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The Mail Herald Jun 5, 1915

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Array REVELSTOKE
Chief lumbering,' railway, mining, agricultural and navigation centre between Calgary
and I the Pacilic ocean.
The Mail-Herald
THE  MAIL-HKRA.LD
Published twice weekly—Read
by everyone—The recognised
advertising medium for the
city nnd district.
Vol. 22-No 45
REVELSTOKE, B.C, SATURDAY, JUNE
0,
191.
$2.50 Per Year
REVELSTvA; PLATOON TO BE
COMMANlA BY LIEUT. McLEAN
Revelstoke Contingent Not be Separated, Declares
Colonel Davis — Pati j Meeting Too Numerous
For Drill Hall—Held in Upon Air—Stirring Speeches
Cood Music—Recruits Offer as Result of  Meeting
KNOTTY LEE
SEES GAME
King's Birthday Ball Game is
Great Exhibition—Fats
vs. Leans
What was probably tho moat re- gratulated Lieut. Me l.e; n
roamable meeting ever held in Revel- cruitH which be thought
stoke in point of thc number, earnestness and enthUSiMm of the audience and in regard to the excellence
ol the speeches and musical program
provided was that held on Thursday
■evening for the purpose of stimulating recruiting ln Revelstake. It had
been intended to hold the meeting iu
the drill hall,  but long belore the re-
About 400 people turned out to see
the game ot the    beusun    when     the
Eats aud Leans played at the Recreu-
lion grounds     last     Tl.ursday utter-
huskiest that lie had over seen in one   uuull (ur t^e i,encliL ol the Red CroBS
Squad, When he was up at 6.30 in the   SOcicty. The Leans went down to de-
uii  his  re-
were  the
morning be saw the men ready [or
drill, If they were in uniform as -hey
marched down the street he believed
that everyone would touch his hat
to them. It was a serious proposition that confronted the empire. Was
outlawry  to  he  permitted    to      con-
AGRICULTURAL FLOAT IS
WINNER OF FIRST PRIZE
First Farmers' Day Complete Success- Well-decorated
Floats in Parade McKinnon Wins Prize lor Driver—
Macdonald Takes horse Race- Events are Well
Contested
MINISTER VISITS
CONSTITUENCY
turn ol the parade which preceded uuer the world? The barbarities of
the meeting the hall was tilled and | the Uoths and Vandals were nothing
hundreds were waiting outside tlu lo those of the present time. Cesar
hull. On the arrival of the parade, when,victorious to .kl a few slaves,
Mayor W. A. Foote announced that now people were mutilated, the po-
an open air meeting would be h__l .. pulace terrorized and ancient build-
Thc piano was speedily moved to the nigs were laid in ruins. Were free men
front of the hall, a platluiin was im- j to be dominated by such methods or
provised at the entr. nee and chairs ; were they to fU-ht for the freedom
were carried out and placed anywh.Ti that while mm were entitled to? Op-
within hearing distance where a space pression must be put down by force
could be found. The audience p .c.. it ! of arms and ammunition. He believed
the space iu front of the drill hall, that the Kevelstoke sciuad would up-
stretched across the opposite pave- hold the traditions of the Canadians
ment and extended far along the and that they , would equal anything
street and Bidewalks in both direc- that had been accomplished. They
tions. The scene was a striking one, were full of patriotism and in prime
and the sea ol faces Included men uud physical condition,
women of every age and of every W. Lashley Hall said that we were
walk in life. Hundrtds of children living in stirring times. It was dif-
were also present and the crowd was ficult to gaiite the future or to fore-
flanked   by  gaily    decorated  automo-   cast impending  world changes.      The
feat by a BCore of 1'2 to 16. The game
was full   of      unexpected      plays und
kept tbe  audience   in paroxysms     of
laughter.     Some of the players   hud
seen a buscball I at previous     to   the j
game and some had not, none were in
training  and some were evidently   dc- i
cidedly   out   of   condition   und their <
labors for a good   cause won     them
generous rooting.  The sum of 1102.50
was taken at the     gate in voluntary
contributions,     and     the   game was
worth it from a spectators'  point of
view.
Knotty Lee the good natured Irish- j
man  who has  acted  as scout for  the I
Detroit Tigers Ior the last two years,
... .. ,   .    ,,..   gaily  decorated  bicycle
spent the day in the city and strolled        , '
., ,,. i.nd Cecil McSorley. in
up to see the game. His conversation J
with a local friend overheard ou the
grand stand was something us follows:
Well we're away. Here comes the
Leans to but. Wbo did you say that
was at bat, Mr. Horobin? Did youse
.-.ee him try to swat that ball, sure,
it was a foot Irom him. Hurd luck,
the best he could get was a walk.
And who's thut up now? Mr. Bews,
Many ol the HuutB iu the Farmers' and  Jimmy  Sampson.      Walter  Hews
Day parade yesterday atternoon   dis- drove the automobile.
played the greatest    ingenuity   nnd ite iioat of the Farmer's Institute,
won  the  warmest  pruiHe    Irom      il 9 designed  by  W.    E,   Smith,  Was most
spectators.     The pony race provided ingenious and was warmly praised.  It
an   exciting  tlnish,   tho  stock  judging represented  agriculture und  displayed
proved mosl   Interesting and tho un- the (our seasons on a complete farm,
tire event was u     complete  success. The daintily  painted  farm  lie.use was
Thc schools     were given a half holi- surrounded with  trees and      in     the
day and the streets along the route garden bloomed torget-me-m ts, dais-
of the procession were thronged with it's,  pansies and othei   spring  Bowers
spectators, In  the kitchen  garden  were  potatoes
The  parade     whicli  started at the and   strawberries   growing.   In   a Ci i
corner ol McKenzie avenue and   first ial ut the buck were two live calves.
Btreet wns Ud by Mayor W.A. Foote's A  field     of rye already cut,  a     field
automobile in which    was His Wor- from  which  potato, s had  been   dug,
ship,  W.E. Smith,  president   of   tho and a grain field     after cutting vferc I
Farmers'  institute,     and S.H.   Hop- at the rear of the house. The entire
kins and W. Newton, the government flout was surrounded     with    grasses
lecturers.  Next came  Arthur     Need- and made a most interesting exhibit,
bam, a smull boy in costume,     oa   a I    Bourne     Bros     hud   an  attractive
F.   McCarty float advertising      Shcrw.n  Williams
rlcyi in costume   with pnints..
..ther  boys  on     horseback  followed. |    The Revelst.ike Sash and Door lac-
Then came     thc     recently  imported tory exhibited on their lloat thc pro-
Clydesdale stallion supplied     by    the ducts of their factory  "made in    Re-
provincial  government   tothe   stock velstoke."
breeders association.  The band came |    The  Revelstoke Meat Market's  float
next followed by. the  decorated floats was decorated      with    1 -ranches    and
| alter whicli cume a number of decor- flags and Carried  a dressed  pig    with
luted automobiles  and    hundreds     of advertisements of Swift's products.
i spectators.     The procession followed The Palace Garage had a gaily   de-
biles whose occupants listened   to the   niapj of  Europe and of the world was   the druggist.  Oh,  whut a  wallup, its
destined   to be   changed   and   habits
(Continued on Page Three)
KILLED BY
SHRAPNEL
Private Forbes Carried Wounded Comrade to Trench
Under Fire
The following extract from an Inverness newspaper tells of the death
of James Forbes, who enlisted iu
Revelstoke where he acted us discount clerk in the Imptrial bank, It
tells also of an act of heroism performed My Mr. Forbes, hitherto un-
reputed iu Canada. The extract is as
follows:
The sad intelligence    was conveyed
yesterday to the    parents of  Private
.lames Forl.es, of  the Canadian con-
composition of Harry Chu-   tingent,  that he hud been killed     in
speeches and music.
Stirring and practical sp.eches, of
not more than three minutes dara- !
tion each, were delivered by Lieut.
CO. McLean, C.B. G.llan, Rev. W. I
Lashley Hall, T. Kilpatrick, Rev. 0.
A. Procunier, R. Tapping, Rev. J.W.
Btevenson, H. Gordon, W. B. Farris
and Hev. J.C. McKenzie. Mayor W.
A. Foote w.is in the chair. The musical program was of a hi^h order and
the Bongs well selected and splendidly sung. Several patrl .tic selections
were given by the city band, the
audience sang with much vim The
Maple Leaf, Tipperary. Rule Brittan-
ia, the National Anthem and other
patriotic Bongs. Mrs. W. Bews sung
"Here's to Our Own Canadian Boys"
specially writcen in honor of the
contingent neiw being firmed; Miss
Parker's son.: "Drake goes West" was
followed as an encore by "A Deui
Land.' ; "Dawn" was given by Miss
Paulding and "The Boys of the Old
Brigade" was sung by F. Paulding;
"Say All Revolr but not Good Bye"
was given ly G.R. Lawrence who us
un ence.re read "The Day" the now
famous
pelle u Hath railway porter. J. L.
Hay recited "Ai Diamond in the
Rough."
The procession which was led by
thc mayor included the city bund,
the  bugle  1 ami     ol  the  102nd regt.,
the High school cadet corps,  the boy   relatives.     Private
scouts and the Kevelstoke platoon   of   comrade were      in
the recent severe fighting in which
tue Colonials tooK part. The lnior-
•nution was sent by a comrade, who
had arran.ed With Private Forbes
that in the event of uny thing happening the survivor would inform the
Forres ana his
the great charge   ing hard luck at sh< it.
good for two bases. No, boy, see, he's
anchored at first. Well 'twas a good
drive, uny way, it scored Horobin.
Whose that to hat now, the fellow
with the the green striped sweater?
Dr. Hamilton, did you say. I'd like
to bet you he scores. Did you see him
lean on it? Sure its good for three
bases. No the sh- rt stop's got it.
stay on first! For the love of Mike,
I thought the short stop had it und
it went clean past him, What'B thai!
short stop's name? Coulthard, did
you say1 I wonder now is he any relation to Jess Coulthard 1 signed up
in 1912 for Hughie. He waa a morning worker too, but in the afternoon
he just could'nt make good. Look at
that felb.w with the green sweater
try to steal second. Did they call
him out at second. 'Twas a close
decision, it looked to me he whb sale.
That's Mr. Macdonald at the bat
noW Well, well, well, the first ball
throwed he lams right into the left
fielder's mit. Wow, wow, he missed
.t. Whose playing that left field. Oh,
McRae, T'is easily seen he's not been
out practising lately. Hurrah! another run. Whose did
ihat scored th
member 'twas Bews.
Give us a look ut your score curd.
Reynolds at I at now 'eh'. That's a
nice Ily, boy. Oh but look it's right
into the short-stop's mit. And he's
missed it. Sure and that man is hav-
First street to the brewery, thence
went to Old Town and on its return
dis! anded at  the  post  oflice.
The flout provided from Dews'
Drug store wn6 an artistic triumph.
lt considted of an automobile decorated in violet and white to form
a luge basket, above thc basket being a handle tied with ribbons. The
basket was filled with spring Bowers
among which appeared the heads of
a number of dainty children. Hour
boys walking in front appeared to be
drawing the basket with wide ribbons while Miss Oonah Leigh in
front of the car appeared to drive
the team. Appropriate
ments of Bews'  perfumes
float   advertisic
W.
(orated
tires.
The following is the
various  competitions:
Best  float—1,   Vi. E.  Smith
Bewe.
Boys" Horse  Race—1,   Mardonall;  .
J.  McSorley.
Heavy horse—1,   J.  H.  Curtis.
G.neral purpose horse—H.  Carlson.
Saddle  horse—F.   McCarty
Driver—H.  McKinnon.
Highest scoring bull—W, E. Smith.
Ili'.eliesr   scoring  dairy   heifer   '.VMM
Smith.
Best dairy cow—1, M. Fleetham, 2,
advertise-  C,  Granstrom.
'rivals   of      Holstein     bull
Attended Celebration of Completion of  Kettle   Valley
[Line at Penticton
ll.m.  Thomas Tayli r,   M.P.P.,   ac-
corapan ed by  Mrs. Tayl r,     arrived
I in the city yesterday atternoon from
the smith a:.i'. Will leave tomorrow
norning for the coast. They are ut
the Revelstoke hotel,
Mr. Tayl. i is returning irom ii
visit to Penticton no re he atl ndtd
the ei le. ration m h. >n. i' 'I lhe com*
pletioc oi the Kettle Valley railway.
IA banquet given by the board of
trade and mm icipality was attended
ly a repres ntatlve gathei n,r and
..as highly slice ss.Mil. Am ii_- the
..nests were J. Rogers, pr. si.leal ..f
the Vancouver board of trade, W.H.
•laikin of Mulkic _i Co., a prominent Vancouver firm, Justice Gallagher, Mr. Flumerfelt, president of tha
.British American Trust Compuny,
supt. 1Mb in. n oi the Canadian Pa-
e .lie railway at Winn pe.:;     Mr. Wur-
,ien, president of the Kittle Valley
railway, the mayors nnd reeves of
adjoining     municipalities and  many
j other  preeminent citii.ens.
The opening of the 1 in-,  which haa
[been secured thr, ugh the railway
policy cf the McBr d' government,
is an Important epoch in the history
I'f   Uritish  Columbia   and  is  the  cul-
Imination of an effort begun Jo years
■ ■    '. The line op na up a fertil?
»go. The line opens up a fertile    aud
Goodyear   promising    tirritiry     which  includes
i   ■■  N Ce It  v..11 y    f.iiiious Ior   stock
result   of   the '
special     prize—C.
spring flowers" appeared at the side
of the basket. The children in the car
were Jean Bews, Isabel Bews, Kenneth Bews, Lulu nnd Mary DuVls. The
boys "drawing" the car were Charlie
and Gilbert     Davis,      Sam Needham
Granstrom.
taislng and districts rich in mineral,
timber and fruit raising possn .lilies.
Mr. Tayl. r spent a couple ol days
in the G.'and Forns i n 1 Gre nwood
districts where hs had business in
i nneeti' n w th the pu lie works department. At Grand Forks the mines
are active and s stcc! s at the Gian-
l,y smelter are in operaticn. At
(,re nwo d it is expei ed .bat the
smelter will soon reopen.
Conditions are improving at thn
coast, s;.ys Mr. Taylor. There is
still unemployment in the cities, but
in unorganized districts tlnre is little distress.
 ■ Mr.  Taylor said  that he was   glad
Boys costume on horseback—1, iV-il  t ,  h-ur that  work  cn  the completion
McSorley; 2,  .T.  McSorley. , f  the  automo! Ue  road was  in    pro-
Chopping contest—I,  J. Nichols.        press.  Tbe provincial work is also in
Best costume on  bicycle—1,  Ar.hir   furj sw:n.-,  he s. ys i nd     good
_r. ss  is  I e:n_- mi de.
Needham.
pro-
RECRUITS NOW
SIXY-TWO
did you say that was Southern Contingent Will .Pass
t run.  hure now I re- , a '
Through Revelstoke on
Way to Vernon
the 54th'.battalion     followed    by de-   which the Canadians made, and tbey      Well that mikes the second one out
corated automobiles and by hundreds   hud tlie pleasure  ol meeting and con-   wid Reynolds getting tu-'ged ut third
of spectators.
As a result of tbe meeting several
recruits signed the roll und a number have signified their intention of
doiiiL- so.
Lieut. C. G. McLean, who was the
iii si ipeaker and win.se address met
with heartiest applause began i.y
saying   that  he lelt   more scared      in
gratulating euch other on being un-
wounded after passing through the
thick of the fightin_\ On the following day the Germans shelled the Canadians with shrapnel and high eff-
plosives, A brave deed was performed
ny Private Forbes, who saw a comrade fall about tu yards from his
trench. Private Forbes, along
another, got out of the trench,
Sixty-two recruits have now joined
thc Revelstoke platoon of the .">4th
battalion or 12 more than originally
i.Hotted to lievelstoke. Lieut.  Mil.can
who will command the platoon,
highly  pleased  with   the  result as    is
also Lieut. Col. Davis,     the    offlcei
and the little fellow wid the     green
sweater out on  second.
And  this gentleman  wid  the glass-
is on nt the bat now, what might bis   commanding.
name be?     That there is Mr.  Laing'      Col.   Davis  win.  passed  through tbe
Sure and he has    played ball before, uty ,„, Thursday announced thai the
battalion will mobilise In Vernon be
tween   June S and   13.
Look at him getting Into bis stride
That's  a  nice Ily   he knocked  out  and
with   light into the mit of short-stop. He's
and   missed  it.  Could   It be the sun duz/.l   I    The  Canadian  I'acitic  railway stea
nddi'ssing  the audience  than  he   is- 	
pected to  feel  in the   trenches.      Col. carried the wi.untied Canadian,  whose ing his eyes,  i.r is     be out   ol  prnci DlH   Bonnlngton   is i.eing  plan..I      In
Davis who  had passed   through      the leg  was broken,  into the trench,  and ice?    You were saying that t'was Mr. commission     for     a special trip     io
city  that morning  had expressed    uis helped in  rendering  first aid.      After McCleneghan at the bat. Sure and he Robson,  whence she  Will convey    the
regret that he was unable to remain the severe     nchting     The Canadians will  not last     long,     be Struck out. Southern contingent     to Arrowhead,
for the  meeting. On behalf of oflicers were relieved, and while a party was That makes  the third  one out,   we'll tn  route  to tlie  training  ground   at
and  men the  Bpeaker   expressed      bis in    the trench,  Private Forbes     was get a chance now to get n line up on Vernon.
thanks for thc kindnesses they     had struck by apiece of shrapnel     in the the Iat men's ability to punish    the The citizen! of Nakusp are cumuii-
tecelved  since    recruiting commenced head and died  instantly.  His     death pill, nicut ing with Col. Davis, through the
and also,his thanks tothe ladies   of gave great regret     to   bis comrades. (Who's that up first for the fat ment board  of   trade,   asking  that iu   view
tbe Red Cross society for the roset- who had seen bis coolness and daring Stuart? Lo..k at   him  hit it   oui      in ol many  recruits  being  from Nakusp
tes which bad been presented   to the during  tbe severe     fighting.    Private the garden. Its good for a three bag- the steamers on     which    they travel
recruits   to   distinguish   them     fro.n Forbes was well known in Inverness, ger. I keep forgetting     it's     the fat stop  there an hour,  so  thnt the.    be
ordinary citizens.    The colonel     had having been trained in the Royal In- men to  bat,  and that they can't run given a proper send-oC.     It iB     pro-
eaitl    that  the Revelltoke  contingent surance    company     oflice in Queen's as fast as the other ginks. My, what posed to have the town band in    at
should go as a Beparute plutoon   and Gate.     About  two years ago he left an awful  handicap to have to    work tendunce at    the    wharf.   It is also
he had been given the honor of .torn- Inverness for Toronto,     having     re- under. They  nre giving awny an aw- hoped thut tho regiment may parade
Andrew Perry Mcintosh, born, Mason City, Iowa, ate 31, brakeman,
next of kin W.J. Mcintosh, Brother,
Barrie, Ontario.
Wm. Graham F. Brown, born, Alexandria, Scotland, age 3J, trainman,
next of kin Mrs M. Brown, wile, Re-
\ elstoke.
Malcolm McBeth, born, Prince Kdward Island, age 31, miner, next oi
kin Mrs. H. McB.tti, wile, Rogers
Puss, U.C.
Henry Hayes, born, London, Kng-
lund, uge 2$, shoemaker, next ..I k.ii
ThoB. Hayes, father, Marylebone,
ls  England,
Haloid Foul Gordon, lorn Vancouver, P.C, ago -0, student civ.l
engineer, next "f km Robert Gordon,
father, Revelstoke.
i bai bs Bruce, born, London Bng,
age 19, O.P.R, clerk, nest of km
Benjamin Bruce, lather, Vanwuver.
'I b imber   of   i' ri nts  I nils ted   ip
to Thursday   morning    was    as [ol
lows:
FAREWELL TO
VOLUNTEERS
manding the platoon. He had no
doubt that they would maintain the
honor of Revelstoke and of all Canada. They  wauled     every      man tbat
was unattached and could enlist.
lie
ceived an appointment in the Imperial bank. His business abilities soon
won for him promotion to a branch
in British Columbia. After the war
broke out he joined  the colors.      He
lui lot .ef weight.
Who is thai great big healthy looking party at the plate now? Mr. Barber,   Barber did youse nay" Sure nnd
here for exercise.
Those who have signed tho roll and
passed the medical examination
since the list was     published    in the
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ it isn't a man by the mme of     Guy Mail  Herald on Wednesduy are as fol-
liad  heard some lay that   they could   put  in  a spell  of tralninc  in  Victor- Bnrher.     Well,  well,  well,    I'll  sure lows:
not go because of their debts.  He   did   la.  nnd along with a lnrce draft was have to see him.  I met a friend     of John Cullls, born London England,
not think thnt the patriotism of   Ike   »ent from there direct to France. The his    at  the const.     And  Just look  at Bge   H),  carpenter,  next of kin   Mrs.
Quota
Sec. Need.
\eis.ai and Kaal '      250
242          >
26       21
Rossland and Trail    IM)
•
21
Cranbrook,   Oolden,
and Creston  200
10^         '.12
Hevclstoke     50
M
(Camloops and north
i tit iy  2IK1
M      ISO
Simllkameen Valley    60
1.'
Totals  1,100
i'.i,       107
John O'Brien in List
nf Wounded
creditors should allow any man t'e bo
kept from the service of his country
because of debt. He thanked tbe ico
pie ..I iM'veisioke for their kindness
and snid that he Imped to be In the
i il |   fe.r lOmO  time.
C, II. Olll.'in expressed bis pleasure
nt beiiu- present nt a meeting cnlled
for no worthy a purpose.     He     con-
news of ins death, at the early
of 28, will be learned with deep
gret  by  ill   win had  the pM
his acqualntani     Deceaaad wns
^_U
.'.ce him    drive that    lall.     Call    a taxi
Tet- we'll help  bim  to first,
of There  coes  the     hi • pitcher  up to
the bat.  Pshaw  he's   struck out,   I  want
only son  "f     Mr.  nn.l    Mr-.   Forte*, ed tn see bim swat the pill.
■    tt.      I ■    dstone i irk. To them My, oh, •     Is -here no limit tt. the
nn.l   to   h  I  BliterS    sincere  sympathy size  Of  the   men"   Sure  thev   gel   big-
will  be "xtended In thelou     of    a	
be    	
brave son  and  brother.
<OotU*m4 •* Pan Tw*.)
Among  the  wounded in  today's  casualty list appears thc name of John
O'Brien formerly     of the 30th b.itta-
K.  Cnllis, mother, Tuft, B.C. j lion, now of the 15th battalion.    Ur.
Anl,rev   Bt,   .P.liiis.   born  Galveston,   O'Brien  enlisted  in     Kevelstoke      and
Texas, age K,   mechanical engineer, was formerly In the employ    i f   the
nexl     'ef    km. Henry ii. st. Johns, Palace livery,                                J
father, Vancouver. William  Arthur    Wilcox of  Sain    •	
Robert Charles   McRae, born. Ule- Arm, well known in Revelstoke, foi       R nl • ■ I inters   are   asking    tho
tillcwait, age 22, newspaper reporter, jmerly with the 30th battalion,     an.l  government thnt the open season   for
i.nt  of kin Alex. McRae, father, Re- now of the 15th, is reported missing |grouse be from  Ortober 1,  to Decem-
vclstokc. In the latest casualty lint.                   her 18,
Dance in Drill hall is Success
ot Season — Many
Present
The dance given by .he Bevelstoke
platoon e,f the 54th battalion, in the
drill hall b.st evening proved an
event of pl asure, aad undoubtedly
was the Buccess oi thi season. In-
t- iis< ly Hnti b,  with     an admirable
spirit   of   c  n.i. eishiie.   was   the   large
-  ts     winch     ri.led the
ball. British and Canadian Ba s and
the h"::e.re.i r.d .Te ss emblem     were
worn by many ■ 'T t ::«• ladin, and fees
i red, white and blue i anting
...! : i, .1  the walls anl were    -• d    n
eriei    I  roui houl.     The
dance from sUrl to Rnlsh was     one
round ■•( pli     in    nd thi      isic, perfect.  An-' 1  Hillier   as   conduct il    of
• ■•   b .ii !,    did     line   w,.rk, and
that his efforts are receiving appr<eci-
atloc   ivas shown  In thi   applause accorded nich number, and the enc res
were most generously  given, A   sumptuous  supper    W'aB  served  nt    mid
night,   nnd   the  delicious  sandwiches.
.nil cakes, proved thc h.ests caterers
ret water.     On the ree pt ion
ttee  were
.  Blinch, Lance-corpl, Rov
J.S.  Field,   J.  Martin.   W.J.  Wiis. : .
J. Morgan, T. Copeland, B. Daniels,
C.   Procunier.
The dunce committee included: B.
Nelson, J.L. Curveon, N\W. Bennett,
B, Ross, C, Corson.
Among the out of town guests .ef
note were Lieut. McLean, who Is the
recruiting officer, nnd Pr. Archibald
of Kamloops.
Three hundred ar.d fifty-five peopl"
turned out to do hone r to the boys,
and tt give th m a hearfy send-off.
and     811 d thi   Dri'l hall to its     nt-
■■      !g|      , PAGE TWO
THE   MAIL-HERALD,    REVELBTOKE
SATURDAY,  JUNE 5,   1915
TLbc ADafMberalb
n'BLlSHKI)   WEDNESDAY   AND
SATURDAY   AT
BBVT.L8TOKK.  11. 0
ADVERTISING RATHIS
Local Heuding Notices and BusinoBS
Locals in cents per line each insertion. Minimum locai od charge '25c.
Display advertisements 25 cents per
Inch  each insertion,  single column.
Legal advertising of any form, also
Government and Municipal Notices 12
cents per line first insertion and 8
cents per line subseiiuent insertions,
allowing 10 lines to tho inch.
Applications for Liquor Licenses 85,
Applications for Transfer ol Lliitior
Licenses (7.Ml.
Oil  prospecting  notices $7..r.O.
I..nnI Purchase Notices, $7.00.
Water Application Notices, up to
10H words, $7.30, over 100 words in
pie.p..ition.
o7W iii-Herald Publishing
Company, Limited
K    G.  ROOKE,  Manager and  Editor.
POLITICAL  HUNS
How the Liberal Opposition took advantage of the "Truce"
SATURDAY,  JUNE
1911
TOMORROWS SERVICES
REV£RSING OUR TRADE
In  March   the    imports of the
Do-
CATHOLIC
St.   Erancis church,  McKenzie  Ave.
minion were less than the exports by uid Eifth street, Pastor, Rev.   J. C.
almost  $7,500,000.    Considering   that MacKenzie.   Sunday    services:—  Low
a  COUple  of  years  ago  Canada's    im- KaBa at 8 a'm' and     HiBh MaaB    at
,   ,                        ,         , 10:30  a.m.  every     Sunday.      Sunday
ports exceeded  its exports by   ubout ...       .      ....         :   > .,,.
school  for the children at '2:iD p.m.,
S250.0M.00.., or about  |S0,«N>,000     a ttenedlotlon and RoBary at 7:30 p.m.,
month, the reversal of Qur trade cur- Confessions Saturday I to 6 and 7:30
rent  is renarkable.   Nothing   but    the to 0  p.m.  and  Sunday  mcrnlng  7:30
extraordinary conditions created by
the war co'iltl  have so  quickly  caused
un excess ..f exports over Imports,
Along with the practical suspension
of foreign trad" by many European
countries came orders to Canadian
manufacturers for war supplies. Orders for war material placed  in (Mm-   _'.
to S.   Weeks days:—Mass every morn-
put,  that man  wid   the  cricket      suit
out.   Taylor  did youse say it wns.
Well we get a Chance to sec what
the bans can do now. The boy. wid
thc green striped sweater is up, did
youse see him Willinrd the pill. ft
brought homo Macdonald. Oh look at
that tall man wid thu beard drive it
nnd make second, on it scoring ltey-
nolds and McCleneghan. Look at
Horobin stealing second, sure its the
first time he's done anything at all.
Considerable doubt   as to thc Bin- Look thPy thrpw that tall man     wi(1
week  to assist     T. Shaw the     local
agent.
W. Feathers of Calgary arrived on
Wednesday's train to take over the
duties ol barber for thc Benson ut the
locul hotel.
Were Clergy Used to
Serve Personal Ends
ing at 7 o'clock, Confessions     before  cerity of the attack upon the govern-  the  heard out  ut  the plate.   Bee  that
Mass.   First   Fridays—Mass  at  8  a. ' ment   conti  ned   in   Mr.   Moses  Cots-  nice ily      right     into    Barber's  met.
"Sunlight is the Miner's Joy"
THERE'S no dirt too siiir to yield to tho
gentle strength of Sunlight Soap. "The
wise ones" know that Sunlight does tlie
work easiest, with l\w, least rub and none of
the wear and tear on clothes that follow the
use of harsh soaps.
Sunlight Soap is absolutely pure—it's the
best general purpose; soap you can buy.
Sunlight Soap
All jjroocrs
mcII anil
lll'OlllllK   Mil    it
Benediction and  Bosary at
in.
MID
worth's  pamphlet,     "The  Crisis      in
He's n canny man be had  to look    in
his band before he was sure  he     hud
First
ST. PI'.TRR'S
Sunday after Trinity.
B.C.," is expressetl in an editorial of _.*•_.•
it. Whose that coming to but for the
"The  Western    Methodist  Recorder."   fat  men   the  onewld  the gray troUB-
Holy   The   Recorder  is  supposed  to be   the  CIR  wid   the  black  stripe dowu      the
ada amount to about 526O,O0O,0C0e.
Tbe outflow of this merchandise will
ateadily Increase as the manufacturing capacity f the country is adapted to the new business. Thus in
March of this year our exports of
inanufactiir.d g....d. amounted to
$15-,6OO,0CO, while in March of 1913
they amounted     to
mmunion   alter   11   a.m.    Evensong   organ of the Methodist church ofthe  leg7 W.  M.  Lawrence? Faith    and     I
10  p.m.   S.'rinons  at  both    services   province audits  utterances naturally   *-r»rss     Its true nobody  loves a     fat
WORLD  NEWS TERSELY TOLD
by the Hector.
At both morning and evening prayer,
prayers authorized by the Lord Bishop for war will be said. Sunday
BChool at 2M10 p.m.
METHODIST CHURCH
Public  service  will  bc held on  Hun-
day at 11 a.m. and 7,:',o p.m.    Morn-
onlj  $4,993,000.   '"K    """mc "A  Revival of Religion"
...... f   .   1 „..     .     1    . m      1 m   tlie  evening  "Issues  raised  by  the
Oui  totul exports lust March  am.unit '
War." At 2.30 Sunday school and
cd to »47,e»s!i,358-, ;o» against $27,760     _...,       , ..        _,   ,
Bible    classes,  Epworth  League
(-00 in March.  1"M.    These heavy in young  people, on Monday al ■  p.
creases will  be far surpassed  later ln Prayer     meeting,  Wednesday,  at
the yeur when delivery is made of re l'-m.      Choir     practice,     Friday
cently placed orders.     Later in     the s v'm'
year also will come the exports     -.1 ,.UKSHyT.:~ CHURCH
the huge cr.,p that now promises   so     lt, ,,„. PrMbyterian church on .Sun-
well. What with war orders now     in ,. . ntster, Rev    I   vv. Steven-
band,      war     orders    likely   to COI ' ;-  taking  as hiB  m..rn-
Within   1916,  and  cro]     exports,      we 'n« itext   "Doing and Knowing," and
lor
111.
a
at
shall be sending abroad   tefore    tbe
fiscal   year  ends     as    n.-.'.rh   as
1     0  ■ worth of    supplies.     At    the
Marcb rati   alone the amount
1 • ■ . and little grain
is now moving.  In the i ist  D01
BtiC     I ~\i '!'•-
ted t *37
...     -       ' ■ tSlde   a- . '.': '.la       Is
now d
1   .-• prod iei   1 ■
nditi v
i leems    1
be aboui
1 ..-•  _,■ ispeel    ! .m    early
t ■ ■     ■ ; ■. '   •
■ .   .
I
U   felt
POLITICAL NOILS
1
( Fe :
evi mm; "The   - the Na-
e_ase
-  •..: R ! I
■•   •
GLACIER
■
1
1 the eai
I
t    on
ert Webl    ind
e
.   • ■ [ the    greal
•: ' I     ee.       L.lleee    tj\ OI''ll'
North Cai ith Ca visitors through.
' . ' Mond .•      M      Hill I on Friday's tral ,
reflect the opinion of the majority of
ihe clergy of that denomination.
The editorial committee is composed
of Rev. W.J. Sipprell of Vancouver
and  Rev.   J.1M  Hicks of  Victoria.
I'nder the    heading    "The Crisis in
B.C."  The Becorder says:
"The pamphlet bearing this title,-,'
issued recently by the Ministerial
I'nion of the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, and a public meeting
under the same auspices at Vancouv-
1 r, seems to have caused a mild sensation The pamphlet which was prepared by Mr. M.B. Cotsworth, and
bears the endorsement of the Bevs.
\.A. Harkness, A. E. Cooke, R. K.
Stillraan, WM S. A. Crux and A. M.
O'Donnell, is a somewhat tierce on-
s,aught upon the provincial administration, charging ilagrant exploitation ol the natural r.-s. mrces of
the province,
"Whether the charges  are  substan
!->• we aie not     in   a
- •        •■   saj.   If I hey are true,  1 be
guilty parties  should not .scape   tbe
ition;      an.l
A   that    the      actual   facts
v.-l).
ver, thc at-
i ncere.
tera hav,'
the personal  depu.np •■ pam
the   party   p.iliti
•
eb mat
■I    not
' .TS.ill ......
he sl
• 1,.   ..'.,.
Knotty Lee Sees Game
r. "I   rroin   I age One.)
Bnd selected .hi.    1    1: btnson as tb.'   1 es   is casbli
otel. it 1
•   '
HOME
STUD1*
Ar'-; Courses only.
S 11 M M R R
SCHOOL
Jl'lV  nad   IIUIHT
OUEEN'S
^       UNIVERSITY
KINGSTON, ONTARIO
ARTS      EDUCATION       Ml':.If INK
SCHOOL OF MINING
MINING
CHEMICAL MECHANICAL
CIVIL ELECTRICAL
BNt.lNHKKlNl,
ORO. T. CHOWN, Iteciatrar
an      Bri idfool      and    D .. ,iri tm„
tbS   week     ;:   • .
great tunnel. to ■■                                 . Is   a
M 1    M icdonald  ■ I     Winnipeg ....   ,-
during     the week  to take over killed   if he's    stayed there     I
the duties of telegraph operator     at i.,„,k ,.,t thai Bai iei  du tin fei third
the local hotel lot  the   eason. His size saved him,     the third base
I   Albert Tenie ..,,.1   1   Curragan   are ,,. ■                        ,,   ..,„.,, 1  . ,:,
frequent visitors during these   sunny ,,,.            ..,,  the base,  Hurrahl    the
days. uttle fellow at   flrst, A'i.i the    green
.1   Bouch of the     I'ass was    down ..,..,...(,., manages io hold the hall and
during the week.
I   Through  Indisposition,     A. Thorne
did  not Mold     his     usual    Saturday
niL'bl   dance last   week,   but they    will
be  conl iinied   in the (at nie.
.1.   Benn   was   confined to  his  room
for  11  few days  having met  with      1111
' accident to his foot,
I    Mr.   Kealogg  nrrived     during    the
i
lit--g^B^^-''<--."--^v"»:
MAGIC"*0™'!
NO BAKING""1
rS- POWDER 1
man, they're trying to kill him. That
big tall man, Dr. Sutherland, is it!
Did youse see him drive it clear to
centre scoring ..ur friend wid the
striped pants.
Well, boy, its getting late and I
got to catch my train. I've sure had
a lot of fun. If I am any wheres nenr
"when the boys play a'.ain I certainly
will try nnd re on hand to see them
juggle the bull.
Pr. .Sutherland misjudges fly, hut
■nnnn-es to tind the 1 nil in time t..
put Horobin  out nt second.
Stuart scored on forced run.
I'pper and MeCnrter both struck
out  in the tirst innings.
Dr. Hamilton manured to hold the
ball long enoueh to put Taylor out.
Laing po'led a nice one to centre
and brought, home Beynolds and McCleneghan.
Reynolds drove the ball to Conlt-
bnri!. but he missed it.
MeRa" wpl'red to firct, On account
of Laing being unable to locate the
plate.
Coulthard nnpped a nice fly, but
Revnnlds eot in the rond of it nnd
caught it.
IV. ,s..*herl"nd made n nice drive
to centre and was rewarded by being
caught out at second.
Charl'e Macdonald drove a nice
■iy to McRae, but saitl McBae mis
judged it by afoot or two anl it.
gently dropped beside him.
Bar! er    bows  signs of  distress     in
the fifth.  But slightly rullies when he
tees tba red cross goto Upper's   ..s
.stance. Weakens rapidly again when
the  rebel'of the Btimnlnn..
1 BANS POSITION (PATS
Horobin, f8rd b.)       McCarter
w   Bew 1,      ■ catchei 1 Hi. Sutherland
Hume, 'Mft   field) Mcllae
in   Hamilton,   11st b,)   .1 ,Q. Bartier
Mcii n.ihi, (a, h. 1       Coulthard
egh "   f .
Reynolds, I '-e.i  b, 1
■cher1
Com  I (rlfhl   li' 1 1.
Score
Leans    1   "   1   1    1   12
ll I   6—16.
Runs secored by tbe I 1 am
First  by   1 lorol In, iie«s
Donald.
•| bird by   Hamilton, McDon ild, Mc
ind Reynolds.
fourth  iy   Hamilton
Fifth  i.v   Horohin,    Bews,    Hamtl
ton an.l  Macdonald,
Runs   ' 'ei e .1  e,v 1 h.   Pats
•    all. I
md i.y   Lawrenee.
Third  by   Btewart,  Upper,   McCai
tei      .ulthard,    Butherl ind,   McRne,
Barber, Lawrence,
Fourth  by   Sutherland.
Fifth  by   McCarter, Taylor, Oodll
hard. Sutherland, McRae
Germany and Austria Hungary have
.ortnallj notified the government ol
Switzerland tint Ihey will reBpert
Swiss neutrality, Tunc will show
what   their  promise  is  worth.
Taylor
Stewart
1'pper
Lawrence
and     Mc
The Bishop ..f London, at nn ordination council to puss upon tbe
application ot mentor the ministry,
caused to bc passed u resolution that
10 such application can bc Considered unless the applicant proves bis
inability to serve in  the wnr.
Pierre Martin, the Invintor of a
process for making steel which by
IMS was employed In producing two-
thirds of the    world's   steel supply,
died  in   Paris  OH May   Jlrd.  The Steel
Institute of England    on   May nth
awarded Martin the Bessemer gold
medal.
Admiral Von Essen, commander ot
lhe Russian Baltic fleet, Iuib succumbed to pneumonia at the Marine Iiob-
pital at Reval. He took part in thc
Russo Japan se war. lie w.ib in command of the Russian battleship
"Sebastopol' when she wus sunk by
the .iapaii.se In December, W04, oil
Port Arthur.
Mr. Norman Hill, secretary of the
Liverpool Steamship owners' association, stated'on May r.t, that during
the nu nth ol Apnl cargoes to the
value of lll.il ,1111 pounds sterling
were carried in anil out of ports of
tbe United Kingdom, while the value
of the cargoes destroyed by sunmar-
Ines was 50,000 pounds* or one shilling in   U1 imi.
Mr, \s iiiitii has written to Sir Bid-
par Speyer a letter In which he characterizes as 'has less und malignant
the Imputatlom made upon your loyalty.to the lliitish Crown.' RetrrYinK
I"   Sir   Ivlc.irs      desire to  relin.|ilish
all,honors bestowed upon    bim    the
phi 1 s.ys practically the king   is
lot prepared to accept the proposal
suggested with regard to nmrka of
distinction which he has received In
recognition of public servicrH nnd
philanthropic munificence,
The  thanks  of   Creat      Britain      to
those dominions and colonies vhnt
have Contributed so lavishly in   men
ami money, at the same ttms acquitting themselves with tin valor ol the
Canadians In Ki.um and ths courses
■ ■I the \u itrallans on thi QalilpoU
Peninsula, wen- voted at a great
meeting beld si tht Qulld 1 lull, London, nn the afternoon ot May 17. The
Premiei    and     Mt, Bonar Law, who
w.ti the principal speakers. mere
wai in in their pralSi ol the overseas
Support  ..f lhe  Motherland.
Thl Oermani are installing pipe
lines In Alsace, whicb are connected
with generating stutl. ns 2t> tn SO
miles behind the front. In general
preparation to w Ioosi vast volumes
'f poisonous gns when the French at
ttmpt to advance. This, nt least, is
the  story   brought  from  Alsace     by
travellers arriving ut Lugnno, whence
the nccounts have been sent to London. It is Buid that Similar preparations are being made on thc Ann
trian frontier where the entire r.e-
gion has been tunnelled and pip<ea
laid.
i Sir (ieorge Herbert Kiirrnr, 11 wealthy .South African mining nitin, haa
been killed in a railway accident is
Qerman Southwest Africa. He was in
active service us assistant tiuarter-
must-r-genrrnl with thc Union ol
Bouth Africa forces under General
llothu, which have Invaded the (Jer-
mnn possession. Sir Oeorge hud beeen
prominent in South African political
affairs, and had un exciting career.
He was sentenced to death for participation in the Jameson raids, but.
his sentence was commuted to a fin*
of $25,000. He served in the Smith
African wnr. Hc was fitty-sii yearn
old.
All kinds of Repairing neatly done
Best Sand Shces for children
Boots, Shoes, Trunks.
Valises, Suit Oases,
Bags, Pack Sacks,
Pack Straps, Whips,
Etc.
Armstrong & Co.
The Leather Goods Store
BOY SCOUTS
WORK BUREAU
Do you want some weeding
done?
Do you want your yard cleaned up, your wood chopp^, or
any old thinj??
Apply to the Boy Scouts and
they'll do it.
They want to work for money for their equipment.
Rinfc up any of the following
patrol leaders and make arrangements.
R. Lawrence. Phone 02
A. Parker at Bews' Store,
Phone 28
L Briggs, 26fi
E. Kincaid, 74 SATURDAY,  JUNE 5,   1915
THE   MAIL-HERALD. REVELSTOKE
PAGE THREB
Revelstoke Platoon to be
Commanded by Lieut. McLean
(Continued Irom Page Oue.)
i,ml customs would be changed also.
.Had the nation failed? Had the, empire failed? He wus proud to suy
thut it bad not failed and\ would not
tail. The church, too, had not failed.
'limy hud heard of the heroism of the
|irieatH In France, In Canada there
was hardly u parsonage hut had sent
a non. It wub so in Kevelstoke. Tbe
Bishop of London had stud that the
tuition must concentrate on the supply of munitions. Men and munitions
Ware needed to destroy the destroyer
who otherwise would destroy the
world.
T.   Kilpatrick  Said  that  Kevelstoke
was to    be congratulated on   Lieut.
McLean and  his able company.    They
would give a good act'..nut. of themselves,  He was not surprised   to see
• he  size  of the  gathering,  The  object
nf the meeting was patriotism and
he would like to know where was a
town more pat I'i.t ie than Kevelstoke.
ThiH wus the greatest conflict that
the world had ever situ. The enemy
was not Observing the rubs of warfare. They wire using poisonous
jrasses and were committing outrageous acts. Germany had been preparing since the Franco-Prussian war.
When all was ready it declared war
on the ilk-titest pretext. Tt invaded
Belgium. Creat Ilritain could not dis-
lionor its name. It was forced to
join. Germany tried to bribe Italy
hut it knew what dependance waB to
he placed on Germany's word and to
its great credit Italy entered the con-
f ict. Canada had already 56,000 men
at the front. They should he proud to
lie Canadians, They heard of men being held in the trenches because they
lacked relief. Men were needed. Those
K"ing deserved the greatest honor as
■did their parents and their wives who
permitted them to co anil who must
have a feeling of pride in their
heurts. They must not forget that
they were fighting for the freedom
und civilization of the world not only of today, hut ..f the generations
yet t.i come It was thtir duty to
encourage those whe. enlisted and to
nee that their dependants did not
want  during their absence.
It was a great honor and privilege
to be lorn under the Union Jack,
baid Rev. C.A. Procunier, Upon all
true patriots now lay the greatest re-
sponsibili y that ever befell citizens
t'i the empire. It wub no time for
platitudes. The empire ne.ded men
to prove that they were worthy sons.
The men hefore him between the age
of 18 and 13 were on the horns of a
dilemma. Were they to prove themselves patriots or cowards? Our
Wing and country need us. The em-
lire was fighting with its back to
the wall as never before. It was a
aerious hour. It was an honor to be
lorn under the Union Jack, but it
carried with it a responsibility.
They would tight on the side of right.
Young men should respond to th*
call because it was right to do so.
Iiord Goschen said that Britain nev-
counts the cost when her word is
concerned, it was a duty to enlist.
Could they accept the blessings ol
empire and be cowards. They should
respond to the call because they were
■lovers of liberty and freedom. The empire had freedom in the broadest
sense and liberty of spirit. Materialism was at the bottom of Germany's
ideas. Napolem said that God was on
the side of the biggest bnttulions.
God was on the side if richt, truth,
freedom and liberty. It wns their
duty not only to supply soldiers and
munitions,  hut nlso to   pray to God
I to Bweep uway the curse from the
world und establish liberty to serve
him with freedom. He was sure the
Kevelstoke contingent would give a
good account ol itself aud he had
every trust  in Lieut. McLeun.
R. Tupping thought thut Revelstoke should'show its appreciation of
the loyalty ot the volunteers | who
fought the battles of the great and
glorious empire, lie had served
through the rebellion., Tbe Canadians
had made a murk and all Could be
prom1 to say they were. Canadians.
He was sure that those to go would
give u good account o! themselves.
Britain, was not lighting Ior territory. Its cause was just and good and
Was bound to  Biicceed.
W, II. farris s.i.l thai, it was a
. 11111• ■   ber   action   not for   talking.       lt
was the duty ot each one to consider
whether,he could not enlist. There
was necessity feer    nan.     It   thrilled
them   to 8 e nun     wlii. hail   given      up
positions and sacrificed everything to
fight fe.i'itbe civilized world. The last
two speakers had pivin sons to the
cause, They had nasi n [or pride, All
must (do their part, either by enlist
ing (Tr by helping those willing to go,
Rev. J, W. Stevenson was .glad to
know that Revelstoke was doing Its
little bit. All had their part to do.
He did not believe that Germany was
an uncivilized nation. Hc believed
that after the wur it would be found
that its heart was true. In Germany
the mass of thc people was kept in
ignorance, ft was not enlightened as
to the true cause of the war. It believed that it was a Btruggle to protect the fatherland. The war waB not
only to maintain the British empire.
It represented a conflict of ideas.
Germany believed that might was
right. Britain was fighting to main-
t un the ideal of the Hag. Sooner
than submit to the German idea all
would be ready to fight and die. The
Revelstoke contingent would go forth
with prayers nnd best wishes. He
hoped they would come back, but it
uny died th'y died for a righteous
cause.
He was proud to le u citizen
of Revelstoke that night suid R. Gordon. Revelstoke had been called upon
and was Bending soldiers, but it was
not sending enough. If it sent the
same number in proportion to population that Creat Britain was sending it would be sending 200 men. If
not enough men between ls and t.i
could be obtained men up to £5 years
of age would go. He did not think
that they would be needed but scores
of the older men were ready to go
und would show the young men u
thing of two if they did. All the men
iequired would be produced. Revelstoke, was the first town in British
Columbia which had provided more
men than asked for. Three things
werc needed: soldiers, munitions and
provision for dependants of those
who volunteered. The Patriotic Fund
in Revelstoke was n.w paying $22" to
S250 a month to dependants of soldiers'of Revelstoke. The present contingent would bring up the payment
to $:I00 a month. The people of Revelstoke were contributing about
about $300 a month and every cent
wns used either in Revelstoke or olse-
where. In April the Montreal branch
of the fund hnd paid out $.r>7,0(HM In
Calgary it wns expected that the applications to be dealt with would
teach 1<M) bv July 1. Hc thanked
those who had contributed to the
fund and the ladies for what they
had done to aid the soldiers. The
young men only need to be convinced.
Until they were culled upon the older
men would provide the funds required
und until the ladies|were called upon
they would continue tho good work
of the Ked Cross society.
Rev. J. C. McKenzie opened his
speech with an appropriate anecdote
which amused the audience and pointed a moral. There wus a civilization,
he said. That power to do an evil
deed was its justification could never
be admitted. The principals of truth
anil right must be maintained, otherwise it meant the downfall of civilization. It was no time for regret; it
was time for action. The collective
life of nations was at stake. They
were living in the hcBt, country in
the world, Freedom and the principals nf Civilization, humanity and
Christian virtue were hanging in the
balance. There was only one way to
"leet the terror. It entailed sacrifice.
The Canadians had won n high nitch
in  the  llllll   ol  fame  and hud   won  the
undying hat" of the Germans. They
were hi nored more by this bate than
May would be i.y German friendship,
Hi' congratulated Kevolseoke on the
number and qu ility of its men. The
men ot the 54th would raise Canada's record a nitch or two higher.
Finds Much Activity
j   in Kootenay Country
R. I'M Green, M.1M, has returned
from a tour of the Kootenay country, taken in the interests of his
constituents. He reports that conditions nre, generally speaking, distinctly promising, Buys the Victoriu
Colonist. There is much activity in
the mining industry, particularly at
Rossland, where the situation is perhaps, better than it has been for n
number of years. This famoUB mining
camp of the Kootenays is now on a
firm and substantial basis. There is
an entire absence ol "wild-cutting,"
which proved so ruinous in the pnst;
the mines ure working full forces,
business with the local tradesmen is
reported excellent, and there is
noticeable a considerable measure ol
permanent and enduring prosperity.
Mr. Green says thnt one of the
problems confronting the mining centres in the Interior just now is thut
of disposing of the zinc output. Ow-
isg to the high prices which the metal brings in the United States mnny
low-grade properties there, whicli
would not otherwise be worked, are
now being operated, with the consequence that there is no demand for
the British Columl ia product. The
iemedy for this state cf affairs, in
Mr. Green's judgment, is thc erection
of reduction works on the Canadian
side of the line, and there seems
some nromise thut thiB boon to the
mining interests will be forthcoming
Pt no distant date. There is a big
market for the refined product.
Mr. Green says that agricultural
conditions all over the Kootcnny
country are eminently satisfactory.
The same copious rains have fallen
there which were experienced at the
Coast, and while nt some places n
little too much moisture bas been
experienced, with a spell of ordinary
warm weather, no injury will be done
the crops, and a bumper harvest is
anticipated.
Asked about unemployment in thc
Interior. Mr. Green said it was not
so much in evidence ns in the coast
cities, the rpnewrd activity in mining
r.nd lumbering hnvlnc civen work to
considerable numbers.
r»».«.oHl   -   ■ *
AN UNFXI'I.ODF.U BOMB DROPPED IN A BARN FROM A ZEPPELIN FLYING OVF.R
YARMOVTH. ENGLAND
C. B. HUME & CO., LTD.
Revelstoke s Departmental Store
FAMILY SHOE
OUTFITTERS
We Aim to Civs Maximum
Wear at a Minimum Price
DRY GOODS DEPARTMENT
500 Yards of Curtain Materials on Sale Now
Scrims, Bungalow Nets, Colored Draperies, Art Serges, worth 50c to 75c
Brighten up the windows while you can get them for per yard 25c
Pongee Silk at a Bargain—A specially good purchase enables us to give you these Pongee
or Raw China Silks at      35c and 50c
Standard Spool Cotton— Black or white, all sizes.    3 spools for Wc or a dozen for 40c.
Cute Coats for the baby and the boy or girl up to four years.     Something extra nice in
these lots at $1.90, $2.90, and $3.90
Girls' and ladies' Wash Sailor Middies and Skirts, each   $1.00
New Umbrellas and Parasols   J5C to $5
Men's Furnishing and Shoe Dep't
Women's Tan Shoe Sale
Now on the tables. All our stock of Women's Tan Footwear. Strictly high-grade—
all the famous J. & T. Bell make. All this season's lasts, not an old or shop-worn
pair in the lot.    You can't make a mistake on them.
WOMEN'S BOOTS
Button or lace, calf or vici kid, suede.     Light and dark shades of brown.     Sale Price
$3.50 per pair
WOMENS OXFORDS
Chocolate kid, brown calf, button and lace.    High and low heels.    Sale Price	
$2.95 per pair
WOMEN'S PUMPS
Plain or colonial lasts.    High or low heels.    Light or dark shades.    Sale Prices	
$2.75 per pair
WATCH THE WINDOWS
Grocery and Crockery Department
Fresh Stock of Pickles Just Arrived
CROSSE & BLACKWELL'S Chow-chow,
Mixed, Gherkins, White Onions and Walnut in pint bottles; Chow-chow, Mixed ami
Walnuts in quart bottles.
Crosse & Blackwell Chutney, quart
bottles, (>5c: pint bottles, 35c; .-pint bottles, 25c.
HEIN// Sweet Mixed, Sweet Gherkins,
Chow-chow, Mixed, sour, and Gherkins,
sour, in pint bottles. Heinz' Sweet Gherkins in hulk sold in the pint or quart.
STEVENS' Pickles, pt. and qt bottles,
sour. HAMBLIN & BRERETON Sweet
Gherkins, pint boft'os. Pin Money, Mellon Manga and S.v. ■•. Mixe I Pickles.
Pickled Beets.
DOM, SEN & Ca. Mangol *Sweet Sliced
Chutney: quart bottles, 75c; pint bottles,
40c.
WATCH OUR WINDOW  FOR BREAKFAST FOODS
Specials for Friday and Saturday
l   |   • i 'iv.1 $|.uu        8lb*. Bean Oolfce, ground tteeh   . ..91.00        Pine Apptp.       mm   ,.10c
Kobertaon'i Strawberry Jam. poU., .80c Roberteon'i Raspberry Jam, poi.
Our spci'iiii Olive,pei botUe     ...8O0 PAGE FOUR
THE MAIL-HERALD' REVELSTOKE
SATURDAY, JUNE 5, 1915
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THE   MAIL-HERALD. REVELSTOKE
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z f»AGE SIX
THE MAIL-HERALD   REVELSTOKE
SATURDAY,  JUNK 5,  1915"
l« YAL TO THE EMPIRE
►1 •■ MM...  OP  INDIA   A('( 'KITS  OBLIGATIONS OK THK « AH.
liy Well e (lie eOoilUlcl its nil (>|>-
iunity io Prove Their Worthiness
to be Citizens of Greater Britain
—Women Aro Devoted i<> thn
King-Emperor aiiiI Are Praying
Kor lhe Success of the Troops.
Thut   India  In loyal  to Great Brl-
aln  in   regard   to  the  war, despite
any tears iu the contrary, Is mainlined In a letter from Franklin D.
(Cogswell ol Ewlng Christian College,
(Allahabad, India, which Bays in pari:
Widespread restlessness  und   j|s-»
aconti'iit   there nlay be   aHong   tlio
l816,QOP,000   that   make   up   India's
population, but   the violent preach-
jBJfi Is of educated Indians (lonilcl.i5(l
4»hrfiaii  Bjajcely  ropresenl   the   Irue
maHiiu  of  the  miposllion   (y  British
lttilc In India or the alms of the most
Mnfluentlal Indian leaders,   The i^oai
Vif the national movement, as freely
expressed   for  years   from   platform
and press by the men who command
the  widest   respect,   is   self-govern-
menl within the Empire, tudia wauls
Wh.' Bame privileges thai are enjoyed
fliy   the   autonomous   dominions   of
'Great   Britain;   at   the  present  time
the greal portion of her citizens ap-
Ipear to be looking no further,
Thus Instead of there bi Ing any
jxrlUl outbreak of rebellion In the
'hour or Britain's trial In the west
Ituere has been a noteworthy demonstration Of loyalty throughout tbe
JpenlLsula, "Britain's war is our war"
Ts the ery thai  has eel d rrora the
■huge mass meetings thai have been
Ihf'd iii every Important town and
(City In the course of the Irbi week.
(Instead of the wur's being a niuial
for chaos, it appears io be regarded
As an opportunity for India to .show
.that she Is worthy of the place In
Ibe Kmpire that she has been ue-
knandtng.
One oi the most feared and most
fesperied of the opponents oi Ihe
■Government, Sir Pheroaeshah Mehta,
(phrased the Idea in a ringing sen-
, jtence that was greeted wiih tremen-
' Idous enthusiasm at a mass meeting
fa the Bombay town ball when he
etaald: "We have often met in this
2ia.ll to assert our rlghta as citizens
lot the Kmpire; we are now proud
to meet lo accept our duties and obligations."
It is not only from aslut • leaders
■who grasp the political significance
Of the position in whicli India now
finds hersell that present raanlfesta-
ItioiiK of loyalty are coming, The war
IS the absorbing topic ol every jros-
tupliitt folk whose hearts are incapa-
,l)le ol any feeling more mixed than
that ol simple devotion lo Ihe King-
•Emperor are hoping and praying for
the success of his forces. Htm they
know. He came to them lo assume
Als Indian realm In the most gorgeous durbar of recent centuries. He
Ih tbeir personal sovereign.
A grizzled old bazaar merchant
came into one of our college buildings the otlor day, and on seeinc a
picture of the King-Emperor raised
his bands devoutly, Baying: "He ts
•U' King. We eat his bread. Wo
'pray God to Kive victory lo his
arms."
i Almost Immediately after the
verve wrecking i>•-_-1«>■ I ol suspense
pver England's decision was ended
%y the declaration of war against
Germany, the ruling chiefs offered
Itheir armies for use wherever the
English should need tbem Ten of
the chiefs proposed a >-'ift of a hospital ship, the Loyally, which has
now been accepted by the viceroy.
Everywhere funds are being raised
for the care of wounded and the relief of distress.     Even  Indian  ladii -.
whose freedom   of   gathering   ii   so
■eriously hindered by the system of
■eelusion to which tbey are t-ubject-
«d. have formed Loyalty lea)
that hav expressed "their readiness
to place Hieir services .ii the feel of
itb.- King-Emperor In such manner
As may be tound suitable." and have
bei;uii to rais>- money fnr ri
tne<*sures.
Everywhere I ik" sums for general
Support of the war and for Ihe maintenance of hospitals and mi;
Trork have been subscribed Not only
English churches bave made prayer
for Uritish victory; in mosque as
wil special prayers have been beld.
The viceroy's recent anni
tbat   two  divisions,  Including  I
tegimenU of I n. i; _. n regulars, t
b.  ii       - tpedit! force has
be-''I
Tl.elt    di
known,
It is Europ. Euro-
p.
cours".
t- ering, and  thi      cal i of
si 1111 • m In everj i
mr' le.
in a co intry io di' il
am! religious   11"- I
would  be strange  -f there wer
animliy   in   such   whole   bei
pr ' loyalty as ih>   fo
Tie-re   Is a "•" tlon of educati d
yt't      .        .i verj tempered ■ •
•loi  of  IU '-ntbusiasm  for the ,
of lb- Empire,    It Is lm lined to
jtthlse with Austria in its vigorous
atrokc   to   end   the   plotting   of    the
egerb      ..     IS)    the   dual    monarchy,
and  lo honor iierrnany for her fiin-
pletS  loyalty   to   her  ally   when   Ilus-
sM. look up the cause of Bervla. The
iaea of England Bghting on the
aame aide with Russia is highly dis-
pleulng.
Vague rumors of renewed fratern-
tiini;  of  Germans and  Turks  have
• filtered through the one strict.) cen
•joreil cable open to Kuiiip", Which
have   mad"   tl Dtlons  Ol  Turkey
a Tllal    issue    tO    India.     If   'lurkey
throw" her Qerman stuffed and Ger-
man equipped army In with her I eu-
<ienb' friends, thui torclnj tbe Bi I Ish
Empire, with more Mohammedan
BU'. | ;,,n other Government
t0 ,     ,,    [here   would  al   the
least in 'ne ertainty aboui the atU-
tud"   tl •    Moslem   leaders  of   India
-ffoti e.     Al   I'I"   Bnt,   however.
•n., ■--., ■ -, press is affirming tho
loyal community in carefully
Lota Of Work III Spring.
Mr. II. A. Macdonell, Director of
Immigration for Ontario, is of the
opinion thai next spring there will he
a larger demand for (arm labor iban
ever known in the prov Ince. and tbat
It will be to the advantage of farmers to secure help al the present time.
Owing to the facts that Immigration
from the old coun Iry has been practically brought to a standstill, and
that so many farm hands have gone
with the Canadian contingent, a
shortage of labor will be experienced
when the spring comes. There Ib no
reason, Mr. Macdonell thinks, why
farmers cannot make arrangements
now by hiring help on a yearly engagement. In response to the circulars which have been sent out to
farmers, ll is stated that a good many
applications are being received each
day for help. 	
Hanking Course Popular.   V
Two hundred students are taking
the banking course recently introduced   in  Queen's  University!"-" "''• ""  -
The muniolpal bond sales ln Canada for October, as compiled by The
Monetary Times, amounted to $737,-
429, compared with $510,9r.0 for
September and   Jn.4 r.'J.2S2   for the
corresponding   period  of  last  year.
Calgary disposed of $250,000 de-
bentures   privately   in   London.
British Columbia leads with $;ioo,-
000,     Saskatchewan     follows     with
$166,129,   Ontario   sold    $i.ri3,noo
worth, New Brunswick $12A,000, and
Alberta  $3,800.
REALLY DELIGHTFUL
THE DAINTY
MINT-COVERED
CANDY-COATED
CHEWING GUM
Make a Corner
Cosy
Collect the Cushion
Cover Coupons with
every QUjitUt Package
Shells Halt  Letter Writing.
The following Is from a Uritish
lance corporal, who was apparently
irritated in his letter writing by interruption from the Herman guns:
'The Germans don't give us much
time for letter writing. This one has
been stopped six limes already, just
because the beggars were creeping
too close, and I had to go out with
my bayonet to chase them off before
Bottling down again."	
She Wis  Ashamed.
"I see you have been wearing my
dresses again, Jane," said her mistress. "You ought to be ashamed of
yourself."
"I was, mum. Jack said If I yrote
such clothes again be would never
speak to me any more."—Liverpool
Mercury. 	
Women Doctors eGo.
The Russian Red Cross Society has
decided to accept women as surgeons
at the front, providing thai the number of women doctors does not exceed
50 per cent, of the number of men
practitioners.
Resented.
' What are your political convictions'" asked the inquisitive person.
'There's no good getting personal," replied the boss. "I have never
<»ven been tried, much leas convicted.
Summer is Here!   "'„";,'!
holidays al Sicamous, B.C.   Weekend   parties  specially catered  for.
Cood Boating, Bathing, Flthlrg, {tc.
for Hire:     All   classes   of   Motor
Bi ate, R n Im ate, Canoes, Pishing
'I i. kle, E
Large or Small Parties Catered Tor
Ke i fm ther pail ••■.-.
v|.A. GILUS, -
N     ,  K
LOYAL  OBD1 If
OF !
-    -    -
V - • ng Bi
M.I.AN K
II  L HAUG, He
■ i,    2k
.'.AH
• ..»>  ivenini
lock,     In   Sdk.rk   ill .
rs    cordially  m-
','..    .ORDON, C. C.
3BLKIBK LODOB No.  12
I. 0. O.  F.
Meets every Thursday  evening In
Hall   at   8 o'clock. Visiting  brethem  eeilinlly  invited.
R   MILLER, N. fl.
I .ME8 MATHIB, BeCItUtf.
KOOTENAY LODOB, No. 18.
A. F. and A. M.
Regular Meetings are beld In
Mew Masonic Hall on the Fourth
Monday ln eacb month at 8 p.m.
Visiting brethren ars cordially
welcome.
JOHN   l.KK,   VT.  M.
ROBT,  (JORDON, Secretary
(JOOI) POLICY
It's good policy to think of thj' future
It's still bettei- policy to provide against
'lie misfortunes it. may have in store
tor you. . The surest way of protecting
void self ami family is a
LIFE IN8UKAN( E POLICY
with   n   reliable  company.    The  high
financial Btandlng and i"nn business
e'ateer of the Kootenay Agenda.
makes it absolutely trustworthy,
Youi- time mav be near at hand
Don't delay.   Take out a policy now.
KOOTENAY AGENCIES, Ltd.
A. E, Kincaid. Manager.
A eFrcneb Heroine.
Saying she was content to lose her
leg for France, Denlse Cartier, the
■thirteen year-old girl struck by a
bomb ilropped by a German aeroplane
in Paris, knits jerseys for the soldiers.
Mclntyrc's Grocery
Have just placed in
stock a large supply
POTATOES
A good, clear, firm,
large - sized potato,
and we guarantee
will give satisfaction.
Mclntyrc's Grocery
H.
Tax
dermis'
Bi
-
- < '-leaned
and
Iiresgeed.
■
.-.
Lumb
um Der men
I' n ill pay you to make
ill at
F. B. WELLS
Fur Buyer and Exporter
: own Rm EL-STOKE, B.( -
utfll
the
specialty
■ f   l^v.
-   i oki       Me!
•   •
E. fj. Burridge & Son
Plumber', and Tinsrr.;-
Metallic Ceilings, CorruRated Pooling, Furnace Work and up-
to-date Plumbing
Work
i BTOKE B <
FREE TRIPS TO
PANAMA
EXPOSITION
How to Get a Free Trip
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who secures 100 yearly subscriptions for
The Mail-Herald will be given a return
ticket to San Francisco, absolutely free
by The Mail-Herald;
Some Superior Points of This Offer
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2. There are no votes, so that you cannot be crowded out the last few days by some contestant who has
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you desire.   We will arrange the dates to suit you.
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Subscriptions secured in either city or country count.
Payment on subscriptions already owing will count
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CITY TRANSFER CO.
Baggage Trai
\ , IM,
l :   I I'll.,...
hi Phone Hfl
swir/Ki; Bl
•   il   i i i
Advertising    Pays
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in   the  Mail-Herald
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I)-) it today The earlier you start the
iooner you can go to the Exposition.
SUBSCRIPTION
=RATES=
12 Months   .   .   $2.50
6 Months   .   .   $1.25
All Subscripiioni Count
it is not necessary to secure
all yearly subscriptions; six
months, twelve months, ami
two years will count us below:
2 0-month subscriptions; valuo
I yearly subscription
1 12 month subscription; valuo
1 yoarly subscription
1 2 year subscription; value
2 yearly subscriptions
For Further Particulars Address
Circulation Manager, Mail-Herald,Revelstoke,B.C. SATURDAY,  JUNK 5, 1915
THE MAIL-HERALD. REVELSTOKE
PAGE SE\BfN|
.AV'.'e-
THK CORPORATION OF THK CITY
OP RKVKLSTOKB
NOTIOl. is hereby given that tbo
first sitting of the annual Court ol
revising, correcting and bearing complaints against the assessment o( the
City of RevelBtoke und the RevelBtoke
School District as made by the Assessor for tbe yoar 1918, will be held
in tho City Hall, RevelBtoke, B. 0.,
on Tuesday, June 8th, 1915, at 8 P.m.
Any person having any complaint
apainut the assessment mult give
notice ln writing to tho AsaeBBor at
least 10 clear days previous to the
above date.
Dated,   RevelBtoke,  B.   C, this  tith
ay of May,  1915.
VV. A. GORDON,
ABBCHHOr
■ I —	
.NOTICE UF MORTGAGE SAl.K
In surveyed territory the land must
be described by sections, or legal
sub divisions of sections, and ln un
■urveyed territory the tract applied
for shall be staked out by the ap
jlicant himself.
Each application must be accompan
led by a fee of $5 which will be re
funded if tbe rights applied for ari
not available, but not otherwise. _>
royalty shall be paid on the mer
(liant.nl,in output of tbe mine at tb.
late of live cents per ton.
The person operating the mine shul
lurnlsh the Agent with sworn returur
accounting for the full quantity o'
merchantable coal mined and pay tbi
loyalty thereon If tbe coal minm*
rights are not being operated, hiioi
leturns should be furnished at Iras
once a year.
For full information appllcatlot
should he made to the Secretary u
the Department of the Interior, Ot
tttwa, or to the Agent or Sub-Agen
of Dominion Lands.
W.  W.  CORY
Under and by virtue of tbe powers
of sale contained in a certain linl.ii
ture of Mortgage, which will be produced ut tbe time ol tbe sale, there
will be oliered lor sale by public auction at the Court House, iu the City
of Revelstoke, B.C., on the loth day
of June, l-l- at the hour of '2 p.m,
the following described property:
All and singular tbat certaiu parcel or tract of laud and premises
situate, lying and being iu ib. ilia
trict of Kootenay and be ng con-
posed of Lot "iiu, Gr.up Oue, on the
otlicial plan or sur.ey o. Kootenay
District.
The property will be oflerel for
sale subject to reserved bid.
The property is said to consist of
2'i'i acres more or less with iarra
buildini;8 and is situate near the
town of Beaton on Upper Arrow
Lake.
Conditions of sale will be made
known on application to the undersigned.
Dated this Sth day of May, 1915 at
RevelBtoke, B.C.
McCARTER & FARRIS,
Solicitors for E.W.I'. Poget,
June 8-4t. Mortgagee
Iti THK SUPREME COURT OS1
bKUiS-l  CUL.i_.U-3-.-t.
lu  the  matter  ul  the  Kxecut.ou Act
Aud in the Matter of uu u--i. a ...-
tween:
L. B. GRIFFITHS, Plaintitf,
Aud:
juHN  ALLEN,  Defeuduut.
TAivK  .viin i.   that  uu     application will be mude on the IM-u n.,y ■■■
NOTICE  OF CANCELLATION  OF
RESKRVE
NOTICE is hereby given that tht
reserve existing on Lot 7926, Koote
nny District, by reason of a notio
published in the B. C. Gazette on tin
37th of December, 1907, 'is cancelled
and that the Bald Lot will be opei
to entry by pre-emption on Tuesday
the 15th day of June, nt tbe hour <>■
nine o'clock in the forenoon. All ap
plications must be made at the oftlo
of the Government Agent, at Revel
stoke, B. C.
R. A. RBNWICK
Deputy Minister of Lands.
.,ands Department, Victoria, B.C.
l-'lth April, 1H15. Jl.
REVELSTOKE RETAIL
PRODUCE MARKET
FRUITS
■urape fruit   Cal.  10c;
Flor.  15c
Bananas, per doz m .i  .60
Lemons,  per doz 25
Apples, new,   I to 'libs. .25
Oranges, navel,    from  25 to .5">
■Javel Oranges       W
Rhubarb,  per pound 01
Gooseberries,  per  pound 15
Pineapple, each  30
Figs, cooking, Jibs, for .25
Dates,  Hallow!     2   lbs.  for .25
Dates, Fard, 2lbs. for ... ,3S
Dates,  Dromedary,  pkg.  ,16, 2 for ,25
June, A.D.. 1*15 at the hour oi lD.ii> ; Walnuts. California, per IT) Kfl
..' clue* in the ioreuoon, ur .-o ooou
\hereaftei as Counsel can he heard,
in Chambers at the Court House, iu
the City of Revelstoke, Province of
British Columbia, for un Order directing that a reference be held to
ascertain the interes'. of the defend
jint in the lands, beiug in the Province ol British Columbia, Towu-
tthip 83,  Range 6,     West of the Cth
tferidian,  Section P. I.     South-west'Hams, retail  lar?
Quarter, of 14, containing 151.02 acres !Bacon,  retail   28'a
more or less and that tho same or a   Chicken, retail   22@
competent part thereof  be    sold     to   Sausages, retail   \1\'n
•realize the amount payable uuder the j Turkey,  per tb 2S
Judgment obtained herein on the 4th I 3eese, per It)	
WaHnuts, Grenoble,
i Pecans, per tb	
I Filberts, per It)	
> Almonds, per tb	
Dim-Mr,  per lb ,
MEATS
Fresh killed beef, retail
I Pork, retail   13&
I button, retail       1-4®
I Veal, retail       131®
.01(3.271
2'J
25
27
3
II'
38
ir,
on
day of January, A.D. IS 11.
Aud further take notice that you
are required to attend at Court on
the above-named day to show cautie
why such an Order might not be
made.
And  further take notice that
the application will be read the
bdavit of George W. Hall, sworn
the  .th day of April, A.D., 1915   and
> nl e.i herein.
Dated this 27th day of May, A. D.
l'J15.
McCARTKR & FARRIS
Solicitors for Plaintifl.
per Ib 27,
 55
 » 90
.30
1.75
.2".
.f)0
SYNOPSIS   OF COAL MINING
REGULATIONS.
Coal mining rights of the Dominion
ln Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Al
rerta, the Yukon Territory, the
North-west Territories and ln a portion of the Province of Uritish Columbia, may be issued for a term ol
twenty-one years at an annual rental of Jl an acre. Not more than
2,500 acres will be leased to one applicant.
Application for lease must be made
i.y the applicant ln person to the
lAgent or Sub-Agent of tbe district
tin which the rights applied for are
situated.
The lease wlll include the coal mln
lng rights only, but tbe lessee ma;
be i"i milled to purchase whatever
available surface rights may be considered necessary for the working of
the mine at tbe rate of $10.00 an
acre.
Duck
Iard, 3 tbs. ...
Lard, 5 lbs. ...
SUGAR
Granulated B. C. Cane
WO tb.  sack    $8.50
Lump sugar, 2 Ibe. ..„.
af    Gran.  B.C.  20 tb. sack,
on   Brown sugar, .'libs	
Syrup, maple, bottle ...
Syrup, gallon      1.75ej2.il"
Honey, comb,  per lb  .:!''
Honey, Itb. jars thll .a.'.
FLOUR
Robin Hood  $2.50
B. & K. Bread F.our  2..VJ
Five Roses  2.50
Lake of the Woods, bag  2.50
Royal Household  2.50
Purity Flour  2.50
King'B Quality  2.50
VKGKTABl.KS
Cucumbers, each	
Radishes, bunch   	
Parsley, per bunch 	
Dry, onions, 5 lbs. for
Cabl'iu'e.  local, each .
New Potatoes, Ib	
Head Lettuce, Ib	
Tomatoes, lb	
New  Carrots,   Ib	
Turnips, per Ib	
Celery, per lb	
DAIRY  PRODUCT8
Putter, creamery, lb 40 <g> .45
Butter, dairy,  per tb      .35
.0-Vg
13.  _
.20
.05
.05
.-■:.
.lv
.0.
.15
.50
.021
.0*1
.15
HODGE7T8 TAKES HOLP.
He Is Now Canada's Commissioner
Pot Red Croe* Work.
Dr. Charles A. Hodgetts, of Ottawa, wbo lias been appointed commissioner for the Canadian Red Cross
Society in succession to the late Col.
Ilurland, of Montreal, who died recently ln London, was lor many years
secretary of the Provincial Hoard of
Health of Ontario and chief medical
health oflicer of the province with
headquarters at Toronto. He resigned this position u few years ago in
order to take charge of the health
department of the Dominion Conservation Commission, with which organization he is still Identified, He
is looked upon us one of Ibe most
competent and authoritative of Canadian officials in tuiilters pertaining
to health.
Dr. Hodgetts sailed recently Tor
England and proceeded at once to
report to the llritisli Red Cross Society, of which the Canadian Ked
Cross Society ls h branch, and whose
particular duty will be to look after
the slek and woun led from tlie Canadian overseas contingent, Dr, Hodgetts will direct the distribution of
supplies sent over from Canada and
esi ecially those sent from tbe headquarters In Toronto. Tlie Canadian
public will be kept informed of the
work, Its progress, and its needs
through tli^ chairman of the Toronto Executive Committee, Noel
Marshall.
Dr. Hodgetts states that he feels
tn mendously the responsibility of
tbe work placed In his bunds and says
he will endeavor to the utmost to
see that it is performed as efficiently
as possible. Dr. Hodgetts hus accepted the position on a voluntary
basis and will not be paid for It. He
went to Kngland to lill tbe new position with the approval of Prem'er
Borden and Chairman Clifford Sifton. of the Conservation Commission.
No better choice probably could be
found in Canada for the comniisslon-
ersbip of the Canadian Red Cross
Society, as It. Hodgetts has been
actively engaged in medical health
work for the past 20 years. He was
Ihe honorary secretary of the Canadian Ited Cross Society when it was
formed 16 years ago and lt was he
■who carried on the organization's
work in connection with tha South
African war. He subsequently became the first life member of the
organization in Canada and for over
20 years be has been prominently
connected with the St. John's Ambulance Corps. For the past 15
years he has been doing similar work
ln connection with the Royal Artillery Medical Corps, branch of the
Canadian militia. He is now a lieutenant-colonel ln tbat body, and was
for five weeks stationed with tbe flrst
contingent at Valcartier looking after the medical" arrangements there.
He is everywhere throughout the
Dominion looked upon as the foremost medical health authority in
this country.
Dr. Hodgetts was born in Toronto
in 1859. He is a graduate ol Victoria
University and the Ontario College
of Pharmacy and has taken postgraduate courses in the leading hospitals of Great Britain, Germany and
France. He was house surgeon al
the London General Hospital for a
time and also at the Toronto Genera)
Hospital and resident assistant surgeon at the Stafford Infirmary, England. He was medical inspector ol
the Provincial Board of Health, latei
secretary for a number of years, and
subsequently registrar general of tbe
province before being made head ol
the Dominion health department In
connection with the Conservation
CommlBBion. He is tbe author of a
large number of important works
on health and holds high oflice in a
large number of medical organizations, being vice president of the
American Health Association and a
prominent officer In a great number
of similar societies.
'Ih'Cbc, Canadian,  per
Ib.
,2S
"heese, Van.  Stilton,
Ib.
..in
.'heese,  Imp.  Stilton,
tb.
.60
Kggs, local  new laid,
doz.
.35 to .30
FEED
Bran, ton 	
	
. ... $3€.00
Wheat, ton *
    56.00
Oats, ton	
	
  60.00
Mounted Police Strengthened.
Fivo hundred extra police have
been enlisted in the west by the Government for service with the Royal
Northwest Mounted Police this winter. Most of the men taken on the
force nro ex-members, who have voluntarily offered to serve temporarily
In helping to maintain order and
render assistance to the many in need
during the next few months.
The large foreign element in the
west, coupled with considerable unemployment in iiiiiui' districts, haa
rendered it necessary to largely increase the police force. This situation also explains why tbe Government has not been able to meet the
desire of largo numbers of tbe Royal
Northwest Mounted Police to go to
the front with the Canadian expeditionary forces. Their experience and
knowledge of the thousands of foreigners now scattered throughout the
west are doubly valuable at the present time. Comptroller L. K. Fortes-
cue has gone to Regina to look after
various matters ln connection with
the force.
Nickel on Banned 1.1st.
A far-reaching contraband of war
Order-ln-COUncil has been pasBed by
the Dominion Cabinet to prevent the
exportation to an enemy country any
articles which would be useful during war lo the enemies of Great Britain. Divested of technical terms the
order-in-council means that Canada
will lake particular care that nothing
will lind its way from the Dominion
to the enemies of Great Britain which
would  be of any assistance to tbem.
A number of articles are specially
mentioned, such as nickel, nickel
ore. woollen goods, food, explosives,
horses, fodder, leather, coal, copper, petrol, aeroplair's, barbed wire,
etc.
Canadian Dry Dock.
The Canadian Government is now
n gotlatins the purchese of an additional siie at Lang's Cove, al Esquimau, B.C., for a dry dock capable
■ ef gcrommodatine i' •■ largest ocean
liners In the world, hs well as Ihe biggest (I "ai'.nought:-: cf to-day or tomorrow.
A BACKACHE
—with burning, highly colored
urinee—are sure signs of weak or
inflammed Kidneys. Gin Pills
cure all Kidney and Bladder
Troubles. 50c. a box, 6 for $2.50.
—at all dealers.
I ii-nr-.-im ••  Men  Warned.
Advice has been received al Ottawa
from the Imperial Government that
some time ago the Board of Trade issued an announcement warning insurance companies agalsnt tbe business
of insuring cargoes In neutral vessels, from capture. The announcement was as follows:
"It has been brought to the notice
of the Board of Trade that British
insurance companies have Insured or
re-insured goods Bhlpped on neutral
vessels against the risk of rapture, or
detention, by HIb Majesty's Government, or allied Governments.
"The Board of Trade are advised
that Buch contracts of insurance, or
re-liiMiiaiice. against the risk of capture, or detention, by Great Britain,
or her allies, are prohibited by the
law of Kngland. nnd tbey think it
necessary to warn insurance companies and underwriters against Mich
business."
Ten submarines which the Fore
River Shipbuilding corporation is
constructing at Quincy, Mass., for
the British government will be launched early next month, within five
months of thc Mmi their keels were
laid, The trial trips will follow soon
after. The boats could be ready for
commission by July I, although they
are not to be delivered until after
t.he war.
The New York Sun has interviewed
u number of well-known German women to secure their views with regard to the sinking of the Lusitania.
Shocking ub it may appear, the German women appear to have little
more sympathy for the women and
children who were sent to thc bottom
of tho ocean than the ollicer of the
German submarine ,vho engineered
the attack. As one gentle soul put
it: "The Knglish ought not to mix
babies with ammunition."
"R  ugh on Bu ta" Hear* mil R its,
Mice. elr.   Don'l  Die in l|le House.   15c
and iv iii Ding and Country S<torn<
do After tlie (Ikei. Mml
SPECIALS FOR YOUNG CHICKS.
Dr. Rush's Chick Food. Cracked Corn.
Wheat, Bran, and Shorts for sale at
L.  C.  MASSONS  STORES
WAR DECLARED!
War ia declared on our stock ot
Tea and Coffee, s.ee our window
for specials.
$1 Buys 3 lbs,
While this lot lasts, and as eanoC-
ber advance is predicted in the
near future we would adv^-ae putting by a few pounds.
BREAD
Why Are we Belling more bread?
There must be a reason.
Let Us Tell You Why
Just compare a loaf of ours witb
iny other «Jid we are absolutely
■sure you will use the best, thiu
you will know why.
BJ3ST BY  TKST
Phone 41
HOBSON'S
Box 734
Shamrock Hams
and Bacon
:<CURED IN CALGARY)
Made from selected hogs-in the most modern plant in the
West- Government inspected—approved by careful housewives everywhere. SHAMROCK IS THE SEAL OF SUPERIORITY, and this applies equally to Lard, Butter, Eggs,
Sausage—wherever it appears.
P. BURNS & COMPANY, Limited
KING EDWARD HOTEL
H . J. MCSORLEY, FFOP.
REVELSTOKE, B. C.
Strictly First-Class
Rooms—Single, en Suite, and with Bath
Revelstoke Wine and Spirit Co., Ltd.
Imfwrters and Wholesale Dealers.
Manufacturers of Aerated Waters
WINES
LIQUORS
CIGARS
Agents for Calgary Beer
Jack Laughton, Proprietor First Street, Revelstoke- B. C
WINDSOR HOTEL
EUROPEAN  PLAN
GOOD ACCOMMODATION KEASONABLE RATES
CAFE IX CONNECTION
f\ D I P M T A I      Suitably furnished with the
HOTEL
J. Albert Stone, Propretor
choicest the market affords.
Best Wines, Liquors and
Cigars. Rates $1 a day.
Monthly rates.
Public  Works Going On.
The program of public works under
construction by the Government Is being carried out In spite of the linancial stringency. The expenditure of
ordinary and capital accounts up to
the end of October exceeded Ihe expenditure on these accounts last year
by about eight million dollars.
To minimize unemployment, all
works under contract are being carried on JubI as the Minister, of Finance In his August budget Intimated
would be the case.
New works will only be entered
upon as the source of revenue from
which expenditure might be met, become apparent. Since the outbreak
of war the money markets of the
world have been closed to public borrowing.
Indians To hare Well.
Glen Campbell, chief inspector of
Indian agencies, reporlF that the
Northern Indians wlll not suffer any
hardships aa a result of a slump In
the fur trade, but will earn a ronifort-
fcbla livelihood by bunting game and
fishing.
pitman Scott, thi deputy superintendent-general of Indian affairs, bus
made arrangements to prevent any
great hardships occurring to the Indians.
i,"
AUSTRIAN
CAVALRY PATROL CROSSING RIVER FAGB .EIGHT
THE   MAIL-HERALD,    REVELSTOKE
HATHHI.AY,  JUNF. 5,   1915
Miss Juiiet McK
duy fur Winnipeg.
,y loft on WednoB
J,  Jones oi Victoria ro;istered   at
the King Edward hotel nn Thursday.
Rifleman  .luck Morgan is spending
a few days at Kamloops.
It. 1).  Firth of Malakwu was at the
King Edward hotel on Thursday.
j.  FraBer of  Armstrong registered     J. D. McNivin of Vancouver     was
at  the'  11
day.
.til Revelstoke on     Tliura-  at tho Hevclstoke hotel on Friday.
W. Newton and ri.H
Victoria were ut the
■toke on Friday.
('.  tilahrtick  ol   C.ilgary  registorcd
at   the King  Edward  hotel yesterday.
Hopkins     ol
Hotel Revel-1
I   c. LonghurBt of Nelson was among
the guests at the RevelBtoke hotel on
C. Stabler of Vancouver will speuk   Friday.
at  the  services    o{     the  Methodist
Miss Qinn "( Vancouver iB the
bouse guest of her aunt Mr. J. Lyons I.n   a few weeks.
tin Monday evening at 6.30 sharp
the Giants will play the O.P.R, at
basoball on tbe Y.M.C.A. grounds,
ll. G, Barber and A.B, Sharpe oi
Glacier were among the guests at the
King  Edward  hotel on Thursday.
Dick Lawrence left on Friday for
Three Valley, when' be will visit for
a few days, the guest of Mr. and Mrs
A, Rutherford,
in   and Mrs. McNaughton attd chll-1   Walter Stone ol   Chicago, is    the
dren arrived (ram Rossland on Sun-  guest .ef Mr. and Mrs. Lenard How-
day.    Mrs.  McNaughton will   remain   son and  Mrs.   Maxon for a week, en-
three months on a visit to her   mot-   route to San Francisco.
ber Mrs. Fred Fraser. Dr. McNaugh- ■    u the recreatlon sroUnds on Tues-
ton returned home ou Tuesday. day 9Tenlng   there wiU be a iaCrosse
The regular monthly meeting of the  game between a picked team from tho
..ourd  of  directors     of  the Railroad   city  "»d  the  54th   battalion.
Y.M.C.A.  Will he held Tuisday eren-|
ung   next   at  7.30.  The  business     Will !
he election     of otliceis and chairmen,
p|  committees for the year.
Church On Sunday.
An auction sale of tiie household
(fleets of Mrs. W.R. Stokes will be
held by w. Parry on June it.
Tomorrow st 2.80 there will bo a
baseball game between the 54th battalion  and    tbe      High  BChool  at   the
recreation grounds,
The regulai monthly business meeting of St. John's Tennis club will
be held on Monday evi ning at H.'AQ
o'clock   m the Y.P.S, room of    the
church.
Miss   Matheson, matron,       and
Miss Fraser, nurse, of the Queen Victoria hospital staff, Revels'oke, were
visitors of  Dr.  and Mrs.  T.  Mcl'her-
T. A. Lewis is PiiehdiUg tt
furlough with
is a veteran of the South African .
war, and is now attached to the llth Was inspected by C. H. Hopkins the
C M.H. who have been camped at provincial government soil nnd crop
Hastinga park all winter and are expert wbo pronounced it the best he
now encamped at Aldershot, Vernon.
week's  son.—Sulmon Arm Observer.
ds parents. Mr. Lewis |
The corn crop  of Rev. W.C,
J. I'.. Sweet of Toronto was at the
Kevelstoke hotel on Thursday.
A. Stabler of Vancouver was at
the  King  Kdward  hotel yesterday.
Miss Alice Brown of the Queen
Victoria nursing stall, returned this
week from a short holiday ut Kamloops.
F.H. Falconer of the geologioal survey department at Ottawa will continue the mapping of the district to
the north of Kevelstoke this year.
All members of the Loyal Order of
Moose are requested to attend the
next regular meeting of the order,
on Tuesday evening, June 8, at 8 p.
in. in Selkirk hull.
The big sale at Howsou and company's opened at 10 o'clock this
morning and the store has been
crowded all day. Grout bargains are
being oliered in all lines ot furniture,
curtains, towels, rugs and in tact on
everything In the store. The Bale will
last for Hi' days, but the earlier tho
better Choice,
At  the conclusion  of  the bin  gamo
on  Thursday  afternoon  the  Federals
played    the  All   Comers.     The score
I ended I tp 0 In favor oi the Federals,
vv. K. Cummings   of    Edmonton,
Grand Mister of I.O.O.F. of Alberta,
and J. Tully, represiutative 'jf tho
Kingston Relief association stuy.td
cfl here on Thursday to pay a visit
I to Selkirk Lodge No. 1_M I.O.O.P. After seeini.' the principle points f interest in the city, they resumed their
journey on Friday's No. 1, for New
Westminster, where they are to attend the sessions of the Grand Lodge
of B.C,
AT  THE  THEATRES
Calder
showing
has seen this year and as
every prospect nf success.
On Monday evening there will be
an old time congregational rally of' A parlor car is now being operated
eld and new friends in the Methodist by the C.P.R. in connection with
Church. There will be a program and trains Nos. 3 audi, between Van-
refreshments will ne served. The couver and Kevelstoke. They are
years report will be read, policy out- furnished with detached chairs of a
lined and society representative elect-j very comfortable design. There     has
Ml.
j been a good demand for the seats
since the flrst ones were operated on
Sm.day last.
Hon. Thomas Taylor, minister of
.public works, who attended the banquet at Pentlcton, Monday night, is The Que u Victoria hospital stall
visiting John R. Jackson, M.l'.l*. for of doctors and nurses presented Miss
Greenwood, at Midway. He is accom- Fraser with a handsome camera be
panted by Mrs. Taylor and expects f. .re ber departure for Scotland. A
to return, to tbe coast via Revel- nuiifbet ■■( friends wer.' at the station
Btoke.—Nelson News. on Wednesday to    * sh her been voy
Today at the Empress theatre.
Daniel Frohman presents Marguerite
Clark in The Crucible in 5 parts by
Mark Lee Luther. This production
was to huve beeu plnyed ou Tuesday,
but on account of delay Tbe Crucible
is on tonight. It is one ot Daniel
Frohmun's  greatest  successes.
(in Monday, The Muster Key, with
stumps will be given, und on Wednesday, Tillie's Punctured Romance,
in five parts, said to bc thc greatest
comedy   nr.eduction  ever filmed.
The TU'. I'M,Hies will be seen in
the Empress theatre about June 11.
agi ,  ar.d  Bhe was given  u large
qui i  ■ >f flowers  and numi
of candy and books. Miss Fraset
eon the Pretorian  on Me nday,     J ine
The Imperial T
arrangt I tesy oi tbe
j
France
••
.Co tit ri.arettes  I
M  '*
tine the t
r.d  McKint
•
■
Tbe Women's Canadian club will
have as its 'ju 'st .'ii M mday, June
7. Mrs. F. Betts of London, Ontario.
Mrs. Ketts will address a meeting ol
the club ou Mondaj evening In the
High school, at S.'iQ p.m, Tbe subject    of her     address     will be "The
• banged   ispect of England since   the
.  itbreak of the war."
"W. C. Calder, son of Rev. W. 0.
i alder, wh'i has enlisted in thl
I ittalion, comes of military stock.
His maternal great grandfather
■ mght at W iterloo just 100
ago and it is possible that he
,y see tight the
whli i;       Is     great    gr •   I
•.    Hi-  great I I
at  Halifax. '•'   years  ago at the    age
• :   •_'.   He ,vas   in the  artillerj
w lb but led    w;fh   military     I.
:- -    r indl ■•'• ■       was    Is
■ ers.
The Ladies Red societj
b .d thi recrea-
.-  Id o 'i.i w
■
. _.J 121
.i : ited  •■ itei
ean was in    cbai
le Mis.  Rob :a
I A  Mesdames     .
tc
Ithai
Three  -iris dressed     as     Red Cr
ee   misted   it tbe .-ate   md lal
.   tervtng Ice cream     a diem r.
They were the Misses Al_-a 0i utel
Bernadlne    Bunnell,   in.. Lena Mats
D'.ck   I.awr>iice    Cecil   Johnson      and
ik Ilre.wn gave  valua! le assistance
m  varie. |g  ways.
One Reported Wounded:
One is Missing
in yesterday's casualty list the
names of two Kevelstoke volunteers
appear,
William      Mclnerny     is     reported
wounded.  Before    enlist__ig m Revei-
be was a bfaki man    and     left
with tl l contingent.
. I:   Brown,  wbo also left  with
ported
missine. Before leavin-: for the front
l clerk in tht dry goods depart-
•   Co., Ltd.
•
•
■
•
'
EMPRESS THEATRE
PROGRAM;
TODAT.—Daniel     Fre,bam    presents the Fascinating Irrest.eple
Marguerite Clark, In The Crucible, G parts. by Mark Lee
Luther,  in motion pictures.
MONDAY.—The Master Key, episode No.  5, with eftamps.
TCF-HDAY.-Shanghaied Baby.
Remember Tillie's Punctured Romance, on Wednesday, f, parts
e?reat comedy.
filled 'i'i: lng the ifternoon     I
final  tea
was held under     the auspic
Altar  society    f Bt,  Fr.mciH   church.
Mrs.  Robbins bai   n    ii il rota,   the
small ' >he house, Blaine
(.nil Laura as door tenders Mr.. 0
Bell, who received the silver donations; Mrs. Vi If "riand who
looked after the culin<-ry t»>,le; and
the Mesdames Melville and We'estm
wh Mi ipronf. Mrs, F. McCarty
pound at the p. rf'C'ly appointed
tea-tablS, which was fragrant with
bunches of wild roseg. Mrs. HohfOO
end Mi<M Blanche McCnrty served refreshments, find the small tables were
very dainty with white dollies and
centered with Munchei< of spleen. The
drawing room wns decorated with
huge snow-balls and rattt filled with
yellow Tri.ee. MIbs Dnpont plnyed
during the nft.Tnoon, In hw nsnnl
pleasing way. Fifty dollnrs was the
flnnnelal result  of    this very snreess-
f'll  te*.
Experiment With Corn
Important to Revelstoke
. ■ ■
re. li
■
■
•    '
0
■
-
do tho sewing; Mrs. Pratt hua uddod
to her very long list of donations
another IW pounds of wool making
3'50 pounds in all, und 3.1 sets of
ueedk'B. The Ladies of the ti.I.A. to
B. of J..K., huve undertaken the work
of making the convalescent ahooB, a
line of work much appreciated by the
Red Cross headquarters and a big
help to the local branch. Result of
lirst meeting, two dozen pairs.
The   Ladies    of    St.  Frances Altar
society  arc  giving      two    ufternoons
each month to the hospitnl brunch of
the  soci'ty   and by   the 'co-opcrntlon
of the many     locul     societies much
work can  be accomplished  in  a   systematic  way.  Tho list of work     received  was as follows'
Mrs,   I'almer,  fi  pairs  socks,
Mrs.  Kdwnrds,  3 pairs socks.
Mrs.  Atkins, 1 pair socks.
Mrs. Qeorge Ross,  2 pairs socks.
Mrs.   A.  Mcllae, 2 pairs socks.
Mrs. f. Paulding, 2 pairs socks.
Mrs.  Tlm Sollies,   I   pair socks.
Mrs. Harold W, Wood,  l pair socks.
Mrs.   Blacklock,   I   pair  socks.
Mrs,   I).  Towse,  2 pair  socks.
Mrs.  Burfield, .1  pairs socks. 1  shirt.
Mrs.  N.K. Drown,     >2 pairs socks,    (i
shirts.
Mrs,  Dickey,  2 shirts.
Miss Haggen,  :. pairs socks.
Mrs. Haggen, .1 pair socks.
Mrs.  Hogan,  1  pair socks.
Mrs. Downs, 1 pair socks.
A friend, 2 pair socks.
Mrs.  Cressman, 1 pair socks.
Mrs.  It.  Urquhart,  1 pair socks.
Mrs. Colpitts, 2 puirB Bocks.
Mrs.  A.E, Miller,  2 pairs socks.
Miss McKinnon,  1 pair socks,     pair
kneelets.
Mrs.  George Rhodes,   (Golden,  B.C.,)
m pairs socks.
Mrs. Charles Davenport, 2 puir socks
Mrs. IM  i'arker, 2 pairs Bocks.
Mrs. J. Hammond,  1 shirt.
Mrs. Hurry Parsons, 2 shirts.
Mrs.   Ralph Lawrence,   1 pair socks.
Mrs. Robert Gordon, 1 pair socks.
Mrs. Horrobin, \ pair pyjamas.
Mrs. F.B. Wells, 2 puirB socks.
Mrs, Wells, 1 pair socks.
Mrs.  J.  Mclntyre,  I pair socks.
Mrs. Morris, 1 pair sockB.
Mrs.  A. Wilson,   I  pair socks.
jMrs. R.  Squarebriggs, 1 nightshirt.
Mrs.  J.W.  Jinkins,   1 night shirt.
Mrs. L, Wood, 1 puir socks.
(Mrs. Purvis,   1  bed gown.
Mrs. Swannie, l pair socks.
Mrs.  Crowe   2 night shirts.
Mrs.   Kincaid,  2 pnirs socks.
! Airs. McKcchnie, (Arrowhead, B. C.,)
-'  pairs  socks.
Mrs. L. Howson,  1   pair socks.
Mrs. Maxon, 1 pair socks.
Mrs.  Payne, 1 pair socks.
Making 61 pairs of socks in all
and a week's work that every citizen
Bhould be proud of,
Thc following shipment is ready to
forward today to Red Cross headquarters and represents three weeks
work:
IO? p.iirs of socks.
i  46 day shirts.
li  Hospital ni^ht shirts.
8 long night shirts.
1   pair knee caps.
fi2 pairs convalescent shoes.
1 suit pyjamas.
Dr.   V.   Orlena  Smith    of
Texas,   a' t.mrist    at     King
hotel   sent  one  dollar ns   a  donatio:
towards the Red Cross work.
GALT COAL burns all night. Re
velstoke General Agencies.  Limited.
BANKHEAD BRIQUETTES BURI*
BEST.
All notices of political mooting!-
and conventions to be beld in anj
part of the Kootenay und Boundary
must be prepaid, or guaranteed at
the following rates: Reading notices
ten cents per count line each inaer
tion; display advertising, 50c. pet
inch. Tho Mail Herald.
WANTED.—Sewing and dressmaking
by the day. Miss R, McMahon 191
First street  Jest, Roieletolie.
AUCTION   SALE
Household Furniture. Having boon
favored with'instructions by Mrs. W.
R. Stokes, late of tho Ideal Cigar
Store, who has moved to United
Stutes. I will sell by public auction
positively without rcBcrve, Thursday
June 17, corner Connaught and Victoria Avenue, facing the C.P.H., at
2 o'clock. Goods Comprising aB follows: Iron and brass Heds complete,
Bureaus, Stands, solid oak leather
upholstered Dining Room Set, valued
at $75.00, Book cases; Rocking Chairs
Parlor Tables nnd Morris Chairs,
Lounges, I pieces of reed furniture,
Carpets, Linoleum, Camp Cots,
Queori Range valued at $40.00'; Kit
ch"n Chairs, Tables, Washing and
Kitchen Ut"nsils, Jardinieres, Electrical Fixtures, Chinawaro, 1 roll top
Desk, good as new; one Sewing Machine and a host of other useful
household effects too numerous to
mention.
Terms of Snle. Everything Must be
Sold. Goods on view anytime after
June 10.
W. PARRY,
Auctioneer.
FOR SALE.—Two stoves in good,
condition. Ono .-hole McClary
Range, one base burner heater. Apply 3G Fourth'stroet, East.     J5.np.
LOST—Between C. B. Hume & Co.,.
and P. Hums & Co., a $20.00 bill.
Return to oilice of p. liuniB and receive reward.
FOR  BALE.—16  in.   Millwood;     also.
Kindling in bunches; each ..2.70     per
i load delivered.   Phones 42 und 85.  J.
P.  Sutherland. Jul-?:
—SALE—
Private sale of household furniture-
Including lirst cluss t'i hole steel
range, kitchen tables, kitchen chnirs,
25 yards Al inlaid linoleum, dishes,
linen, buffet, dining table, chairs,
heating stove, lounge, sewing machine,
parlor furniture, parlor carpets, 5
single iron bedsteads complete, and
other goods too numerous to mention. Sale from date of this advertisement until sold. No reservation,
everything goes. AddrcsB, house situated on George Bell's ranch.
MRS. GORING
NOTICE TO THE PUBLIO
Notice is hereby given thut the undersigned is the solo owner of the
business carried on at Revelstoke under the firm name of "Kwong Hong
On" nnd that no person other thnn
the undersigned has any authority to
purchase any goods or incur any liability on behalf of said firm.
LEE CHEW
Dnted May 26th, 1915. J5-4t
If you want what you want when you
want it try Mail-Herald Want Ads
FOR SALE
PURE-BRED
AYRSHIRE BULLS
AND
HEIFER   CALVES
ALSO  PURE-BRED
BERKSHIRE    PIGS
VV
Apply to
C. Calder, Tonka Farm
Austin.
Edward
Winners nf Nelsnn
Shields in Schools
The  following  is  the report
•iblic schools for tho month
Central School.
P.K.S.
I.
II
'    III.
i
m \ il
rtkirt
Much Good Work
. fnr Bed Cross Society
ting 'll       Hi'
Red  t'rosa H'.fiflty  was beld at     I
■ l iy, .end
finished   .vork   x;,n t. mdid In,   I
■ s some     i >
more  ladles responded and  were add
d   to   the lo lr"mly   km
find   others  have      helped   in   van   ;i
ways needed to     entry on the work.
I.VIiSH  Hiekrf  Class lent  in about  tbrie
dozen    bnndkerehlesfs,    Mr.   Robson
jkimlly took tbe (lacking eases to
Francis  Hall,   Mrs.   O    R.  Lawrence
end Miss George provided ths   typewritten copies ol Instruction   for   the
knitters,  Mrs. Tomlinson,  Mrs  Horn
Ih nnd  Mrs,  proCtiniel  have done the
',
.n III
■
on I
D VI
> 11. ZG
Division   VIII    2fi
Division   IX       26
■I
24
■ ■
■■
.School,
..     9
..   22
.   2.,
...  23
thc
May
At.
2'.\
37
a
a
411
37
43
261
1!)
37
3!l
3t;
37
K)
3s
34
3H
Tot els 'ui      H7 54    ;:iv
i '.• l ool the Nelson Shield
is won iy M islon VT. and In Bel
Mrk  It Is retained by Division VTIT.
EMPRESS THEATRE
sday, June 9th
Mary Dressier
In a Six-part Comedy
"TILLIES'
PUNCTURED
ROMANCE"
Supported by wl.tble Normand and
Charles Chaplin
ONE DAY ONLY
Admission   -   -   Adults. 25c
Children. 10c
Th.' Recruits of 'lie "1I1I1
I lal i.ilion v\ ill he | ei.t
•  a'Ii OF  TIIANKfl
We     bei-   to   etpreds     onr einrcre
thank's to friend* for thrtr sympathy
rnd lo those who nent flowers nt the
time "f Ihe Mite Mrs. Gbirke's dmth.
MTl   nnd Mr*.   T   KNDX
cnttlnj: of many ulilrts for those that
land    Tnrd h.ip circulated    a
Warnlnr to the London public thnt in
vent of sn sir-craft    r; Id all  house
holdsrs 'mint   shut    the doors     and I
(Windows of    the    lower part of the ,
house to ejelttde the deleterious eases j
with which Qerman bombs are filled. |
Summer Footwear for
Women and Children
Children's Barefoot  Sandals in
Tan  •81.15 to $1.40
Ladies' Tennle and Sport shoes
in   While   Buck    and    Canvas,
Bed Ruhbet ind Mulehlde Soles
     >-'2.7ii to SM 7M
Ohildren'e Stock Slippers in Tau.
Black, and White..$1.26to$2.73
Ladies' Street I'utups in White
Buck and Canvas, turned flexi-
Itle soles $2.60 to $8.W
MCRAE SHOF.  STORE
Howson Block
PHONE 217
'For Sandals, Canvas andlTcnnis Shoes

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