, trotting care free
ahead, past the solemn yew trees, the
resting place of many brave and fair.
Today is Sunday in Camp and all over
the world all peoples, our people, our
friends are showing ttheir thankfulness for the joys that are, as we do
when in memory we hear those dear
old bells. There is the bugle call for
church parade; it is Sunday for us
too. Can you hear those Temple
bells? Do you recall those Sunday
scenes? Do you remember the old
faces that made the morning service
part of home? Those are memories
worth having even if we hear no
chimes in this our adopted land, a
corner of the last great west.
NOVA SCOTIA
The industrial possibilities, as well
as the tourist attractions, of Nova
Scotia have received considerable attention in recent years, or since the
tide of immigration toward Western
Canada set in. Somevery informing
and entertaining books have appeared dealing with Nova Scotian possibilities. Visitors to whom the Nova
Scotian landscape has been a revelation, and the Nova Scotiaji highway a disappointment, have contributed their share to thegeneral discussion. All appear to be in agreement on one principal point, namely,
that the Nova Scotians do not realize
what they have to offer the rest of
the world, or, if they do, are short of
understanding as to how to offer it.
One very clever book with a London
imprint points out that Nova Scotia
is a "passed by" province, which is
literally true. It has been passed by
for years. The immigrant looking
for a home, or the capitalist looking
for investment, on arriving at Halifax has usually boarded a train for
Quebec or Ontario or Manitoba or
Saskatchewan, or Alberta or British
Columbia, without taking the time or
making the effort to look about him
in one of the garden spots of the
world, Nova Scotia.
It is pleasant to read that "development of the province of Nova Scotia, agriculturally, industrially, socially and as a stock raising country is
an aim of Canadian government officials." It surely should be, and promise of a successful outcome of the
movement is made brighter than it
would otherwise be. by the plan to
have the development schemes carried on in co-operation with the provincial authorities. The general manager of the province's excellent
railway system simply reiterates
what has often been put down in
writing when he says that the resources of Nova Scotia have hardly
been   touched.   He   would   be   within
conservative bounds were he to say
that the resources of the peninsula have never been fully understood, abroad or at home.
Everything claimed for the beauty,
climate, fertility, and opportunities
for industry offered by Nova Scotia
to the desirable immigrant will be admitted off-hand by those who have
seen the country. The one thing needful is that these advantages shall be
advertised, and the one effectual method of advertising them is through
the medium of cheap transportation,
good roads and plenty of well conducted, not fashionable, hotels.
FACTS FROM FERNIE
Louis Carosella has been appointed
Italian Consular Agent in place of C.
Dicastro, who has been transferred
to Edmonton.
McLean's drug store has expanded
into the next store and takes up the
space formerly occupied by M. A.
Kastner's insurance office, as well as
its previous location.
Singer's Sign, over the store of
Wm. Barton, where musical instruments play a fitting accompaniment
to the Singer's sewing machines, now
spans the whole octave. Mr. Barton
has also extended his operations
and doubled his business capacity.
We apologize for our account of the
Masquerade Ball, Oct. 31, being so
full of errors. The particulars were
given over the phone and only reached the ear of the Mentioner indistinctly just as the Mention went to press.
The correct list of prize winners is as
follows:
Jim English, 1st prize for best representative gentleman, costume
King Henry VIII.; Merthyr Gorrie,
1st prize for best comic gentleman;
Mrs. A. Moon, 1st prize for best representative lady, costume, Russian
princess; Miss Alice Wilde, 1st prize
for best Scotch lady; Mrs. Gilmore,
1st prize for best comic lady.
FINE BATTALIONS
ARE INSPECTED
Two of the finest Canadian battalions, raised in the western provinces, passed through Ottawa and
drew up on Parliament Hill for inspection by Sir Robert Borden and
Lieut.-Gen. Sir Sam Hughes, Sunday
morning. They were the 196th
Western Universities Battalion from
Camp Hughes, commanded by Col.
D. S. McKay, and the 131st New
Westminster Battalion from Vernon,
B.C., commanded by Col. J. D. Taylor, M.P.
Escorted by the bands of the 207th
and the 230th Battalions, which
formed a guard of honor, they
marched from the Broad street station, at 8.30 a. m., to Parliament
Hill, where they took up positions
on either side of the main walk.
The review commenced at 10 o'clock
when a signal gun on Nepean Point
was fired.
The Prime Minister and General
Sir Sam Hughes were accompanied
by Gen. MacDonald, Gen. Gwatkin,
Gen. Hodgins, Lieut. Zinovi Pech-
koff, who spoke on Saturday at the
Canadian Club luncheon, and several
other officers of the headquarters
staff. The western battalions presented a splendid and impressive appearance as they marched past in
platoon formation  at an easy gait.
Military airs wereplayed by their
own bands. After the march past
the visiting units again drew up at
attention on the lawns and the officers were addressed by Premier Borden. He declared he was expressing
the views of all the Canadian people when he said that they were
going to fight for the cause of the
Empire not only, but £or the cause
of civilization. He congratulated
the . commanding officers on the
splendid appearance of their battalions.
Sir Sam called for three cheers for
the King and for the Prime Minister
and Colonel Taylor called for three
cheers for the Minister of Militia.
The response was whole hearted and
could be heard for over half a mile
around.
The appearance of the 196th battalion was unique in that it was the
first infantry unit seen in Ottawa
wearing leather leggings. This battalion was raised in the universities
of Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta
and British Columbia. All the members    are   young   clean   shaven   men
THE
CROWS NEST TRADING COMPANY,
LIMITED
THE
STORE
OF
GOOD
VALUES
FERNIE      :      :      :      BRITISH COLUMBIA
P. BURNS & COMPANY, LIMITED
S hamrock
H ams
A re
M atchless
R esults
O f
C areful
K uring
Used By Those Who Know
FERNIE, B.C   FERNIE, B.C.
Capital $100,000.00
Office and Warehouse
Baker Avenue
P. O. Drawer 436
Telephone 79
THE POLLOCK WINE COMPANY, LIMITED
WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS
FERNIE,   B.   C.
Canada
ALL SOLDIERS WELCOME
FIRST  CLASS  CAFE
MRS. JENNINGS : : PROPRIETRESS
FERNIE,   B.   C.
THE CROW'S NEST PASS COAL CO., LTD.
®®S®«®®. PRODUCERS AND SHIPPERS OF S®®®®®®®®®®^
GENUINE   "CROW'S   NEST"
®®®®®®«®®®®COAL AND COKE!s®®®®®®®®®®
BEST Coal
BEST Preparation
BEST Service
Mines at Coal Creek and Michel, B.C.
Coke Ovens at Fernie and Michel, B.C.
General Office ...... Fernie, B.C.
•®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®@®®®®®«®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®^
Established April 1899.
Fernie, B.C.
W. A. INGRAM
Wholesale and Retail TOBACCONIST
BILLIARD ROOM
and LUNCH COUNTER
:OUR COFFEE IS GOOD:-
the average age being about 21 1-2
years. The average chest measurement of the men in the battalion is
said to be 38 inches.
The 131st battalion, commanded by
Col. Taylor was raised in New Westminster, B.C. It possesses an excellent fife and drum band which played at the head of the parade on the
march back to the station. Col. Taylor is well known in the press gallery
of the House of Commons. He was
formerly connected with the 43rd
regiment D. C. O. R. of Ottawa and
also served in the Northwest Rebellion    with    the    Ottawa company of
sharp shooters. Major Todd, who
commanded that company, greeted
Col. Taylor on his arrival in the
Capital. He was also met by several
old ccomrades of the 43rd.
Several thousand people of Ottawa
were on the hill early to witness the
military spectacle and the western
boys were given a rousing reception.
After the review both battalions
marched back to their train and left
the city during the afternoon. They
were treated to refreshments by the
women of the Voluntary Aid Detachment. The men greatly appreciated
the women's  thoughtfulness.
F. C. LAWE. A. I. FISHER
LAWE & FISHER
Barristers, Solicitors, Etc.
Offices: Imperial Bank Chambers
FERNIE, B.C.
Dr. H. S. SIMMONS
Dentist
Bank of Hamilton Block
FERNIE, B.C.
THE FAMILY HERALD
AND WEEKLY STAR
MONTREAL, QUEBEC
THE PALM
FKUITS AND CONFECTIONEKY
FERNIE, B.C.
S. T. Saunders
SHOESHINE
INGRAM  BILLIARD  ROOM
Fernie, B.C.
ROYAL CANDY CO.
WE  MANUFACTURE  CANDY
Call in FERNIE B.C.
Use
BAPCO
Paint
J. D. QUAIL
General   Hardware   Merchant
Axes—All Kinds
FERNIE, B.C.
ICE CREAM
Telephone Office
HARDMAN'S
for
SOFT DRINKS
Elko. B.C.
G. FALVO
P. O. Box 141
SHOE)   HOSPITAL. FERNIE,  B.C.
T. N. HIBBEN & CO.
Stationers
VICTORIA, B.C.
KENNEDY & MANGAN
Lumber, Lath, Shingles, Sash & Doors
Office & Factory Opposite G.N. Depot
"BEAVER BOARD"
Fernie, B.C.
J. CARMICHAEL
High-Class Tailoring
Pressing and Cleaning.
FERNIE, B.C.
THE TIMBERMAN
Is  the   recognized   exponent  of  the
lumber industry of the Pacific
Northwest.
PORTLAND, ORE.
Dr. JOHN BARBER
DENTIST
Office: Over Bleasdell's Drug
J.-F. Block.
EVENINGS    BY    APPOINTMENT
Telephone 12J.   Fernie, B.C.
Go to
J. G, SAAD
For Dry Goods, Boots, Etc.
and Jewellery
(Near the C.P.R. Station)
Fernie, B.C.
♦ At
Sweeney & McConnell
Printers      Stationery
VICTORIA, B.C. NOVEMBER   9,  1916.
:iE   MORRISSEY   MENTION
THREE
J. F. SPALDING
PHOTOGRAPHER
Your friends can buy anything you
can give them EXCEPT
YOUR   PHOTO
I   Until   Nov.  15th  prices will be  reduced  to  encourage   early
ordering
SPALDING studio   FERNIE, B.C.
MORRISSEY CAMP
JUVENILE BENEFIT
in Aid of the
Belgian Children's
Relief Fund
At the School House
FRIDAY, NOV. 17th, 1916
At 2 p.m. and All Afternoon
There will he a musical
jprogram and refreshments.
Come and contribute to the
jBelgian Children's Relief
IFund.
Everyone Welcome
Help our children to help
{the Belgian Children.
Committee : Miss Ruth
jCooper, Q. M. S. Brown, P.
S. Wildman.
^PRODUCE SOMETHING
BETTER
The true patriot in   1917
[will be the citizen who causes
j two   blades   of grass to grow
[where only one grew before.
This is the slogan of the Canadian Credit Mens Trust Association, of Winnipeg, Man.,
who are the publishers of the
Credit    Men's    Journal,   a
monthly periodical of exceptional interest to all business
men,
MISS CONROY
I        DRESSMAKING
Fernie, B.C.
|Phone   78 P.O.  Box  1168
1THE FERNIE CARTAGE CO
Livery, Dray, Transfer
Perry Bros., Prop.
WOOD FOR SALE
FURNITURE MOVING
I Fernie British  Coulmbia
THE HOME BANK
OF CANADA
James Mason, General Manager.
|Head Offce      -      -      -      Toronto
Branches and Connections
Throughout Canada
Fernie, B.C
ELECTRIC POWER IN B.C.
The hydro-electric projects of Ontario are not duplicated in British
Columbia, yet in this prov'nce electricity has grown to be ouite a factor on the farm, especially in the
Fraser Valley.
Hundreds of farmers in the Fraser
Valley can secure electric power
without trouble, and many of them
are using it. J. M. Steves, the well-
known Holstein breeder of Lulu Island, connected his barn up with
the electric system and let "juice"
cut his mangles and do similar tasks
for him. Shannon Brothers, of
Cloverdale, owners of a splendid
dairy farm and like Steves producers of ' certified milk, introduced
electric power to their farm. There
it does everything it is asked to do,
quickly, efficiently, safely and
cheaply, and it is always available
at a moment's notice. The Shannon Brothers operate their mechanical milker by electric power.
Reeve Bridge, of Richmond, chairman of the Agricultural Credits
Commission, long has used electric
power on his farm. The farms of
Robert Kelley at Kensington Prairie,
Charles Evans at Sardis, and Robt.
Armstrong at Chilliwack, are "electric''' farms. Few farmers who adopt
electric power once, relinquish it.
Recently the farm of Charles E.
Hope at Langley Fort became a
demonstration place, so to speak, for
electric power. "Deep Creek Ranch,"
as Mr. Hope's farm is called, is large,
containing some 600 acres. Mr. Hope
is interested principally in dairying.
He is a wideawake, progressive farmer, with his ear right to the ground
all the time for improvements. He
decided that he couldn't get along
without electricity—that is, he would
overlook an opportunity if he didn't
use it. So recently the electric company set poles and connected up his
farm with wire.
Electric power will perform at
least one unique operation at Deep
Creek farm. One-sixth or thereabouts of Mr. Hope's farm lies at
the junction of the Salmon and Fraser rivers, and in past years has been
subject to spring freshets. To rid
himself of these, the proprietor at
considerable expense had a dyke
built. In connection with this, a
pump to eject water will be used,
driven by a 15 h.p. electric motor.
A pole line nearly a mile long was
constructed to bring current to this
Other things will be done by electricity, too. Electric power will
operate the hay cutter, grain crusher,
milking machines. This fall Mr.
Hope contemplates doing his threshing by electricity, for that purpose
drawing a motor on skids into th(
fields.
The interest of British Columbia
farmers in electric power is rapidly
increasing, and the power companier
are receiving many inquiries. Recently the Fraser Valley Development League, an organization working for the improvement of agricultural conditions in this section, was
addressed on the subject by Geoffrey
Porter, chief electrical engineer of
the largest power company in British Columbia. The talk was in one
of the theatres of New Westminster,
and was illustrated by many views
on the screen. Photographs were
shown of electrical power in use on
Fraser Valley farms. Mr. Porter
explained very fully the many uses
to which electric power could be put,
the relative cost, and other essential
points.
There is one factor tending to
popularize electric power which is
felt more in British Columbia thar
in some of the other provinces. Electricity is the common lighting agent
in British Columbia. It is thecheap-
est, and is almost always used when
available. Scores of farm houses are
lighted by electricity. Thus the
farmer already knows something of
electricity, is predisposed in its favor
and can equip himself with facilities
for electric power with the minimum
of difficulty. Truly, electricity in the
house and in the barn makes farm
life attractive and very frequently it
increases profits also.—J. T. B. in
Montreal Star.
MENTIONED IN CAMP
""■'-. Pte. Sims is thenew C.A.S.C.
ba1_er.
That it will now be possible to sit
n the Recreation Room.
That the Recreation Room Committee has purchased a piano.
That a trail with no hills would
be mighty tame.
That a baby has arrived at the
Sergeants' Mess.
That Corpl. Oughton has quite a lot
of stationery on hand—no less than
six little blotters arrived in one day.
That the subscriptions o he Canadian Prisoners of War Fund are
something for "E" Co. to be proud of.
That Lt. McLaine has become quite
an old timer in his first week in
camp and is very much at home.
That. Lieutenant Wallace reported
for duty as Quartermaster at Morrissey Camp, Nov. 7.
That the weather was as mild as
May, and then again it is now November and snow at that.
That Mrs. Lieut. M. D. McLean returned to Fernie from Bonnington
Falls on Friday last.
That it was good of Mr. McLean
to present the booby rize. He is
certainly a good judge of books.
That Pte. Lockyear Wray has gone
home to Fernie on sick leave for a few
days.
That Corpl. Oughton visited Fernie
on Tuesday and was not blown up by
a magazine.
That Lieut. A. K. Stuart paid a
farewell visit to his friends in Fernie last week.
That the snow fell 7 inches on Sunday night and it was still there in the
morning.
That Jonesey telling of his to-
ba,ccco plantation in S. A. to
Frenchy is as soothing as a smoke.
That thenew Recreation Room can
boast several new chairs and it is no
longer good form to sit on the forms.
That at the beginning of the month
Mercury will appear in the morning
sky before sunrise. Only the early
riser will see this beautiful planet.
That the Sergeants' Mess has an
interpreter as guest, though the members all speak the same language,
more  or  less.
That tonight there will be held the
second whist drive, only the dance
being postponed on account of the
many activities of the week.
That Sergt. Wildman and Private
Cosgrove visited the camp at the
Meadows on Sunday — but caught
nothing.
That Friday, the 17th, is the Children's Day in camp in aid of the Belgian boys and girls, and a musical
and refreshment program has been
arranged by the school trustees.
That the private who was commissioned to go to Fernie Friday
evening last to buy a piano for the
Recreation Room came back with the
promise of a promising piano.
That at the last meeting of the
Whist Drive committee, Sergt. Cecil
Minton was elected treasurer; Corp.
John Cooper to the most delightful
and honorable and enviable position
of ladies' man; Pte. Neil O'Connor to
be in charge of all the tables and
other accessories; and Pte. Stuart to
secure the prizes and other inducements to good whisting.
That a whole carload of chocolates arrived in the camp for a
certain party in khaki. Everyone
wonders who She is.
That a member of the 107th sent
for an overcoat buut by an oversight he got a blanket and a baby's
comforter.  He now needs the latter.
Kootenay's Mail Order Housr
When in Fernie, visit the stores
that advertise their goods in the Morrissey Mention.
oooooooooooooooooooo
O 0
o                      NOTICE o
o The   Morrissey   Mention   will o
o appear on Thursdays of each o
o week   hereafter.     AH   corres- o
0 pondencc,   advertisements   and o
o items for insertion should reach o
o the Mentioner  not  later  than o
o Tuesday of each week.    After o
o the  last issue,  Dec.  28th,  the o
o following rates will apply: o
o Subscription,   One   Dollar   and o
o           Fifty Cents per year. o
o       Overseas, Eight Shillings. o
o       U.S.A.,  Two  Dollars. o
o Contracts for advertising space o
o                 on application. o
o The   Mention   will   be   larger, o
o longer,  and at  least 6  pages, o
o o
oooooooooooooooooooo
The TRITES-WOOD CO.,
STORES AT:—
Fernie,   Michel,   Coal   Creek,   Natal
FORDFORDFORDFORDFORDFORD
emm*
A. C. LIPHARDT
JEWELLER
Watch Repairing
Special Order Work
FERNIE, B.C.
WM. BARTON
Sewing Machines
Musical Instruments
Sheet Music
Fernie, B.C.
FERNIE HOSPITAL
Cor. Pellatt and McEvoy
Telephone 13. Fernie, B.C.
HOTEL   FERNIE
First Class Accomodation
S. F. WALLACE     -     .     -     Prop.
Wallace Cigar Store
Choice Tobaccos
Billiards Barbershop
FERNIE, B.C.
FORDFORDFORDFORDFORDFORD
FERNIE GARAGE
Call in.
Agent
FORD CARS
Ford Cars sell at the following low
prices, F. O. B. Fernie, B. C.
Roadsters       -      -     $535.00
Touring; 5 Passenger   555.00
Repairs a Specialty
P. Bean, Prop.
Phone 158. FERNIE, B.C.
F. BEAN
Plumber and  Steam  Fitter
Furnace and Stove Repairs
Phone 135 Fernie, B.C.
THE
FERNIE-FORT STEELE
BREWING CO., LTD.
R. G. McEWAN
MEAT PIES
MEAT PIES
MEAT PIES
Call in. Next door to Free Press office
FERNIE, B.C.
D. G. HARVIE
Tailor
DOES  GOOD  HANDIWORK
Fernie, B.C.
Premier House
ROOMS
15 Pellatt Ave., FERNIE
H. A. WILKES     -      -      -      Prop.
Fernie
KEFOURY BROS.
Dry   Goods,  Clothing
FERNIE, B.C.
High-Grade Bottled and
Draught Beer
Aerated Waters
FERNIE, B.C.
N. E. SUDDABY
Drugs, Books, Kodaks, Films,
Fishing Tackle, Edison Phonographs
THE REXALL STORE
Fernie, B.C.
McLEAN'S
DRUG and BOOK STORE
Fernie, B.C.
Telephone 142. P. 0. Box 1174
THE 41 MEAT MARKET
Fernie, B.C.
While You Live in the
PROVINCE
Read the "Daily Province"
Vancouver, B.C.
M. A. BERIGAN
BLACKSMITH
Horseshoer
Fernie, B.C.
THE
DUTHIE HARDWARE
COMPANY
FERNIE, B.C.
Read The
DAILY
SPOKESMAN-REVIEW
SPOKANE, WASH.
WELL DONE LAUNDRY
MRS. A. McCORMICK
Morrissey Camp
A. Dragon
Cigars — Barber   Shop — Pool   Room
OPPOSITE THE ISIS THEATRE
FERNIE, B.C.
Stay at the
STRATHCONA
HOTEL
SIX STORIES OF SOLID
CONCRETE
Victoria, B. C.
READ
THE KOOTENAIAN
KASLO, B. C.
THE KINGS HOTEL
The   House   for the People
Wm. Mills, Prop. FERNIE, B.C. FOUR
THE   MORRISSEY   MENT1
NOVEMBER 9, 1916.
»K»»***»*»»«4**»»»»M"»»»»H»M *********************
WE   ARE   ALLIES
TRADE WITH FRANCE;;
         ■ ■ n   —
J. C. GHEST
NTHR/Vj I'ES BRIQUETTES
*
*
*
*
*
t
| CARBONS    —    —    —    —    —    —    COKES  {
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
| 4 Rue Pe'trell (14":)     France
*
^VVVVVVVVTVVTVVVtVVtttVVtVtTTTtVVVVVTV1
COMMISSION AGENT
CORRESPONDENCE   INVITED
CANADA'S BOYS WANT SMOKES!
THEY ARE FIGHTING IN FREEDOM'S CAUSE
THEY ARE FACING FEARFUL CONDITIONS
THEY  ARE   HONORING  CANADA'S   NAME
THEY    WANT    JUST    ONE    THING!
WHEN THEY WERE IN CANADA THEY COULD DO AS YOU
DO, GO INTO THE NEAREST STORE AND GET A FRESH SUPPLY.
NOW THEY ARE ASKING YOU TO SUPPLY THEIR URGENT NEED.
"I was nine weeks without a smoke"
These were the words of a wounded soldier in a hospital in Canada.
When   the   Boys   Come   Home   you
would not like them to tell you how
they  suffered  for lack  of  Tobacco?
Such a little thing !
Every Smoker knows what it means
to be without! !
Positive  discomfort ! ! !
Absolute suffering ! ! ! !
Think of one night; two nights; a
week; a month; nine weeks, and no
Tobacco !
LOOK  AT THIS BOY'S FACE
AND HANDS
CAMP NOTES
Send  your contributions to       Organizing Secretary
Francis R. Jones, Windsor Hotel, Montreal.
ORPHEUM
THE4TRE
WHERE   EVERYBODY   GOES
WED. and THURS.
Nov. 8 and 9.
Bessie Barriscale
in
HONOR'S ALTAR
Triangle   Fine   Arts  in   Five   Acts
and
Mack Swain
in
His Auto Ruination
2 Part Keystone
Friday and Saturday
Nov. 10 and 11
Lillian Gish
in
"Sold For Marriage"
Also
"Fatty" Arbuckle
in
"The Other Man"
2  Part Keystone
PROVINCIAL PREFACES
Monday and Tuuesday
Nov. 13 and 14
Lois Weber and
Phillips Smalley
IN
The Dramatic Sensation
"Hop, The Devil's Brew"
AT  THE  WALDORF
...Wm. Graham, Gus Johnston, F.
Wheatley, Wm. .McLaughlin, U. M.
W. of A.; Louis Chenier, Jaffray;
Peter Fletcher, Moosejaw; R. H.
Bohart, Jr., Bull River; G. A. Mil-
lett, Elko. 	
Creston has donated a carload of |
apples to the B. C. soldiers in Eu-1
rope.
Out of a population of 7000, Fernie
claims to have 1100 soldiers overseas.
The Rev. H. W. Simpson, Rector of
Rossland, has accepted the incumbency of St. Jude's Anglican church in
Greenwood.
The B. C. Copper Co., Greenwood,
will in future have its blister copper
refined at the Trail smelter and refinery instead of shipping it as formerly to New Jersey.
J. F. Wilson, of Michigan University, has been appointed professor of
electrical engineering at Queen's
University, Kingston, Ont.
Mr. Francis R. Jones, of Montreal,
Organizing Secretary of the Overseas
Club Tobacco Fund, is touring Canada lecturing on the needs of the Canadian soldier in France. He has been
speaking at all the principal cities in
the west and was at Nelson and Trail
last week.
Thomas Crosby was very seriously
injured in a train accident at Grand
Forks last week.
Manager J. G. Mullen, of the
Greenwood branch of the Bank of
Commerce, has been transferred to
Seaforth, Ont. He was given a great
send off at the Greenwood Club before his departure.
Mrs. Sidney Oliver and Miss Eileen
have returned to Greenwood from a
trip to Eastern Canada.
The' new parliament buildings at
Ottawa will be heated by electricity.
Canadian marble will be used for the
interior decorative work.
A license has been refused to the
longest bar in the world, employing
28 bartenders, by Rock Island, 111. The
bar cost over $70,000.
Premier Bowser has secured a seat
in the new B.C. legislature, being
elected fifth out of six members for
Vancouver.
Our congratulations to Q. M. S.
Brown on his promotion.
Sergt. Major W. S. Curtis, Sergt.
H. L. Phelan, Pte. J. P. Carnigson,
Pte. R. H. Roberts and Pte. J. W.
Smedley are returning home from
France to the coast this week.
Pte. Jim Jory (Greenwood) 54th
Batt., C.E.F., somewhere in France,
in a letter received by Lieut. Fred.
McLaine, states that he has recently
met Lt. Rush, 102nd Batt. (formerly
Bank of Montreal, Greenwood) who
went to France as a private in the
2nd C.M.R.'s, with Trooper C. A.
Thomas, formerly of the Canadian
Bank of Commerce staff. He says
he often sees "Col." Baker (Carmi,
B.C.) and has also met Lance-Corpl.
Alex. Shaw, Pte. Rube Corrigan, and
Privates Whippier and Chris. Eaton,
all old timers of the Boundary and
Kettle Valley.
Major G. A. Reid, the son of Dr.
Reid, Sault Ste. Marie, and son-in-law
of A. Boyle, ex-M.P., Niagara Falls,
has been killed in action.
Pte. Cunningham Brodie, son of the
late Dr. Brodie, of Fort Steele, B.C.,
has been killed in action.
Pte. Hughey McCallum, 629574,
son of Mr. and Mrs. P. I. McCallum,
of Grand Forks, has been wounded in
the left arm and thigh. He is at present in No. 13 general hospital, Boulogne.
Scotland has instituted camp reforms at Dyre, Aberdeen.
Capt. F. C. Selous, the well known
explorer, Royal Fusiliers, has received the D.S.O. for conspicuous gallantry, resource and endurance.
Lieut. Albert Ball, Notts and Derby Regiment and R. F. C, has received the Military Cross and the D.S.O.
and bar, all at the same time for several wonderfully brave and victorious
with the enemy in the air.
Constine Baby, a Roumanian in-
Camp on Tuesday, with the Leth-
terpreter who arrived in Morrissey
bridge prisoners of war, is a great
traveller and linguist. His home is in
Montreal. It is expected he will remain in Morrissey. He has been with
survey parties all throughout Canada.
Col. R .W. Gregory, Camp Commandant Central Mobilization Camp,
Vernon, says the work done this year
by the troops stationed at Vernon was
remarkably fine. He speaks in glowing terms of the men and the camp.
Lt. A. K. Stuart, 30th B.C. Horse,
has rejoined his regiment at Vernon
Camp, being transferred from the
107th E.K.R., Morrissey Camp, and
left for Vernon on Thursday last.
Major E. Mallandaine, O.C. 107th
E. K. R., paid a short visit to camp
on Sunday last.
Pte. (73132) Acting Corpl. Leo.
Clarke, Canadian Infantry, has been
awarded the Victoria Cross. Pte.John
Chipman Kerr 1101465) has also received a Victoria Cross.
General Townsend, defender of Kut
has been made K.C.B.
Pte. Hugh Brown, a returned veteran, suffering from acute rheumatism, left Fernie for the convalescent
hospital at Esquimalt last week,
where he expects to regain his health.
Sergt. Craig, 103rd Regt., who visited Morrissey Camp last week, has a
brother a prisoner of war in Germany. He was much interested in the
fund raised in Morrissey Camp to aid
prisoners of war in Germany.
G. G. MOFFATT
Fire Insurance Agent
Fernie, B. C
Dr.W. W. Lailey, B.A., MX).
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
(Bank of Hamilton Building)
Office hours.  10:30 to 12:00 a.m.
2:00 to    4:00 p.m.
7:30 to    8:30 p.m.
Phones: Residence 144; Office 46.
"Here, what's all the row about?"
asked the policeman, breathlessly.
"This  woman  is   collecting   money
for a peace fund, and when I refused
to contribute she knocked me down."
—Buffalo Express.
A. T. HAMILTON
Sole Agent for
TORRID   ZONE   STEEL
BRICK   LINED
FURNACES
Fernie
B. C.
W. F. Muirhead & Co.
EXCLUSIVE   SHOE   STORE
Established  10  Years
Rubbers of Every Description.
FERNIE, B.C.
CENTRAL HOTEL
Dominic Citra     -     -     -   Proprietor
Fernie, B.C.
MRS. E. TODD
The Exclusive Ladies' Store
Fernie, B.C.
HOLLY MASON & CO.
All Kinds of Hardware
SPOKANE, WASH.
LADIES
When   in  Fernie,   go  to
MRS. COLTON
For HATS
A. E. FERGUSON
FOR BRICK-LINED HEATERS
Phone 153 Day or Night
Fernie, B.C.
THE  ROUTE  MARCH
BARBER SHOP
LAUNDRY
BIG BUILDING
Morrissey Camp
Shaving—5 cents
Hair cut—15 cents
Saturday, Shaving only.
No. 237
War Souvenirs Carved
Big Building
No. 197
Carved Swagger Sticks
No. 189
S^^
WE. MAKE.
^B
moi
that pri riz
SPOKANE
kt&ericfoiY ]gfigr«vii\i^
COMPANY
.DESIGNERS  ENGRAVERS^
SPOKANE
LOCK & HAWTHORNE If
Painters Decorators
FERNIE, B.C.
WANTED
NAMES  and   ADDRESSES
of Fernie Boys now
Canadian Prisoners of
War in Germany.
Address Replies to:
Lt.   R.   Dunbar   Abbott,   Secretary
Fund in Aid of Canadian Prisoners
of   War,   Morrissey   Camp,   B.C.
 o	
The Rev. Mr. Lane, of Fernie,
held Divine service at Morrissey
Camp last Sunday.
(In  Training)
We've got our foreign-service boots—
we've 'ad 'em 'alf a day;
If it wasn't for the Adjutant I'd sling
the brutes away;
If I could 've my old ones back I'd
give a fortnight's pay,
And chuck 'm in the pair I got
this  morning!
We've marched a 'undred miles today,
we've 'undreds more to go,
An' if you don't believe me, why, I'll
tell you 'ow I know—
I've measured out the distance by the
blister on my toe,
For  I   got my  foreign-service
boots this morning!
We've got our foreign-service boots—
I wish that I was dead;
I wish I'd got the Colonel's 'orse an'
'im my feet instead;
I  wish  I  was  a  nacrobat,  I'd  walk
upon my head,
For  I   got  my  foreign-service
boots this morning!
We're  'oppin  and we're 'obblin to a
cock-eyed ragtime tune,
Not a soul what isn't limpin' in the
bloomin' 'ole baloon . .. .
But   buck  you   up,  my  com-e-rades,
we're off to Flanders soon,
For we got our foreign-service
boots this morning!
—"Punch."
William's Drug; Store
Cor.   Fort  and  Government
Mail Orders Promptly Filled
VICTORIA,  B.C.    .
Holy Family Church
FERNIE, B.C.
Sunday Services:
First Mass 8:30 a.m.
Second Mass 10:30 a.m.
Baptisms 1:00 p.m.
Sunday School 2:15 p.m.
Benediction of the Blessed
Sacrament 3:00 p.m.
REV.   FATHER   MICHELS,   O.M.I,
Services Every Sunday
Christ Church
Matins 11 a.m.      Evensong 7:30 p.m.
Rev. A. B. Lane       -       -       Rector
FERNIE, B.C.
Methodist Church Services     ]
11 a.m. Sunday 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening, prayers
D. M. Perley, B.A.     -     -     Pastor
FERNIE, B.C.
Salvation Army Citadel
(Cox St.) '
L. Cox, Captain.
Sunday Services: 11 a.m., 3 p.m. and   ,
7.30 p.m.
Every week day: 8 p.m.
The new President of China is Gen.
Feng Kwo Chang, a prominent supporter of the 'aie President Li Yun
Hang. He was goverenor of Nanking
and was chief of the military council
of China.
Sir George Perley, acting Canadian
High Commissioner in London, has
been appointed Minister to Canadian
Overseas Forces in Britain, and will
preside over a sub militia council
there.
OLIVET BAPTIST CHURCH
Fernie, B.C.
Services  on   Sunday:—
Song Service at 7:30 p.m.
HOME BAKERY
Pork Pies        Pork Pies
Pork Pies       Pork. Pies..,„
Pork Pies       Pork IWfl
Fernie, B.C.
S H U - S H I
For   Soldiers
HARGREAVES CANADA LIMITED   j
Toronto,  Ont.
ORPHEUM   THEATRE
FERNIE, B.C.

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