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The Morrissey Mention Nov 2, 1916

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Array The Morrissey Mention
OFFICIAL ORGAN "E" AND  "H"  COMPANIES 107th EAST KOOTENAY REGIMENT.
Number Thirteen.
FERNIE, B.C., NOVEMBER 2, 1916.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
FOR RELIEF OF CAN-
'ADIAN PRISONERS OF
WAR IN GERMANY
The committee in charge of the collections for the above fund have been
working hard since the meeting held
in Morrissey camp last week. Sergeants Carter, Minton and Ross have
already secured the following
amounts, to be paid monthly. "E"
Co., 107th E.K.R. has certainly every
right to be grateful for the privilege
of being able to contribute a little to
relieve the suffering of our brothers
in their confinement in German prison
camps. There are still other monthly
donations to be received which will be
published next week. The list is open
to any and all who wish to contribute
and is in no wise confined to members
of this company or to the 107th Regiment. It is hoped that many others
may join us in doing what is but our
duty.
Abbott, Lieut.  R. Dunbar and
Mrs    5.00
Black, Sergt. Chas 50
Brackley, Corpl. H.
.50
Boardman, Sr., Pte. R     1.00
Burns, Pte. W. V 50
Minton, C.S.M. John   $1.50
Lambkin, Q.M.S. W. L     5.00
Carter, O.R.S. Harry     1.50
Hamilton, Sergt.-Cook Robert 50
Ross, Sergt. W     1.50
Minton, Sergt. C. J     1.00
Harrison, Corpl. H 50
.      .50
.50
.50
.50
.50
1.00
.50
1.00
.50
.40
.50
1.00
.50
1.00
.50
1.00
1.00
1.00
.50
.50
.50
.50
1.00
1.00
1.00
1.00
2.00
.50
.50
.50
1.00
.75
.50
1.00
1.00
.50
.50
.50
1.00
1.00
.50
10.00
.50
2.50
2.00
1.00
.50
5.00
.50
1.00
!50
.50
.50
1.00
.50
1.00
.50
McPherson, Corpl. W	
Edwards, Bugler W	
Beaubris, Pte	
Black, Bugler Harold 	
Cooper, Bugler G	
Cooper, Lce.-Corpl. John 	
Clarkstone, Pte. W	
Critch, Pte. John	
Corrigan, Pte. G. W	
Coffey, Pte. N	
Connors, Sr., Pte. T	
Donaldson, Pte. R. A	
Grocott, Pte. Harry 	
Crofton, Pte. C. M	
Clark, Pte. W. G	
Green, Pte. Joe 	
Henthorne, Pte. H. G	
Hartwell, Pte. W	
Hollingshead, Pte. E	
Hope, Pte. John 	
Jenkinson, Pte	
Jones, Pte. Harold 	
James, Pte. H	
Killey, Pte. J	
King, Pte. Geo	
King, Pte. Chas 	
LaFortune, Pte. F	
Lawrence, Pte. J	
Lyon, Pte. S	
Lyas, Pte. J	
Lamont, Pte. Robert 	
Lane, Sergt. E. H	
Meek, Lce.-Corpl. James 	
McNiven, Pte. P	
Mcintosh, Pte. J	
McDougall, Pte. Dan 	
McDonald, Pte. G	
Phillips, Pte. D. T	
Parent, Pte. L	
Perry, Pte. J. D	
Reid, Pte. J. R	
Shaw, Major C. JE., and Mrs	
Small, Lce.-Corpl. James 	
Stuart, Pte. R	
Smith, Pte. Lew 	
Saunders, Corpl. Chas	
Tipper, Jr., Pte. W	
Taylor, Pte. Geo	
;Warr,en, Pte. Ed	
Wainwright, Pte. J. M	
Wilson, Pte. Geo ...~
PUTTING OM TR    SCREW.
1 ,-.
—Syracuse Journal.
DISTRICT ORDERS
Sergeant J. A. Little, 102nd Regiment, is atttached to No. 6 Station,
R.C.R., for pay, rations, and discipline, while employed on instructional
duty at the Royal School of Infantry,
Esquimalt, with effect from the 17th
October, 1916.
107th East Kootenay Regiment—
To be Captain, Lieut. H. E. Barnes,
vice provisional Captain G. F. Stalker, who is retired.    25th Aug. 1916.
To be Major—Lieutenant (supernumary), C. JE. Shaw, 50th Regiment,
whilst in charge of internment camp,
Morrissey B.C.    1st August, 1916.
Lieut. J. S. Harvey, 50th Regiment,
is granted the temporary rank of
Major, whilst in command of "J"
Unit, Military Hospitals Commission
Command.    1st September,  1916.
Lieut,   (temporary  Captain)   A.  E.
Craddock, 5th (B.C.) Regiment, C. G.
A., continues to hold the temporary
rank of captain conferred upon him
by General Order 22, 1916, whilst performing the duties of paymaster "J"
Unit, Military Hospitals Commission
Command.    2nd. September, 1916.
FRED W. L. MOORE, Major,
A.A.G., i|c Administration,
M.D. No. 11.
CAPT. ADAIR CARSS
IS KILLED IN  ACTION
DAILY ORDERS
Taken  on the strength—
No. 248, Pte. Smith, Lew.
No. 249, Pte. Hope, John.
No. 250, Pte. Crofton, C. M.
Taken off the strength—
No. 59, Pte. Goole, G.
No. 65, Lce.-Corpl. Joinson, J.
No. 222,Pte. Gregory, J.
C. JE. SHAW, Major,
O.C. "E" Co., 107th E.K.R.,
Death of Well Known Officer Follows
Closely That of His Fiancee, the
Late  Miss Cecelia  Green
Victoria, B.C.—News has been received of the death in action of Capt,
Adair Carss, of the 102nd battalion,
Capt. Carss was well known in this
city, where his family had lived for
many years.
It is a touching coincidence that the
deaths of Capt. Carss and of Miss
Cecelia Green, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. R. F. Green, M.P., who had been
engaged for some time, took place
within a few days of each other,
neither being aware of the passing of
the other.
J. H. Austin, aged 44, a prominent
Victoria lawyer, has been killed in
action in France.
HARLES E. HUGHES
Republican Presidential Candidate hns «t >ted that "He did
""f want th support of anyone who ' any interest su-
,,..;0„ t    n, .   0f the TTnited
>' Q "•' >ld not instant-
••''•<•:>•        Ihe right of in-
yf of   •   , riea against any
"iuntry    '        er, who wants
immunity p  • foreign aggres-
[•>n or i mild have the power
if this nation held captive to
iny    foreign     influence     or
swerved   by   alien   machinations."
PRIVATE  W.   A.   BLEASDELL
of the 148th Battalion, C.E.F., a well
known Montreal regiment, who has
left for England recently, is a son of
A. W. Bleasdell, a prominent druggist
of Fernie, B.C. Private Bleasdell has
a host of friends in Fernie who will
be glad to hear he is well.
WUB
The Western Universities Battalion,
196th, C. E. F., has issued the first
number of its regimental paper,
"WUB," a splendidly edited and
printed periodical, published by permission of the camp commandant,
Camp Hughes. It is a credit to the
battalion and should be a most pupu-
lar reminder of a great regiment.
Everyone in British Columbia who
has any relative or friend in the 196th
should at once subscribe to this effort
of a student regiment. The Mention
wishes it every success, and compliments the Winnipeg Saturday Post,
who are responsible for the good appearance of the Wub.
BRITISH PRISONERS
OF WAR IN GERMANY
HOW TO  HELP  THEM
You would like to do something but
can afford so little. Remember
"Every mickle makes a muckle." If
you are willing to take trouble you
can still do your bit. There are
three ways.
1. Give ten cents a week yourself
and collect the same from nine other
people. This forms a "circle" and
provides for one prisoner. Your dollar will send him every week a parcel
of good substantial food.
2. If ten cents a week is too much,
try for a semi-circle made up of ten
five-cent pieces, or a full "circle" of
twenty five-cent pieces.
3. If this is still too much, collect
twenty-five cents a week in pennies,
and this will provide a good loaf of
bread sent straight from Switzerland,
and a loaf is a pretty good present to
send to a hungry prisoner.
WHICH OF THESE THREE
WAYS WILL YOU CHOOSE?
Why is it better to send the money
for the purchase of parcels by the
Canadian Red Cross is London rather
than to send parcels from British Columbia?
Because it is imperative that we
keep our men supplied with food, and
in case of the parcels not reaching
their destination, private individuals
have no redress, whereas the Red
Cross can refer complaints to the
American Embassy in Berlin for an
investigation. Also the Germans are
moving the prisoners constantly from
camp to camp, and the notification
from the prisoner of this change of
address reaches England at least two
weeks sooner than it could reach British Columbia. It is essential that a
regular supply of food be sent to each
prisoner, so the committee recommends that private parcels be sent
only as extras to supplement, not to
supercede, what is being sent by the
Canadian Red Cross.
Parcels of food sent to prisoners:
1 tin of corned beef, 1 tin of assorted
biscuits, 1 tin of ccfee au lait, 1 tin
of dripping, 1 tin of Golden syrup, 1
tin of fruit in syrup, 2 tins of fish
pastes, 4 meat soup cubes.
Parcel No. Two—1 tin of pork and
beans, 1 tin of fruit and cherry cake,
1 tin of mackerel in oil, 1 tin of mar-
gerine, 1 tin of jam, 1 box of biscuits,
sugar and milk.
These boxes are varied every fortnight, but these are two pretty good
samples.
THIRTIETH ANNIVERSARY
CONGRESS
AT THE WALDORF HOTEL
THIS   WEEK
Wray, Pte. L	
Williams, Pte. R   ...
Williamson, Pte. C. .
Williams, Pte. J. ...
Webb, Pte. Patrick
Young, Pte. W	
"Sweet    maid    (experienced)
restaurant"—Scottish  paper,
hope  she  knows her  Kingsley-
good, sweet maid.")
for
(We
"Be
Wm. Wood, Elko, B.C.
H. H. Lair, La Crosse, Wash.
F. A. Russell, La Crosse, Wash.
H. Barr, Wasa, B.C.
W. M. Frost, Sppkane.
Geo. H. Wiseman, conductor, and
members of "Birth of a Nation" Symphony Orchestra.
F. A. Heise, Cranbrook, B.C.
W. F. Foley, Cranbrook, B.C.
M. Bydoc, Cranbrook, B.C.
SERGEANT  ROBERT CROWE,
Regimental   Paymaster   107th   East
Kootenay Regiment.
Sergt. Crowe has his headquarters
at Creston, B.C., the regimental headquarters, and at Morrissey camp,
where he has spent most of this year.
He is very popular and perhaps the
best all-around fisherman and sport
in the camp.
When kings fall out, whole hosts of
humbler humanity have .to help make
the holocaust!
Mr. Lloyd George, after distributing prizes at a school, said he hoped
the children would have a good record
when he came again. Thereupon they
rose and with tulips said, "Same to
you, sir!"
Capt. Cox, of the Salvation Army,
Fernie, B.C., leaves on Nov. 6th to
attend the thirtieth anniversary congress of the Salvation Army, to be
held at Winnipeg November 10th,
11th, 12th and 13th.
The congress will be conducted by
the Chief of the Staff, Commissioner
Howard, who is second in command
of the Salvation Army throughout
the world. The Chief of the Staff
will lecture on "How Goes the Army."
His Honor, Sir James Atkins, Lieut.-
Governor, will preside, supported by
many leading citizens.
Commissioner Howard, assisted by
Commissioners Sowton, Lamb and a
number of other officers will also visit
Regina Nov. 14th and Calgary Nov.
15th, where His Honor, Robert Brett,
Lieut-Governor of Alberta, will preside at the meeting.
THE REBEKAHS, DANCE
Nothing costs a nation so much as
its liberty. ,j
Lieut. Fredk. W. McLaine, 107th E.
K. R., reported for duty at Morrissey
camp on Tuesday evening. Lieut.
McLaine has been a resident of Midway and Greenwood, B.C., for many
years, coming to the Boundary district in 1895.
There was a sound of revelry by
night. The Rebekahs' dance given
last Wednesday, October 25th, testified to the wonderful popularity of
the ladies' order, for there was a
goodly attendance. The supper proved
that orders has been given by the
ladies with a supreme liberality. As
for the music, it was excellent—Allen's orchestra; but how could it be
otherwise when the players were surrounded by belles—fair and brunette
—ringing changes on the peals of
merriment and  merry  men.
The Rebekah ball is an annual
event; one of those events that eventually will have to be repeated. The
dancing broke up at break of day;
and Cupid, as usual one of the most
welcome guests, got in some of his
deadly work—or is it life-saving
work ?
One guest, whose name is to be
obliterated pro. tern., found considerable difficulty in getting out of a huge
brass trombonelike instrument—after
supper. The supper was in keeping
with the rest of the evening—superb.
Why stir up the mud until you are
ready to use the scraper.
A cynic is a person who sneers at
life after life has sneered at him. TWO
H ""m*M    THE   MORRISSEY   MENTION
NOVEMBER 2,  1916.
The Morrissey Mention
Official organ "E" and "H" Companies
107th E.K.R.
Head Office: Fernie, B.C.
Mentioner, Manager.
Private Randolph Stuart
Subscription ONE  Dollar Per Year
Overseas, Six Shillings
U.S.A., 150 Cents
(OR 15 YEARS FOR A TEN SPOT)
Subscribers     wishing      addresses
changed please notify Mention office.
P. 0. Box 830. Telephone 33
November 2, 1916.
MEMORIES
The saddest things and the happiest things in our life are our memories. How grateful we should be for
that peculiar faculty of mind which
allows us to remember—and forget.
Not only are the happy episodes of
existence to be remembered, let us
not forget at least some of the sadder
experiences, if only to remember to
profit by them to our advantage and
the advantage of those we come in
daily contact with. Life without memory would mean a world without history. History is memory inscribed.
Fiction is history as we would have
had it be; so we are indebted to the
memories of the past for the present
and our hopes of the future. How
bald would Society (with a capital S)
be without memory. For gossips could
not exist without memories—elastic
memories—and without gossips where
would Society be? Memory enables
us to labor under the continuous illusion that there has been a present
that is now a past, when really there
is only a present. Worry and anxiety
is fear of the future which is a shuddering recollection of what has happened more often than not to someone else. Memory is the brain's cold
storage of useful and useless facts—
"Is that a fac'?" Later they become
subject to correction or alteration or
are proved not to be facts at all and
they have to make room for other
facts which take their place, and we
remember what mayhap we had forgotten, that our memories often make
cowards of us all. Keep sweet memories of that which is sweet and forget the memories that are not sweet.
ALADDIN
AND HIS WONDERFUL LAMP
'THE BIRTH
OF A NATION"
Most people who go to the movies
expect a few reels, a pilmo player, a
violin or two, something amusing,
something pathetic, and all for two
bits—or less. They are prepared to
pay a larger price for a comedy, a
farce, musicale or a limb exhibit. But
Fernie on Monday was visited by
something vastly superior—an historical life drama, accompanied by
the supremest symphony orchestra—
a double attraction, either of which
was well worth the rather higher
raised price of admission. The pictures themselves would indeed be hard
to better. 30,000 people taking part,
3,000 horses, battle scenes so realistic that one really expects to face a
casualty list published the next morning, love episodes that defy any criticism, a touch of humor at times, and
many a touch of pathos, and all the
while a constant stream of harmonious melody cultured and synchromatie
under the splendid leadership of Mr.
George H. Wiseman, a conductor of
great sympathy and feeling.
The story itself is so old, so true,
so well chosen, the psychology so correct, that it must and does appeal to
the studious and observant mind,
while the music of the orchestra
makes the scenes portrayed more
easily absorbed and more lastingly
impressive. EVERYONE EVERYWHERE SHOUL SEE "THE BIRTH
OF A NATION." The only reason
some Fernieites missed it was because the Grand theatre would not
hold any more; it was filled to the
brim
No more picturesque, charming performance has visited Fernie in recent
months than F. Stuart-Whyte's perfect production, "Aladdin." Delightful ditties, truly tuneful topical lyrics,
superior scenery, Madame Celestine
costumes with abbreviated continuities, excellent extremities, and last
but not by any means least an aggregation of sweetly pretty faces, together with the most droll and delicious humor—a pot-pouri of everything that is good and wholesomely
instructive and entertainingly pleasing.
Mr. Stuart-Whyte is to be congratulated. Had Fernie possessed a
larger opera house it would still have
been filled and we should have seen
another scenic display which the limited stage space precluded from production. Out of an evening of such
unqualified enjoyment it is hard to
choose what was especially and singularly any better than the rest of the
program, but the sweetly-rendered
duet by Miss Zara Clinton (Aladdin)
and Miss Beatrice Carmen (Princess
So-Shi) was one to be long remembered. The young lady who played
the violin rhapsody captured the
hearts of the already-captivated audience. Mr. J. V. Barrett-Lennard,
as Abanazar, the "mad magician from
the west" (there are many others in
the west), surpassed himself and is
an extremist in delirious merry magic
antics. He almost managed to take
Aladdin's lamp but at least he took
the cake. The Widow Twankey,
Aladdin's mother, played by Mr. Harry Hoyland, was certainly attractive
enough for any emperor to marry. He
is an artist of the first class; so is
our old friend, Mr. Billy Oswald, who
was the part to a "Tee hee" of Gen.
Sam Fuse; and right here we refuse
to say what we would like to say, except that the general and the widow
are some pair to draw to. Is that a
fac'?    It is.
If the Mentioner ever gets hold of
that wonderful lamp it will be used
to "wish" the Aladidn company back
again and that the slaves of the lamp
and ring accompany the "wishing"
light-giver.
IS THAT A FAC ? ? ?
That the Grand theatre, Fernie, was
filled to the roof when "Aladdin, Jr."
played here last Thursday evening?
That only a thin man could have
found breathing room at the Grand
theatre last Monday night, when "The
Birth of a Nation" pictures and symphony orchestra ehai-med a vast audience ?
That the little lady who lost her
father's wages "down a big, black
hole" hollered remuneratively?
That many envied General Fuse's
multitudinous mallingerings about
Widow Twankey's blind porker?
That "He's awa'. Puir Sandy Mc-
Whappel! Aie! It's his last bite.
You can see the ham and egg stickin'
on the edge o't. Puir Sandy, he used
to men' my bits. Aie, he's deid; he's
gane; he's awa'.    Aie! Aie!"
BIG BOY BLUE
THE
CROW'S NEST TRADING COMPANY
THE
STORE
OF
GOOD
VALUES
LIMITED
FERNIE
BRITISH COLUMBIA
P. BURNS & COMPANY, LIMITED
S hamrock
H ams
A re
M atchless
R esults
O f
C areful
K uring
Used By Those Who Know
FERNIE, B.C. FERNIE, B.C.
F. C. LAWE. A. I. FISHER
LAWE & FISHER
Barristers, Solicitors, Etc.
Offices: Imperial Bank Chambers
FERNIE, B.C.
Dr. H. S. SIMMONS
Dentist
Bank of Hamilton Block
FERNIE, B.C.
>■■■■■< '..    ^m\
THE FAMILY HERALD
AND WEEKLY STAR*
MONTREAL, QUEBEC
Capital $100,000.00
Office and Warehouse
Baker Avenue
P. O. Drawer 436
Telephone 79
THE POLLOCK WINE COMPANY, LIMITED
WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS
FERNIE,   B,   C.
Canada
ALL SOLDIERS WELCOME
FIRST  CLASS  CAFE
MRS. JENNINGS          :          :          PROPRIETRESS
FERNIE,   B.   C.	
3®p)®QS®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®^^
THE CROW'S NEST PASS COAL CO., LTD.
®@ PRODUCERS AND SHIPPERS OF 3®®@®®®®®®®^Si
GENUINE   "CROW'S   NEST"
COAL AND C0KE--~~t
BEST Coal
BEST Preparation
BEST Service
®®®®®®®®®®®
When in Fernie, visit the stores
that advertise their goods in the Morrissey Mention.
There's the blue of the sea and the
blue of the sky,
As well as the blue of a feminine eye;
But none of these kindle a thrill so
acute
As the eloquent blue of a hospital suit.
It's  a  soul-stirring  symbol  of valor
and pain,
It tells what its wearer would never
explain.
Yes—what has been done, and what's
left to do
Is silently preached by the Tommies
in blue.
We see them ensconced in a .smooth-
running car,
And good-looking, kindly-faced fellows they are.
Maimed, bandaged, and scarred, but
enjoying their ride—
The flotsam tossed up by war's merciless tide.
Though   the  praise  at  our  heart  is
not tardy or faint,
We suffer from British self-conscious
restraint;
Yet I know of one hand that would
like to salute
Each gallant Boy Blue in his hospital
suit.
Contributed to the Mention by Pte.
Walter Hill, 77988, Canadian, Ward
12, Port Hill Hospital, Chatham, England.
Mines at Coal Creek and Michel, B.C.
Coke Ovens at Fernie and Michel, B.C.
General Office ...... Fernie, B.C.
®®®®®®®®®®«®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®«®®®®®®®®®®®^
Established April 1899.
Fernie, B.C.
W. A. INGRAM
Wholesale and Retail TOBACCONIST
BILLIARD ROOM
and LUNCH COUNTER
:OUR COFFEE IS GOOD:
THE PALM
FRUITS AND CONFECTIONERY
FERNIE, B.C.
S. T. Saunders
SHOESHINE
INGRAM  BILLIARD  ROOM
Fernie, B.C.
ROYAL CANDY CO.
WE  MANUFACTURE  CANDY
Call in FERNIE B.C.
J. F. SPALDING
PHOTOGRAPHER
Fernie, B.C.
Use
BAPC0
Paint
J. D. QUAIL
General   Hardware   Merchant
Axes—All Kinds
FERNIE, B.C.
HARDMAN'S
for
ICE CREAM SOFT DRINKS
Telephone Office Elko, B.C.
G. FALVO
SHOE  HOSPITAL.
P. O. Box 141
FERNIE,   B.C.
T. N. HIBBEN & CO.
Stationers
VICTORIA, B.C.
KENNEDY & MANGAN
Lumber, Lath, Shingles, Sash & Doors
Office & Factory Opposite G.N. Depot
"BEAVER BOARD"
Fernie, B.C.
J. CARMICHAEL
High-Class Tailoring
Pressing and Cleaning.
FERNIE, B.C.
VALE MEADOWS VALLEY!
 r The   camping   party  has  re-
^^^^^^g^^^^^T3^^^?:     ',„<»    turned  from   the   Meadows,   a
fmlvjSl ifuffl^^^^^^^'-'^^^WMKfC' wa'k of eight miles in a whirl
of white snow; the ladies are
once more wearing costumes of
city cut; the men have discarded their hirsute disguises and
redonned their uniforms. The
deer are no longer afraid to
leave the bald peaks but are
rp> *•••'•-•'-- "™TOTO2a^*     "*"   ~~"    " taking   a   peek   at   the   small
buildings erected in the valley below by the campers.   The birds, blithe and
bold, are picking up the remains of many breakfasts.
Camp is broken up!
THE TIMBERMAN
Is   the  recognized   exponent  of  the
lumber industry of the Pacific
Northwest.
PORTLAND, ORE.
Dr. JOHN BARBER
DENTIST
Office: Over Bleasdell's Drug
J.-F. Block.
EVENINGS    BY    APPOINTMENT
Telephone 121.   Fernie, B.C.
Go to
J. G. SAAD
For Dry Goods, Boots, Etc.
and Jewellery
(Near the C.P.R. Station)
Fernie, B.C.
Sweeney & McConnell
Printers     Stationery
VICTORIA, B.C. NOVEMBER 2,  1916.
THE   MORPJSSEY   MENTION
THREE
J. F. SPALDING
PHOTOGRAPHER
!Your friends can buy anything you
can give them  EXCEPT
YOUR   PHOTO
U Until   Nov.   15th  prices  will  be  reduced  to  encourage   early
ordering
■ SPALDING STUDIO   FERNIE, B.C.
IGRAND THEATRE
Fernie, B. C.
WEDNESDAY  AND  THURSDAY
Two-reel comedy—"THE DOOMED
HERO"
Three-reel comedy-drama—"THE
HEART   OF   A   TIGRESS"
One-reel L-KO comedy-drma—
"SIMPLE POLLY"
FRIDAY   AND   SATURDAY
((Detective discovery;  a  terrible clue;
nobody  guilty.
TEMPTATION   AND   THE   MAN"
in five acts
FERNIE FACTS
Miss Hazel McCool will sing the
latest songs at the Grand theatre
every night.
"Peg 0' My Heart" will pay a return visit to the Grand theatre early
in December.
The Isis theatre will be dark until
the return of Mr. Geo, Alexander
from Calgary in a few days.
Prices at the Spalding studio are
cut in pieces till the 15th of November as an extra inducement to everyone to send their pictures to their
friends and relations in time for
Christmas and the New Year. There
is no present so welcome to the boys
at the front as a photo from home.
Editor Wallace of the Fernie Free
Press has received an invitation to
visit Morrissey camp on Sunday next.
The masquerade ball was a great
success. Hallowe'en was celebrated
in royal style. Miss Alice Wilde as a
Scotch lassie won the first ladies'
prize; Mr. J. English as Henry III,
the first prize for gentlemen. Miss
M. Moon as a Russian princess took
the second prize. The best comic
costumes were worn by Miss Jiteson
and Mr. M. Gorrie.
There will be a grand juvenile concert in aid of the Belgian Children's
Relief fund at the Club hall, Coal
Creek, on Friday, November 17th, at
8 p.m.
THE STREAK OF YELLOW
Everybody  Welcome
at the
CARD PARTY AND
DANCE
jNext   Wednesday.   Evening,   November 8th, at the
Catholic Church Hall
A  good time is promised.
FATHER A. MICHELS,
O.M.I.
With a pocket full of money
Any coward can be brave;
When the skies are bright and sunny
Any man his flag can wave.
But the test of every fellow
Is disaster's  sudden blow,
And if he is streaked with yellow
It is then that it will show.
You will never find a quitter
If he's leading in the race;
It is when the fight grows bitter
And another makes the pace
That the coward starts to bellow
And to whimper at his woe;
If a man is streaked with yellow
When he's pressed it's sure to show.
Can you stand the gaff of losing,
Can you battle to the end;
Take the cuffing and the bruising
And not let your courage bend ?
For the test of pluck is never
When you're leading in the race,
But are you game as ever
When another  sets the pace?
—Live Oak Review.
A Move To Incorporate
She: "I shall have to be a little
firm with you."
He: "Fine! Let us make it a partnership!"
THE HOME BANK     IT'S MENTIONED IN CAMP
OF CANADA
James Mason, General Manager.
fc'Head Offce
Toronto
Branches and Connections
Throughout Canada
Fernie, B.C.
That two black-tail deer got into
the small flower garden in front of
the Rock Creek hotel recently. Major
McGraw, who was at the hotel, shut
the wicket gate thinking they were
tame deer belonging to the proprietor,
T. Hanson. An extra two feet of
fencing was rapidly put up and the
deer seem perfectly at home, feeding
on alfalfa and hay. In Morrissey and
at the meadows the deer are not so
obliging, prefering the frigid temperature of the high ridges.
That Miss Bertha Whalley visited
Pte. and Mrs. Whalley on Sunday.
That Pte. McNiven is the politest
whist played who ever was.
That the Mentioner has put in an
application for a certain position, now
vacant, in Mrs. Black's circus.
That Miss Annie and Mr. Robert
Winstanley were guests of Mrs. Cecil
Minton last Sunday.
That Mr. Dicken and Miss Phillips
drove to Morrissey camp from Fernie
on Sunday last.
That Regimental Quartermaster-
Sergeant Lambkin is on sick leave for
two weeks.
That the Rev. A. B. Lane, of Christ
Church, Fernie, will hold Divine service in camp November 5th.
That a wold-be sign writer took to
the woods when mamma Bushrat returned to her quarters.
That amongst the Surday visitors
to camp were Mrs. King and Mrs.
McEwan, of Fernie.
That those who arrived late at Mrs.
Cecil Minton's party found Sergt.
Cecil amidst a crowd of ladies having
the time of his young life.
That a lady visitor to Morrissey
camp on Sunday says "No more
ranching for hers"—annieawy, not
for a while.
That the church parade at 10 a.m.
was well attended, only a few on
furlough or duty being absent. Rev.
Mr. Perley  officiated.
That those who visited Fernie on
Monday and took in "The Birth of a
Nation" say it was a magnificent
spectacle for saw eyes.
That Susie completing her costume
adjustment is as intoxicating as a
goblet of Mumm's extra dry. It goes
to the head.
That Lieut. Fredk. Wm. McLaine
reported for duty at Morrissey camp
November 1st and has already made
many friends.
That Sergt. Lane has been seeing
red—ink all over the C.A.S.C. office
floor. It was Waterman's ideal, not
his.
That Mrs. C. JE. Shaw left on Monday morning for Victoria. She will
visit old friends at Greenwood and
Vancouver en route.
That Pte. James Brown has passed
his medical examination for overseas.
Everyone who has met him in Morrissey will be sorry when he goes
away.
That Privates Green and Stuart
mushed through the blizzarding snow
flakes to Camp Mott on Sunday—and
back again without firing a shot. They
only saw one bird and it flew away
with a smile of derision at their tardy
aiming.
That the occupants or tne tent in
the meadow wilderness are the most
delightful hosts in the wide, wide
world, the only complaints being that
one lady tried to darn one of the visitors with a needle needlessly stuck-
up in the seat he sat on.
That the finder and discoverer of a
small hand axe will meet with a suitable reward if the said axe, which was
lost on the Mott Camp trail to the
meadows, is returned promptly.
That Pte. Perry underwent an operation on his hear here Monday last,
since when even a whisper of two per
cent is audible to his Issuership.
That District Orders do not always
foreshadow coming events, but rather
bespeak the confirmation of what has
happened.
That two ladies who recently paid a
visit to the camp school state that
Miss Cooper is a piost efficient teacher
and that the singing of the children is
excellent, their deportment A.I., and
that the work being done is well up
to the standard.
That one private consumed seventeen salmonaise sandwiches in compliment to the youth of the lady in
whose honor the wedding day celebration took, place on Saturday in the
C.A.S.C. quarters. He also attempted
to get outside seventeen apples but he
couldn't. He belongs to the wrong
core and nearly made a corps of himself.
That the sidewalk at the palatial
entrance to the C.A.S.C. offices has
been replaced at last with the talus
pile material at the foot of Hill 70
opposite the "Well Done" laundry,
which unfortunately does not mean
there will be a dry lawn in front of
the said offices. It means mud in the
said offices or we are sadly mistaken.
Kootenay's Mail Order Housf
The TRITES-WOOD CO.,
STORES AT:—
Fernie,   Michel,   Coal   Creek,   Natal
A. C. LIPHARDT
JEWELLER
Watch Repairing
Special Order Work
FERNIE, B.C.
WM.  BARTON
Sewing Machines
Musical Instruments
Sheet Music
Fernie, B.C.
FERNIE  HOSPITAL
Cor. Pellatt and McEvoy
Telephone 13. Fernie, B.C.
HOTEL   FERNIE
First Class Accomodation
S. F. WALLACE     -     •     -     Prop.
FORDFORDFORDFORDFORDFORD
mWM
FORDFORDFORDFORDFORDFORD
FERNIE GARAGE
Call in.
Agent
FORD CARS
Ford Cars sell at the following low
prices, F. 0. B. Fernie, B. C.
Roadsters       -     -      $535.00
Touring; 5 Passenger   555.00
Wallace Cigar Store
Choice Tobaccos
Billiards Barbershop
FERNIE, B.C.
R. G. McEWAN
MEAT PIES
MEAT PIES
MEAT PIES
Call in. Next door to Free Press office
FERNIE, B.C.
D. G. HARVIE
Tailor
DOES  GOOD  HANDIWORK
Fernie, B.C.
Repairs a Specialty
P. Bean, Prop,
Phone 158. FERNIE, B.C.
F. BEAN
Plumber  and  Steam  Fitter
Furnace and Stove Repairs
Phone 135 Fernie, B.C.
THE
FERNIE-FORT STEELE
BREWING CO, LTD.
Rlgh-Grade Bottled and
Draught Beer
Aerated Waters
Premier House
ROOMS
15 Pellatt Ave., FERNIE
H. A. WILKES      -     -      -      Prop.
Fernie
lii-'jfiLr
KEFOURY BROS.
Dry  Goods,  Clothing
FERNIE, B.C.
McLEAN'S
DRUG and BOOK STORE
Fernie, B.C.
Telephone 142.
P. O. Box 1174
FERNIE, B.C.
N. E. SUDDABY
Drugs, Books, Kodaks, Films,
Fishing Tackle, Edison Phonographs
THE REXALL STORE
Fernie, B.C.
M. A. BERIGAN
BLACKSMITH
Horseshoer
Fernie, B.C.
THE 41 MEAT MARKET
Fernie, B.C.
While You Live in the
PROVINCE
Read the "Daily Province"
Vancouver, B.C.
A. Dragon
Cigars — Barber   Shop — Pool   Room
OPPOSITE THE ISIS THEATRE
FERNIE,  B.C.
THE
DUTHIE HARDWARE
COMPANY
FERNIE, B.C.
Read The
DAILY
SPOKESMAN-REVIEW
SPOKANE, WASH.
HELEN WARE in "SECRET LOVE"
at Orpheum Theatre next Monday
and Tuesday.
Robinson Crusoe was overjoyed at
finding the day after today—Friday.
What would he have done had he
found Billy Sunday?
WELL DONE LAUNDRY
MRS. A. McCORMICK
Morrissey Camp
Stay at the
STRATHCONA
HOTEL
SIX STORIES OF SOLID
CONCRETE
Victoria, B. C.
READ
THE KOOTENAIAN
KASLO, B. C.
THE KINGS HOTEL
The   House   for the People
Wm. Mills. Prop. FERNIE, B.C. FOUR
THE    MOFi
NOVEMBER 2, 19161
WE   ARE   ALLIES
ITRADE WITH FRANCE
! J. C. GHEST
! CARBONS    —    —    —    —    —
COKES
ANTHRACITES    —    BRIQUETTES
COMMISSION AGENT
CORRESPONDENCE   INVITED
* 	
| 4 Rue Pe'trell (J4*:)     France
* ...,
Paris (9E)   %
t
PTTTT
CANADA'S BOYS WANT SMOKES!
THEY ARE FIGHTING IN FREEDOM'S CAUSE
THEY ARE FACING FEARFUL CONDITIONS
THEY  ARE  HONORING  CANADA'S  NAME
THEY    WANT    JUST    ONE    THING!
WHEN THEY WERE IN CANADA THEY COULD DO AS YOU
DO, GO INTO THE NEAREST STORE AND GET A FRESH SUPPLY.
NOW THEY ARE ASKING YOU TO SUPPLY THEIR URGENT NEED.
"I was nine weeks without a smoke"
These were the words of a wounded soldier in a hospital in Canada.
When   the   Boys   Come   Home   you
would not like them to tell you how
they  suffered  for  lack  of  Tobacco?
Such a little thing !
Every Smoker knows what it means
to be without! !
Positive discomfort! ! !
Absolute suffering ! ! ! !
Think of one night; two nights; a
week; a month; nine weeks, and no
Tobacco !
LOOK AT THIS BOY'S FACE
AND HANDS
PLAIN TALK
FROM CHARLIE
Sergt. W. J. Claridge, late of the
13th battalion, C. E. F., who left here
three weeks after the war broke out
with the first contingent from this
city, and who has served continuously
with the exception of two periods
when he was confined to the hospital
while recovering from wounds, which
periods of evacuation are denoted by
two bars of Russia gold braid worn
on the left sleeve, returned to the city
a couple of weeks ago, having been
recommended on the field to the rank
of lieutenant, but unfortunately was
evacuated before a vacancy occurred,
and has been renewing acquaintances
preparatory to joining the 225th battalion in which he is appointed to a
commission.
"The foremost matter that strikes
me as a returned man from overseas,"
said Sergt. Claridge, 'is the totally
different ideas on the present crisis
the people of this country have to the
people of the old country." And then
he continued, "I have been asked by
several in this city how I thought the
war was going along, and did I think
we should win. I personally cannot
comprehend how persons living in a
part of the Empire and who, I feel
sure, have followed the war from the
commencement, can yet have these
feelings of doubt as to the ultimate
result of the issue. Back in the old
lands the whole of the people are so
whole-heartedly into the struggle that
everyone is doing something. Women
are making munitions or taking the
places of men on the railroads, car-
driving, in the government departments, in fact, in almost every
branch of labor that in pre war days
was carried on by the male citizens.
Even the children take their pennies
to school to put into the war savings
fund. Everyone lives over there with
one set and grim determination, and
that is—the defeat of the enemy.
"And why is this? Because back
there the war with its grim and
ghastly realities is brought home to
them more so than is possible so far
from the actual affair as you are
here. But I wish to state with every
confidence that this attitude of the
people back in the old land must be
taken up by all here.
"We were forced into this game
and must pursue it with only one possible result, and that is—to win, and
win as quickly as possible. There
must not be any talk of peace until
the Hun is beaten conclusively; for
should there be a patched up peace,
that "day" which the enemy always
has looked for he is looking for yet,
and not until he is decisively beaten
will he let up on this idea.
"Walking around the city I can see
young eligibles enjoying an easy life,
self-con ten ted in their snug complacency. Have these young fellows
paused to figure out what a critical
time it is to the Empire? I wonder
what would be their feelings if it had
been their mothers or sisters who had
be outraged and murdered by the
Huns, their homes plundered and
razed to the ground. If only they
could have witnessed the scenes at
Ypres, April 1915, when the Hun was
endeavoring to force his kultur on the
few remaining inhabitants of Belgium, and then figure that the positions might have been reversed had it
not been for the men who fought,
blead and died, that these same eligibles should be privileged to continue
their lives of snug enjoyment. And
when I speak of eljgibles I wish to
point out plainly that I refer to those
through this part of the country who
are young men, physically fit and
whose responsibilities could be equally as well assumed by those unfit for
military or the fairer sex, and are not
engaged in occupations that are of
such imporatnce that will help in the
successful prosecution of the war.
"I think the majority of us realize
the vital necessity of maintaining at
the highest possible figure, our exports; this from an economic point is
absolutely necessary, so it must be
conceded that men working in and
around the mines, or allied branches,
are performing work of national importance. But there are others still
around   the   country   whose   places
:ould b(   very ta ily fill- i by woj    a
with but very  Title tianng.
done over the "] ond" an    can b*
here.
'"My advice to those fellow i o
th;nk it over. The boys oversen a e
looking anxiously forward for you to
io and help them out. One of thr
vital factors in this war will be ' a1"
power, and the enemy is far f nm
beaten yet and every eligible young
man will be needed. Don't wit to
be a conscript; you will not like it
and the writing is on the wall. It will
surely happen for we have just got to
win. If you figure on dodging your
duty as I have learned with deep regret that apparently some are evading their duty by migrating across
the border, my only question is: Do
these fellows intend to live here when
the boys come home?
"I should like to say on behalf of
my comrades overseas, how much we
appreciate what the women at home
here have done. When one is in the
mud and slush of Flanders, it is sure
great to receive the comforts that are
always coming along. Wherever you
go when with the Canadian Expeditionary Force battalion, battery, hospital or bases, there is always a supply of comforts from the women at
home; either from the Canadian Red
Cross or War Contingent association.
Also to the administration of the
patriotic funds, their work, I can assure them, is greatly appreciated, for
it is certainly a satisfaction to the
boys when they start out to know
that efforts are being made by those
unable to go to care for their dependents.
"Fernie, I know, has done splendidly, but there are still some here who
would be better employed at the presume handling the business end of a
rifle than contenting themselves with
the self-satisfied idea that they are
not needed in the big game."
CORRESPONDENCE
Fort Pitt Hospital,,
Chatham,  England,
October 13, 1916.
Pte. Randolph Stuart,
Editor Morrissey Mention.
Dear Comrade—Asking youd kindness and favors to insert these few
lines in your paper, the Mention. I
am an old timer of Fernie district.
Thanking you very much indeed.
I would be very pleased to have a
line from any of the boys, and I shall
always be glad to reply. I must report myself in hospital and that I am
progressing towards recovery. I met
my unfortunate accident on April 26
at Hill 60, Ypres district. The trouble is shell shock. I have now got
over the shock but now am suffering
from nervous breakdown. I am happy and cheery and contented under
the conditions and circumstances.
I have been treated well since I
left Fernie and never had room to
make one single complaint. There is
great credit coming to the British
Empire for the way she treats her
troops. I was not the first to go but
now I thank God for giving me
health and strength to take part in
this great war. I have not done much
but 1 spent nine months in the trenches and I made the very best use of
my time. I am satisfied to know that
I have done a little bit.
I will now ring off. Thanking you
very much. I wish you every success and good luck. I remain your
honorable comrade,
Pte. Walter Hill, 77988,
Canadian, Ward 12,
Port Pitt Hospital,
Chatham England.
PITCAIRN ISLANDS
The King and Queen received at
Buckingham Palace Mr. and Mrs.
Scoresby Routledge, who have lately
returned from a three-years' scientific expedition in their yacht Mana.
They presented to their Majesties
Charles and Edwin Young, two Pit-
cairn Islanders, descendents of the
Midshipman Young, the sole mutineer officer of His Majesty's Ship
Bounty.
It is an extreniely rare event for
Pitcairn Islanders to visit England.
The two young men were greatly
gratified with the kindness of the
King and Queen, who conversed with
them at length, and inquired closely
into the conditions of the island and
its people.
G. G. MOFFATT
Fire Insurance Agent
Fernie, B. C.
Dr.W. W. Lailey, B.A., M.D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
(Bank of Hamilton Building)
Office hours.  10:30 to  12:00 a.m.
2:00 to    4:00 p.m.
7:30 to    8:30 p.m.
Phones: Residence 144; Office 46.
A. T. HAMILTON
Sole Agent for
TORRID   ZONE   STEEL
BRICK   LINED
FURNACES
Fernie
B. C.
W. F. Muirhead & Co.
EXCLUSIVE   SHOE   STORE
Established  10  Years
Rubbers of Every Description.
FERNIE, B.C.
CENTRAL HOTEL
Dominic Citra     - Proprietor
Fernie, B.C.
MRS. E. TODD
The Exclusive Ladies' Store
Fernie, B.C.
HOLLY MASON & CO.
All Kinds of Hardware
SPOKANE, WASH.
LADIES
When  in  Fernie,  go  to
MRS. COLTON
For HATS
A. E, FERGUSON
FOR BRICK-LINED HEATERS
Phone 153 Day or Night
Fernie, B.C.
S H U - S H I
For   Soldiers
HARGREAVES CANADA LIMITED
Toronto, Ont.
ORPHEUM   THEATRE
FERNIE, B.C.
O.C.—"Absent without leave; ten
days C.B."
Tommy—"Please, sir, I fell through
a hole in the sidewalk and couldn't
get out." ,
"Which hole?"
"I think, sir, it was the 107th from
the- canteen, west by north-west."
"Case dismissed."
PIANO   WANTED
To buy or rent, a piano, at a reasonable price. Must be in good condition. Reply to P. O. Box 830, Fernie, B. C.
"LIBERTY/'
OR, A DAUGHTER OF THE U.S.A.
Sometimes success sits on the lowest rung of the ladder qf life.
Coming  to the  Grand Theatre very
soon.
This play was written and produced
by Jacques Jaccard and wjll be released in twenty chapters of Xwp
reels each. First episode, three reels.
It deals with life in Mexico and on the
border, featuring Marie Walcamp as
the heroine, and an all-star cast of
"Universal" players.
HOME BAKERY
Pork Pies       Pork Pies
Pork Pies       Pork Pies
Pork Pies       Pork Pies
Fernie, B.C.
'JBKOEmt Mb ft m U      •     * * '* ? 1
BARBER SHOP
LAUNDRY
BIG BUILDING
Morrissey Camp
Shaving—5 cents
Hair cut—15 cents
Saturday, Shaving only.
<
No. 237
War  Souvenirs  Carved
Big Building
No. 197
Carved Swagger Sticks
No. 189
j^sa
Wt MAKE.
CUT«
^"HAT PR-INJ
SPOKANE
j*\ift6ricfoiY lE^rgyiaf^
COMPANY
.DESIGNERS  ENGRAVERS;
SPOKANE
LOCK & HAWTHORN^!
Painters
Decorators  I
II
FERNIE, B.Ol
William's Drug Store
Cor.   Fort  and  Government
Mail Orders Promptly Filled
VICTORIA,  B.C.
Holy Family Church
FERNIE, B.C.
Sunday Services:
First Mass 8:30 a.m.
Second Mass 10:30 a.m.
Baptisms 1:00 p.m.
Sunday School 2:15 p.m.
Benediction of the Blessed
Sacrament 3:00 p.m.
REV.   FATHER   MICHELS,   O.M.I.i
Services Every Sunday
Christ Church
Matins 11 a.m.      Evensong 7:30 p.m.I
Rev. A. B. Lane      -      -'      Rector]
FERNIE, B.C.
Methodist Church Services
11 a.m. Sunday 7:30 p.m.
Thursday Evening, prayers
D. M. Perley, B.A.     -     -     Pastor!
FERNIE, B.C.
Salvation Army Citadel
(Cox St.)
L. Cox, Captain.
Sunday Services: 11 a.m., 3 p.m. andj
7.30 p.m.
Every week day: 8 p.m.
OLIVET BAPTIST CHURCH
Fernie, B.C.
Services on Sunday :—
Song Service at 7:30 p.m.
I—l—W——I
The first dollar a boy ever earnei]
is the largest reward he will ever sec]
in this world.   The last dollar he gavw
away in this world will earn him the
greatest reward in the next.
*. F. GJtEEN'S DAUGHTER
BPS AT VICTORLAI
Victoria, B.C., (Oct. 23.—Miss Cel
cejia R. ;Gi;een, aged 25, only daughter!
of £. F. Gre.en, M.P., died here to-l
night.   She was born in Illecillewait]
and lived at Kaslo for some time. She]
was well known in Kootenay.    Her]
brother, Capt. R. H. Green, is paymaster of the 54th battalion.

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