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Lowery's Claim May 1, 1902

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 LOWERY'S CLAIM
NUMBER TWELVE.
NEW DENVER, B. C, CANADA.
PRICE: TEN CENTS.
m A Y,    19 0 2
Lowbry's Claim is published every
month at New Denver, B. C, Canada. It
is devoted to Truth and Humor. It has
no press or trust list, hut is sent free to all
persons over ioo years of age. It is a
Sham Crusher, and will fight all frauds
to a red finale. It costs $i a year in any
part of this world, but lack of mail facilities prevents it being mailed to Mars,
Hades and other out-of-the-way places.
All agents can make 25 cents upon each
subscription obtained. Advertising rates
are $2 an inch each insertion, and no cut
is made for time or position. If you desire this journal do not depend upon your
neighbor, but send in your white or green
dollar before the thought grows cold.
The same editor shoves the pen on this
journal and The New Denver Ledge, so
do not confound your orders when sending in your collateral.
R. T. Lowbrv.
New Denver, B. C.
A tunnel would be just as dark
by any other name.
Man and woman, body and soul,
make a complete whole.
As a rule it does not pay to draw
to one King, except in England.
What sliall it profit a man if he
corrals the entire earth, and does
not pay the printer?
Hell received a sad blow the
other day in Washington. The
Presbyterians revised  their creed.
For robbing a church in an Ontario town two men were recently
sent to jail for five years. Some
churches brook no opposition.
A blue mark here indicates that
your subscription expiies with the
next issue. No credit is given, so
renew in time if you wish this journal sent to your address.
A blue mark on this paragraph
means that your subscription has
expired. As credit is not given
you are requested to renew before
another month passes along.
The cure for Prohibition cranks
is State ownership of the liquor
business from still to saloon.
Kisses are of various values. In
Wisconsin Mrs. Slayton sued a man
for $15,000 for three kisses. She
lost the case, and the market price
of osculation still remains unsettled.
For the lack of space this month
we are compelled to leave out several articles that will burn holes in
conventional thought when the
reading public get a chance to
peruse them.
<��>
The tourist world will yet ring
the praises of British Columbia. It
is greater than a dozen Switzer-
lands, and with proper advertising
will eventually become the banner
tourist country of the universe.
For collecting junk in a bag
made out of the American flag a
rag-picker in Boston was fined $20.
Such reverence for a piece of red,
white and blue cloth is extremely
touching, especially to the fellow
fined.
England believes in taxing the
necessaries of life, and not such
things as tea and liquor. If the
people of that nation spent less
money upon drink and coronations
they would have more for war purposes.
After praying for 40 years for a
baby, a New Jersey couple placed
a small want ad in a newspaper
and that same night a bouncing
baby boy was left on their doorstep. Prayer is all right if you are
not in a hurry, but for quick returns use printer's ink.
A bashful girl went to a local
drug store to purchase a bath
sponge, but when the good looking
clerk stepped up suddenly to enquire as to her wants she got so
rattled that she told him she want
ed a sponge bath.   And then it was
the clerk's turn to get rattled.
<��>
The Ontario papers complain
about the low birth rate of that
province. Modern education has
made women wiser in matters of
maternity, and modern living has
made many of them unfit for
motherhood. It is better to have
a low birth rate and good children
than the reverse.
A Kentucky editor said silver
buckles were becoming fashionable
on garters and he hoped to see
more of them. His wife sued for
a divorce and the only woman in
town who had silver buckles on
her garters cow hided the poor
editor until he was as raw as a
potato.
Oliver Cromwell could not brook
the least approach to Popery.
"What are these?" he said, as he
saw a dozen silver statues in the
niches of the chapel. "The twelve
apostles," replied the trembling
dean. "Take them down," said
Cromwell, "and coin them into
money, so that, like your Master,
they may go about doing good."
Talmage passed over the divide
last month. As he left over $300,-
000 behind it is difficult to say
where he now is. If it is true that
no rich man can enter the Kingdom
of Heaven he must be on the outside of the gate unless he has convinced St. Peter that no man from
New York is rich who only has the
trifling sum of $300,000 to his
credit.
A clergyman was questioning a
class in his Sunday school about
the man who fell among thieves on
the way from Jerusalem to Jericho.
Bringing the story to a point, he
asked: "Now, why did the priest
and the Levite pass by on the
other side?" "I know," said a
lad; "because the man was already
robbed." lis
tiOWERt'8 CLAIM.
(*Ut.
IW*
Healthy   ThiRkiRg
Its Effect Upon the Body Greatly Seneficial^v^
Undesirable fixed conditions are
set up in the body because of false
habits of thinking���getting into
ruts. These picture upon the body
as wrinkles and hardening of the
bones and tissues. The juices of
the body disappear through dwelling upon the past, not receiving
new, fresh presentations of life and
truth; then the cells collapse and
the hair turns gray. Wrongs un-
forgiven, selfishness, and many
other beliefs in "evil." such as
anxiety, sorrow, fears, and doubts,
contribute to the withering and
breaking down of this temple, wrhich
should remain intact as the dwelling of the Holy Spirit. Yet, in
case all these mental causes be absent, the simple unconscious consent to think as others do���that
death is as real as life, that disease
cannot entirely be escaped, that
there is no remedy for certain evils
���is enough to age one when the
years arrive in which the ravages
of time are supposed to prevail.
The mentality that is ever ready
to take new presentations of Truth
is iu the divine way of immortal
youth. ''Change your mind" is
the watchword of the dispensation
that grows toward the Christ.
It is the changeless One in us
that is the rock, our standard, and
the cause of our steadfastness,
trustworthines8,and the persistence
of all those qualities that are beautiful, true, and good. At the same
time, in the realm of appearances,
we are ever changing; and it is for
us to determine that the change
shall be for the better, as long as
this earth shall continue to appear.
In true youth there is no getting
into the rut of unbelief; all is
bright and full of hope; faith ami
truth abide. These we keep, not
liecause of ignorance of the world,
which is the reason for callow confidence, but because of our Principle���that Faith and Trust are God
(therefore omnipresent and omnipotent;, all that can fill our hearts
and that we are to recognize in our
fellow-beings.
In fearless youth, conservatism
does not abound; that which "mak-
eth all things new" is radical���not
ahead of the times and thus eccentric, but keeping pace with the age
and ever "up to date." It does
not fear public opinion, yet it respects it, knowing how spiritually
to fulfil the fifth commandment,
whose  fruit is "that thy days may {habits   shall   attach themselves To
consider how the first Inaccurate
speech is the means of keeping the
false  mentality that produces the
[pain. If one must speak of such
evils, let them lie put into the past
tense, saying, "I have had continued pain"; not. "I suffer with
headaches," but "I have suffered
with headaches,"
I,*et us watch   that  no old-age
be long upon the land   which  the
Ijord thy God giveth thee1
us.    Truth kc*eji8  us young,    refusal to accept new presentations of
The genuine youth within each [Truth is degenerating, and be who
of us does not harbor revenge and j would ever remain young must be
hatred, nor is it self-laden with j tolerant-toward all beliefs and not
anxiety and regret. The young in too quick to decide as to whether
years who show these things are ! he shall accept or reject what an-
old men before their time. The! other believes to be truth. So long
principle, Good, is all there really jas one doe* not show forth perfec-
is, and the practise of putting away tion. there* is some truth which be
every belief in evil as a re��ality and is consciously or unconsciously re-
power contributes to the demon- jeeting; yet it will come to hitn in
stratum of immortal youth. Sarah some form for his conscious accept-
Bernharcit attributes her perennial lance. "God s|>eakcth once, sea
youth to the foet that she never twice; yet man perceiveth it not"
worries or lets her mine! dwell up- * Job xxxiii. 14 >. and it will bedJs-
on disagreeable things. astrous to that man who does not
Youth kneiws no time.     It   livi*  hear it at the' third speaking.
in tin eternal   Now.    It  does  not
It is that truth which  vou  have
dwell upon the mistakes and miser- i lieeti rejecting that is the key-Stone
ies of the past with withering re- |of the |��erfeet life that you are uj>-
morse and bruising self-condemna-  building.      "The   stone   that   the
tion; neither is it attached to  thei builders rejected has  become tlie
joys of the past, as if they would head of the corner.'* Let us r.Ol
never eome again. It knows and j he alow of heart to believe. If a
leioks fe��r the good of the' present \ thing he good it is safe to believe
moment constantly, and this is the j that some time,   somewhere,   with
secret of our  quick   recuperative Isome one, it is true,    If the thing
ability. The youthful mind in you j seem evil to us, let us cleanse our
changes   quickly   from   a sense of ieyes until we see no evil;   then,   if
evil, as a child  stops  crying  im-lit were altogether error, it will !*���
mediately when its thought is di-(dissolved with tiie disappearance of
verted.     It is because you are ever I the evil, and if there lie truth in it
when
it will shine forth as the sun
the clouds have passed away.
Persistently believing in the Good
that is God���-thai it is everywhere
and in every one', the only power
working���fills us with the grace ol
mind that cause* the  body   to   be
pliable and elastic,  well   rounded
tti per-
young that sorrow and sense of loss
rest lightly upon your shoulders.
It is not natural to the youth to
have anything chronic! which comes
from chronos, time*), and the revival of one's youthful consciousness is the healing of ���chronic diseases."       "He   shall    renew    thy
youth," says  a    Psalmist,    iu   the and strong, ami the picture
same breath with   "who  forgiveth  feet health and life.
all thine iniquities; who hcaleth all       There is a greater   step   in   the
thy diseases." i spiritual life than that which keeps
It is a mistake to judge of the Ithe body young. It is the attain-
present by the past. Certain be- ment in which there is such a mas-
uevers in mental healing are defer- tery over the l*��elv that we can
ring their recovery by suggesting cause it to appear just what we will,
to themselves, by thought and las did Jesus Christ. Even before
speech, a repetition Unlay of an ex-1 the last degree of his initiation, he
perience of yesterday.   Thus one had power to hide his ImmIv when
will say, "I have continual pain,"  they wished to kill him <>r to mak
but when   asked,    "Have   you
uow? ' will reply, "No, but I have
it most of the time,"   and   do not
i make
him king. He could fill it with
light, make* it as light in weight as
he please*!, deliver it from the hyp-
iflHHrJS n
Mat, mi.]
LOWERS CtiAtM.
ita
notism of {death, and, in short, exercise all those powers called by
the Hindus siddhis and do many
greater things.
As we are willing to accept these
privileges that are presented to us,
from year to year, through the discoveries and inspirations that are
coming to the thinkers of our time,
we shall be given more, until the
whole earth shall begin to awaken
from its night of unbelief, and men
shall loosen their imagination from
the chains of fear and ignorance,
anel through the power of Universal
Love enter into the recreations of
the paradise of their youth, wherein
there is never known old age nor
death,but untold bliss forevermore.
���Annie* Rix Militz, in Mind.
Game to the bast-
"In days gone by," said the man
with the horseshoe pin, "I never
traveled by boat or rail without
hunting for a fellow passenger to
play poker with me. I was gone'
em the game. I'd go without food
and sleep for it. I'd play for
pennies, dollars eir brick houses.
One night, as I left Chicago for St.
Louis, I fell in with a chap who
thought well of himself, and we
had a stilt game. Iliad bad luck
for an hour and lost a hundred
dollars, but then the cards iwgan
to come my way again. I'd got
liack half my losse\s, when a hand
was dealt in which we both held
up four cards and I opened the pot
on two pairs. The other man
might have had the same or be
drawing to a flush or a straight. I
drew my one card anel didn't help
my hand, but by tbe grin on his
face as he drew his, I judged that
he' had something geiod.
"Well, we began seeing and raising, and in ten minutes there was
$100 in the pot. I had just opened
my mouth to raise him   $20   when
si
the train struck a curve and our
car lurched over and rolled down
an embankment fifteen feet high.
It was four days later when I came
to my senses ami found that I was
in the hospital. On the next cot
to my right was my opponent at
poker. We had both been badly
smashed up. We lay looking at
each either for awhile and then he
feebly said:
" T11 see your $20 and raise you
$10.''
" 'And I raise you $10 more,'
said I.
" 'And $10 more.'
" 'And $10 more.'
"He closed his eyes and appeared
to think for awhile, and as he
opened them again I knew that he
was game.
'I'll see your $10 and raise you
u
"He was either a good bluffer or
he had a good hand, but I was
bound to see it through, and again
I raised him $10. After two or
three minutes the nurse came over
and asked what was the matter.
" 'I raised him $10 and haven't
heard from him,' I explained.
" 'And you won't, either,' she
replied. 'You have raised him out
of the game.'
"The poor chap had gone dead,"
said the man writh the horseshoe
pin, "and the pot, wherever it was,
was mine. As to whether he was
bluffing or had a good hand I can
only guess, but as they carried him
out I turned over to the wall and
made up my mind to return to
checkers and sticf there."���Detroit
Free Press.
I believe that men are inspired
today as much as men ever were.
I believe in the sunshine, friendship, calm sleep, beautiful thoughts.
I believe in the paradox of success through failure.
I believe in the purifying process
of sorrow, and I believe that death
is a manifestation of Life.
I believe the Universe is planned
for good.
I believe it is possible that I will
make other creeds, and change this
one, or add to it, from time to time,
as new light may come to me. ���Fra
Elbertus.
Credo.
I believe in the Motherhood of
God.
I believe in the blessed Trinity
of Father, Mother and Child.
I believe that God is here, and
that we are as near Him now as we
ever shall be. I do not believe He
started this world a-going aud went
away and left it to run itself.
I believe in the sacredness of the
human body, this transient dwelling place of a living soul, and so I
deem it the duty of every man and
every woman to keep his or her
boely beautiful through right thinking and right living.
I believe in salvation through
economic, social and spiritual freedom.
I believe we are now living in
Eternity as much as we ever shall.
I believe that the best way to
prepare for a Future Life is to be
kind, live one day at a time, and
do the work you can do the best,
doing it as well as you can.
I believe there is no devil but
fear.
I believe that no one can harm
you but yourself.
I believe that we are all sons of
God and it doth not yet appear
what we shall be.
I believe in every mau minding
his own business.
The Bloui banded.
She doesn't go to her clubs and
euchres half as much as she did.
People used to say this charming
woman spent most of her time at
these gatherings. One day she
called on a dear friend to reprove
her for her slackening interest in
the club. I believe it was a club
for reforming the gas meter or
something���anyhow it was a reform
affair.
"Look here, Lizzie," said the
enthusiast, "why on earth don't
you come to the meetings? Here
you are paying your dues and
never showing up. YTou owe it to
the club to take an interest in the
work.''
"But I can't come," explained
her friend. ' 'There's the baby,and
Henry doesn't come home sometimes till late, and supper must
wait, and if he wants to go out I
can't go away and leave the children. I would worry myself to
death."
"Well, I must say Henry is inconsiderate," said the caller.
"Why, there's my husband and
children, too. They give me no
trouble every time I want to go to
the club. He says he will be glad
to stay at home with Bridget and
keep an eye on things till I come
back.    He never objects.''
'''Maybe," retorted the amiable
hostess, "if I had a housegirl as
handsome and young as Bridget
Henry would be glad to stay at
home, too, but mine is black and
goes home at nights.''
The blow landed, and Charlie
hasn't been asked to look after
Bridget and the house since.���
Louisville Times.
Lust may sin, but love cannot
even tell a lie.
 mmttSM ISO
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
(Mat, im
The Soul's After Life
By T. Shelly Sutton, in The Iconoclast ^^\��
The problem of the soul's immortality has, during the past few
years, received more erroneous agitation and less serious consideration than any problem known to
the civilized world. Yet man���an
insect lost to the infinite network
of universal intricacies���standing
helpless and bewildered on a great
desert of doubt���surrounded by the
un tangible and "sorry scheme of
things"���finds himself forever surrounded by an impenetrable cloud
of mystery. The riddle of the grim
Sphinx stares defiantly in his face,
and his life is like a question written in the language of Spain���it
begins and ends with the interrogation point. He is directly and
vitally effected by the problem of
the soul's immortality, yet there
are pseudo-philosophers and would-
be writers who say to him:
"Attend you to the life that now
is regardless of the after life.''
This doctrine is lately being injected into public thought-channels
with alarming persistence; yet it is
the most senseless and shallow
doctrine ever conceived by a ver-
miculous brain. If it is even possible that the soul could exist after
its dissolution from the body, then
it is man's duty to himself to ascertain by every probe and plummet
of reason the depth of that possibility. If there is an after life,this
life must be productive of tbe means
to better it���and that life must be
affected by the life that now is.
Already the world is populated
by a worthless crop of anti-thought
numb-skulls who are incapable of
casting a right ballot, whose eyes
are blinded by delusive motes, who
admit they are not equal to self-
government, and who can protect
neither their personal nor their domestic interests. The world needs
thought. It is high time for these
"dumb terrors"���these degenerate
types of Markham's "Man with the
Hoe"���to do some serious thinking. Give us thought���good,
healthy, substantial thought-���
whether our theme be immortality,
politics, social conditions or religion.
Put knowledge into our idiot asylums; let the sunlight pour through
the dark dungeon of the lunatic;
scatter thought into every poverty-
stricken home, and teach the white
slave of America to cultivate his
mind. If the soul is immortal, let
him know it. If he be a political
vassal give him a conviction that
will cut the bondage. Let all
themes be presented for his consideration. And when the high
tidal wave of literature has passed
over and leaves barren the white
sands beneath it let him gather the
few remaining pearls of truth aud
wisdom and store them away iu
memory.
Let us be serious. Consider all
problems. Laboring men are told
by their political bosses that they
should vote as they are told "by
those who have their interests at
heart." Priests forbid their followers to question the authenticity
of the Bible, or to read   Protestant
iterate���it is ripe   time   for sober
thinking.
The serious consideration and
argument of any theme, however
insignificaut, tends to throw a light
in some dark corner of the world
and can do no injury. Now is the
life to live and the life that now is
requires much of our attention in
order to live it as our conscience
iictates. But if there is even a
possibility of an after-life, let us
consider both sides of the question
soberly and seriously. The world
has devoted its attention to too
many ex parte pictures.
*       *       *       *
"That which is can never be
destroyed, although the metamorphosis of Time ancl Tide may alter
it beyond recognition and conceal
its original, external identity.
Something can never become less
than it is, though it may liecome
externally different; nor can it lie
changed to nothing; nor from noth-
or Atheistic documents.    Protest- I ing can we produce something."
ants instruct their��flock   to   avoid I    Such is the context of  a   theory
Catholicism, Spiritualism, Theoso- j advanced by one of the oldest   anel
pby, Christian Science, Mohammedanism, Infidelity and all adverse factors in the ecclesiastical
battle-field. The tug for political
office and religious supremacy has
made these edicts necessary to the
leaders. And the result of public
obedience is everywhere visible.
Laboring men vote against their
own interests to hold their employment. Catholics dare not investigate the doctrines of Protestantism
for fear of eternal damnation. Protestants dare not touch a volume
of Paine's "Age of Reason" lest
their souls should become contaminated by the mephitic contents.
An age of an ti-thought has crept
upon us. Fools and illiterates
have been created as a result of
this brainless submission. At the
present speed of increase posterity
will have idiots in its majority.
Werse than Kipling will lie considered poets; religious fads, less
sensible even than Christian Science,
will be substituted for the sincere,
though questionable, hard-shell
creeds. Vandals will sit at the
easel and outdo Raphael; Max
O'Rells will emulate emr dear old
Horace Greeley; chaos will be supreme in the intellectual world,and
Thought���contrary to the public
or popular belief���will be punish
able by imprisonment. Protestants or Catholics or politicians will
re-establish the Inquisition,   I  re-
grandest philosophers known to
ancient literature. We must admit
the absolute, undeniable truth, of
this utterance. Using it as a fundamental fact. I will build upon it
an argument in support of my belief, which has been the subject of
considerable abuse and silly ridicule
since the publication of my arriele
���"Immortality; Who Can Disprove It?"���in the July issue of
the Iconoclast.
"Succession   and   Substitution"
is my present theme.
The doctrine of Mrs. Eddy, despite? its many absurdities, may tie
said to contain one paramount, unquestionable truth, which stands
out like a great Aetna among the
worthless knolls of barren lava.
Every animated creature is governed by a Mind���however minute.
Even Mark Hanna is in some degree affected by his attenuated
mental faculties. Deprive the material man of this Mi ml and there
remains, as death verifies, only a
cold lump of useless clay. From
the Mind the body derives its animation, its five distinct senses, its
feeling, its intelligence', its reason,
its instinct, its warmth, its perception, its passions, its strength, its
life. The force: must be greater
than the effect. The creator must
be greater than the thing created.
Hence the Mind���since it is con-
ceptive, creative, generative, mas- Mat, i908.|
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
181
terful and sustaining��� must be
stronger, more enduring and more
substantial than the body which it
governs and animates. If the material man is eternal���and we know
it is���then must the Mind continue
to exist after its exit from the mortal clay. The body being the slave
the Miad must be the master. One
being perpetual and indestructible,
it follows "as the night the day"
that the other is likewise.
A stream of water falls from a
precipice, makes its indentation in
the sands below, passes on and
merges with the waters of the
ocean. Gazing at the effect���the
indentation���but seeing no water,
can we wisely assert that the particles making up that stream have
passed out of existence? Impossible! The constant fullness of the
sea Indies the statement that one
particle of water can cease to exist,
however often its identity may be
changed. The body being governed
by the mind, the mind must be
greater. The body becomes an
effect; the soul is like unto the
water.
Is the law of nature, granting
that this law is put in force by no
higher power���though it lie shown
to preserve and create harmony���
though it be proven to systemize
all action���though it be known to
manifest consistency in all things
from the regulation of the various
orbs to the guidance and disposition of the smallest insect���and
though this law reveals within or
behind it a legion of mental attributes���demonstrating in every deed
a wise object���manifesting a mission in all life���presenting a perfect
plan of government and creation
which defies even the criticism of a
genus homo���I say, is this law of
nature to be marred by one unjust
effect? Is the harmony which it
has universally established to be
completely broken by one exceptional discord, one false note?
Is the system of all life and creation to bc made faulty and imperfect by a single failure in its object?
Is the all-perfect plan to be proven
imperfect in its most-to-be-expected
detail? Sooner would I think that
every star in the high firmament
could be melted into chaotic nonentity, than to conclude that Mind
���the all-governing factor of animated life���could be totally destroyed and wiped from existence.
It is not the poetry of the belief
that appeals to me.    There is poetry
in the belief���there is poetry in all
of God's creation���the Universe is
a grand poem���the systems governing it are wordless rhymes���the
plan of Creation is a perfect metre
and a sweet rhythm���but it is not
the poetry. It is the fact that I
cannot believe it possible for this
great plan to be faulty in any single
respect. Deprive Mind of its immortal life and make man merely
an animated worm, and the all-
perfect plan becomes an incomplete,
imperfect, blotchy system. The
idea is contrary to the visible demonstrations of nature���granting
that there is no Higher Power to
assure a continuation of life beyond
the grave.
* *       *       *
The tree springs from the ground
in the form of a tender twig. The
twig develops, limb by limb, into a
healthy shrub. Year after year
the shrub reaches its roots into the
moist earth and saps therefrom its
sustenance���the properties which
give it strength, verdancy, size and
life. From the earth and air it
derives all that it is or can possibly
become. The tree reaches the
height demanded by the Law of
Nature, and finally its sap withers,
its branches droop and its seeds fall
to the mother earth. The sap vanishes into the air and returns to its
first condition. The sea receives
the moisture, the earth the seed.
Ere the last of its rustic limbs have
rotted away in the ground these
seeds have sprouted forth, and
again has the Law of Nature made
manifest the consistency and the
perfection of the plan of succession
and substitution. The sprouting
of the seeds calls back from the sea
a moisture, aud from the earth a
substance, belonging to its species.
The sea is the unit of all liquid���
the earth is the unit of all earthy
substance. Each is a giver and a
receiver. The properties derived
from these sources must necessarily
return at a given time. That is
death. The plan of succession and
substitution recalls them   again���
and again must replace them.
* *       *       *
There is a unit mind controlling
the universe. Individual minds
are but fractions of the unit, even
as the drop of water is but a fraction of the sea. The man is a
factor in a perpetual plan. He is
a part of, and a dependent upon,
the eternal unit. The individual
mind possesses no identity saving
as the drop of water may possess a
color or a flavor at variance with
that of the ocean���made so by contact with foreign substance, contamination or adulteration. In
the process of adulteration it becomes changed beyond recognition.
In the process of metamorphosis it
may lose its identity to man. But
ultimately the process of life wdll
purify it. It returns to the mother
ocean. The drop of water is lost
in its original identity.
Thus the race is propagated and
thus the thread of  vegetable  and
carnal life remains unbroken.   The
individual works out a mission in
unison with the race.    We are all
brothers of one family,   wdth one
identity, found only when  we   return to the unit mind.    Our relationship demands complete affiliation���brotherhood,  fellowship, so-,
cialism���what you  will.    Of  that
we will speak later.    However we
may differ on human equality, we
can not deny the power   of   mind
over matter���the supremacy of the
former, the consequent dependence
of the latter, and the immortality
of the inelividual and  unit   mind.
Were the individual mind only an
ephemeral animation instead of a
perpetual   substance,    the    earth
would soon witness   the   complete
destruction of all life.    There is a
unit condition to   waters,   a   unit
condition to all earthy   substance.
Did either of these pass from their
unit   condition   never   to   return
again, the Unit of each would soon
become exhausted, and the Law of
Succession and Substitution would
be without resource to enforce its
continuation.    Did the individual
mind pass out of existence at the
dissolution of the mind and  body,
the unit mind would soou dwindle
into nonenity, unless there   was a
supreme God or Creator to  supply
a substitute and continue the plan
of substitution.    If we are to admit
the existence of   this   Creator   we
can not deny the probability of the
soul's after-life.    Denying this God
and doubting the existence of the
unit mind we are left with only the
horrible   monster ��� chance���as a
sustainer and creator.    If chance,
sans mind, sans power,   sans   system, is the creator of the   earth's
myriad wonders and startling beauties, why is it peaches do not grow
on apple trees, pears on plum trees,
berries on sage-brush?
As we think, we live���no more. 1SS
LOWERY'8 CLAIM.
(Mat, I9fti
Ingersoll's Last Poem.
We have no falsehoods to defend���
We want the facts,
Our force, our thought, we do not spend,
In vain attacks.
And we will never meanly try
To save some fair and pleasing lie.
The simple truth is what we ask,
Not the ideal,
We've set ourselves the noble task
To find the real;
If all there is is naught but dross,
We want to know and bear our loss.
We will not willingly be fooled,
By babies nurse-d.
Our hearts by earnest thought are schooled
To bear the worst;
And we can stand erect and dare
All things, all facts that really are.
We have no God, to serve or fear,
No hell to shun,
No devil with malicious leer,
When life is done.
An endless sleep may close our eyes,
A sleep with neither dreams nor sighs.
We have no master on the land���
No king in the air���
Without a manacle we stand,
Without a prayer,
Without a fear of coming night,
We seek the truth, we love the light.
We do not bow before a guess,
A vague unknown;
A senseless force we do not bless,
In solemn tone;
When evil comes we do not curse,
Or thank l>ecause it is no worse.
When   cyclones   rend���when   lightning
blight
'Tis naught but fate,
There is no God of wrath who smites
In heartless hate;
Behind the things that injure man,
There is no purpose, thought or pain.
The jeweled cup of love we drain,
And friendship's wine
Now swiftly flows in every vein
With warmth divine;
And so we love, and hope, and dream,
That in death's sky there is a gleam.
We walk according to our light,
Pursue the path
That leads to honor's stainless height,
Careless of wrath,
Or curse of God, or priestly spite,
Longing to know and do the right.
We love our fellow man, our kind,
Wrife, child and friend,
To phantoms we are deaf and blind.
But we extend
The helping hand to the distressed,
By lifting others we are blessed.
Love's sacred flame within the heart,
And friendly glow,
While all the miracles of art
Their wealth bestow
Upon the thrilled and joyous brain
And present raptures banish pain.
We love no phantoms of the skies,
But living flesh,
With passion's soft and soulful eyes,
Lips warm and fresh;
And cheeks with health's red rag unfurled
The breathing angels of thia world.
The hands that help are better far
Than lips that pray,
Love is the ever gleaming star
That leads the way,
That shines not on vague worlds of bliss,
But on a paradise in this.
We do not pray, or weep, or wail,
We have no dread���
No fear to pass bevond the veil
That hides the dead;
And yet question, dream and guess,
But knowledge we do not possess.
We ask, yet nothing seems to know,
We cry in vain;
There is no "master ofthe show'1
Who will explain,
Or from the future tear tbe mask.
And yet we dream, and still we ask.
Is there beyond the silent night
An endless day?
Is death a door that leads to light?
We cannot say;
The tongueless secret locked in fate.
We do not know���we hope and wait.
Another "Last"
of Christianity Pakir.     I
[A traveler and author of world-
wide renown sends the following;
e>ff-hand sentiments to a friend,
who has solicited permission to
publish them as significant of the
results of observation and thought;
for which few men living have enjoy ed such opportunities. It is
only the people who stay at home
anel only read a religious paper who
do not change their nursery ieleas.]
As to Christianity.    1   am   sure:
this century will see the last  of it j
excepting among a few fanatics anel
imhecile8,who don't count anyway. S
���* 9f
Just think what of it has died out
since my boyhood; all the old clog-,
mas that are gone are treated neiw
with complete indifference. Every i
day you see something in the papers
of trials for heresy, confessions,
disbelief, changes of creed,etc All
we have to do is to listen to the
wailings of the religions press and
the pulpit. They are iu extremis.
Thirty years ago the saying that
"where nothing is known anything
might le believed" was more apropos than now, when so much is
known that everything cannot lie
lelieved. Of course we can go beyond our reason if it seems prob-
able,but a man who believes against
evidence is insane in that particular, no matter how sound he may
be on other points. Belief today
among so-called educated people is
due either to wilful credulity or
crass ignorance. Religion is in
direct opposition to our present
knowledge. It cannot stand before
today facts and demonstrations of
astronomy, geology, biology, and
psychology. It is as much "out of
drawing" with the appalling universe as a child's toy would be beside the Brooklyn Bridge. I term
it foolish, childish nonsense. It is
in many respects paralleled, by the
faiths of the savages I have seen in
Central Africa. There is some excuse for them in their dense ignorance, but not for the educated anel
enlightened Christian. No leliever
seems to take vital interest enough
in Christianity to investigate it.
He swalbiws the most ridiculous
myths as if they were axiomatic
truths and so wraps himself in a
veritable Fool's Paradise. He lie-
lioves iu a heaven with that mad-
house yarn, Revelations, describes
as a cuie, 1,500 miles each way.
To tell such a one that our telescopes have searched the firmament
for hundreds of millions of miles
for years ancl found nothing but
globes, aud none of them nearly so
small as that, bas no influence
whatever with them. So I say, let
science progress���we are every day
doing quite as wonderful things as
those recorded of the gods���the
truth must and will prevail in the
end. It is the modest toiling
scientists who are tbe really devout
men, not the dogmatic theologians.
No, "nearness of death can make
no difference" whatever to an Agnostic���bis attitude e-an only be
that of curiosity. Thirty-five years
ago I held certain opinions aliout
Christianity, backed mostly by
common sense, thinking, talking
with Others, reading the Bible and
observing. Today I bold practically the same vie*ws,ouly now overwhelmingly reinforced by a worldwide experience, great study of
books ami really vast amount of
thought. I know a thousand reasons why Christianity is a fraud
and humbug, a lie, or a delusion.
I do not know one' single reason by
which by any possibility it might
le true! Can I do anything else
than wholly rejeet such a system
eif belief and worship? The belief
is silly, the worship is grotesque.
In conclusion it seems to me that
the past attitude of the Agnostic is
no longer sufficient. We actually
know that the history ami postulates e>f Christianity arc false*. I
think we therefore ought to take a
more affirmative, aggressive stand.
I may do myself better justice in a
book some day. I could make
quite a large volume based on my Mat, 190S)
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
183
personal religious history. It is
the only subject that I have ever
mastered, having given a really
enormous amount of observation,
experience, thought and study to it.
I have been intensely interested in
the subject from eight years of age
to the present day.
I spoke of the status of the four
sciences of astronomy, geology,biology aud psychology as containing
complete and absolute refutation of
Christianity���perhaps I should add
to these the new "higher" historical criticism and the results of the
study of Comparative Religions.
This last is quite enough alone.
We find that all the great religions,
like the planets, are bom, mature,
decay anel die. Some of them, as
Christianity for instance, are badly
decayed a long time before they
die, but they have to end just the
same. All these religions are built
upon identical lines. They all
have saviors, trinities, prophets,
angels, atonements, rewaids, ancl
punishments, etc. A book has
lieen written you know giving the
historical lives and adventures
(reincarnations) "of Sixteen Crucified Saviors." All religions contain something good and much also
that is bad, ancl Christianity forms
* *w
no exception to this rule. It seems
that the best thoughts of the best
men have in all ages been similar,
but the best things in Christianity
have beon cribbed from other and
older religions.
It seems to me that the simple
reading of the Bible is enough to
utterly condemn it. It is doubtful
If a liook has ever been published
that contains so many errors of
fact and fancy; and this the work
of the otiiniscient god. I say nothing of its foolishness, immorality,
and oliscenity. Of what value anyhow is a revelation? The world is
not standing still. Evolution is at
work. What might have been of
some service in the barbarian semi-
civilization of Syria '2,000 years ago
is a ridiculous misfit in this advanced and enlightened age. The
Bible has been revised and corrected, added to, and subtracted from
a dozen times. How can you
"edit" a revelation? If Christ is
alive any where and able to come
back to earth today he probably
would not recognize himself in the
account of his career as given in
the New Testament.
Then, too, the character of God,
as presented by himself in the Old
Testament,   is   simply   revolting.
Why, he is no better than   a   bad
man, while a supreme being ought
to be a thousand times better than
the best mau. The scriptures say
we are made in his image. There
are two of us here; is then the Almighty a hermaphrodite? I have
read somewhere that the conventional weak and effeminate portraits of Christ are due to the fact
that an effort was made to picture
him as representing the two sexes
���a sort of composite photograph I
suppose. \YTe are made in his
image, and he is elsewhere described as a spirit, therefore he is
properly classified by Haeckel as a
gaseus vertebrate. What nonsense
it all is!
In every direction in which we
turn we meet obstacles if not complete barriers. It is wholly impossible to reconcile our present
day knowledge with any such system of belief. When a man doesn't
know a thing he always says I believe so and so. But today facts
and demonstrations rule the world,
not sentiments and emotions.
Christianity while having done
some good indirectly (this of course
is begging the question) yet has
been such a power in the past as to
have been able to keep the world
back a full thousand years. It
has cost billions of treasure and
millions of lives. It has filled
asylums and divided  families.    It
9/
has always been the open or secret
opponent of liberal education and
is today. But its power (other
perhaps than politically) is nearly
gone. I never meet anyone who
tries to live up to it. Why, if
people should try to carry all their
religious ideas into commerce and
business, the work of the world
would stop, and chaos would come
again.
Some of the most cruel and
wicked things that have lieen done
to ine* have been deme by professing
Christians. Of what value is it
then to an intelligent man? I
have had no sort of religion whatever for forty years and have felt
no need of any. When I was a
lioy everybody about me read the
Bible in public, not alone Sundays
but week days. I don't think I
have seei\ any of the same class of
people with a Bible in their hands
in thirty years. They would be
guyed even by their fellow believers,
Life's Mirror.
There are loyal hearts, there are 9pirits
brave,
There are souls that are pure and true,
Then give to the world the best you have,
And the best shall come back to you.
Give love.and love to your heart will flow,
A strength in your utmost need;
Have faith and a score of hearts will show
Their faith in your word and deed.
For life is the mirror of king and slave,
'Tis just what you are and do;
Then give to the world the best you have
And the best will come back to you.
���Madeline S. Bridges.
Teaching and Pfaetiee.
There was a great display of
millinery in the churches yesterday; the shops down the street
were totally outdone. The woman
who couid not boast of a new Easter
hat and suit was virtually told to
"Go way back and sit down.'' The
man who could not admire a chunk
of cloth, decorated with a daub of
colored ribbon and a feather, might
as well have stayed at home. To
any one who viewed some of the
church scenes those lines which fell
from the lips of Christ, the meek
and lowly Nazarene, sounded very
odd and out-of-date: "Take no
thought for your life, what ye shall
eat or what ye shall drink, nor yet
for your body, what ye shall put-
on And why take ye
thought for raiment?'
>'��
It uias Impossible.
A quotable story is told of a
missionary who was spending a
short holiday in Texas. After he
had been at his hotel for some days
he met a very fierce-looking man
of the cowboy type, who, he noticed,
had anything but a sweet temper.
"Do you know," he said to him
one day, "that you should love
your enemies?"
"That's a thing I can't do, sir."
"What! I am sure a man like
you could do anything if you
tried."
"Anything but that, parson; it's
impossible."
"Impossible," said the missionary, surprised and hurt.    "How!"
"I ain't got one to love. I shot
the last this nieirning."
It has been said that if we could
banish fear, worry and unkind
thoughts from our minds that we
would never grow old. It is worth
trying, especially for elderly maidens. 18*
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
(Mat, mot
i
Ingcrsoll's Last Poem.
We have no falsehoods to defend���
We want the facts,
Our force, our thought, we do not spend,
In vain attacks.
And we will never meanly try
To save some fair and pleasing lie.
The simple truth is what we ask,
Not the ideal,
We've set ourselves the noble task
To find the real;
If all there is is naught but dross,
We want to know and bear our loss.
We will not willingly be fooled,
By babies nurseei.
Our hearts by earnest thought are schooled
To bear the worst;
And we can stand erect and dare
All things, all facts that really are.
We have no God, to serve or fear,
No hell to shun,
No devil with malicious leer,
When life is done.
An endless sleep may close our eyes,
A sleep with neither dreams nor sighs.
We have no master on the land���
No king in the air-
Without a manacle we stand,
Without a prayer,
Without a fear of coming night,
We seek the truth, we love the light.
We do not bow before a guess,
A vague unknown;
A senseless force we do not bless,
In solemn tone;
When evil comes we do not curse,
Or thank liecause it is no worse.
When   cvclones   rend���when   lightning
blight
'Tis naught but fate,
There is no God of wrath who smites
In heartless hate;
Behind the things that injure man,
There is no purpose, thought or pain.
The jeweled cup of love we drain,
And friendship's wine
Now swiftly flows in every vein
With warmth divine;
And so we love, and hope, and dream,
That in death's sky there is a gleam.
We walk according to our light,
Pursue the path
That leads to honor's stainless height,
Careless of wrath,
Or curse of God, or priestly spite,
Longing to know and do the right.
We love our fellow man, our kind,
Wife, child and friend,
To phantoms we are deaf and blind.
But we extend
The helping hand to the distressed,
By lifting others we are blessed.
Love's sacred flame within the heart,
And friendly glow,
While all the miracles of art
Their wealth bestow
Upon the thrilled and joyous brain
And present raptures banish pain.
We love no phantoms of the skies,
But living flesh,
With passion's soft and soulful eyes,
Lips warm and fresh;
And cheeks with health's red rag unfurled
The breathing angela of thia world
The hands that help are better far
Than lips that pray,
Love is the ever gleaming star
That leads the way,
That shines not on vague worlds of bliss,
But on a paradise in this.
We do not pray, or weep, or wail,
We have no "dread���
No fear to pass beyond the veil
That hides the dead;
And yet question, dream and guess,
But knowledge we do not possess.
We ask, yet nothing seems to know,
We cry in vain;
There is no "master ofthe show"
Who will explain,
Or from the future tear the mask.
And yet we dream, and still we ask.
Is there beyond the silent night
An endless day?
Is death a door that leads to light?
We cannot say;
The tongueless secret locked in fate.
We do not know���we hope and wait.
Another "Last"
of Christianity Pakir.
[A traveler and author of worldwide renown sends  the   following
off-hand sentiments   to   a   friend,
who   has   solicited   jennis-siem   to
publish them as significant   of the
results of observation and thought
for which few men living have  en- j
joye��d   such   opportunities.      It is
only the people who stay at  home;
anel only read a religious paper who;
do not change their nursery ideas.] \
As to Christianity, I am sure
this century will see the hist of it
excepting among a few fanatics and
imbeciles,who don't count anyway.
Just think what of it has died out
since my boyhood; all the old dogmas that are gone are treated now
with complete indifference. Every ;
day you see something in the* papers
of trials for heresy, confessions,
disbelief, changes of creed,etc All
we have to do is to listen to the
wailings of the religious press ami
the pulpit. They are in extremis.
Thirty years ago the saying that
"where nothing is known anything
might be lielieved" was more apropos than now, when so much is
kneiwn that everything cannot Ih��
believed. Of course we can ge> le-
yond our reason if it seems probable, but a man who believes against
evidence is insane in that particular, no matter how sound he may
be on other points. Belief today
among so-called educated people is
due either to wilful credulity or
crass ignorance. Religion is in
direct opposition to our present
knowledge. It cannot stand before
today facts and demonstrations of
astronomy, geology, biology, and
psychology. It is as much "out of
drawing" with the appalling universe as a child's tov would le beside the Brooklyn Bridge. I term
it foolish, childish nonsense. It is
in many respect* paralleled by the
faiths of the savages I have seen in
Central Africa. There is some excuse for them in their dense ignorance, but not for the educated anel
enlightened Christian. No believer
seems to take vital interest enough
in Christianity to investigate it.
He swallows the meist ridiculous
myths as if they were axiomatic
truths and so wraps himself in a
veritable Pool's Paradise*. He l>e-
lieve��s in a heaven with that madhouse, yarn. Revelations,  describes
as a cube, 1,600 mile��s each  way.
To tell such a one that our telescopes have searched the firmament
for hundreds of millions of miles
for years and found nothing but
gloles, and none of them nearly so
small a:-; that, has no influence
whatever with them.    So I say, let
9-
science progress���we are every day
doing quite as wonderful things as
those recorded  of  the  gods   the
truth must and will prevail in tbe
end. It is the modest toiling
scientists who are the really eb'vout
men, not th*- dogmatic theologians.
No,"nearness of death can make
no difference" whatever to an Agnostic���his attitude can only be
that of curiosity. Thirty-five years
ago I held certain opinions aliout
Christianity, hacked mostly by
common sense, thinking, talking
with others, reading the Bibb'  aud
observing. Today I hold practically the same vleW8,only now overwhelmingly reinforces! by a worldwide  experience,   great   study of
liooks and really va*t amount of
thought. I know a thousand reasons why Christianity is a fraud
and humbug, a lie. or a delusion.
I do not know one* single reason by
which by any possibility it might
le true! Can I elo anything else
than wholly reject such a system
of belief and worship?   The  belief
is silly, the worship is grotesque.
In conclusion it seems to me that
the jiast attitude of the Agnostic is
no longer sufficient, We actually
know that the history and postulates of Christianity are W��e. <
think we therefore ought to take a
more afiirmative, aggressive stand.
I may do myself better justice In a
book some day. 1 could i����ke
quite a large volume based on my Mat, 19OT]
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
183
personal religious history. It is
the only subject that I have ever
mastered, having given a really
enormous amount of observation,
experience, thought and study to it.
I have been intensely interested in
the subject from eight years of age
to the present day.
I spoke of the status of the four
sciences of astronomy, geology,biology and psychology as containing
complete and absolute refutation of
Christianity���perhaps I should add
to these the new "higher" historical criticism and the results of the
study of Comparative Religions.
This last is quite enough alone.
We find that all the great religions,
like the planets, are born, mature,
decay and die. Some of them, as
Christianity for instance, are badly
decayed a long time before they
die, but they have to end just the
same. All these religions are built
upon identical lines. They all
have saviors, trinities, prophets,
angels, atonements, rewards, ancl
punishments, etc. A book has
been written you know giving the
historical lives and adventures
(reincarnations) "of Sixteen Crucified Saviors." All religions contain something good and much also
that is bad, and Christianity forms
9 9/
no exception to this rule. It seems
that the best thoughts of the best
men have in all ages been similar,
but the best things in Christianity
have been cribbed from other and
older religions.
It seems to me that the simple
reading of the Bible is enough to
utterly condemn it. It is doubtful
If a iiook has ever been published
that contains so many errors of
fact and fancy; and this the work
of the omniscient god. I say nothing of its foolishness, immorality,
and oliscenity.    Of what value any-
* how is a revelation? The world is
not standing still. Evolution is at
work. What might have been of
some service in the barbarian seini-
civilization of Syria 2,000 years ago
is a ridiculous misfit in this advanced and enlightened age. The
Bible has been revised and corrected, added to, and subtracted   from
* a dozen times. How can you
"edit" a revelation? If Christ is
alive auy where and able to come
back to earth today he probably
weiuld not recognize himself in the
account of his careen* as given in
the New Testament.
Then, too, the character of God,
as presented by himself in the Old
Testament,   is   simply   revolting.
Why, he is no better  than   a   bad
man, while a supreme being ought
to be a thousand times better than
the best man. The scriptures say
we are made in his image. There
are two of us here; is then the Almighty a hermaphrodite? I have
read somewhere that the conventional weak and effeminate portraits of Christ are due to the fact
that an effort was made to picture
him as representing the two sexes
���a sort of composite photograph I
suppose. We are made in his
image, and he is elsewhere described as a spirit, therefore he is
properly classified by Haeckel as a
gaseus vertebrate. What nonsense
it all is!
In every direction in which we
turn we meet obstacles if not complete barriers. It is wholly impossible to reconcile our present
day knowledge with any such system of belief. When a man doesn't
know a thing he always says I le-
lieve so and so. But today facts
and demonstrations rule the world,
not sentiments and emotions.
Christianity while having done
some good indirectly (thisof course
is begging the question) yet has
i been such a power in the past as to
I have been able to keep the world
| back a full thousand years. It
has cost billions of treasure anel
millions eif lives. It has filled
asylums and divided families. It
ha* always been the open or secret
opponent of liberal education and
is today. But its power (other
perhaps than politically) is nearly
gone. I never meet anyone who
tries to live up te> it. Why, if
peeiple should try to carry all their
religious ideas into commerce and
business, the work of the world
would stop, and chaos would come
again.
Some of the most cruel and
wicked things that have leen done
to me have been done by professing
Christians. Of what value is it
then to an intelligent man? I
have had no sort of religion whatever for forty years and have felt
no need of any. When I was a
boy everybody about me read the
Bible in public, not alone Sundays
but week days. I don't think I
have seei\ any of the same class of
people with a Bible in their hands
in thirty years. They would be
guyed even by their fellow believers,
Life's Mirror.
There are loyal hearts, there are spirits
brave,
There are souls that are pure and true,
Then give to the world the best you have,
And the best shall come back to you.
Give love.and love to your heart will flow,
A strength in your utmost need;
Have faith and a score of hearts will show
Their faith in your word and deed.
For life is the mirror of king and slave,
'Tis just what you are and do;
Then give to the world the best you have
And the best will come back to you.
���Madeline S. Bridges.
Teaching and Piraetiee.
There was a great display of
millinery in the churches yesterday; the shops down the street
were totally outdone. The woman
who could not boast of a new Easter
hat and suit was virtually told to
4 'Go way back and sit down.'' The
man who could not admire a chunk
of cloth, decorated with a daub of
colored ribbon and a feather, might
as well have stayed at home. To
any one who viewed some of the
church scenes those lines which fell
from the lips of Christ, the meek
and lowly Nazarene, sounded very
odd and out-of-date: "Take no
thought for your life, what ye shall
eat or what ye shall drink, nor yet
for your body, what ye shall  put
on And why take ye
thought for raiment?'
VI
It uias Impossible.
A quotable story is told of a
missionary who was spending a
short holiday in Texas. After he
had been at his hotel for some days
he met a veiy fierce-looking man
of the cowboy type, who,he noticed,
had anything but a sweet temper.
"Do you know," he said to him
one day, "that you should love
your enemies?"
"That's a thing I can't do, sir."
"What! I am sure a man like
you could do anything if you
tried."
"Anything but that, parson; it's
impossible."
"Impossible," said the missionary, surprised and hurt.    "How!"
"I ain't got one to love. I shot
the last this morning."
It has been said that if we could
banish fear, worry and unkind
thoughts from our minds that we
would never grow old. It is worth
trying, especially for elderly maidens. 184
LOWERY'S CLAIM,
(Mat, imt
A Mother's PassioR
By H. lUrman, in Luc'f.r-'K&'&W&KKK**i��R
The longest "Tale" introduced
by Mr. Lane to show what a woman
will do for love is given in his own
language, as follows:
A Mrs. Elliott, wife of a prosperous farmer in Cadiz,Ohio, found
in the family coachman, an attraction that so appealed to her as to
make her forget duty, honor,
motherhood and all that should
keep her true to those for whom
she was supposed to live. She
looked upon him as a man who
would fill a certain gap in her life;
whose love would warm the chill
that had come to her. So she left
all for him, but to awaken shortly
after to her error. Deserted by the
man who had led her astray; divorced and despised by the man
she had deserted, her mother-love
surmounted all else and humbly,
penitently she sought the forgiveness of those she had wronged but
to find all hearts steeled against
her. Her appeal, however, that
she might be a member of her
former husband's household, was
granted, a servant's place being
given her, and so this story has
come to light.
Mrs. Elliott had thrown herself
on her husband's mercy. She told
him that he ought to take care of
her for the sake of her children.
She was ashamed to go anywhere
else. She promised to do anything
he liked���to work for him, to black
his boots, to scrub the floor.
Elliott was still bitter. He
thought slowly over her appeal and
finally said that he would take her
back to his home as a servant.
In return for this treatment she
was to agree always to work faithfully as a servant and never to seek
to be anything but a servant. She
was to be absolutely obedient to
him and the children and never to
attempt familiarities with any of
them. She was to be prepared to
obey orders at any time in the
twenty-four hours and never to ask
for any evenings off. She was to
have no visitors of any kind whatever and never to go away from the
farm.
All these hard conditions the
poor woman accepted readily. She
signed an agreement in which they
were embodied and immediately
entered upon her new duties.
I Her former husband and the
ichildren address her as "Mary,"
while she always says "Sir" to
'Elliott. The children have been
told that they must never speak to
I her or of her as their mother.
"Mary!" yells Master John,
"bring me some more meat at
once!"
"Yes, sir," cries his mother.
"Mary," cries Miss Margaret,"I.
waut some more pie. Y'ou're very
slow."
"Yes, Miss Margaret," says the
mother.
This sort of thing goes on all day
long at the Elliott household. The
family drudge does all the work
that an ordinary mother would do,
and all the work that an ordinary
servant would do, and yet she does
not receive any of the cousidera-
tions that either mother <ir servant
would. She is expiating her terrible folly.
She gets up at 6 o'clock in the
morning and cleans her master's
and her children's shoes. Then
sbe lights the fires and does some
of the other rough work. She
waits on the table at breakfast time
and then sees that the children
have theii rubbers on and their
clothes in good condition when they
start for school. She is never allowed to say anything unless she is
spoken to.
On Sunday Elliott drives the
children to church five miles away.
*9
The "servant," by special permission, is allowed to go there on fexit.
When an old friend of the family
calls, one who knew Mrs. Elliott in
happier days, the former wife must
still act as a servant. She must
not show in any way that she
recognizes the visitor. This is
part of the agreement.
Mrs. Elliott feels that she must
submit to every humiliation and
sacrifice to atone for the crime she
committed. She stands in profound
awe of her former husband, a man
of cold, silent and inflexible character.
When he was asked how he was
able to carry out such a strange
arrangement he replied:
"It works very well. I have
nothing to complain of. The children are glad to have her round the
house.   She does more   for   them
than most servants would and then
her wages are very little."
* *       *       *
A terrible object lesson truly, of
what a woman will do for love.
Analyzing the lesson, however, in
the light of racial experience, I
take the ground that Mrs. Elliott
was none the lees dominated by
mother-love when she ran away
with the coachman than when she
returned to the old home and willingly became a bond slave to hus-
banel and children.
Mother-love include*, embraces,
embodies, all other love.
When she deserted the husband
and children that did not love her
it was because the blind mother-
love within her heart told her to
seek companionship, mateship.that
would enable her to become a real
mother.      Her   womanly   instinct
af
told her the life she wa* then living made it impossible that she
could become the mother of loving
and lovable chil Iron -children that
would be an improvement upon
herself and the man who might
assist her to practicalize motherhood.
That she' made a mistake when
choosing the coachman was probably not so muoh the fault of her
womanly intuitions as the fault  of
her wretched environment, and because no other man extended a
hand to help h ��r out of the hell of
soul-starvation in which she then
was living.
A drowning man catches at
straws, and a woman drowning in
a loveless element, will catch at a
log���if in tbe shape of a man.
* *       *       *
As I understand it Mrs. Elliott
is not now working for love; at
le��ast not for lewe of her children
liecause she gave them birth. If
she hives them at all it is as she
would love anel work for any
motherh's* child. She is now |>ay-
ing the debt exacted of her by her
own falsely educated conscience ���
her own artificial, anti-natural,
standard of purity and honor, as
wife and mother. To the demands
of this conventional Moloch she is
willing to sacrifice the remaining
years eif her loveless life.
In summing up his criticism Mr.
Laiw says: "This poor woman
must lie judged guiltless because of
her atonement." But would she
be guilty if she had made no atonement?
Verily I think not. Mat, iwn.]
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
185
"Love is of man's life a thing
apart; 'tis woman's whole existence," says Byron. Then when
love dies all that is womanly dies.
Why then Should woman be
blamed when, to save her life, she
flies from a loveless home, and refuses to return?
Speaking of the husband in this
case Mr. Lane says, ' 'The man can
be judged only by his attitude toward the penitent, forgiveness-
pleading woman and in this judgment he appears so brutal and
worthlessly inhuman that a warmhearted loving woman would lind
life impossible with him."
But the popular standard of
morality for woman compels her,
in countless thousands of instances
to live with just such a man. The
house belongs to the man; the husband is the legal head of the family,
and when a warm-hearted, loving
woman finds she has made a mistake, finds that there is no real
love between her husband and herself, the popular and legal code of
morality will not permit her to demand an equitable division of the
mutually earned property; will not
allow a peaceful and mutually desired separation and reorganization
of family ties. To mutually desire
separation and reconstruction is
regarded an offense against public
morals, an offense against marital
virtue that must be punished by
compelling the unhappily mated to
live on, to suffer on, and to bring
into the world children deprived of
their most important birth-right,
namely, the right to he born of
love.
To condemn a woman to live in
unwelcome marital relations is to
compel her to become the mother
of imbeciles or criminals.
The crime of undesired matei nity
of unloving and unloved motherhood, is perhaps the greatest of all
crimes. To give life unclear such
conditions is worse than to destroy
life.
*       *       *       *
My central thought on reading
the above pitiful story was that
Mrs. Elliott is to be commended
rather than blamed, for her desertion of a loveless home. Commended and helped instead of
cursed, because in being true to the
mother instinct(including of course
the mating instinct without which
motherhood is impossible) she
showed herself a true woman.
Mother-love���the instinct of race
reproduction, knows nothing of
prudential considerations. When
this instinct asserts itself in full
force, taking the form of what is
called the "grand passion," every
other consideration is forgotten.
Even the instinct of personal safety,
desire, for good name, "fear of God
and hope of heaven," all, all, are
swept away as chaff before the
wind, by this all-conquering racial
instinct or impulse.
Ella Wheeler���than whom there
was never, perhaps, a better interpreter of normal nature���struck it
right when she made ber heroine
to say, "Let us drop down to sweet
hell, if only in the arms of him I
love."
This is the voice of motherhood
in it* enlarged, its truest, its racial
sense, and the woman who has
never felt tons has not yet known
the flowering stage of perfect
womanhood���is not yet lit for the
crowning glory of womanhood, the
creation of a new human being.
"Every great soul," says Ella
Wheeler, "is the product of a great
passion, and the reason there are
so few great souls is that there are
so few great passions. All not thus
begotten are illegitimates, bastards!" or words to that effect.
* *       *       *
Again says this world-famous
"poet of passion"���of normal nature: "Whoever is begotten of
���pure love is of immaculate conception, and is a 'child of God' "���
which word is a contraction of
good.
That is to say, no child can be
well-lorn except when mutual love
brings the parent* together in the
most tremendously important act
of their lives���the giving life and
character to a new human being.
That there may be "infatuations," attractions that do not deserve the name of love, is doubtless
true. There are many women ancl
still more men to whose natures
true love is impossible; that is, the
love that includes and blends the
physical, the intellectual and the
pbychic���simply because there was
no such love between their own
parents, and hence the necessity
for freedom to correct mistakes in
choosing companionships when and
where the creation of new  human
beings is a possibility.
* *       *       *
Tragedies similar, in all important particulars, to that of the
Elliott   family are being enacted
daily all around us. Every observing woman and man knows of
many such. It is only when some
unusual or sensational features
bring them into public notice, such
as the case of the jailer's wife at
Pittsburg who liberated a prisoner
and escaped with him, a few weeks
ago, or when a conspicuous example of the sterotyped '' Wife-Murder
and Suicide'' occurs, that such tragedies get an airing in the public
prints. As in the matter of abuses
under the chattel slave system in
the South, a few years ago, it is
against "public policy" to say
much about the inner working of
our conventional marriage system.
Iu most cases these tragedies are
silently endured, silently lived, until death releases the victim: reminding us of Joaquin Miller's
poem, "The Bravest Battle that
Ever was Fought"���fought in a
"Walled-up Woman's Heart���the
woman that would not yield"���
would not ery out and let her
heart-hunger be knowu to the un-
synipataetic public which would, in
most cases, only laugh ot her folly
for lettiug it be known that she was
dying from want of love���the love
that is her "whole existence"���the
love that is her natural right as
much as air and sunshine are her
natural right���quite as necessary
to the life of the womanly woman.
Three Ulere Enough.
A La Crosse, WTis., Irishman, in
order to celebrate the advent of a
new era, went out on a lark. He
didn't get home till three o'clock
in the morning, and was barely in
the house before a nurse rushed up
and, uncovering a bunch of soft
goods, showed him triplets. The
Irishman looked up at the clock,
which said 3, then at the three of a
kind in the nurse's arms, and said:
"Oi'm not superstitious, but Oi
thank Hivens that Oi didn't come
home at twilve!"
The love of gain makes many
American theatrical managers itch
for a chance to put the Passion play
upon the stage, but public sentiment is against it. Theatre-goers
may be hardened spiritually, but
they cannot bear to see Christ
crucified before their eyes, even in
a mimic scene, and they are right.
Such plays are of no benefit to anyone except in a monetary sense,
. 188
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
[Mat, ism
moment planets might leave their
appointed courses, and, without
law or order, crash against each
other, involving the ruin of worlds.
���John Peck, in "Miracles and
Miracle Workers."
He [Christ] had faults which
neither I nor my readers would
venture to imitate without loss of
self-respect. His mind gave way,
and he was not responsible for what
he said.���Rev. C. Voysey.
Enigma and mist seem to be his
[Christ's] element; and when I find
bis high satisfaction at all personal
recognition, and bowing l^efore his
individuality, I almost doubt
whether, if any wished to draw the
character of a vain and vacillating
pretender, it would be possible to
draw anything more to the purpose
than this.���F. W. Newman.
What little recognition the idea
of obligation to the public obtains
in modern morality is derived froin
GrefK and Roman sources, uot from
Christian. Other ethics than any
which can be evolved from exclusively Christian sources must exist
side bv side with Christian ethi s
to produce the moral regeneration
of mankind.���John Stuart Mill.
Christ had "no knowledge of the
general condition of the world; he
was unacquainted with science; he
was harsh toward his family, and
was no philosopher; he went to excess; sometimes his intolerance of
all opposition led him to acts inexplicable and apparently absurd;
and bitterness and reproach became
more and more manifest in his
heart."���Renan.
Let any one sit down and critically analyze the sayings and doings
ascribed to Jesus in the gospels���
let him divest his mind of the superstitious feareif irreverence,and then
ask himself whether all those sayings and doings are in harmony
with the highest wisdom speaking
for all ages and races of mankind,
and with the conceptions of an absolutely perfect human nature, ancl
I am mistaken if he will not find a
very great deal he will be forced to
condemn.���Rev. J. Cranbrook.
Flag Fetieh.
We take the flower of our Canadian manhood from useful toil on
the specious plea of patriotism.
We ship them off to the other side
of tbe world to fight against men
with whom we have no quarrel,
whom we do not even know, the
merits of whose case we do not
understand. When our boys pilli-
age and burn and slay we laud
their gallantry. When the tables
are turned, when the messenger of
death lets out a brave Canadian
soul, and the body lie* neglected
with the numberless dead in an
African trench, we name it heroism and Canada weeps at the loss
of her sons. When the wire* tell
us a story of a last desperate stand,
where the boys met death calmly,
the marital spirit swells and we
congratulate ourselves that Canada
ha* furnished the only real fighting
men in Britain's legions. Such is
the fetich of the flag.
But what quarrel have we with
the farmers of the Orange Free
State?    What have they done to us
*tr
that we should seud our men to
burn their homes?
Nothing; positively nothing!
Then for whom doe* the bayonet
gleam? Who owns the gold mine*,
for which these nations fight? Do
we, the people, own them?
No; capitalists in London own
them.
Will the people own them when
the war is over?
Not at all. The right* of the
capitalists must be protected, although the cost may stagger humanity.
Then this is a capitalist war. All
these thousands of men who clothe
themselves in kakhi and march to
the grave* to the strains of martial
music, all these are fighting for the
capitalist* who own the gold mine*.
What do the capitalists do for
them?
They give them U4 cents a day.
They deck them in the livery of
death ami furnish them the tools
with which to slay their fellow
men. The dead lie where they fall,
forgotten on the bloody fields of
Paarderburg and Magersfontein.
The maime'd can care for themselves or become mendicants���a
charge on charity. The survivors
go home' when the war is over and
help pay off the debt created by the
war. Some they mark as heroes
and place them on a pedestal to lie
an idolized example for rising generations. Priests are paid to pray
for their SOUR Kings condescend
to use some of the power the people
have given them to confer on these
soldiers an empty title. Newspapers flatter them aud praise their
gallantry. Tales are told and
poems written of how some warrior
bold climbed over dead men to a
throne. So the martial spirit
thrive*.
But the man behind the gun?
The man from Canada: what about
him?
Well, if he is not killed, or does
not lose any of the larger sections
of his anatomy, he may come home
and look for a job on a farm.
"What fools these mortals be!"
���Sandon Paystreak.
About Some Men.
Dear Claim,���I don't want to
be an angel, but I'd rather be an
angel than a mau any time, even if
you do spell him with capital letters
and call him a capital fellow.
He's nasty, man is.
He chews tobacco, which even a
hog wouldn't do, nor any other
decent brute.
He drinks vile whiskey until he
gets the D. T. 's and various other
mental, moral and physical infirmities.
He visit* Hook-shops, not for the
purpose of gratifying a natural anel
legitimate appetite, but to wallow
in lust with the woman whom he
first degraded under a pretense of
love.
He gleiat* iu murder and revels
in the chronicles of crime.
He preys upon the poor anel the
weak, and prays in the sanctuary
for strength to do it.
He pretends to control the destiny of nations and sells his controlling interest for the dollar.
He set* the human brother boo* I
at variance and sic's 'em on, in
order to create a foreign marke't for
his wares, while millions are naked
and starving at home.
He manufacture* misery by the'
wholesale and talks aliout the inscrutable decrees of Providence!
Poor Providence!
He sustains an Industrial System
that brutalize* ancl degrades the
human race, and plays stoker for a
hell to roast its victims. Fire* are
refining, you know.
He bestows untold care and expense upon the breeding of horses
and dogs, and lets Chance and Lust
propagate Humanity.
He taxes and corners the bread-
stuffs of the country and provide*
a war to kill off the people whei
ought to be fed.
He fosters a mercantile system
\
MMMM Mat. 19011
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
189
I
whereby the man who is honest
enough to pay his bills pays al��o
for the "bad debts" of other people.
He provides a hero's monument
for the man who dies in a lust of
murder, and a hangman's noose for
the man who kills in a murderous
lust.
He elects to die by new ancl aristocratic diseases, and pays a doctor
two hundred and fifty dollars to
remove his appendix, but never
thinks to stop up the hole where
his brains ooze out.
In ninety-nine times out of a
hundred he's a failure, even in
finance, where the only success he
cares about is located, yet he never
dreams of turning his eye* toward
any other goal.
He lives ten years as a pimp ancl
a whoremonger and then deserts
the wife he ha* wed Itecause he discovers she has not lieen a total al>-
stainer.
He���Oh, he's nasty, aud mean,
ancl a fool. I'd rather lie a woman
or what I am.        Only a Bird.
beautiful as the God of Nature de
signed."
Apology uuas Proper.
attend for the first time the very
High Church Episcopalian service,
with its elaborate ritual and its
extraordinary musical features, at
the; church of St. Mary the Virgin,
"Mabel," he said, with an ap- New York. The reply of a very
parent effort,as he gazed clown into prominent Roman Catholic priest,
her dreamy eyes, "you've always when asked by the friend who had
been as a sister to me, haven't taken him there how he liked the
you?" service, "Well, really, I prefer the
The long expected  moment had simple ritual of my own'' church,"
at last arrived, and she gazed coyly is a current story at the clubs.
at the floor. Even   more   amusing   was   the
"I've   tried
whispered.
to,
Gewge," she! comment of the elderly Scotch
j woman whose relatives said to her
"And if I were to say something as they were leaving after the ser-
to you that should only be said by vice: "Well, Aunt Janet, did you
persons who are intimately ae- enjoy the service?"
attainted and who thoroughly un- "A'weel," said Janet, in re-
derstand each other, you would not; sponse, "it's verra interestin', but
take offense?" what a w'y to spend the Sabbath!"
She thought it rather queer that ��
he should view a simple proposal; Sadness Explained.
in this light, but she trembling as- j
OhI Girls.
In one of his sermons   Dr.   John
Dow gave the  following  good  ael-
young
the
ladies   of  his
vice to
flock:
"The buxom, bright-eyexl, rosy-
checked, full-breasted, bouncing
lass, who can darn a stocking,
mend trousers, make her own
frocks,command a regiment of pot*
aud kettles,  feed   the   pigs,   chop
sured him she would not
"Them, Mabel," he continued,
lowering his voice to a quiver, "I
apologize for my boldness in saying
it. but when I leaned over to turn
the pages of your music I b
off two of my suspender . buttons.
Will you sew them on?"
And trembling inwardly, but regaining her outward composure
with BU effort, the brave girl went
into the other room and brought
forth the necessary implements.
On Another Line.
The brakeman at a certain
tion on the Northern  Pacific
In Liverpool recently a sentimental young lady was on the
Cunard steamship quay when she
saw a young girl sitting on a trunk
in an attitude of   utter   dejection
usted i aml de8Pair-
*  "Poor thing." thought the romantic lady. "She is probably
alone and a stranger. Her pale
cheeks and great, sad eyes tell of a
broken heart and a yearning for
sympathy." So she went over to
t the traveler to win her confidence.
"Crossed in love?" she asked
sympathetically.
"No," replied the girl with a
sigh, "crossed in tbe Servia.and an
awfully rough passage too.
sta
Kail
i,
wood, milk cows, wrestle with the | way had been granted leave foi tin
boys, and be a lady withal in purpose of being married, in ao-
'COmpany,' is just the sort of girl I dition, he was given the custo.nai5
for me. and for any worthy man to | return railway pass.
During his absence a new tie Ker-
COllector had been    put    em,    who,
marry.
"But you, ye
pining,    moping,
ioiu^;^Ui.or^^^iT^nediok'8'",;""- ,"M"ft",,,>,1
putty-fac-Ml, oomBUmpttve, moit- Me *"*}* , , , t |,oth ,)a)JS men are so
g-HH, nu.Hi.-nunl.MinK. novel-de- Be���ML*�� �� ��* �� J��J ,,.������ -usistr
vooriug daughter, of Peehion and ^^E^ndered the     "   ' -   -
idleness, you are 110   more   nt   ior | pocKet, uj
matrimony than a pullet is to look
after a family eif fourteen chickens.
Why He Cot Up.
A young man rose from his seat
in the train, and a stout lady was
in a twitter at once.
"Oh, dear me, sir, how very kind
of vou. I don't really feel as if I
ought to take your seat. Gentle-
unselfish.     Do   you
tt*T
latter. . ,
The collector opeued and gravely
1 *iw�� "lines " then returned
l'he truth Is, my dear |WWrt��l"~Jft JoTheadshake, aud:
want more liberty anel less fashion
able restraint, more kitchen and
less parlor, more leg exercise anel
less sofa, more pudding and less
piano, more frankness and less
mock modesty, more breakfast and
less bustle. Loose yourselves a
little, enjoy more liberty and less
restraint by fashion, breathe the
pure atmosphere of freedom, anel
become something   ����   lovely ttncI
'Gee!   man!
1   it's a   ticket for a
(j Id long ride, but  not   on   the
N. P
At a 8igh
Church Service.
Some very good stories are told,
says the New York Times, of the
impression made upon those   who
And she besamed at him   archly.
"No, ma'am," he said, in a hollow voice. "I don't insist. I only
got up 'cause, by the feel of it, the
seat's wet. You see, it's raining,
anel the window's been left open."
Michael J. Coyne, a New York
policeman, saved five lives at a
fire. He isn't likely, however, to
be regarded as half as much of a
hero as he might have been if he
had waved a flag somewhere and
shot a few men to de?ath.���Chicago
Record-Herald. 188
LOWERY'S CLAIM,
(Mat, imm
moment planets might leave their
appointed courses, and, without
law or order, crash against each
other, involving the ruin of worlds.
���John Peck, in "Miracles and
Miracle Workers."
He [Christ] had faults which
neither I nor my readers would
venture to imitate without loss of
self-respect. His mind gave way,
and he was not responsible for what
he said.���Rev. C. Voysey.
Enigma and mist seem to be his
[Christ's] element; and when I find
his high satisfaction at all personal
recognition, and bowing r^efore his
individuality, I almost doubt
whether, if any wished to draw the
character of a vain and vacillating
pretender, it would be possible to
draw anything more to the purpose
than this.���F. W. Newman.
What little recognition the idea
of obligation to the public obtains
in modern morality is derived from
Grreejc and Roman sources, uot from
Christian. Other ethic* than any
which can be evolved from exclusively Christian sources must exist
side by side with Christian ethi -s
to produce the moral regeneration
of mankind.���John Stuart Mill.
Christ had "no knowledge of the
general condition of the world; he
was unacquainted with science; he
was harsh toward his family, and
wa* no philosopher; he went to ex-
cess; sometimes his intolerance of
all opposition leel him to acts inexplicable anel apparently absuiel;
and bitterness and reproach became
more and more manifest in his
heart.''���Reman.
Let any one sit down and critically analyze the sayings and doings
ascribed to Jesus in the gospels���
let him di ve��st his mind of the superstitious fear of irreverence,and then
ask himself whether all those sayings and doings are in harmony
with the highest wisdom speaking
for all age* and race* of mankind,
and with the conceptions of an absolutely perfect human nature, and
I am mistaken if he will not find a
very great deal he will be forced to
condemn.���Rev. J. Cranbrook.
Flag Fetich.
We take the flower of our Canadian manhood from useful toil on
the specious plea of patriotism.
We ship them off to the other side
of the world to fight against men
with whom we have no quarrel,
whom we do not even know, the
merits of whose case we do not
understand. When our boys pilli-
age and burn and slay we laud
their gallantry. When the table*
are turned, when the messenger of
death lets out a brave Canadian
soul, and the body lie* neglected
with the numberless dead in au
African trench, we name it heroism and Canada weeps at the loss
of her sons. When the wires tell
us a story of a last desperate stand,
where the boys met death calmly,
the marital spirit swells and we
congratulate ourselves that Canada
ha* furnished the only real fighting
men in Britain's legions. Such is
the fetich of the flag.
But what quarrel have we with
the farmers of the Orange Free
State? What have they done to us
that we should send our men to
burn their homes?
Nothing; positively nothing!
Then for whom doe* the bayonet
gleam? Who owns the gold mines,
for which these nations fight? Do
we, the people, own them?
No; capitalists in London own
them.
Will the people own them when
the war is over?
Not at all. The right* of the
capitalists must be protected, although the* cost may stagger humanity.
Then this is a capitalist war. All
these thousands of men who clothe
themselves in kakhi and march to
the grave* to the strains of martial
music, all these are fighting for the
capitalists whei own the gold mine*.
What do the capitalist* do for
them?
They give them 24 cents a day.
They deck them in the livery e>f
death and furnish them the tools
with which to slay their fellow
men. The dead lie where they fall,
forgotten on the bloody fields of
Paarclerburg ami Magersfontcin.
The maimed can care for themselves or become mendicant*���a
charge em charity. The survivors
go home when the war is over ancl
help pay eiff the debt created by the
war. Seime they mark as heroes
and place them on a pedestal to be
an idolized example for rising generations. Priests are paid to pray
for their souls. Kings condescend
to use some of the power the people
have given them to confer on these
soldiers an empty title. Newspapers flatter them and praise their
gallantry. Tales are told and
poems written of how some warrior
bold climbed over dead men to a
throne. So the martial spirit
thrive*.
But the man behind the gun?
The man from Canada: what about
him?
Well, if he is not killed, or does
not lose any of the larger sections
of his anatomy, he may come home
and look for a job on a farm.
"What fools these mortals be!"
���Sandon Pay streak.
About Seme Mer*.
Dkak Claim,���I don't want to
le an angel, but I'd rather lie an
angel than a man any time, even if
you do spell him with capital letters
and call him a capital fellow.
He's nasty, man is.
He chews tobacco, which even a
hog wouldn't do, nor any other
decent brute.
He drinks vile whiskey until he
gets the D. T. 's and various other
mental, moral and physical infirmities.
He visits Hook-shops, not for the
purpose of gratifying a natural ancl
legitimate appetite, but to wallow-
in lust with the woman whom he
first degraded under a pretense of
love.
He gloats in murder and revels
in the chronicles of crime.
He preys opon the poor and the
weak, and prays in the sanctuary
feir strength to dei it.
He pretends to control the�� des-
tiny of nations and sells his controlling interest for the dollar.
He set* the human brotherhood
at variance and sic's 'em on, in
order to cieate a foreign market for
his wares, while millions are naked
and starving at home.
He manufacture* misery by the'
wholesale and talks about the inscrutable decrees of Providence!
Poor Providence!
He sustains an Industrial System
that brutalize* and degrade** the
human race, and plays stoker for a
hell to roast its victims. Fires are
refining, you know.
He bestows untold care anel expense upon the breeding of horses
and dogs, and lets Chance and Lust
propagate Humanity.
He taxes and corners the bread-
stuffs of the country ancl provide*
a war to kill oft* the people who
ought to be fed.
He fosters a mercantile system
1 Mat. 1901]
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
189
whereby the man who is honest
enough to pay his bills pays al��o
for the "bad debts" of other people.
He provides a hero's monument
for the man who dies in a lust of
murder, and a hangman's noose for
the man who kills in a murderous
lust.
He elects to die by new and aristocratic diseases, and pays a doctor
two hundred and fifty dollars to
remove his appendix, but never
thinks to stop up the hole where
his brains ooze out.
In ninety-nine times out of a
hundred he's a failure, even iu
finance, where the only success he
cares about is located, yet he never
dreams of turning his eye* toward
any other goal.
He lives ten years as a pimp ancl
a whoremonger and then deserts
the wife he ha* wed because he discovers she has not been a total abstainer.
He���Oh, he's nasty, and mean,
and a fool. I'd rather be a woman
or what I am.        Onlv a Bird,
attend for the first time the very
High Church Episcopalian service,
with its elaborate ritual and its
extraordinary musical features, at
the chuirh of St. Mary the Virgin,
OhI Girls.
In one of his se��rmoiis Dr. John
Dow gave the following good advice to the young ladies of his
fleick:
"The buxom, bright-eyeHl. rosy-
cheeked, full-breasted, bounenng
lass, who can darn a stocking,
mend trousers, make her own
frocks, com maud a regiment of pot*
and kettles,  feed   the   pigs,   chop
beautiful as the God of Nature designed."
Apology uias Proper.
"Mabel," he said, with an ap-. New York. The reply of a very
parent effort,as he gazed down into prominent Roman Catholic priest,
her dreamy eyes, "you've always. when asked by the friend who had
been as a sister to me, haven't taken him there how he liked the
you?" service, "Well, really, I prefer the
The long expected  moment  bad simple ritual of my own1 church,"
at last arrived, and she gazed coyly  is a current story at the clubs.
at the floor. Even   more   amusing   was   the
"I've tried to, George," she! comment of the elderly Scotch
whispered. woman whose relatives said to her
"And if I were to say something as they were leaving after the ser-
to you that should only be said by vice: "Well, Aunt Janet, did you
persons who are intimately ac- enjoy the service?"
quainted and who thoroughly un- "A" weel," said Janet, in re-
derstand each other, you would not' sponse, "it's verra interestin', but
take offense?" I what a w'y to spend the Sabbath!"
She thought it rather queer that ��
he should view a simple proposal; Sadness Explained,
in this light, but she trembling as-      ^ Liy        ,  recently   a   senti.
sured him she would not. (mental  young   lady   was   on   the
"Then, Mabel,' he continued, ^^ J^^p^nay when she
lowering his voice to a quiver,   "1
apologize for my boldness in saying
saw a young girl sitting on a trunk
���puivgiw iw uit W.M-WO '""-/'"Sjin an attitude of   utter   dejection
it, but when I leaned over to  turn; , A ,_
the  pagc��s  of your music I
off two of my   suspender . buttons.
Will you sew them on?"
And trembling inwardly, but regaining her outward composure
with  an effort, the brave girl went
i   r,tr~A i and despair.
busted!        .,    F .. .      ,,    ..       , . ..
"Poor thing, thought the romantic lady. "She is probably
alone and a stranger. Her pale
cheeks and great, sael eyes tell of a
broken heart  anel  a yearning  for
forth the necessary implements.
On Another Liine.
The brakeinan at a certain   sta
tion on the Northern  Pacific   Kail-
..      ., ii. .u-j. sympathy.      So she went over to
into the other room   ancl   brought   V r.     .    ..   . a,
.   ., " , 4   *    ' the traveler to win her confidence.
"Crossed in   love?"   she   asked
sympathetically.
"No,"   replied   the girl with  a
sigh, "crossed in the Servia.and an
| awfully rough passage too.'
wood, milk cows, wrestle with   the  way had been granted leave for t    \ Wh     He Got Up.
boys, and   be  a   lady   withal in pnrposeof being mar"��v*"��     i young man rose fo
'company,'   is just the sort of girl dition, he was given the customary I    *J0���*      dastou
for me, anel for any worthy man to return railway pass. .. ,   A I....     ....:..  �����
om his seat
stout lady  was
in a twitter at once.
���Oh, dear me, sir, how very kind
of vein.    I don't really feel as if   I
��� er
ought to take  your  seat.    Gentlemen   are   so   unselfish.     Do   you
m |     1)uring his absence a new ticket-
"Butyou, ye pining, moping, i col lector had been put on who.
lolling, Bcrewed-up, wasp waistcd. j upon Benedick s return, d< manned
putty-faced,   consumptive,   mort- his ticket. ^^
gageKl, musio-mureleriiig,  novel-de-1     Benedick, ^^^^JK really insist?
vouring daughters of  fashion  and ; and [^^^.^L^, tendered  the      And she beamed at him   archly.
Idleness, you are no   more   lit  forpocket, i>y un.
matrimony than a pullet is to look  latter }
after a family of fourteen chickens. |     1 he��>Ue< tot q?  ? ^ ^^
ice
The truth is, my dear girlsyou scan n< headshake,  audi
want more liberty and less fashion-  ^^f^,0^ a   ticket  for a
able restraint, more   kitchen and a Urna? ride, but not   on   the
less parlor, more leg exercise   and a��� u      g
less sofa, more   pudding   and   less N. ^
piano,   more   frankness   and   less I
mock modesty, more breakfast and | ^ a \\\gh
less bustle. Loose yourselves a
little, enjoy more liberty ancl less
restraint by fashion, breathe the
pure atmosphere of freedom, and
become something   a*   lovely  anel
Church Service.
Some very good stories are told,
nays the New York Times, of the
impression made upon those   who
"No, ma'am," he said, in a hollow voice. "I don't insist. I only
got up 'cause, by the feel of it, the
seat's wet. \rou see, it's raining,
and the window's been left open."
Michael .1. Coyne, a New York
policeman, saved five lives at a
fire. He isn't likely, however, to
be regarded as half as much of a
hero as he might have been if he
had waved a flag somewhere and
shot a few men to death. ���Chicago
Record-Herald. ISO
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
(MAV.  luotf
WomaRly   Beauty
On Taking liife
Too Seriously.
Did it ever occur to you, I  want
All Gan  Develop It WhO LUM N^\^\^\^N^N^\^N^N^N^ to ask, that the   World   and   his
Young woman, do you worship I cycling are exercises that can be
at the shrine of Beauty? Or may j recommended. Regulate the dis-
it not be better asked, do you not jtauce according to your strength,
worship at the shrine of Beau ty, I and do not be afraid of becoming
for what would  woman  be if she fatigued���it will soon pass away.
Eleanor Wainwright says of the
walking   exercise:     "Long   brisk
walks have a wonderfully beautify-
jing effect  upon   the   skin,   as   18
j proven by the brilliant complexions
j of the   English   women   who   walk
vigor of glorious, .     ,..,,.     ,,        .,      ,.
6 B constantly in all weather.
There is  absolutely  no  need at
any time for a  corset after  vour
*��� 9/
figure has lieen developed to proper
proportions, and it   should   le ciis-
did not? Now, while in the heyday of youth, while the rays of
life's sunshine are warmest and
brightest, do you not yearn for
comely proportions, for a clear-
tinted complexion, for the grace,
suppleness and
exhilarating health ? Now is the
time to determine, with a strong,
inflexible will, that these marks of
perfection shall be acquired. Now
while the body   is still  immature.
still   expanding  and   developing, Icarded entirely if you value health,
your  physical   appearance  can  be strength, beauty, anel. last, but not
changed in every outline,   in every   least, the power to hold the energy
proportion.    Remember that  ugli- *ud attractions e>f youth far beyond
ness is a positive sin against Nature the usual time for showing age.
and its possession indicates, beyond      Womanly    beauty���the    theme
all chance of refutation,  that you (that has intensely interested  the
have grossly disobeyed  laws  controlling  the  harmonious  development of vigorous health.
To make possible "the life beautiful" the body as well as the mind I blood
and soul   must   lie   cultured  and!cheeks
>ping
better today than they ever did it
before?    Are they not making life
lighter and easier for us than  they
did for our   great   grand-parent*?
Just fancy for a   moment   what a
really   decent   establishment they
keep.    Iu the first place you dem't
have any  painted   faced   Indians
prowling around your house to relieve you of your scalp, as wa* the
situation in the days of our Puritan
ancestors.     Iu  the   second   place
you are not compelled to on Ier your
clothes from Loudon,a* the colonial
cavaliers did, which is a consideration.    Thirdly,you can travel from
the Atlantic to the Pacific for  two
cent* a mile, which George   Washington, great as he was, could  uot
do, and fourthly, if you  aie   commercially clever enough   you   can
ce mi maud a salary of a million dollars a year.a sum the like of which
John Alden could never have hoped
living in all ages. is.  if calmly dis- to lay at the feet Of Priscilla  Mul-
secteel,   almost   entirely  physical, j lens.     Sixthly,   at   the   breakfast
From whence come the bright eyes, table each morning you   can   read
the  lips  carmined   with  the  rich all that happened  the   glole   over
of  health,   the  el ear-tin ted \ the   day   before,   a   thing   which
the   supple1   gracefulness, j would   turn    lien  Franklin   green
made symmetrical in every curve, j the symmetrical outlines of a beau-, with envy, and seventhly, if you
Life, in its aesthetic sense, with all teous form���swaying the minds of choeise, you can love your neighbor
its subtle magnetic force, cannot be j men ancl at times  the destinies of! as yourself,which the early settlers,
even partially realized by the* mere j nations ?   There is not a sign de
act of existence.    To  exist   is   not looting beauty which has not either
its origin or its influencing power
in the physical side of life. Where
would the society  belle  lie   if  her
to live. It is the abundant vitality of a cultured body that gives to
every action, to every word, that
forceful spontaneity, that ease of lever-ready witticisms were not ac-
perfect confidence, so essential to companied by the changeful fire of
the successful accomplishment of sparkling eye?���that sure sign of a
the projects of life. Within phys- good digestion. Of what charm are
ical training a woman has a power ! well-meuileled feature's when not
for beautifying, not only her physi- '��� conjoined to a certain power of ex-
cal proportions, but her eyes, her pression. created by the confidence
complexion, her very personality Iof effervescing health as much as
itself. by .guiding intellectuality?    With-
Therc are any number of sys-j out this feeling of physical exalta-
teuis of calisthenics laid down, and tiou, this innate something that
all of them are good. It is not a stirs the pride, dignifies and makes
question of what system is best, it sublime the mein, beauty  loses its
is all in the persistency anel regu-;grand power and its most alluring
larity of practice'. It is especially I element <>f expression. What is
essential in exercise for producing j grace but the muscular strength
the smoothly rounded symmetry of [that gives one perfect command of
beauty, without the  more  rugged
outlines of strength, that the exercise never tend towards violence.
Always commence moderately,and,
above all, be persistent and regular
in your endeavors.     Walking and
the body!     What is suppleness but
ease of movement?���that yielding
pliancy that betrays harmonious
ancl unrestricted development.
Health is the very foundation of
all beauty���grand or simple.
from lack of neighbors, were obliged
to leave undone. I might thus go
on up to tlie flfty-thirdly and then
only have told half the blessings
we enjoy over our forefathers. It
all seems to resolve itself into a
button and a liell. You press the
one or you ring the other, and behold, the earth's efforts are brought
to your door. Which unmistakably is pretty good housekeeping,
when you come to think of it. No
trouble, no worry, no excessive
toil; everything ready at hand.
The World and his Wife have certainly done things up brown. The
pleasure and the case should all be
ours.
And now where does tlie moral
come in? Here���that the easier
life^ is maeie^ for us the harder we
take it. Two hundred years ago
on the spot where you stand, men
faced real dangers. Red-skins,
wild animals and the hardships of
the pioneer life confronted him at
every turn. Death and disaster
were   their   constant companions. Mav, 1908.|
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
isi
i
Yet did these men prove cowards,
or allow themselves to be always
unhappy because of their perils?
Today we think the world is about
to fall on our heads if anything
goes greatly amiss. With a policeman at every corner and a sheriff
within call we consider ourselves
the prey of every misfortune. In
our stone-fronted and com fort-filled
homes we deliberately set to work
to make tragedies out of trifles. A
single case of small-pox in Philadelphia sends all New York on a
run   to   the   doctors   for   vaccine
state of emotion, and emotions are
neither created nor uncreated by
acts of the will, to promise or to
bind oneself to continue a relation
resting upon such emotion is to
stultify reality by stultifying truth
and integrity in the individual;
and the act is followed as we all
often see by the realized misery of
mismating. But this is where the
second evil begins; a married man
and woman may not be free unless
one accuses the other of crimes.
They may not part for the best of
causes, that love between  them is
treatment, and the inability to I not: then the acts which are na-
secure a coveted bargain at the de- tural results of bondage, crimes or
part men t store causes the light ofa not, are done, and they part, soiled
woman's life to go out for that day. .- and scarred; with curses on their
The pilgrim of 1020, after two!lips and hatred in their hearts,
months' buffeting on the seas with  Thus are bad matters made worse.
scurvy and shipwreck impending
hourly, counted himself extremely
lucky to reach land at all; your
trans-Atlantic traveler of 1902 considers himself ill-used indeed if the
��� Ironicus.
My Symphony.
To live content with small means;
steward on a short, safe, five-day I to seek elegance rather than luxury
voyage so much as brings him an ��.d refinement rather than fashion;
over-rare steak once. So runs the to lie worthy, not respectable; and
world to trouble of its own seeking, wealthy, not rich; to study hard.
Why take it all so seriously? think quietly, talk gently, act
What if occasionally, like Jack and I frankly: to listen to stars ancl birds,
Jill, you do tumble down and spill babes and sages, with open heart,
your happiness. The hill is still to bear all cheerfully,do all bravely,
there, the pail is close at hand, and | await occasions, hurry never; in a
there is always more water to be | word, to let the spiritual, unbidden
had at the top.    Why   not   climb Iand unconscious,  grow up through
the hill again, refill the pail, anel
carry it more carefully next time?
Methinks that would be the better
wav.���The Brown Book.
The music Stopped.
It happened iu a little church on
the east side of   New    York   city.
9/
where the motive   power   for the
the commonplace.    This   is to be
my   symphony. ���William    Henry
9/ 9/ C ��� e>
('banning.
.When God made the earth it
shook to and fro till he put mountains on it to keep it firm. Then
the angels asked, "0 God is there
anything in thy creation stronger
than these mountains?'' And God
organ conies from the strong  arms j replied. "Iron is stronger than  the
of an industrious Irishman
At a recent service the choir got
into trouble, anel   while   confusion
mountains for   it   breaks   them.'
"And is there anything in creation
stronger than iron?*"     "Yes, fire is
reigned the organ suddenly stopped. I stronger tban iron for it melts it "
The situation   was   not    relieved   "And is   there   anything   stronger
when a hoarse whisper came from than lire?" "Yes, water for it
behind the organ and floated out quenches fire." "Is there anything
into the auditorium.    Ii said: stronger than water?"   "Yes,wind
-Sing like  t'undcr!    De bellers | for. it puts water in   motion"    "0
is busted!"
Divorce as a reinedv for the evils
9/
of marriage is an expedient which
like many others in this meddling
world, only serves to make bad
matters worse. Men and women
may only love and unite by permission of the Government, that is
the first evil; because, as love is a
our sustainer. is there anything in
creation stronger than* wind?"
"Ves, a good man giving alms; if
he give it with his right hand and
conceal it from his left he overcomes all things. Every good act
is charity; your smiling in your
brother's face; your putting a wanderer in the right road; your giving
water to the thirsty is charity;  ex
hortation to another to do right is
charity. A man's true wealth
hereafter is the good he has done
in this world to his fellow man.
When he dies people will ask,
What property has he left behind
him? But the angels will ask,
What good deeds has he sent before
him?"���The Koran.
To be Honest^to be I^ind
To be honest to be kind���to earn
a little, and to spend a little less,
to make upon the whole a family
happier for his presence, to renounce when that shall be necessary and not be embittered, to keep
a few friends, but these without
capitulation���above all to keep
friends with yourself���here is a
task for all that a man has of fortitude and delicacy.���Robert Louis
Stevenson.
A girl absent from school for half
a day brought the following satisfactory excuse: "Miss teecher���
My dotter's absents yesterdey was
unavoidable. Her shoes had to lie
half-soled and she had a sore throte.
Her konstitushun is delikit and if
she is absent any more you can
know that it is on acount of un-
avodabel sickness or something
else." A boy absent for half a day-
laid the following explanation on
his master's desk: "Dear sir,���
Please excuse Henry. He went to
grandpapa's fuueral with me this
forenoon. I have been promising
him for several weeks that he might
if he was good, and he has been
very good, so I kept my word."
In Russia.
A tourist give* the following as
an example of the rigid formality
with which the officials in some
part* of Russia act.
Russian Official ��� "You can't
stay in this country, sir."
Traveler-"Then I'll leave  it."
"Have you a permit  to  leave?"
"No sir."
"Then you cannot go. I give
you 24 hours to make up your mind
as to what you will do."
It is told of an old hen,that after
the Methodist preacher had eaten
and gone she was heard to say that
one of her sons had "entered the
ministry." 198
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
[Mat, i90t
Answers te Enquiries,,
I am a young man in  poor circumstances, but anxious to succeed
as a prize fighter.    Can you direct
me
fession? ���Ambitious.
Try the B. C. Legislature.
Do you know why the Christians
are so anxious to convert the Chinese?���M. C.
Probably so that they can do up
Abraham's bosom. It must be
badly wrinkled by this time, so
many people have lain on it.
My husband never conies home
until three in the morning. How
will I break him of the habit?���
Beatrice.
Get some other fellow to sit up
with you until he comes.
On my wages I find it difficult
to get pant* that will not bag at the
knee*, and I am anxious to hold
my place in my set. Can you advise me in the dilemma?���Ping-
Pong.
Don't wear any.    Put on a dress.
What time should a woman be
left alone?���Old Bach.
When the line breaks and a
week's washing goes into the mud.
Florentina, whom I madly love,
has an insane appetite for ice cream
and buggy rides. I am a clerk on
$6 a week. What had I better do?
In despair.���Reginald Softly.
Fly the coop, or else get more
money.
I have been in a mining camp
lately and heard the people talking
about jack-pots. WThat kind of a
dish are they?���Bruce  Tenderfoot.
They are used for cooking beans,
and are frequently hard to open.
They are rather expensive and not
conducive to home comfort.
pause, and the bride prospective
looked at the would-be groom.
Finally he saiel: "I can prove that
my former wife is dead."    "How
3    , . will you do so?"    "I was sent here
to a good school  for that pro- \$ tStu     u     n    m.   u -a *.
ion?i4,nhitmn�� !        for killing her.      The bride accept
ed him notwithstanding.
It is related that the only man
who ever got even with Cecil Rhodes
in the matter of personalities was a
little German clerk in tbe government office at Johannesburg.
Rhodes on this occasion had to
stand in line, and he didn't like it.
He had not lieen used to standing
in liue in South Africa or anywhere
else. "Please attend to me at
once," he said, "I can't wait."
"When your turn comes, mister."
mumbled the clerk. "Confound,
you, sir; don't you know who I
am? I'm Rhodes." "Oh, yes, I
knew that; but that doesn't worry
me," was the unruffled reply. "If
you were in Cape Town, I'd have
you discharged in a minute," roarenl
the premier. "Yes. I have heard
that they discharge people in Cape
Town for doing their duty," answered the clerk; "but we ain't in
Cape Town.    This is a  republic."
Good Toronto is shocked over
the short-dress poster, and a movement is on foot to suppress the evil.
It is evident that some Toionto
people cannot look at a female leg,
even on a poster, without having
visions of something usually considered damnable. "To the pure
all things are pure," and if artistically executed no poster should
jar the healthy minded. Prudes
will always be shocked at the* sight
of certain things, even if God did
make them.
<*--.*^-j*-j*--^-**wi*-**^***iJi*-tJ***v^^
^--���-���^vJs^-sJS,?*Os^******yN*^^
Tourists
Not long   ago   a   convict   in   a an^   -nr 1
French   penal   colony,    who   was a"u  QLl  dRcCl  S
serving a life sentence  there,   de- -^
sired to marry one of   the*   women when in New Denver, win Hnd the nkwmakkkt
. 1 j* ii     i*���       4.      Hotrl a iro.-d nlnee to <-ani|�� ov.'r Rlffltt.    Fro.
con viets, and made  application   to  gIbaKnT��r��efinest teenero In the world e��n
the authorities for   the   necessary  I* Been win ; ��� ^     - -   ^ i^
permission.    The governor of  the
colony offered no objection, but the*
priest proceeded   to  cross-examine
the prisoner.    "Did you not marry
in   France?"   he   asked.    "Yes."
"And your wife is dead?"    "She
is."    "Have you any document to
show that she is   dead?"    "No."
"Then I must decline to marry you.
You must produce some proof that
your wife is dead."    There was a
Identity in Doubt.
Before making millions, ex-Senator Edward O. Wolcott and his
brother established a law and real
estate office in Georgetown, Col.
Henry Wolcott ran the real estate
business and did fairly well, but
there was nothing doing in the law,
and the ex-senator became discouraged, gossips a Washington writer,
and decided to move to an adjoining camp, where a silver lead had
been struck. He packed his belongings on a donkey. Just as he
was leaving he remembered his first
sign, reading, "Ed Wolcott &
Brother." "You don't want that
sign, do you, Henry?" asked the
ex-senator. "No, Ed, take it
along," replied Henry. Edward
packed the sign on the donkey and
arrived at the new mining camp
the next afternoon about dusk.
The miners came up and looked
him over. One of them read the
sign strapped on the donkey's back
ancl asked: "Which of you all is
Ed?"
"The meanest man in Missouri
live* in Carthage," says the Joplin
Herald. "The other day he put a
large porcelain egg in the nest Of
an ambitious old hen and found
that the eggs that she afterward
laid were increased in size, Then
he put a goose egg in the nest and
the aforesaid hen laid one just as
large. He was so well pleased
with the scheme that he put a foot-
hall in the nest and waited the results. When he went next time
to search for eggs he found one as
big as the football, but no hen iu
sight. Securing the egg, he saw
engraved on it, by hen photography, the words: "I'm no���ostrich,
but I have done my best." Later
he found the hen inside the egg."
SMOKE
BRITISH LION &    4
MAINLAND  CIGARS
One of the future features of
Lowbrv's Claim will be the publication of short stories and sketches
drawn from mining camp life in
the west, and written by a pen
shover who knows that life from
soda to hock. The stories will be
entirely different from those hothouse dreams of writers who never
gazed upon or lived in the stirring
scenes of a strenuous western existence. The stories will be true
to life, and everything will le
called by its right name so that a
knowledge of Latin and Greek will
not be necessary in order to savey
the literary float.
IHHaHMIMBfll

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