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The Morrissey Mention Oct 12, 1916

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Array The Morrissey Mention
OFFICIAL ORGAN "E" AND  "H"  COMPANIES 107th EAST KOOTENAY REGIMENT.
Number Ten.
FERNIE, B. C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER   12,   1910.
PRICE   FIVE   CENTS
CAPTURED BY CHIEF OF PROVINCIAL
POLICE DRYDEN, OF WALDO, B. C
Great credit is due to Chief A. Dryden of the provincial police, of Waido,
B.C., for his splendid initiative and resource in locating and capturing the
two prisoners of war—Nos. 277 and 295—who escaped on Friday morning
last from Morrissey internment camp.
About 9 a.m. the two men, who were trusted orderlies doing fatigue work,
walked over to the back of the buildings they were working at with pails of
rubbish to empty. They never came back but disappeared in the nearest
brush and when the alarm was given they were well out of sight. A search
party was scattered about the camp in every direction and by noon the
entire section in the immediate neighborhood was covered. The search was
continued on Saturday and parties were out all night, but no word was
received until Sunday morning when a message come over the wires from
Waldo, B.C., that one man was captured by Chief Dryden and was already
in the cells, whilst the other was located in the immediate vicinity. An
armed detail under the able leadership of Lieut. R. Dunbar Abbott set off
for Waldo in a fast motor, Sergeant-Major Minton driving, and in less than
fifty minutes they were at the scene of the arrest of one man and the discovery of the other.
Waldo is twenty-four miles from Morrisey and one hour after the arrival
of the car both men were in the cells. The escaped prisoners were camped
close to the jail at Waldo on Sunday morning and were fetching a pail of
water when Constable Dryden spotted them. He did not have his gun at
the time but soon armed himself and secured one of the men, then he located the other and as soon as Lieut. Abbott arrived he sent two men up a
draw to the left and one man to the right, posting another of the 107th at
the railway station, where there was a train standing.
The escaped prisoner headed across the hillside through the thick brush
towards the station but was soon headed off by Sergt. Carter and Lieut.
Abbott and narrowly escaped being shot as he was covered by both close
to some old shacks where he took refuge under a log. The actual capture
took place about a mile south of the school house and the police station
just above the flats on the Elk river on the way to Phillip's bridge. The
drive to Morrissey camp was done in record itme and the two men in cells
by three o'clock.
The search party under Lieut. R. Abbott consisted of Sergeant-Major
Minton, Sergeant Harry Carter, Sergeant Wildman, Corporal Ross and
Private McCormick.
A PATRIOTIC RECORD
DISTRICT ORDERS
A provisional school of signalling
sommenced at Beacon Hill Park, Victoria, B.C., Oct. 2nd, 1916.
FRED W. L. MOORE, Major,
A.A.G. in charge Administration,
M.D. No. 11.
It is notified that 2,000 men, if possible, are to be enlisted for the Royal
Naval Canadian Volunteer Reserve
before the end of the current year.
A board of officers assembled at
Work Point barracks, Esquimalt, B.
C, Oct. 2nd for the purpose of inspecting the C.P.A.S.C. launch "Leila"
previous to taking the same on government charge.
Rocky Mountain Rangers, 102nd
Regiment—To be provisional lieutenant (supernumary) Douglas Henry
Newberry Russell, gentleman, from
22nd May, 1916.
E. A. SEELY SMITH, Major,
G.S.O., M.D. No. 11.
PRIVATES  ROBERT  AND
HAROLD MINTON
Two sons of Sergeant-Major and
Mrs. Minton, 107th, E.K.R., Morrissey
camp, who are now in France with
the mechanical transports. Robert
joined the 13th C. M. R.s and was
transferred later to the Canadian Artillery, Battery 20. His brother Harold enlisted in Fernie with the first
not so long ago working in the District Ledger office as printer's devil.
Sergt. Cecil Minton of the 107th is
another son of a fighting family of
loyal Britishers. We are proud to be
able to reproduce a picture of the
youngest Minton in khaki, "Lance-
Corpl." Jackie Minton, in a striking
and characteristic attitude beside his
very own teepee. He is the 3-year-old
son of Sergt. Cecil and Mrs. Minton.
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DAILY ORDERS
The  undermentioned  officer  is  demobilized from October 9th inclusive:
Lieut. Ashley Cooper.
Demobilized:
No. 226, Pte. Shearer, John.
No. 231, Pte. Abbott, John D.—in
order to join 196th Batt., C.E.F.
No. 233, Pte. Leach, F. P.
Taken  on  the strength:
No. 246, Pte. McDougall, Dan.
No. 247, Pte. King, George.
No. 248, Pte. Taylor, George.
contingent of Canadian Highlanders.
Private Harold later claimed his brother and now the two boys are together. Curiously enough, they met
their cousin Henry, of the 54th, in the
trenches.   Private Henry Minton was
LCE.-CORPL. T. W. SHORTHOUSE
We regret that the cut of Lance-
Corporal Shorthouse has been delayed
in transit but hope to reproduce it
soon. He is a Fernie boy, well known
and well liked. He left the coal city
June 11th, 1915, with the 54th Batt.
to Vernon camp and thence to England last November, and is now serving with the 2nd Batt., No. 2 Co., 1st
Brigade in France. He was formerly
a clerk in J. D. Quail's commodious
hardware store, where he had been
employed for over three years. He is
one of a large family who live in West
Fernie, his father being the owner of
the principal dairy business of that
part of the city.
Seven in Khaki
Morrissey camp, the 107th E. K. R.
and indeed all British Columbia should
be proud of a family with the magnificent record of self-sacrifice that
Pte. W. G. Clark, of Victoria, B.C.,
and his sons and daughters possess.
Private Clark is an Englishman
vho.^e home is in the capital city. He
enlisted with the 102nd Kamloops
Regiment last May and was sent to
Edgewood internment camp, being
transferred to "E" Co., 107th East
Kootenay Regiment last month and is
now a member of the guard at Morrissey.
Private Clark's oldest son, Jack G.
Clark, was living in Washington, D.
C, when the war broke out and was
engaged, through the French Embassy there, with the armoured train
service of the French army. He has
been in many hot engagements but
has been missing for some months.
We are privileged to produce a
photo of another son, Pte. Chuck
Clark, taken at Vernon, B.C. His is
the head at the bottom of the picture.
He enlisted with the 54th Batt., C. E.
F., now in France, and was wounded
at St. Eloi, June 15th.   Chuck played
school in Vancouver, B. C, and now
nursing our wounded troopers at the
Casino, Bologne, France, is a daughter of Private W. G. Clark, 107th E.
K. R., and like her brothers is doing
noble work.
A married daughter, Mrs. Widdi-
field, lives in Honolulu, H. I., where
she is a school teacher. This is a
great record and one for our guardsman to be proud of. We are sorry we
cannot also reproduce a photograph
of the father of this patriotic family.
had never heard of the 'six weeks
peace.' He said: 'It was like this:
When the wet weather hit us last fall
our trenches were water to the knees,
our dug-outs were made almost impossible, and it was simply a terror to
get around at all, and fighting was
out of the question.
" 'This went on    until    Christmas
day, 1914, when Fritz came out on top
| and signalled a Merry Christmas, and
I our boys were not slow to accept the
■ challenge. Pretty soon along the two
| mile front both parties were shaking
hands    and    exchanging    Christmas
I cheer.   The Germans had all kinds of
good things, including beer—and good
beer it was too—while we had tobacco
and  cigarettes to  burn.    Well,  both
sides had a swell day of it and when
it came to taking to the water again
a deep gloom settled over all.    Suddenly somebody suggested a truce until the trenches could be put in decent
shape and everybody jumped at the
chance.   There were some large brick
yards in the vicinity and it was not
long before both sides were busy.
" 'For six weeks not a shot was fired
with serious intent on this front and
we were able to put our trenches and
dug-outs in their present fine shape.
" 'You understand that this was all
done more or less on the quiet, but it
finally leaked out and somebody began to ask foolish questions in the
House of Commons, and the result was
that one day orders came that the war
must be resumed. An officer went over
to interview Fritz and broke the sad
news to him. He wanted to know
'Why things couldn't go on as usual
until the dry weather started. We
have made our trenches habitable;
why destroy them '?'
"Our officer returned in sore perplexity. The next day Fritz appeared
in plain sight and of course we could
not shoot in cold blood. Our officer
went over again and told him that
'the war was on.' Fritz only laughed,
whereupon our officer drew his gun
and shot the Saxon officer in the leg
and  the war was on.' "
goal for several seasons with the
Rossland, B.C., hockey team.
Orderly Sergeant Harold Clark, of
the 48th Battalion, scout division, Victoria, B.C., was wounded last April
and is now convalescing at Epsom,
the scene of many Derby days. His
photo speaks for itself. He looks a
fine fellow and we hope he will soon
be fit again.
Sergt. Leo Clark, now at Hawkins,
Kent, enlisted with the 5th Regiment
at Kamloops, B.C., and was at Val-
cartier and Salisbury plains. He spent
two winters in the trenches but was
wounded at Festubert on the 24th of
last May. He is now training engineers in trench work in England with
the 5th Brigade Field Engineering
staff.
Private Cecil Clark, another member of this splendid family, is somewhere in France with the Army Medical Corps, and letters received a
month ago gave good news of his
health.
Miss Ethel Clark, formerly teaching
PTE. H. S. CHESTON
1st Overseas Batt., Canadian Pioneers
Private Cheston, whose wife and
family live in Morrissey, B.C., was
born in Warwickshire, England. He
came to Canada in 1910. One of his
brothers has served in France and at
Salonika as a gunner in the Imperial
army. He is now on sick leave in
England. Our Private Cheston left
Morrissey on  the 20th  of last  May
107th   HEADQUARTERS
Creston is now the official headquarters of the 107th Kootenay Regiment,
the transfer from Fernie taking place
the fore part of the week. The old
provincial jail building on Fourth
street is being utilized as an armory.
Major Mallandaine, who is in command, has on staff Pay-Sergt. Crowe
and Corpl. Keddell, who is acting orderly. As the major's purisdiction
covers the territory between the Alberta boundary and Grand Forks it
will be seen that Creston has a fine
central location for the purpose.—
Creston Review.
Brockville, Ont., bachelors between
the ages of 21 and 60 will hereafter
be called upon to pay a poll tax annually of $5 into the town treasury
in order to comply with a by-law just
passed by the municipal council.
SIX WEEKS OF PEACE
As the following was a part of a
very humorous and entertaining
speech given by one of the guests at
the dinner party at the Waldorf hotel
September 21st, we take the liberty
of reproduccing it at this late date
from last week's Fernie Free Press:
"We were stationed in England, as
you know, for some months after
leaving Valcartier camp, and the horrible stories that reached us from
time to time of flooded trenches and
dug-outs at the front certainly sent
a chill over us when we were ordered
to France in February, 1915. You can
imagine my surprise when, upon being
sent to the trenches for the first time,
to find them beautifully lined with
brick, fine dry dug-outs furnished
with chairs, tables, and the walls decorated with pictures.
"I expressed my surprise to a sergeant who had been there for some
time and he laughingly asked me if I
anci nas been for some time training
at Shorneliffe, leaving for somewhere
in France only three weeks ago. His
younger brother died of heart disease
in Ambulances. For the benefit of
those who knew Private Cheston, and
he had many friends here, we give his
regimental number—490164—so that
letters which it is our duty to write
often to the brave men at the front
may be sure to reach him. TWO
THE   MORRISSEY   MENTION
OCTOBER 12, 1916
The Morrissey Mention
Official organ "E" and "H" Companies
107th E.K.R.
Head Office: Fernie, B.C.
Mentioner, Manager.
Private Randolph Stuart
Subscription  ONE  Dollar Per Year
Overseas, Six Shillings
U.S.A., 150 Cents
Subscribers      wishing      addresses
changed please notify Mention office.
P. 0. Box 830. Telephone 33
October  12, 1916
HIS NUMBER
We have the Devil's number. He is
not as black as he is painted. This
thought was brought home to us after
seeing some of the snapshots taken
of the children's sports last week at
Morrissey camp. He appeared in most
of them—indeed, he is ever present
however much we may avoid him.
Those who blame everything unpleasant on to him should read "The Sorrows of Satan" by Marie Correlli. He
paints every horrid thing rosy-hued,
but it is those who always lay the
blame on the Devil who are the very
devil themselves, doing the dirty work
in life. Leave him severely alone and
he will leave you alone, for he is a
gentleman if he is a devil. He hates
men and women who work, for "work
is worship" and he loathes worship.
He preaches idleness, putting-offness,
and lying around or about and others.
So work hard, smile and be happy
and you need not have even a bowing
acquaintance with him. He has no
use for those who use their privilege
of loving anything — birds, dogs,
horses and other people. He only
loves the inconsiderate and selfish,
the mean and the proud, especially
those who never do anything for
themselves or anyone else. Grouchers
and kickers are his closest pals—more
so than thieves and slayers. The most
of us have some time or other made
his diabolical acquaintance but it's not
wise to keep up the friendship (or
fiendship) too long as he might be
inconveniently hard to drop later. As
an artist he is almost supreme, being
able to lure with the lyre—spell it as
you may—to amuse w'th his music,
to fascinate the eye and heart with the
roseate tints he spreads with his
brush and pallett on the sordid canvas of "High Life" with a capital "L."
He is to be respected, but not to be
feared. If only we did our work as
well as he does his we would indeed
have nothing to fear. Take our humble advice—leave mad-vice alone and
treat Old Nick like the very devil, but
don't blame him for all that's wrong,
blame those inhumans who work for
him. We have his number—it's
skidoo—and shall be as pleased as he
is when his occupation is gone. It
rests with our race to secure his "discharge" and our "relief" from his
"guardianship, and in-sin-uating ex-
hilerations. We have it in our "Orders
to tell him to go to H—1. So let's be
good or we'll go too.
DIABOLISMS
Some angels are devils in disguise.
It's a long tail that has no devil
at the other end.
Keep your temper and the tempter
will keep away of himself.
Sunshine and fresh air are two of
the Old Gentleman's worst enemies—
and our best friends.
Be sorry for Satanic Serenity. Even
the meanest human has a chance to
do a good turn—if he wants to.
At least credit the devil with having
resisted the temptation to tempt you
oftener than he has.
Even the devil has his good points;
so many take their pointers from him.
Once more we have his number—23.
People are prone to suppose it
takes two horns, a tail, some hoofs
and a prong to make a devil. Too
many horns will do it alone.
Even a devil can be turned into an
angel.
To feel like the very devil is generally the result of a too close application of some form of his plausibility
and it won't harm-youosity.
An Eskimo can raise the Devil if
he will. In spite of all reports the
temperature of Hades is not so hot
that he catches cold by visiting either
pole. The equator makes him smile;
his work is so easy in a warm climate.
THE BOSTONIANS
It is not too much to say that the
Bostonians are a great deal better
than their advertisements say they
are. Young and beautiful, always
merry and bright, they please everyone they play to and can play to
everyone they please. It's a treat to
see them and hear them. Tonight,
Friday, and Saturday they are to be
viewed again. It's a real pleasure to
review them. Individually it is hard
to discriminate—all are good; some,
of course, are gooder than others. We
leave it to everyone to go and see
who is the goodest. At any rate,
Fernie has had a Bostonian feast for
a week and it should have swept all
the cobwebs, if any there be, far
away, to entertain these entertaining
youngsters in the City of Industry of
East Kootenay, not forgetting the
fact that miles of smiles resulted from
the frequent visits to the Grand theatre. Sunshine and smiles are a component part of the Bostonian Nights
Entertainments; pity we can't have
more of them. After leaving us the
Bevy of Beauties goes to Lethbridge
to lighten the Albertans of their
worries if they have any, which we
doubt, since crops are good and business brisk in up-to-date Lethbridge.
It's a long, long way to Lethbridge
and our pass does extend that far,
still—it's a long, long way.
Come to Fernie again, Bostonians!
Dn't miss the next performances of
the Misses Boston.
DELIGHTED TO PAY LICENCE
The Morrissey Mention had the
distinction of being mentioned by the
asemblage. Aid. Jackson desired to
know if the Morrissey Mention was
contributing to the city exchequer by
the payment of the traders' licence
and the records showed that the editor of the Mention was not a license
holder. It pointed out that there
were two weekly publications in the
city which were required to comply
with the city ordinance in this respect
and that there was no just reason why
the Mention should be permitted to
operate as an advertising medium
without license, thereby disriminat-
ing against the other publications.
The city clerk was instructed to communicate with the editor of the Mention, drawing his attention to the
omission and request prompt payment
of the license.—Fernie Free Press.
(Mention Ed.—We shall be delighted to have the privilege of contributing to the Fernie city exchequer or
anything else that will benefit Fernie,
B.C. The above was the first notice
we received.)
As we go to press we are in receipt
of copies of some grateful postcards
received by the secretary for British
Columbia of the society that provides
for parcels of food and clothing to be
sent to Canadian prisoners of war in
Germany. It is the intention of "E"
Co., 107th E.K.R., to subscribe to this
good cause and shortly we hope to announce the time and date of a meeting
to be held for the purpose of raising
funds to "adopt" several brave fellows in temporary captivity.
THE
CROW'S NEST TRADING COMPANY,
LIMITED
THE
STORE
OF
GOOD
VALUES
FERNIE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
P. BURNS & COMPANY, LIMITED
S hamrock
H ams
A re
M atchless
R esults
O f
C areful
K uring
Used By Those Who Know
FERNIE, B.G FERNIE, B.C.
Capital $100,000.00
Office and Warehouse
Baker Avenue
P. O. Drawer 436
Telephone 79
THE POLLOCK WINE COMPANY, LIMITED
WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS
FERNIE,   B.   C.
Canada
F. C. LAWE. A. I. FISHER
LAWE & FISHER
Barristers, Solicitors, Etc.
Offices: Imperial Bank Chambers
FERNIE, B.C.
Dr. H. S. SIMMONS
Dentist
Bank of Hamilton Block
FERNIE, B.C.
THE FAMILY HERALD
AND WEEKLY STAR
MONTREAL, QUEBEC
THE PALM
FRUITS AND CONFECTIONERY
FERNIE, B.C.
S. T, Saunders
SHOESHINE
Ingram Pool Room
Fernie, B.C.
ROYAL CANDY CO.
WE  MANUFACTURE   CANDY
Call in FERNIE B.C.
J. F. SPALDING
PHOTOGRAPHER
Fernie, B.C.
*-
ALL SOLDIERS WELCOME
FIRST CLASS CAFE
MRS. JENNINGS          :          :         PROPRIETRESS
FERNIE,   B.   C.	
THE CROW'S NEST PASS COAL CO., LTD.
PRODUCERS AND SHIPPERS OF S®®®®®®®®®®®®
GENUINE   "CROW'S   NEST"
®®®®®®®®®®®C0AL AND C0KE®®®®®®®®®®®
Dr. Hasell, for many years the presiding genius at the Provincial Royal
Jubilee hospital, Victoria, has resigned to take charge of a returned soldiers' hospital at Esquimalt, B.C. Dr.
and Mrs. Hasell were the recipients
of a magnificent bronze desk with
appurtenances from the staff and
nurses of the hospital.
The Bostonians have taken Fernie
by storm. The Grand theatre has
been filled to the last seat every night
this week and tonight they play "Tipperary Mary," a charmingly arranged
operatta which no one should miss.
Friday night the favorites are to be
seen in "The Rose of Honolulu" and
on Saturday a revue of the best
scenes of their repertoire of the
week.
BEST Coal
BEST Preparation
BEST Service
Mines at Coal Creek and Michel, B.C.
Coke Ovens at Fernie and Michel, B.C.
General Office ...... Fernie, B.C.
When in Fernie, Visit
The Northern Hotel
CAFE
Wm. Eschwig, Prop.       Fernie, B.C.
Use
BAPCO
Paint
J. D. QUAIL
General   Hardware   Merchant
Axes—All Kinds
FERNIE, B.C.
HARDMAN'S
for
ICE CREAM SOFT DRINKS
Telephone Office
Elko. B.C.
G, FALVO
Established April 1899.
Fernie, B.C.
W, A. INGRAM
Wholesale and Retail TOBACCONIST
BILLIARD ROOM
and LUNCH COUNTER
:OUR COFFEE IS GOOD:
>DOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOCO£
Wood Wood
CTfWlTC Heating       STOVES      Heating STOVES
Cook Cook
RANGES RANGES
Selling Out
Go to the Old Man
JILLINGSWORTH    -    -    -    FERNIE, B. C.
P. O. Box 141
SHOE  HOSPITAL. FERNIE,  B.C.
T. N. HIBBEN & CO.
Stationers •
VICTORIA, B.C.
KENNEDY & MANGAN
Lumber, Lath, Shingles, Sash & Doors
Office & Factory Opposite G.N. Depot
"BEAVER BOARD"
Fernie, B.C.
J. CARMICHAEL
High-Class Tailoring
Pressing and Cleaning.
FERNIE, B.C.
THE TIMBERMAN
Is   the   recognized   exponent  of  the
lumber industry of the Pacific
Northwest.
PORTLAND, ORE.
>>J October 12, 191c
THE   MORRISSEY   MENTION
THREE
THE HOME BANK
OF CANADA
James Mason,  General Manager.
lead Offce
Toronto
Branches and Connections
Throughout Canada
Fernie, B.C.
SUBSCRIPTION TO THE MENTION
NOW
ONE DOLLAR, ONE YEAR
ONE DOLLAR, ONE YEAR
ONE DOLLAR, ONE YEAR
ONE DOLLAR, ONE YEAR
ONE DOLLAR, ONE YEAR
7ELL DONE LAUNDRY
MRS. A. McCORMICK
Morrissey Camp
THE
IDUTHIE HARDWARE
COMPANY
FERNIE, B.C.
Read The
DAILY
SPOKESMAN-REVIEW
SPOKANE, WASH.
Sweeney & McConnell
Printers      Stationery
VICTORIA, B.C.
Go to
J. G. SAAD
For Dry Goods, Boots, Etc.
and Jewellery
(Near the C.P.R. Station)
Fernie, B.C.
Dr. JOHN BARBER
DENTIST
Office: Over Bleasdell's Drug
J.-F. Block.
EVENINGS    BY    APPOINTMENT
Telephone 121.   Fernie, B.C.
THE KINGS HOTEL
The   House   for the People
Wm. Mills, Prop. FERNIE, B.C.
When in Fernie, visit the stores
that advertise their goods in the Morrissey Mention.
A wonderful picture showing 18,-
000 people, 3,000 horses. This film cost
half a million of real money to produce. Don't fail to get seats for this
life, 'rama at the Grand Theatre, Fernie,-'B.C. Aspecial orchestra accompanies this film.
FERNIE, B.C.
OCTOBER 30th
DANCE
IN AID OF THE RED CROSS
Under the Auspices of the Newgate
and  District Farmers'  Institute
Thursday, October 19th, 1916
at 8 p.m.
KITCHENER HALL,  NEWGATE
Lunch Served Tickets $1.00
CAMP NOTES
Football is on the wane. The last
game played in Morrissey camp resulted in a victory for the Lions over
the Eagles by five goals to none.
Members of the former C. A. S. C.
mess after a week at the barracks,
are rapidly getting too inflated for
their uniforms.
Corpl. Oughton, C.A.M.C, took a
patient to Fernie on Thanksgiving
day for a slight operation. Not a very
jovial visit to pay on Thanksgiving
day.    The patient is doing well.
Capt. S. C. Norsworthy, manager,
Bank of Montreal, Mexico City, who
enlisted in the 42nd Highlanders to
avenge his brother, Major Norsworthy, killed in action, is reported
wounded in both legs.
Sergt. Armstrong writes from England where he has been recovering
from wounds, that he is leaving for
Canada about the end of the month
to accept a commission in a battalion
at Digby, N.S. Sergt. Armstrong had
been in touch with Major R. J. Black
in London. He says "Bert" is very
anxious  to  get  to  the  front.
Mr. D. McNeish, government superintendent of roads, has received a
letter from Private McKay, 447742,
from the territory of trenches, France.
He says the weather is perfect, the
crops wonderfully good and the whole
country beautiful. They are in a fine
farming district. He met P. Kennedy the other day with the Engineers, who was at that time in the best
of good health and spirits.
It is mentioned in Morrissey: j Kootenay's Mail Order Hou.tt
MISS INA MITCHELL
With the Famous Bostonians at
the Grand Theatre this week.
Miss Ina Mitchell, the pretty prima
donna of the Bostonians, is a daughter
of Manitoba, being born in Winnipeg,
a Canadian of Canadians. She has
been with the Bostonians for some
years, the years with them and without them are not very many. Her impressions of Fernie are really worth
repeating: "I like the town and the
people," she said, "and I do hope they
like men. The audiences have been
so appreciative. My father was with
the 102nd Regiment at Bonnington
Falls and is now off to the front. My
brother is a private and went to
France with the first contingent. He
is now on his way home after sixteen
months in the trenches. I expect he
has landed at Quebec by this time.
My uncle Charlie is a lieutenant with
the Canadian Electrical Engineers
now in England. He enlisted at Vancouver.   I am sorry to leave Fernie."
THEDA BARA
At the Isis Theatre Next Monday and
Tuesday
HOEING
Last year I was hoeing,
Hoeing mangel-wurzels,
Hoeing mangel-wurzels all day in
the sun,
Hoeing for the squire
Down in Gloucestershire
Willy-nilly till the sweaty job was
done.
Now I'm in the wurzels,
In the mangel-wurzels,
All day in the wurzels 'neath the
Belgian •sun.
But among their little lot
It's a different job I've got—
For you don't hoe mangel-wurzels
with a gun.
—W. W. Gibson in The Province.
That Bugler Edwards  is  better.
That Hazel Hart has a lovely voice.
That Patsie Henry is a born comedienne in the top row.
That all the young Bostonians are
to be congratulated.
That we have a lot to say about
the patriotic fund next week.
That we have lost our printer's
devil.    Willy has gone.
That a wire received in town says
the 225th are pippin picking.
That G. Falvo, Fernie, makes oid
boots new.
That Sergt. F. Turner has returned
from a visit to his home.
That Dr. W. W. Lailey will open a
new hospital in Fernie in November.
That in life as on parade the devil
takes the hindermost. Quick march.
Double.
That Charlie Bennett, the fine tenor
with the Bostonians, loves the girls.
He said so and we don't blame him.
That an Australian in Morrissey
says there are more at home like the
Bostonians! Well, Australia's some
country!
That the public meeting was most
pratriotic and instructive. Sir Herbert and Mr. Nation are doing great
and noble work.
That either the lamps have become
degenerate or the oil distillate. At
any rate, there is no light that does
not fail.
That as soon as Sir Herbert Ames
spoke on the war at Victoria hall last
Monday night a number of eligibles
got up to go out.
That Mr. and Mrs. Harry Whalley,
Miss Bertha Whalley, Mr. R. D. Win-
stanley and Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, of
Fernie, spent the week end in Morrissey.
That if all U.S.A. naval lieutenants
look as nice in their uniforms as the
one in the "Isle of Dreams" there
would soon be not a single one left.
That the Dominion Patriotic fund
needs no better champions than Sir
Herbert Ames and Mr. Fred Nation.
The patriotic fund aims at relieving
any possible distress coming to those
wage earners who are battling for
the nation.
CAPT. HARRY A. SIMMONS
C. A. D. C.
An only son of Dr. H. S. Simmons,
of Fernie, B.C., Capt. Harry A. Simmons, of the Canadian Army Dental
Corps, is now at Bramshott, England.
He left Victoria as a lieutenant last
April and has since been promoted.
He was born at Fredericton, New
Brunswick, and as a boy went to
school in Greenwood, where his father
was practising dentistry for some
years. After leaving Greenwood, Capt.
Simmons attended high school in Vancouver and in 1911 graduated from
Toronto University, practising in the
terminal city until war was declared.
When asked by the Mentioner what
he intended to do with his practise,
he said: "I've just turned the key in
the door and walked out; when I get
back I'll just give the key another
turn and walk in again."
ORPHEUM  THEATRE
Charlie Chaplin Here Next Week
FERNIE, B.C.
ARTWAH
The TRITES-WOOD CO.,
STORES AT:—
Ftrnic,   Michel,   Coal   Creek,   Natal
FERNIE GARAGE
Call in.
Agent
FORD CARS
Repairs a Specialty
P. Bean, Prop.
Phone 158. FERNIE, B.C.
F. BEAN
Plumber  and Steam  Fitter
Furnace and Stove Repairs
Phone 135 Fernie, B.C.
FORDFORDFORDFORDFORDFORD
^^kmrnK^Mt
FORDFORDFORDFORDFORDFORD
A. C. LIPHARDT
JEWELLER
Watch Repairing
Special Order Work
FERNIE, B.C.
Wm. Barton
Agent
Singer    Sewing    Machines—
Victrolas and Records
FERNIE, B.C.
FERNIE  HOSPITAL
Cor. Pellatt and McEvoy
Telephone 13. Fernie, B.C.
HOTEL   FERNIE
First Class Accomodation
S. F. WALLACE     - Prop.
Wallace Cigar Store
Choice Tobaccos
Billiards Barbershop
FERNIE, B.C.
R. G. McEWAN
MEAT PIES
MEAT PIES
MEAT PIES
Call in. Next door to Free Press office
FERNIE, B.C.
FERNIE IRON WORKS
THE
FERNIE-F0RT STEELE
BREWING CO., LTD.
J. BEAN
Proprietor
High-Grade Bottled and
Draught Beer
Aerated Waters
FERNIE, B.C.
N. E. SUDDABY
Drugs,  Books, Kodaks, Films,
Fishing Tackle, Edison Phonographs
THE REXALL STORE
Fernie, B.C..
M. A. BERIGAN
BLACKSMITH
Horseshoer
Fernie, B.C.
S H U - S H I
For   Soldiers
HARGREAVES CANADA LIMITED
Toronto,  Ont.
READ
THE K00TENAIAN
KASLO, B. C.
GRAND THEATRE
Fernie, B. C.
"The Coquette"
OCTOBER 18th and 19th
CHARLIE CHAPLIN
"The Champion"
'Road of Many Turnings"
OCTOBER 16th and 17th
D. G, HARVIE
Tailor
DOES  GOOD  HANDIWORK
Fernie, B.C.
Premier House
ROOMS
15 Pellatt Ave., FERNIE
H. A. WILKES      -     -     -      Prop.
Fernie
KEFOURY BROS.
Dry  Goods,  Clothing
FERNIE, B.C.
McLEAN'S
DRUG and BOOK STORE
Fernie, B.C.
Telephone 142.
P. O. Box 1174
THE 41 MEAT MARKET
Fernie, B.C.
While You Live in the
PROVINCE
Read the "Daily Province"
Vancouver, B.C.
A. Dragon
Cigars — Barber   Shop — Pool   Room
OPPOSITE THE ISIS THEATRE
FERNIE, B.C.
Stay at the
STRATHCONA
HOTEL
SIX STORIES OF SOLID
CONCRETE
Victoria, B. C. FOUR
GRAND THEATRE
B. E. Lang Presents
THE FAMOUS BOSTONIANS
In The Latest Of Musical Comedies
16—SINGING AND DANCING FUN MAKERS—16
Wednesday Eve—"The Girl In The Shrine"
Thursday Eve—"Tipperary Mary"
Friday  Eve and Saturday  Matinee—"The Rose of  Honolulu"
Saturday Eve—Big Revue Night
Saturday, School Children's Matinee
PRICES 50c and 25c. Seats on sale at Suddaby's Drug Store
THE   MORRISSEY   MENTION
59=
OCTOBER 12,  191
Notary Public
Townsite Agent for Hosmer, B. C.
P. 0. Box 887
Telephone No. 73
G. G. MOFFATT
INSURANCE AND REAL ESTATE
FERNIE, B. C.
—Agent for—
PHOENIX  ASSURANCE  CO OF  LONDON  ENGLAND
LIVERPOOL, LONDON AND GLOBE
GUARDIAN ASSURANCE CO.
LONDON AND LANCASHIRE FIRE INSURANCE CO.
COMMERCIAL  UNION ASSURANCE CO., London  England
NORWICH FIRE INSURANCE  SOCIETY
Dr.W. W. Lailey, B.A., M.D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
(Bank of Hamilton Building)
Office hours. 10:30 to 12:00 a.m.
2:00 to    4:00 p.m.
7:30 to    8:30 p.m.
Phones: Residence 144; Office 46.
A. T. HAMILTON
Sole Agent for
TORRID   ZONE   STEEL
BRICK   LINED
FURNACES
Fernie
B. C.
W. F. Muirhead & Co.
EXCLUSIVE   SHOE   STORE
Established  10  Years
Rubbers of Every Description.
FERNIE, B.C.
CENTRAL HOTEL
Dominic Citra     ...   Proprietor
Fernie, B.C.
MRS. E. TODD
The Exclusive Ladies' Store
Fernie, B.C.
HOLLY MASON & CO.
All Kinds of Hardware
SPOKANE, WASH.
LADIES
When   In   Fernie,   go   to
MRS. COLTON
Eor HATS
A. E. FERGUSON
FOR BRICK-LINED HEATERS
Phone 153 Day or Night
Fernie, B.C.
A   "Province"   Liner   Pays
William's Drug Store
Cor.   Fort  and  Government
Mail Orders Promptly Filled
VICTORIA,  B.C.
Services Every Sunday
Christ Church
Matins 11 a.m.      Evensong 7:30 p.m.
Rev. A. B. Lane       -       -       Rector
FERNIE, B.C.
Methodist Church Services
11 a.m. Sunday 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening, prayers
D. M. Perley, B.A.      -     -     Pastor
FERNIE, B.C.
Knox Church
Rev. D. T. McClintock
Sunday: 11 a.m. 7:30 p.m.
FERNIE, BC.
Salvation Army Citadel
(Cox St.)
L. Cox, Captain.
Sunday Services: 11 a.m., 3 p.m. and
7.30 p.m.
Every week day: 8 p.m.
OLIVET BAPTIST CHURCH
Fernie, B.C.
Services  on  Sunday:—
Song Service at 7:30 p.m.
IT IS MENTIONED
That Pte. John Reid is getting well
again.
That J.P.'s Weekly is about to take
a rest.
That the babies' chorus was extreme.
That Greenwood will not have a
fall fair this year.
That the two dancers from Honolulu
were graceful and delightfeet.
That the Grand theatre would do
well to have programs of all shows.
That Doris Canfield could sing a
coon song to perfection; why not give
her one.
That the S.M.'s driving to Waldo"
was magnific and terrificent and passed B.Leaf.
That one of the C.A.S.C. rigs took
Jack and his belongings to the train
for Nelson.
That the little lady who sang "Baby
Shoes" and "Memories" gave pleasure
to a great many people.
That Governor Hill, of Ceylon, lives
on an Eyeland and uses her I sles to
see Lon and to good purpose.
That a Wildman took after the
wildmen. He had three arms, they
none; that's what made them wild.
That there's an Iroma Ina bunch of
Canadian and American beauties
There will "be still' an Iroma next
year, we hope.
'H'
CO'Y, 107th E. K. R.
Bonnington Falls
Two stalwart members of "H" Co.
went a-trolling in the lake and caught
a monster.   The proverbial sea
serpent is no longer "it." It was too
big to lift out of the water, so it was
left there. The bottom of the lake is
still there, too.
Oh dit—"H" representatives at
Trail have blazed a Trail for themselves and have cut out all the eligible
bachelors of the smelter city. What
will their wives say? This is a knock,
but "every knock is a boost." More
power to them. If they need any
more power they can get it from
Bonnington Falls. The electric company can spare some H.P. to "H"
Company—and then not run short.
Lieut. Fred W. McLaine gave a
farewell dinner to some of his many
friends in Greenwood before leaving
for Bonnington Falls. The old mayor
of Greenwood is one of the best
horsemen in B.C. and rides lot? of
other hobbies, too. The once upon a
time amateur dramatic society of
Greenwood will never be a thing of
beauty and joy for ever again. He
was stage manager and one of the
leading stars, and has even been the
Mentioner's fond parent on several
occasions, although many years his
junior. This is a compliment and a
complement to the above. Sergt.
Stuart Tees, recently reported killed
in action, was also a member of the
G.A.D.C. which boasted ten active and
acting members. The rest are scattered from here to Flanders, and all
but one in khaki. The ladies are
nursing.
At Bonnington Falls the Kootenay
river is still falling over the falls this
fall.
They say the C.A.S.C. corporal has
gone to the coast today but left his
lleart in Wellon and taken one in exchange wifh-apm. At making captures
"H" Company} is second to none save
"E" Compan/ alone.
As it iOTOO cold to bathe in the
lake at Nelson, "H" Co. will—no, we
won't repeat it—it's increditable.   But
there will be a spring clean-up.
FERNIE FACTS
It is impossible to buy wood in the
city at present. Cheap labor is very
scarce and the contractors are having
their hands full to obtain men.
Mr. Lome Campbell was in town
last week on business in connection
with mining interests at McGillivray.
The Patriotic dance Monday evening was a huge success and the Fernie world and his wife were there.
12,000 FEET OF
SUPERB PICTURES
D. W. Griffith's "The Birth of a
Nation" is decidedly the most remarkable historical spectacle ever presented in America. It will be seen at the
Grand theatre Monday, October 30th.
Petersburg, Atlanta, Appomattox
and Ford's theatre, the foothills of
South Carolina and the wild rides of
the Ku Klux Klan live again in Mr.
Griffith's 12,000 feet of superb motion
pictures, which took eight months to
produce, cost $500,000, employed 18,-
300 people and 3,000 horses. The great
spectacle is an epitome of scenes, incidents, characters, passions and emotions of the whole great period from
1861 to 1870—the period occupied by
the civil war and reconstruction.
Suggested by Thomas Dixon's "The
Clansman" and "The Leopard's Spots
it has great epical quality of its own,
which stamps it as a masterpiece of
genius.
The enormous popularity achieved
by it in New York, Boston, Chicago,
San Francisco, Los Angeles, Toronto
and Montreal has been repeated in all
the towns of the route, and the prospects are that it will crowd the local
theatre at every performance.
MENTIONISMS
Sonie people are so objectionable
they are unmentionable.
Misjudge not that ye be not misjudged.
Cast your lies upon the waters and
they will surely return to you after
many days.
Thanksgiving day passed without
any casualties except Turkey. Turkey's death rate was 'high" and
Greece was in evidence.
After looking at the hotel register
we have come to the conclusion that
you cannot write with beer inside
you.
BARBER SHOP
LAUNDRY
BIG BUILDING
Morrissey Camp
Shaving—5 cents j
Hair cut—15 cents
Saturday, Shaving only. |
No. 237
War  Souvenirs  Carved
Big Building
No. 197
Carved Swagger Sticks
No. 189
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MENTION THIS PAPER TO YOUR
FRIENDS. MAYHAP THEY WILL
BECOME OUR FRIENDS, ANEJ
YOU WILL BE A GOOD FRIEND
TO THE MORRISSEY MENTION
WHO WILL BE A GOOD FRIENI
TO  YOU.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Fernie Branch
P. B. FOWLER      -      -     Manager]
LOCK & HAWTHORNE I
Painters Decorators
FERNIE, B.C.
Holy Family Church      j
FERNIE, B.C.
Sunday Services:
First Mass 8:30 a.m.
Second Mass 10:30 a.m.
Baptisms  1:00 p.m.
Sunday School 2:15 p.m.
Benediction of the Blessed
Sacrament 3:00 p.m.
REV.   FATHER   MICHELS,   O.M.I.
All windows must be left open a
few inches in the men's barracks to
air the rooms every morning.
By order,
DR. CORSAN, M.O.,
107th E. K. R.
Don't meet troubles half way. If
it's coming to you, it will come soon
enough.
The early bird may get the worm,
but the  late corporal catches—well,
you know!
Lieut. J. Lewis of the 225th R.M.R.,
Mrs. and the Misses Lewis, of Vernon camp, were recent visitors to
Morrissey.
BY-PRODUCTS
MISS INA MITCHELL AND MR. CHARLES BENNETT
The new Liberal government should
immediately go into the question of
establishing an experimental plant
for by-product coke ovens. The Crow's
Nest Pass Coal company has been
considering the proposition for some
time and we believe if the government
would co-operate in the matter, it
would not be long before we would
have one of the greatest industries in
the west. The local board of trade
and the city council should also wake
up and take a live interest in this
question.—Fernie Free Press.

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