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Lowery's Claim Sep 1, 1906

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Array At��
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CLAIM
NUMBER 37
NELSON, B. C. CANADA.
PRICE?:  10 CBNT3
SEPTEMBER, 1906.
Among the Angels.
With this Issue Lowery's Claim is
for the second time deposited in the
tomb from which it may never arise,
even if Gabriel blows his horn and announces that all tyrants have been
drowned In the froth of their egotistical
idiocy. This journal has lived too soon
to be generally popular, for the class of
work it has contained does not appeal to
those sunk In the stagnant pond of
creed, custom, superstition and mental
ossification. An Irishman brought up
on flsh and potatoes will have a fever
when he first eats meats. So It is with
people fed upon ancient theological dope,
love of kings, bishops, dukes and dollars. With the blood of slaves running
In their veins, and minds tainted with
the awe of authority they gag when a
dish of virgin, virile and living thought
Is set before them and rush for the do-
nator like a mad bull chasing a red flag.
Perhaps it is a mistake to hand out mental beefsteak when gruel can only be
digested.
I will admit in tho days .of long past
thai I have sometimes played a pair oi
sevens se If they were a set of fours,
but. i nthe real drama of life the role of
the hypocrite did not nppeal to my upper
stope. It always looked cowardly to mc
to play Judas under a Jesus mask. 1
could never rob the 'human race all
week, and then square the'sin by sitting In the front pew on Sunday and
singing Jesus Pays It All. Like some
parsons who say that they bave a call
to preach the gospel I also thought I
had a call when I turned my Claim loose
to reform the world. My financial sense
told me that there was no money In It,
especially in a sparsely settled country
full of the enemy, but I could not resist
the call even though many a friend said
I would starve to death. However, all
earthly things come to an end, and now
I lay my pen down to sleep for several
substantial reasons. The parsons say
that I will be damned if 1 keep on; the
postoffice has switched me onto a sidetrack, and physicians say that I have
a "flat wheel" concealed within my internal anatomy. So it ls up to me to
hike away to the land where the sun
gives a continuous performance, and let
the weeds of graft, fear and superstition
choke the flowers of truth in this glorious but bigoted Canada of Laurier's until liberty ls dead and the slaves are
dancing at ita grave while their chains
make sweet music for the theological,
political and capitalistic grafters who
sit on the cushions and murmur a prayer
to their kind of a god.
Renan said in France that truth anel
love were the only true religion, but the
individual who teaches them solely in
Canada will be constantly stepping on
thorns. The people arc still enamored
with religions that promise surcease of
sorrow provided they have the price.
I expect to produce some literature
later on that will be circulated in book
form. To any of my subscribers who
have not received the full number of
papers they are entitled to I will send
back numbers to square the account or
the cash If that is not acceptable. Those
who wish to buy a bunch of Claims can
have 10 copies sent by prepaid express
for the sum of one dollar.
With these few remarks the shroud
is folded over a journal that perhaps has
been too Intensely human. Some will
look upon its death as a blow to freedom, while others will find sweet music
in the dropping of the clods upon its
coffin. Let it rest in peace for over ite
ashes I intend to build a literature that
will redden the cheek with laughter and
woo man from the temples of error by
"handing him Truth coated with Love
much the same as wc swallow quinine
encased in a jacket of sugar. This hammering bitter Truth in with clubs is too
much like fighting the crowd at a Ddnny-
brook fair. I might thump the crowd,
but what a sight I would be going home
on a shutter.   Au-men!
I send a copy of Float to any address
in the world for 25 cents . Special rates
ito newsdealers.
The cry of the early days, "Crucify
Him," is still heard in the world. At
every onward step Truth is pursued and
harassed by gun, boycott and the censor
with the blue pencil.
If we had no daily papers there would
be less crime. Reading about crime has
a tendency to increase it
Better buy a bundle of Claims before
they are all gone. I pay the express and
sent 10 different back numbers to any
address for one dollar. Within a few
years any one of these papers may b
worth more than a dollar.
Harmony of thought is necessary if
you wish to be free from bodily ills. Discord in thought produces disease and
eventually sinks us in what we call sin,
sickness and death.
IS THIS JUSTICE?
It is a month ago since the Claim wa*
shut out of the Canadian mails and although I nave requested the Department
to name the articles upon which I bave
been condemned, I have not yet received
the desired information. My .-business
is ruined and I am blacklisted without
even knowing the name of the articles
that cut the rope. Just becaase one or
two officials think differently than I do
and foolishly have been y*ven tyrannical power, a blow is dealt me that savors
of cowardice and injustice. The discourteous and unceremonious treatment
handed to my journal by those in power
at Ottawa will yet act as a boomerang
upon those who Inflicted it. "Judge not
lest ye be Judged."
The metaplasm of the mind   seldom
takes place in a day.
The more we love the more we live.
When man ceases to love something
Nature produces the chemical change
commonly called death. If we treated
all the world as we do our loved ones
what a picnic this life would be!
When man arrives at the stage where
he understands himself we will have no
physicians or creed boosters.
Patent medicines without faith, have
never cured a single disease. They often
get tho credit due to another reason
altogether.
If people never talked about nor
thought of disease there would be little
in any community. Fear creates what
we call disease, and that is tvhy so many
epidemics sweep over the country. Beware of the man who talks about disease.
Partner, you will sometimes notice
that the dwarfish atom called man when
clothed in brief authority will attempt to
dam the stream of eternal truth that
flows from minds mentally keyed beyond
the grasp of the pulpy stuff he calls
brains.
The fight for human rights has always
been hallowed by the cross, gallows and
boycott.
Passion ls too often mistaken for love,
but lt is of the flesh, transitory, and
passes away whtls lovg is eternal.
After reading tho letter that mado
Lowery's Claim a Robinson Crusoe
among the journals of Canada, we were
surprised that such a kind old gentleman as Mons. Lemieux should permit'
such a billet deux to be sent out west
to put the ker-fleux upon a journal that
has always tried to dieux the square
thing to the poor mortals held In
bondleux by tho cruel rope of mental
slavery.
: ;
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Jf**. LOWJWT'B claim
J
The Falling Leaves
The slave hates the man who is tree.
But for Lowery's Claim thousands
would never have heard of Nelson. The
"dead ones" in this city cannot be reconciled to that truth although it has
not cost them a single rupee.
I believe that Dean Swift was wise
when he said that sarcasm applied
against the whole world lost its effect.
After all, partner, do not blame our
postmaster-general too harshly for setting the brake on your favorite journal.
He is French any may not understand
the many and deep shades ot virile English literature.
The War Cry haa not yet been denied
the use of the Canadian mails which
speaks volumes for our love of literature.
or the gurgle of red-eye as the bar-
keep pours out another round of drinks.
Up to the time, that our beloved postmaster-general shut my paper out ot the
mail sacks I waa under the Impression
that the French were the personification
ot politeness. One by one our illusions
fade.
. The many thousands of people who
have delighted In weeding Lowery's
Claim can thank the Laurier government for depriving them of that privilege. They will no doubt feel proud of
living In the only country on earth that
has denied this paper the use of the
mails. It ls such a pleasure, you know,
to have some tyrannical official dlstate
what you shall read. Bless our French
postmaster-general for perhaps his cue
came from Rome.
If the thousands of hypocrites in
in Canada would practice righteousness
they would lose the propensity to regulate others.
This is a year of great calamities.
Vesuvius broke loose, 'Frisco fell to
pieces and now Russian methods against
a free press are permitted in Canada.
The priests, parsons and politicians
must keep the people in fear or ignorance or their graft will soon become
bare as a melon patch In a coon settlement.
Cancer is unknown amongst uncivilized nations.   The simple life has many
blessings.
They are not all French In the post-
office at Ottawa. Bill Smith has his
name on everything I get from that
city.
During the early days in Jerusalem
the authorities nailed Christ to the cross
without even having a parson read
prayers to Him. This makes it easier
when that Ottawa blue pencil dangles
bafore my vision.
Insane people are not conscious of
tlieir mania. It is the same with moral
degenerates who assert that the articles
in Lowery's Claim are Indecent and
obscene. The printed page cannot be
obscene; but the diseased imagination
of a perverted mind can see filth in
anything that the distorted vision of its
owner falls upon, from the picture of
a cherub in the clouds to an undressed
male bovine at a country fair.
Truth boldly expressed always destroys the peace of conventionalism, and
that Is the main reason why so many
fossilized minds turn upon Lowery's
Claim like an enraged bull chasing a
red flag. In the delirium caused by the
harpoon of truth being shot through the
cobwebs clustered thickly in their upper
stopes like slime on the stones ln a
slow running creek the first impulse is
to. reach for the editor and make him
look like a Chicago sausage. Those who
can withstand the first shock and read
on will soon find a peace stealing over
their souls that will bring heaven to
their door, and cause them to bless the
journal that pointed out the mountain
of light where all the inhabitants can
look down into the swamps of fear, ignorance and superstition, and see the
human race writhing in the wrong life
like a bunch of flies stuck to a sheet of
paper that has been designedly smeared
with the sweet stuff that attracts, captures and destroys.
ing suits. Canada, especially in the
east, is still full enough of prudes and
mud-brained mentalities to make it uncomfortable for any journalist who
parades the freedom of his soul before
their knife-blade visions. The blood of
slavery to creed, custom and master ie
still too thick In the veins ot the people
to permit of their receiving anything
but the smallest dose of reform without
jumping at yo ulike a fool fighting the
dentist who draws his tooth. No use of
getting angry with people who cannot
see all at once the light of the better
way. Better give them a little at a
time, as you give beet tea to a starving
man. until they become strong enough
to tackle a full meal of knowledge without making a rough house and killing
the friend they do not understand.
In Canada graft ls mighty and seems
to prevail while truth often has to walk
the pike in bare feet.
Too many people condemn the man,
ancl not the event.
Yes, dearie, it ls always thus. The
man ahead of the game is the guinea
they are all chasing. The fellow asleep
on tbe floor with a litter of dirty cards
for a blanket, and a spittoon for a pillow may have been great when the night
was young, and the deal had Just begun; but now, broke and drunk, he
sleeps the boozy snooze, dead, even to
the sound of the chips kissing ths kitty,
When the hunutn race become intelligent enough to eliminate all the mortal
errors that so long have been Incorporated in the Holy Bible the war of creeds
will be over and the mtllenium in full
blast At the present the gold ln this
great well of English literature is too
thickly covered with the mud of matter
to be easily discernible by tbe ordinary
mind.
The people In the United 8tates are
progressive, and are about to do away
with the autocratic power hitherto given
to one or two men in the postoflice towards the exclusion from the mails of
any paper that did not suit their views.
As Canada, even to the use of cheap
stamps, copies largely after the United
States in the conduct of Its postofflce,
we may eventually have a more Just
way of dealing with papers thst are too
fsr In advance of the generation ln
which they are published. From personal experience 1 would advise publishers 1n Canada or those doing a large
business In this country, to beware of
tiHin.fi; an excess of gray matter In their
publications, and. also, to see that Iheir
Ideas are clad ln heavy garments and
not exposed before the world In bath-
The editor of this journal Is still sane,
and will duck when he comes to a low
bridge; but nothing except Nature will
make him drop the pen in defense of
what he thinks is best for the mortals
stumbling through the darkness of the
green timber ln search of the gold that
lies on top of the mountain of spiritual
light.
THE  FAREWELL
Standing by tbe grave of one of my
youngest and most troublesome Journalis
tic children the following apostrophe by
Ingersoll seems appropriate to the oc-
saston:
"Oh Liberty! thou are the GcmI of my
Idolatry. Thou art the only Diety that
hates the bended knee. In thy vast and
un walled temple, 'neath the roof leas dome
star-gemmed and luminous with suns,
thy worshippers stand erect. They do
not cringe, crawl or bend their foreheads
to the earth. The dust has never born
the Impress of their lips.
Upon thy altars mothers do not sacrifice their babes, nor men their rights
Thou askest naught from man except the
things that good men hate���the whip,
the chain, the dungeon key.
Thou hast no popes, no priests, who
stand between their fellowmen and thee.
Thou careat not for slavish forms, or
selfish prayers. Thou hast no monks.
no nuna, who in the name of duty, murder joy.
At thy sacred shrine Hypocrisy does
not bow, Fear does not crouch. Virtue
does not tremble. Superstition's feeble
tapers do not burn, but Reason hold a
aloft her Inextinguishable torch, while
on the ever-broadening brow of 8clencfl
falls the ever-comlng morning of the
ever-better day."     ___^__
A WINTER'S FUHL
I have on hand TWENTY-FIVE different back numbers. I send the lot to
any address ln America and pay tlie express charges for the sum of $2.60. Send
all orders to R. T. Lowsry, Nelson. B. c. LOWERY'S CLAIM.
The infidel is simply a man who does
not believe as you do.
Radium is as plentiful as the man who
does his own thinking.
When successful the rebel becomes the
father of his country. When not he is
usually shot, hanged or exiled; so be
sure you are right and can win before
you attempt to capture a nation.
Refusing your neighbor liberty of
thought means the placing of yourself
in slavery. If you cannot lead do not
drive.
In Canada whiskey is locked up until
it becomes of age. After that the people
who use it are frequently locked up.
Avarice is destructive of the peace of
mind, and Is a strong argument against
gambling.
Humor will cure a multitude of ills,
while a dash of green paint will sometimes make your best friends hunt for
a gun.
Lowery's Claim has no sex although
some might labor under that delusion
after noting how the Postoffice treated
it last month.
The man who gets too far ahead of
the procession is liable to be stoned
for his alacrity, while the one who plods
along in the rear will have no enemies
at his grave.
The farther evolution takes man from
the ape, monkey, baboon and jackass
formation, the less liable he is to own
an appendix, or have a fit of collywobbles when you josh him about the brand
of theological dope he is addicted to.
In Canada a paper that hands out
truth without capsules is almost certain to be marooned. Truth is like Hud-
eon Bay rum. Few can swallow it
straight without making signs for ice
water and trying to club the bartender
at the same time.
and wizards and burned at the stake.
Nowadays the people, or at least some
of them boycott the man they cannot
understand and If he publishes a paper
they use their political pull and get his
paper shut out of the malls. They forget, of course, that truth Is eternal and
cannot be obliterated by the muck rake
of an ignorant and bigoted majority.
Looking at the clock will make you
grow old.
Don't forget to buy a Float before they
are all gone .
Over in the South Seas there is an
Island where is costs nothing to live.
Poor walking keeps millions from taking advantage of It.
A drop of dye will color a panful of
water, and one discordant individual
will frequently sour the entire community.
King Edward Is not In very good
health ln spite of all the prayers said
for him overy Sunday.
There should be no circumference to
the mind.
Error in thought is the cause of mental and physical sickness. The more you
. love money and the sensual life the deeper you will dive into that condition of
mind called hell, but represented as a
locality by the teachers of theology
that does not evolute.
Have you bought a Float?    Best   bc
sure!
The dollar has no pride, consicence or
politics. One day it will sit with kings,
while the next it may roll into the gutter, or repose fn the noisy clamor around
a crap game in the dark alley of a great
city.
Because Lowery's Claim has put "30"
on the hook the world should not grow
despondent.
It is better to be a snowbird and live
upon the lining of a cloud than to dwell
in a palace and have your soul tied to
the evils of things that are unreal.
Good  morning,   Partner!     Have  you
read Float?
The lord's Day Act puts one in mind
of the Bible, and ought to be a mine for
the lawyers just the same as the Bible
has been a mine for the preachers.
Both are full of contradictions and that
Is what makes litigation and theology.
Without counting those who use theological done there are 50,000 drug flends
in New York city. A horrible sacrifice
to the demands of modern civilization.
The world is not quite as fierce as it
used to be. In the tough old days when
men or women exercised any inclination
to put forth idea or improve the condition of society* they were called witches
Strange events come to pass in the
west. I have seen a bartender reading
the prayers In an Anglican church;
a priest running a gambling game; a
Presbyterian deacon drunk on Sunday;
A Baptist putting water in his whiskey;
a Methodist at a circus; a Congregation-
allst preacher mining; a Jew eating
Chicago chicken; a Salvation Army officer working; a Mormon who was not
married, and a Dowieite reaching for the
oysters. In addition to this 1 have been
slandered by one parson, praised by one
priest, and caught several pagans reading the bible. I have also met several
creed boosters when they were enthused
with red-eye instead of the holy spirit;
saw one sky pilot bet on an ace in the
hole, and I can produce positive evidence
that up at. Bear Lake during the early
youth of the Slocan that Parson Reid
stopped ln the middle of that grand old
prayer for the royal family anel waltzed
out to the bar for a "bean" while Scotty
"ginned up" ths entirs congregation;   I
have also known many a parson to "dig
up" a dime for Lowery's Claim and
drink in its contents like a boy in the
cent belt reading his first noval about
the redskins of the far west Any live
parson can get a heap of texts out of
the Claim if the iightning does not strike
the house while he is perusing the distilled thoughts in its pages.
I pass the deal without even calling
the P. M. G. a Syphax.
For one dollar you can get 10 different
numbers of Lowery's Clai msent to any
address.
Drop a line to me at Nelson if you
wish to know how many different back
numbers I have on hand.
The power of right thought put into
even one sentence will sometimes right
a great wrong or break up an empire.
Live, Love and tell the Truth for tomorrow you may be in Canada.
When everything is free this earth
becomes a Paradise. If you can grasp
the real meaning of universal freedom
your salvation has begun.
Better buy a few Floats and send therm
to your friends. The price is 25 cents
each, and the postoffice has not turned
the semaphore against it.
During this summer Nelson has looked
like a flower garden, and smelt like a
back lane in Old Jerusalem. A mutilated sewer aud a dead City Council are
responsible for the odor. The leading
excitement of the city has had nothing
to do with it.
Perhaps after It is gone Lowery's
Claim will not lie missed as much as
some bank cashiers.
True religion makes people happy
anel healthy. When your parson is sick
it is a sure sign that his wire to heaven
is grounded.
True socialism will become a reality
when the thought of the people becomes
strong enough to break down all the
barriers.
TWO SIDES TO THE STORY.
Mr Upmore crept out of bed, groped
his way to the telephone and called up
the central office.
"Hello!" he said in a low voice.
"Please send word to the nearest police
station that there is a burglar in my
house. If they will make a quick run
they can catch him. My house number
i*s No. 243 ."
There was a pause of half a minute,
ard then a gruff voice finished the message in this wise: -
"Hello, central! Youse needn't call
up de cops. De burglar has got de guy
wot owns dis shebang covered wit' a
gun, an' he'll be out o* here wit' de
swag in about 'leveii seconds. By, by,
sis/' LOWERY'8 CLAIM
Si
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���
Common Sense
Dr. J. H. Tilden, in The Stuffed Club.
Human knowledge up to Spencer,
Darwin, et al.. was formulated ia keeping with the theory of special creation,
and, as a result, suppression, inhibition,
opposition snd contrariety were the
standard rules for ethical, political, social and scientific government.
Notwithstanding the general acceptance of the theory of evolution, human
affairs are far from being squared by Ita
laws, proving that the theory, as yet,
bas not become a public conscience.
In the past fifty years there has been
a mighty war raging���a fight between
man's subconscious nature and his acquired knowledge; the war has heen the
same that has been, and will be, so long
as man exists, namely, a fight .between
truth and error���-a fight for the tuain-j
ware awed and made to believe Him a
Ood, and the conventional and wise
were confounded by His wisdom when
He waa but twelve years of age.
Spencer and Darwin evolved from
youth into their knowledge, their mental
life work -appeared to develop their theories naturally, hence I say all world
moving Ideas sre immaculate and are
horn, out ot virgin minds, minds not
contaminated by the errors of old beliefs. People will be heard to say of
*nen who are said to be original: "They
have always ben peculiar
spread    and   far-reaching   ��nni<���...
much mmtr tta TEaL^*"*
U��n I* going on now . ^vsi'io.Z
jumped on future generation �����
heredlmry legacy The old bell,f, JS
km UM out nnd the new ,���d f���
t�� "JZ? ^J? mt^,a* ��*��-*-������
out. Instead, nil their time ran be m��ni
In helping to mike a unlver.nl nppHra-
tlOn. ' r   ^m
A very small percent of Intelligence
(a^istjMi|UI evolution In Its unl-
that de-
****** **** ��" ��. i uere is out one i
tenance of established beliefs ln oppos- that is for those infected with
Snch men csn be killed, but the world j vernal application; most minds
aad world movements continue. Those
who would kill the influence of an Immaculate birth should know that the
massacre of all children under a given
age; Uie multiplying of Golgathas; the
wholesale use of Hemlock; tbe tortures
of tens-of-thousands of Inquisitions; collegiate, scientific and social ostracisms
will not do it There Is but one way, and
ition to the imminent and eternal law
of change.
This fifty years* war is usually recognized as a war between religion and
science���against the Interpreters of evolution���but this is a mistake, for men.
the discoverers of nature, are not rea-
ponsible for a discovered process of
nature, hence a war against them Is
fruitless; if tbey are put out of the way
natnre remains and will find other minds
through which to operate. The war Is
not against Spencer, Darwin, et al., but
between man's subconscious natnre and
his acquired knowledge and is always
a fight to the finish when once started.
Nothing is so foolish as a fight between
science and religion, for science should
be truth and religion anonld not be error.
If the theory of evolution had not been
freighted with truth H would not have
received at once tbe opposftkni of every
intellect capable of thinking. Every
church in the land lifted up its voice in
an endeavor to crush tbe new theory.
for its subconscious sensed the new
truth, and great fear was feft lest evolution should displace���destroy���tbe laws
of its existence. Most of tbe scientists,
teachers, schools and colleges met the
ne wtheory with ridicule and opposition.
Were these criticisms against Spencer.
Darwin, et al.? No! A thousand nos! If
they had been these men and their influence would have been sniffed out; in
fact, if evolution had been a Spencer or
Darwin scheme. It would have died ln
embryo, the conception and birth was
like that of Christianity���Immaculate.
Christ, like Spencer, was a man, but he
advocated ethical laws that were immaculate���they were born out of a Virgin
mind.
The conception of new truth always
takes place in a virgin mind, one that
has not conceived before, and to make
this simile as far-reaching as truth will
admit, I will add that all great epoch
and world reforming ideas are conceived in virgin minds, minds that have not
been contaminated by frequent conceptions, gestations and abortions peculiar
to the commonalty of mental life.  Christ
was so peculiarly adaptive to the truths
He advocated thai tht common minds
 ���    ������ w�����*���     wnnu    a   SOUl
|destroying (soul destroying In the sense
'that truth always destroys the peace of
conventionalism) truth, new birth, immaculate conception, to go out and do
aa Judas Iscariot  did.  then so far aa
***   *��  9 -pi   11   M ��        mm * < ������ ' 1
clare tor evolution today sre Incapable
of making an application of it to everv
department of knowledge Evolution
and tne old order are much like a patch
quilt in many minds; some of the bast
informed are aadly jostled by such dis-
covertea aa radium and the elect n>n
���Some of onr aagea tbdught that radium disposed ot the theory of the immortality of matter -vid conservation of
energy, In met some declare today that
there Is no matter because wc an* growing nearer and nearer Into s belief in
an ultimate element, and even the ultimate element Is perhaps no element at
th��*r ��r* ��� -~r*   ""---��   �����-   wm��ti neiueni  is pernap* no e e?
ZfcZZXrZL** "����� *?.�����������- �������� *��P*>- ..ecf-ldty. .nd tin*
ed to advance: then to prevent the Infection from taking root, keep the existing minds Immune from the Infection
of truth by cultivating ignorance and
j-auperstrtion--by cultivating fear through
'selfish Interests���by promises of an eternal reward for a mote of conoeeslon. ^^^
The reason a newly discovered truth j able under the proper environment*.
creates opposition is because It appealsjand that all elements can
riilty is
not matter or anbstance, simply a form
of motion.
There are minds that appear to bs
phobic on the Idea of matter; they declare that there Isn't anything; the word
matter throws them Into a spasm. Thi
fact thst all elements ar* Interchang-
to tne subconscious nature and disturbs
the repose of accepted beliefs.   This Is
what the theory of evolution did and is
doing, and those so   disturbed are not
aware that their fight Is against themselves���an intestine war, s war between
their chemical,  pbyt-tologlesl snd psychological   want   neresaUies  and   their
worn-out, outgrown and   excretory   or
pathological mental  holdings, but they
really think they are warring against
tne man or men who are declaring heretical doctrines.    A heretic is Impotent,
or what he gives   out Is Impotent,   so
| long aa what be declares creates no dls-
'turbance���opposition-for the seeds aown
most find enough soil to germinate and
It Is the germination that disturbs. Great
opposition means great virility cf   the
mental concept that creates the opposition, and not only tbe concept per se.
bat of the soil on which it is received.
No one is going into a fight against
shadows; If we   oppose   sny thing   with
vigor It is because we are conscious of Its
importance, that ia. its capability of injuring our cause:  we sense its power
but we do not senae fta truth.   The virtue of a new truth    Is   not sensed st
once, it must hsve time to mature In our
minds, after which we can compare its
fruits with the old  vintage, and then,
and not until then, are we ready to accept the new and reject the old; hence
tbe fifty years' war against evolution Is
a war within the minds of all thinkers
and the war will continue until there are
no more minds to conquer
nt. -a.   	
Each succeeding generation will coma
Int* ths evolution theory ana lit wide-
and reverted bark to the ultimate clement which so far In human analysis i��
tracd u> the electron. does not remove
the fact that at one end of this process
mater is a fact and iVcause or thin fa-t
the other end must slao be mater, for it.
Is Inconceivable that something can coma
out of nothing.   If the world of matter
���reality���Is built out of force then force
must be mater or mater ta crystalled
force.   What's the difference?  The question will not down.   What are we talking and writing about?   Something or
nothing?   Surely something, for nothing
can't contemplate about nothing; neither
can something contemplate about attributes ot nothing.    Something in a fact
and we are dealing dally with that soroe-
thlng. and for lack of a better nam.* *e
call it matter and force, and as everything that la la changable ami  inter-
changable and reducible to a unitary entity���entity, not nonentity���we   ahotilel
stop our dispute about the   reality   of
mstter and agree to disagree; thewe who
can't accept the matter theory can accept the nothing theory, for after the
start made the evolution theory works
out all  right    As soon as nothing   ���
crystallised  Into something    th-nn    the
phobic on matter can evolve naturally.
The old theories on which most of
human actions depend work out ao badly that there Is a great state of unrest
and dissatisfaction; .nls dissatisfaction
has at leant furnished us a key-a new
theory���and so far as it haa lieen appjiw
It gives greater satisfaction and promise*
to give us more. .
Hvoluttou applis* to the healing art LOWERY'S CLAIM
promises more than all previous theories.
The every-day practice of medicine
means opposition to existing conditions;
it there is a pain it must be opposed by
drugs. It is quite eurficient to know
that the patient suffers pain, the cause
ls seldom thought of, or if it is the
chain of causation is never or seldom
traced back to the initiative. Pain in
the head is relieved with morphine, to
the detriment and often the death ot the
patient, for some cases ot pain are of
an Inflammatory or congestive form, and
as morphine increases hot hot these conditions, death is not an infrequent result
of Its administering. This danger is
pretty generally understood, and as a
consequence most physicians are too
cautious to take chances with this drug,
but they resort to some form of the coal-
tar derivatives which aot badly on the
heart and often produce death,
but possibly not as often as morphine.
Some form of the coal-tar remedies are
used in most of the headache powders
for sale on the market. When people are
foolish enough to take a orug for a
headache they do it at great risk. One
of our local demists told me of a struggle he had to save the life of a lady recently. He was on an excursion train,
and as there were no e?jctors on the train
he volunteered to do what he could for
the woman who hael taken two or three
headache tablets; he said his entire
trip was spent in watching and doing
wuat he could to prevent her heart from
ceasing to beat because of the horrible
effects of a popular headache remedy.
The public little knows the real suffering and number of people killed every
year by drugs. Few doctors realize the
jcomplacatlons and disadvcantsjges set
up by drugs in their every-day practice.
From now till the close of the warm season there will be hundreds killed and
thousands ruined for life by having
chronic diseases developed ln a professional endeavor to cure typhoid and
other fevers. Drugs and feeding will
cause this appalling calamity, and there
is no way to prevent It, for the people
believe in drugs and feeding, and the
best, or most of the so-called best, and
all of the ordinary doctors believe, advocate and practice this delusion. The
people can be told year after year that
these fevers can be conducted to a favorable termination in from seven to
fourteen days, but they will not believe
It. Why? Because they ask their doctor
and he says that it can't be done, and
of course that setles It; if he can't do
it lt can't be done, for he is always the
best doctor ln the world. Such people
will tolerate a sickness running into
months, leaving complications that will
last for life, and then declare that all
was done that could be done. The textbooks are full of graphic descriptions
of the complication of typhoid fever, and
most of them will declare that they can't
be avoided, which Is, or should be, a
recognised He; the truth is, all the. desperate symptoms commonly met with in
fevers are made by a fallacious treatment.
Disease in an evolution. The non-ob-
atructed processes of nature aro building for health���a normal condition���and
when this state is found otherwise it is
because of obstruction. Food under such
circumstances is obstructive, drugs are
positively obstructive, everything that
opposes rest, rest of mind and body, is
obstructive. The natural processes that
are going on are according to the law
of evolution; the fever is a normal process, but your doctor will say a hyperpyrexia���a high grade fever���will kill
unless it is controlled; the fact is a high
grade of fever will burn out the poison
quickly and subside if some deluded doctor or nurse does not throw on the fine
more fuel. A high grade of fever In all
legitimate fevers is quite ephermerai,
and unless it ls fed it quickly burns out
and is gone forever. The best proof that
food is obstructive In fevers is the fact
that an elevation of temperature and an
Increase in heart action, plus increase in
nervousness and restlessness always follows the ingestion of food, any kind, all
kinds���yes. predigested food!
Nature's plan of correcting disease la
the proper one and It   physicians   or
healers do mor,9 than to aid the process
they become obstructionists and do more
harm than good.   In all bowel obstructions nature stops the natural functioning at once, but doctors do the opposite,
and because their malpractice   ends so
disastrously surgical   interference   has
been pretty generally resorted to and is
declared the only scientific practice.   It
ls not science,   but possibly   there  are
fewer deaths following it than the other
forms of malpractice, but why resort to
malpractice at all when there is a better way?   Yes, I say better advisedly,
for I have nature and the great law of
evolution behind me, and they declare
that there is no legitimate practice except the lending of a helping hand in the
line suggested by natural order.     The
Least interference in bowel obstruction
Is that of enemas; no one but a fool will
attempt to force the bowels to move with
drugs, and It requires almost as great a
fool to give one teasponful of food. The
remedy first, last and all the time is:
Let the patient alone! and if this is done
well���incientifically���the   mortality   will
be next to nothing.   No plan of practice
or surgery can compare.   If the patient
is suffering pain, which they do at first,
one or two hot baths* a day continued
until pain is gone, will soon have the
patient comfortable, and unless meddled
with by giving drugs or food, the comfort
will be continuous to the end, which will
not be death, but life, health and freedom
from complications . There is no physician except nature.   Don't talk to me
about the science of medicine,   for as
practiced, lt means anything but science.
There are emergencies brought about,
usually by malpractice, that require surgery, but not oftener than once, where
operaltions  are ^now  restorted  to  ten
times.
The usual number of appendicitis cases
will be sent to the boneyard this fall. If
they were banished to same tent out of
the city with what water they need within their reach and left alone there would
be few deaths, Indeed very few compared with the number that will die in the
hands of careful attendants and physicians.   Not many wili believe thia, but
the truth will remain the same even if
no mind will accept it.
The diseases commonly met with in
dally practice do not require much skill.
When one feels sick, eating should be
suspended until all sick feeling is gone;
then the eating should be light to break
the fast; If symptoms return stop the
food until gone, then eat again. It is
safe to induce the bowels to move by
use of enema, and if there is a bad taste
in the mouth lemon water without sugar
will do no harm and will probably make
the sick person feel better. Fevers need
much skill in the line of letting them
alone.
I divide fevers into two grand divisions, namely, active and passive; the
former may he divided into simple and
septic; the latter is symptomatic and
marked by an inhibition of the function
of radiation; this class of fevers is marked by an elevation of temperature due to
retention of heat In the body from lost
skin function���paralysis of the function
of radiation���it probaly represents the
highest grades of temperature.
In the first class of fevers, the simple
variety is due to non-septic fermentation
It may come from indiscretion in eating,
overeating, or eating when the nerve
force is used up by worry, excitement,
trouble, pleasure or work. If the subject Is generally healthy the attack
may be very short, lasting one or two
days and pass off; If the subject is one
of delicate health the attack may last
longer, and If either is managed badly
a long stretch of sickness may follow.
It Is my experience that nearly, if not
quite all, ot the septic fevers are the
simple variety at the start.
The disease known among children as
gastric fever is simply a fermentation at
the start; all the disagreeable symptoms
are added by the foolish practice people
have of urging a child to eat when it is
sick, then it a real good doctor is called
who believes in fighting the fever with
fever medicine, the sick stomach with
bismuth, calomel, nux vomica or podo-
phyllln, and perhaps many other drugs,
besides urging food to "keep up the
strength," the case may be drawn into a
continued type of fever with septic complications and at last death ends a brave
and heroic fight for a child's life.
How many mothers will lose their babies this fall and have the consolation
that their good doctor fought a brave
but ineffectual fight to save their darlings! If they could kno wthat the fight
is all on the other side���that the dear
little ones are fighting for life against a
blind, stupid, so-called science���a profession that has no faith in nature but recognizes disease as something to be opposed in every way. The doctor says the
fever must come down, yet he feeds,
which invariably increases the temperature and creates restlessness, and for the
restlessness a drug uiust be given to
deaden sensation; this inhibits the functional activity of the excretory organs,
and this inhibition causes retention of
excretions which take on a more deadly
change to further poison the system;
then the good doctor undertakes to force
the organs to throw off, which requires
more drugs; and so it goes; this medley
an LowiaTa cuuat
of soiiw^rinit-Hiuitdiuir sym-nomia- r2ieu knowledge sort weatrfe, ami yet we *���%>
rmarinif oritem in aw arrjsmpr to a-utv main ignorant aad vow. Why? &eeauee
due 'uem���flominues in many ease* turit w-% aee floe. scupeUf to pay rne price for
ieaitL ��nda the ftoe�� Tlirwe abb* oa se^j what w** need, forg*nn��r. that. "To htm
���rtwt nl bin mirage* .nay 'aav-e a ch��mlo Qtar harh snail be given, and en a.m fhat
wftaknass 10ft ti *n�� iar <*tf mrtr hO*��- ham nor *rui4l bo scekea away w-m, that
ie* to trouble tUsm :to* .iiV. whieh iter hntfcV'   Jf one aaerf* a v-rdc
Wh*m vwur tloetor cailo* atieuc tfever; h* should haw ao evthev thought but fto-
medielne 110 is talking- about snmerhingi nav* must oook. ���emejl ��H# a*o**y*
ttsw <to*�� not *-��t��- Drug* will not ��not, ^p *towrt��g and smoking aad drinking
* mvf*r' if ttiev- douid: ir wetMil dbe iftgrt^i i^agr enough, tie saw* ekes* emounf aeeeea-
nemui Hor ZfevHr i�� at <wna��^a*lw tneStt- aary.. Tot* don't indulge? A�� fight,
ore- and- wtirftB flbr aoort cartisar c*hattj.w*ar your obt etothe*--* a 8*1* kwagar. for
iarm A aaut emalfc ths* surftsse aart & fe mar* ns^eetaoM. *�� a inert whew
matte* Eetoe patient flsst e*unttaitf*rtw-. .tat {brute*) -^ ^ p^ ^ ^ ragged fkee
until 'Heflawer'IW* burned, iut she I>��<^*; iigmwasw. If you sasvt save any a*or*
on, which it tepenifc* ao ^emerty wtil ***^\-om eio-tata*. srop ��*frag and save ��*Augh
ai te-er Si* inuut iiumuireda ef people, <m boartt atil* co bay tho books ye*
wun aa*-** sever jgwe�� si- momentr* aeedi Where there- fie a will there fe a
bought- n��> rtn* mufceZ ?*& ffmemhe* j ^^y There ia ao a*c��se but ignorant
many ft��wr�� c��mamUsrf by **floU1*2Jj ^un-utsey go gr** for rsmaialag ra povet*
a��ear- t 0104. ha��^'seen, flavera ieaw* a<ss��'| ^ 3,^ figgtj^aaeav
-in**-* dnu^ ims^ tteent luwwit aart E haw1 ^^ aestltk nbratto aroo aeeel ts ro get
iteen i*wn laar. ;w ^u��w * thn* *22S J,sw*ri* ����� vlbvwiag along the tiaea of
a drug; ftnc i�� ^*�� liee^ise die <tt*e^i;ajBSMegF~-0etfftas La a fcsirry aboul pay-
���#aa U��4tt and cu* enettlagf ��aaw�� a*lfhag wheat jtm owe, for Ufcere ini any-
arjumr im eawrsie: J*la^^ wr**11* ������� eww^to and  retrarts  the
Atar itSimnie *yie��** *^ ��** eflneaswa "J: .annl Iffce slanc; sr/>p -mating if aecesaary
oun<i�� sivJL- by swuHiaiicy aart flNeatMMOicyj ��II yon are eaisare wHi the world; don't
p^pl* wfto <** ******   ^kl *M,W
a^ 11k   Mu���� Chrreet Ea^^
be- afraid of starving to death;
yon do yaw will die In a most
caiiee-���������ai'abliabicg
but if
noble
g_ !��.��� 1���1.���- ���������������up   setf-respect,       But
''you won't die; the fast will take the cob-
ggggsi ein* dollar iiy a y*wf* sBh^-^P00*-1 wefta oot of your brain and you will be
fkn!r ie worxn ao* etotlaar -0 bee^e *��2'!able to eee clearer and think to a pur-
cw��r amnftiiti etrftic ���*����* tso out house ^^p^^ j^ yoa km>w tJ|# j^^ou gg^f
inn* *v*ry mottdt tso^ jack a* **y *ft*^^peop��e do not succeed in life?   I mean
ia* **    fe <sftaic* ** m3Scfc     i5L2S?l*'  ������e��<i:     -rtove  enough  of every-
Sft sa4bei, s8^ a��S<iat1 **k M ^p*5^! thing to make a comfortable borne. Be-
iwibt ymffT BkJ 7^* ���*ax *��u*cWtt* 5^ f*eansA they eat too much, sleep too much
aatfiung? Ler ���* Cirfl ^ ***** **** y":****i otherwiee indulge their sensual na-
t\sm I #HJg*r. *: Y<wi wil* a^** gj **?" | wires until they can't think effectively,
aiiaar wntrtit ttsmag wfth����t P*?1����J^ : If rney think at all their thoughts are
'****���* _���,.��.    K****e��IK*��    Will    CfeftSC .. ^m m ~. -�� /j   .
���ar.    Vf** M* *>��.    WW--'*���m  ....    ^^^_-
,r.   Kw��l she atr you M��> ������5
made np of fear, tbey are afraid lo spend
a dollar for Correct English, for tbey
swtt fa* .'wwr. for y*wi *^ ht*ve to mace Q<wd ^ ^^ ^ ^ -om<> ^j,^ ^^
taut e*fl&rr. oef����*a^y to brave eaoagb en- w gtnff J||U> tJie|r ,1,^^ stliffed bodies
ucaiioa rm fcawer the new* �� P"^ *Jr to st��i    farther   dull tbeir   intellects.
and tw* w &*��� ^ ***�� ^^ to * ��/ ,* Books and fasting, or eating moderate-
ring ba��t air.   Dues snmeoae any    Any-1 lf   clmr toe lnt*nect ^ tbey ^ -^
evniT *.aa tanweae *a^ fh^"^ w * wol^IJf Ihow to make money faster than they do
grart air <*i r.h* ��nctaW>'�� ' ^mVt^:i nov. but their minds are not sllowed
my friend, mo* erf buansmay �� a^Joor^f^ ^^ rfd ��� foo<J ttuJ||I||, jrapUtty long
*i* otouclfcs o*ut of rweive. aad It reegrnrew - -<lrtn^fc  frt ^^t^n ftn tn iKia    vthrstinn
enough to catch on to this
���nt airins.ns* >w �����* ��"������'��������� ��� - 1 eoou-^n   iw  can u  uu   iu   -kow     ��iur��
mor^ tivaiue <*** ***** *>��*&f ta��* :^ I Some people can't afford one   doll
m <&*. Tt> get Mgicweat fresh **f *n^, year for the Club.   Watch them.   1
vibration.
ar   a
#ay   ft* itujoUltpMic. ftead gned  ��ete
study tho beat boolm; lout auk wbae ia
rAught tn    rhem;    ask    IT   there   ae��
tacvjgbre la faem.    G**x   rtuiugbm   sxut
rheri,   like  bsada,  mrta* tHem. a* suit
Pm*\\\Wmmt
There ia biit <vn* inesiinu wornr ask-
iag atiour ivwkir ffiaim ruey Omugbrs'
U fkvsy karoe. give caem ro tne. Sow
r-hey are wovmt msv-e pertinent Thm man.
wHo is> a afie.itiew* fkir a parruuilar Jt��sa;��e%
ie a atvvVer ia nte realm of think:tig, a��*
aaoA't ieam-M tm fafnk, he only rhtak^
, be thinks. Tf Jtie.hard m had *pen: iua
|rtfs la apTiod -*r?e��ftt';.ia4 "hinikiug he -vould
seve��r have fivtnd hiinat��lf .n rhe tl; 'mmi
of offewiiig hia sln-fdom for a hor** tie
might ha** gitea, hia itlngaOm for a
thought, a rhia* time, ail kings wili .to
If they mm get tatfe che had haiitr. of
tht a king, lor rhjaktug ami regenia -.s itir-*>
aot gone r-oajscher much since the .lays
Of Anronlaoa
Oood books, books wtth though ra or
brjoks tbat mtsiut m think: art th*t mm.
Important. 1 houghr-a are the only real
marks of dlsriaerriou ber.w-��ett aa^a. I
waa talking srjsso rime ago with one of
our most stj^cessful buetaewi men He
nevers puts his hsutda to am etart^rprise
that tr does not fiourtah. Why? Gk*eausea
of lock? Sot on your life. He Is a man
of good horse ���ease, he haa alio****! his
mind to mave a!osg fn a natural manner. He has learned a kit our. ot books.
but ween be gets through with books tbe
authors would never recognise what he
cribbeo from them, for be has mixed
tbeir thoughts with the thoughts of
others, and then -cemented tbem together
with hia own mental personality, the
quintessence ot which belongs, to him
and him alone; It is an essence that
���very man possesses la potentiality but
it will never be evolved from the brain
until tbe brain la taught to f bmk for itself. It Is that mysterious entity that
given life to Individual work and is not
transmissible A Yale professor came
to thk* city prepared to stay with our
Atuveasfui man long enough to learn his
secret for making a success out of whst
several technically educated men had
made an abject failure Our professor
*ald    "I am here to stay as long a* n**-
Evrry essary to learn how you hav- made a
^^^^���  previous   to your
 w m ._    mm was a failure     Our simple are shy on thi* knowledge, im p^|*fW/\Ug��itgjp tbe Club teaches Vvei? ? ^"m^ded "business man    tall    minds
of whieh aliow me m ret-r *<*?_?* ����� i J**r    Tbey would like the   Club   aad | worth having are simple;    complicate
 "*-      '-    minds are always failures and are for-
m etare. ro* gK1- wi*i*��.*-.-.��� ���*" ^^   -^year ior me uud.    vvatcn xnem.    tv ^^
our home* ro wrpply ���� wit a. eofti&v    n^b���f4Hm0ainf+-gun   will   afford   to success out of what.
luaure iieabrh    (*nr wf��r. l^Ml^\^JZ die prematurely because of a lark of tn^ manipulations.
knowledge, sor prom ������������lilii  the riah teaehea everv ' ���i.   min-rf-Mf   hi
m^v-rw  i��a^ ��" .��� -   - -^        ^jyear.     iney woma
sehooiar    ^rlittt the   uOtig&t, ^ "J* would uke K If H were not for tbe In
so owr aehooU, out eharchea, oar th��st-1
f��a to cold wear.her are death tr*P*Jf"
diaary haila.  post oflUsa    aad    *****
bnUdlnga are aot ro be nvnUoned.   Tne
iatorisfirtfie* for mMwtal  research, bo*
| fidelity and atheism found In it! AU ever leading ererr one else into taiiurei
right, if they are too stupid to aee tbat aaid: "1 can tell you all I know in 30
it Is lust aa necessary to feed the brain I minutes:" an dhe did. but our professor
right as It is to feed tbe bod yproper-1failed to carry back to Yale anything
ptcala aad *aairart.xm�� do not bave
enough pure air to Xtxmre bealtb from
th* araa>tpAtar. of p��xre air; aa4 I would
actTlise aayevne who knows the worth of
pure air, ajui who haa a lingering respect arm Left fo rthe medleal profea-
elo*, not, to slstt the hedrooms of the|
��*et*aigft prhy^laa:. and don't for tbe |
sake of anM laag ayne���fw the old time
reapeer,���fake no-r.tVie of the average
beaJth of the avera-r^ wyatctan's fam-
ffy. That which ts true of air ts also
trwe of ewery jipectflc entity of man's
ly. they can get off the earth just as soon
as they may and give room for better
people. The mind dyspepsia Is as great
in the world as tbe stomach dyspepsia.
and the orthodox mental fodder needs
fixing just as much as tbe orthodox body
fodder.
zHeaith Is one of the most Important
things In this world. How to breathe
won't bring it. How to exercise won't
secure it A fad diet will fail to secure
it Drugs, prayer, tbe laying on of the
hands, aome peculiar belief in mental
treatment, in fact fadlsm. can't possibly
**T5...Tr    *   mlA    ��� "*"��*��  ireeaimew. in lac-i iamsui. ciai p-ues-Min*
ctgeftronment.    we are la the midst of bring salvation.   The** Is but one right
be bad aot brought with htm. It waa
oa the order of Raphael's instructions to
s contemporary wbo bad asked him to
explain how be misled his palnta After
the great painter bad explained bts methods of paint mixing, the believer In
formulas said: "You do not tell me sn>-
thlng new; l mix my paints the same as
vou.'' Raphael then added: "I also mix
brains with mine.' There Is a soul to
tbe writers of some books that Is t*>1
tranamlssable. but If said writers are
studied and followed closely they will
help those who do to find tbeir own potency.   I>e seen .uot a few men in my LOWERY'S CLAIM
���-
life who were possessed with the mind
virility to Impart a quickening influence
to mine.
The mind, like the grain m the fields,
requires the contact of a generating pollen to bring lt Into quickening. Only
a small per cent of minds ever reaches
the stage of productiveness. There is
but one way to start the development.
Create a love for books that force thinking, then don't be afraid to think.
The larger part of the great fortunes
of this country have been accumulated
after tbeir amassers have passed 40. In
fact, the first forty years of a man's life
are the prepartory years���the years of
training and discipline. A large part or
this time he is laying the foundation-
just getting ready to rear the superstructure. Many of us stumble around many
year* before we get into the right place
and then for additional years we make
many mistakes. Most men elo not get
wise until tbey have passed 40. They
must get knowledge before this, but not
much wisdom. Wisdom Is a ripening
process.   It takes time.
At the age when Dr. Osier thinks men
are becoming useless Lincoln was trying to get an appointment as a land commissioner ancl failed. At the same age
nobody outside of his own little community knew Ulysses S. Grant. He had not
then accomplished anything of note, and
yet he became the greatest military figure of his day.
Kvery man makes his own deadline.
Some reach it at 35, eome at 40, some at
50; some do not reach it at 80; some
never reach it. because they never cease
to grow.���Success.
Indeed, every man makes his own
deadline, eitlier mental of physical. A
man may say he Is going to live forever, but if he lives in a way that he
breaks his health down he will not live
as long, probably, as the man who knows
that he will not live always, yet con
forms his life to health rules.
Some men begin to talk about being
olel at forty, and they are usually successful lu conforming themselves to tiie
idea.
What is success? "Keep a going!"
An eternal keeping at It���intelligent persistence. Jt ls more necessary to gain
knowledge than wealth, tor enough
knowledge will attract enough dollars
to furnish comfort; the comfort required by wholesome knowledge never means
great wealth. High life costs much. A
life that requires a large income to furnish the lubricant is not a life compatible with either health or longevity, and
It cannot be said, in any rational sense
of the word, to be a success.
Gathering wealth per se ls not a success, even if millions be attained. To
know how to use wealth successfully requires more intelligence than is commonly found among wealth amassers.
Fortunes are gained before forty years
of age, but they usually convert those
who gained them into spendthrifts and
the fortunes gained after that age often convert their owners into misers.
However, neither rule holds good in all
cases.
The game ot success ls not out until
life is played out Those who keep busy
and cultivate contentment and wisdom
are liable to strike high places sooner or
later, but if one's life is well lived what's
the difference what It ls called?
A Maine doctor has figured out to a
gnat's heel that a man's most productive
period is .reached at 25 years of age, after
that he declines in value���economic
value. This may be true ln Portland,
Maine, and in the state of Maine, but I
think It would be hard to prove In Colorado or the west. This is a country in
which men do not grow old. We have a
lot of active boys in this country from
45 to 75 years of age. Fortunes are
made in this country after men are twice
the age of the Maine man's limit.
Even some of the women in this country are so virile at 50 they do not hesitate to marry a man 25 years of age. A
country with such mothers can't be discouraged with a Yankee age limit. Isn't
it just barely possible that New England
has lost all her best manhood by exporting her youth to this country? Only
the best and most ambitious follow the
Star of Empire.
At the last analysis It all depends upon the man. If he is made of the right
kind of stuff he will not submit to age
nor other limitations.
Of all the jokes that Mark Twain ever
sprung, none is so good as the stale old
platitude that is doing veteran service,
namely. "Yes, I think the patient will recover If no complications set in." The
following is just as good even if not so
old, "Oh. yes! the operation was a great
success but the patient did not rally."
Again. "The patient was doing nicely but
she caught cold." Here is another that
has brought consolation to many broken
hearts. "Everything was done that could
be done!"
SLEEP, THK KEY TO HEALTH
An eminent New York physician is
quoted by a leading Chicago newspaper
as saying sle.?p is the key to health. One
hears so many theories introduced as
the key or secret of health that some
doubt Is natural. One after another,
electricity, vegetables, meat, no meat,
exercise, Idleness, water beer tobacco,
its antidotes, sarsaparilla and cod liver
oil have been praised by various authorities. Of late, it seems to have been
taken for granted that when the food
problem is solved the secret of health
will be known. After carefully considering the claims of all foods, Punch
comes to the conclusion that food is Injurious to tbe constitution, and should
not be taken. It will be a relief to many
people to learn, on the authority of the
New York physician, that food is not
necessarily injurious, and that it may
be eaten with impunity, so long as one
sleeps scientifically. At the outset, the
doctor warns the public that the nature
of the employment must, determine what
hours shall be devoted to sleep. The
old adage of ten for a woman, eleven for
a man. and twelve for a man and wife,
must not be rigidly adhered to. The
first essential Is to find out what number of hours is sufficient and then to
rigidly adhere to it   It will not do to
sleep fifteen hours one night and twenty
minutes the next.    It is far better to
take nine hours each night.   Too much
sleep is bad, for it induces sluggish action of all the digestive organs, ending In weakness and disease.   Nor is too
little sleep to be recommended, for it is
not enough.   There should be a stated
time for retiring and a stated time for
arising, one In the evening and ths other
in the morning.   Before going to bed,
the doctor said, only restful and quieting thoughts should be indulged In for
an hour or two.   To induce sleepiness
he recommends reading a book, or taking a hot bath, or sipping   a glass   of
warm milk.    Never go hungry to bed,
for not only is it a bad thing tor the
health, but it makes sleep impossible.
Never get hungry, for the same excellent
reasons.   Having followed these directions carefully, it only remains to wind
up the clock, put out the cat, and go to
bed.   The bedding   should   be light in
weight, says the doctor, though heavy
enough for warmth.    It is inadvisable
to go to sleep with the teeth chattering.   To Ue flat on the back without a
pillow is to ensure a straight figure and
a shapely neck;  but it   also    induces
heavy breathing and   snoring,   as the
mouth is apt to fall apart some distance.
A bandage under the chin might prevent
this faux pas.   It is well to He on the
right side, whichever it is found to be,
and to avoid holding the arms above the
head, as this posture makes an additional demand on the heart.   Keep the arms
at the sides.    Asthmatical persons are
advised to use high pillows, but others
should use smaller head rests.   Sleeping
on the counterpanes ls a mistake, if not.
a crime, and no word dropped by the
doctor would seem to justify it.   After
lying quietly for some   hours,    gently
stretch the limbs by putting out the cat
again, and after taking   another slight
meal, return to bed.   It is now time to
get up.���Mail-Empire.
If a man desires to irve beyond 63. the
grand climacteric period of life, he will
have to outgrow fanaticism in eating.
A small per cent of humanity live to 70
and beyond in a haphazard and rough
and tumble style, a still smaller percent live to that age wrapped in a cloak
cut two by four out of some specialized
fanaticism, but if one would live well
and long, he should avoid specialisms
that are founded on selfish prejudices.
It takes a wise man to distinguish be-
ween his selfish interests and the general good. A distiller believes in his
products, and because they bring him
wealth and Influence they can't possibly
be of harm to anyone.
People who live largely on cereals will
become decrepit and die early. After
one learns the pinched cereal face he
needs never be mistaken, one can detect
it as far off as he can see it.
Sir ln carrying on your government
why should you use killing at all? Let
your evinced desires be for what is good,
and the people will be good. The grass
'must bend, when the wind blows across
It.���Confucius (to Emperor Ke Kang), LOWERY'S CLAIM.
Gams and Chips.
Some one has advanced the statement
that every human being is a gambler at
heart. Yet for a man to go into the business of establishing a card gambling
house under modem conditions is to attempt one of the riskiest businesses in
the world. Recently one of the most
noted gaming house keepers in the country seems to have suggested a further
anomaly in the situation in his utterance In a court of record:
"When I conduct a house on a 10 per
cent gasis of profit it is only a matter
of time until my steady patron goes
broke."
ln the face of this statement, however,
tbe innocent layman may be still further at sea when it is recalled by old
habitues of the gaming table that nearly ever gambling king of modern history has finished close to the poorhouse
and the potter's field! How is it possible that the gambler with the insidious,
certain 10 per cent which inevitably
wrecks the man who goes often enough
to the green table almost Invariably dies
in poverty?
Today it is the gambler king who at
least has an ephemeral show to gain
fleeting riches. But in order that these
riches shall approach riches as they are
measured in other businesses the man
who opens the gambling house must
have a fortune for the investment. His
outlawed business itself will make it
certain that he pays the maximum rental or tbe highest price for the property
which he chooses for occupancy. To sustain this he will need to seek out the
wealthy patron who not only has money
to lose but who may have a certain influence which may tend toward immunity for keeper and player alike. The
"establishment" will need to have the
best cuisine and the best cellars, with
palatial furnishings and a retinue of
servants in full keeping. And somewhere money will be necessary in blinding officials to the existence of an institution which is visible to the merest
tyro in passing along the strC2t
A constitution of iron, the absence of
a nervous system, the discrimination of
a King Solomon, and the tact of a diplomat are requisites for the successful
gambling king. Considering the qualification of the man for such a place and
the final ending of the gambler king's
career, it might be a sociological study
worth while to determine where, on a
more wrothy bent, such capacities in a
man might land him.
In real life, however, it must be admitted that the gambler king ls looked
upon in exaggerated light. Almost without exception the big gambler is posing
always. Conventionality has demanded
it of him. But far more than this, in
order to command the following which
he desires he must have a certain social
aide which Is not too prominent, but
which with tact and judgment he may
bring out on dress parade. To the layman the gambler ls the dark, sinister
figure pictured ln melodrama.   He bears
the eame relation to gambling that Simon Legree bears to tbe institution of
slavery of fifty years ago.
One of the noted gamblers of his time
In this country passed from laboring on
the docks into the prise ring. When his
ring work waa ended the gambling house
was an easy step onward in illegitimate
fields. On the docks h'is reputation was
not above a bit of "strong arm" work in
separating a man from tbe money which
the dock walloper wanted. Naturally,
under the Queensberry rules, there were
things In the ring whicb he could not
do in overcoming an antagonist, and he
learned to make concessions to fairness
���which waa education.
Opening a gambling house that was
adapted to the wants ot a rich clientele,
it was a necessity that he preserve this
educated regard for hia patrons and
that he should add to it. Boon be was
In a position where it waa imperative
that his reputation for fair dealing be
kept Intact. He became the "gentleman"
gambler whose "word" carried all the
accepted concomitants of Jhis gentleman's business. To the course of events
he attained a high legislative office under the government But it may be said
for those who knew the man aa a man,
not one' ever ceased to regard him at
heart as the dock walloper, w.wi* .ae inherent and unreconstructed disposition
to regard other men aa legitimate prey.
Had other conditions and circumstances
made a card sharp of bim, he would
have held to the promoting of his nature.
In the conduct of a gambling house of
the first class, the gambler king needs
for himself and for his patrons the assurance of uninterrupted play. Men oi
money and position will not go to a
house where there Is menace of a police
raid. The small gambler may subsidise
the policemen on the beat ln which hia
house stands, but he cannot placate the
whole police department And even
when it is thought that the gambler
king Is impregnable in his castle some
one may break over the barriers snd
raid the place in the name of law snd
order.
Wit inn a few years New York has
given to the world some of the Inside
workings of the gambling business.
When Jerome raided the place of places
which had hen considered Immune, the
proprietor of the bouse was considered
worth a million dollars. Before the litigation waa done and the fine paid, the
king gambler was out $600,000. his club
houses were closed, and he had been
branded officially as a common gambler,
pursued in the courts for payment of law
yers' fees which he designated as outrageous and a "shrieking scandal." Y,et
this man was of the type whose word
had been declared as good as his bond.
The dice, faro and roulette are the
principal games of the gambling house
and considering these the experienced
player will tell you that he la suspicious of a "petey" in the dice box, a "high
layout" In faro, and a "squeezed wheel"
in roulette in just tbe proportion that
the gambling house keeper baa not recognized tbat he cannot indulge them
because ot the fear of detection.   The
gambler holds to the gambler's view ot
tbe gambler���aud It is not complimentary to the profession.
Tbat the gentleman gambler ls justified ln his attitude toward the gentleman player, too, haa been shown In the
New York revelations. There one gentlemen player, loser to the extent or $300.-
000, compromised with the bank for 130
bills ot $1000 denomination. There a
gentleman player who had lost $69,000
to the bank tried to compromise on $20,-
000, but waa in a position where the
bank could not hold him. How much
a gambler king may loan and lose ln the
course ot a year can scarcely be approximated. Tbe gambling debt is a "debt
of honor," and even In business not all
such debts are paid. Whether a borrowed debt or a debt of loas to the bank tli is
honor ts the security���unless In emergency tbe gambler king discovers that
he can blackmail with safety to his Interests aa a whole.
ln general tbe gambler who Is "on
the square" operates on a 10 per cent
basis for hia bank. In addition there Is
the "unknown per cent" which ls hie at
tbe end of the year. The roulette wheel,
for example, presents to the player just
one chance ln thirty seven of winning
on a single play, while tbe winning on
tbat play la paid in the proportion ot
only 34 to 1.
The one great characteristic in human
nature on which the gambler counts Is
the fact tbat It requires more nerve In
a man to win tban ls required of htm to
lose! It Is startling for the layman to be
told that $5000 In a night ls a big winning for a player, while $5000 ls only an
ordinary loss In a big establishment
This fact Is baaed In subtle psychology. There are two type* of players.
one of which gambles when it is In a
state of elation and the other out of a
stsge of depression. With either or
these types winning It ls a gambler's observation that the man who will play
until he has lost $25,000 when luck
hopelessly is against hi mcannot hold
himself to a chair after he is f5000 winner.
Gamblers have made money���fortunes
���in time past, only to he buried In the
potter's field. There are several tea-
sons assignable for this end. Extravagant living appeals to the gambler, and
when he lias left his own special line of
gaming lt does not appeal to him strongly as either pastime or means for recouping his fortune. If he turns to gaming at all It ls likely to be in fields
where he does not know the game. Sometimes he goes to the board of trade-
sometimes to the stock market. Playing there he is without system and without knowledge of conditions. He is likely to bull the grain market two days after the weather conditions have assured
the greatest grain crop in history.
Once a gambler, always a gambler, la
his condition, and lt only is a matter
of time until some one has a game which
beats him out���Chicago Tribune.
"Did he lose his money?"
"No; only his reputation."
"Ah, well that's not so bad���he can
buy that back."���Chicago Examiner.
$ ?,TSSe��w3S*3
LOWERY'S CLAIM
GOOD NEWS FOR BALD HEADS
Is your pate shiny? Cheer up, cheer
up. Are you as bald as Nick Long-
worth, Douglas, the shoe man, and the
late Bill Nye? Forget lt There ls hope
for you. Not hope for hair, but hope for
you in tbe thought that we bald heads
are at laat to be given the position in
society that we are entitled to. 'For
simultaneously from two Independent
sources comes striking testimony to the
virtues of the hairless head. It is stated
that, first, there are no bald criminals,
and, secondly, there are no bald lunatics.
Neither statement is laid down as
absolute or infallible, but lt ls asserted
that there are only just sufficient exceptions to prove the rule. The authority regarding the first statement is J. T.
Riley, a magistrate on the Halifax (London, England), bench, who aaid ln court
that be had only met with two bald
"charges" In his twenty-three years' experience.
Tbe second statement comes from the
Rev. 8. M. Field, of Bradford, England
���himself a bald head ot the moat pronounced type, who quote* the chief official ot a celebrated English foolish
bouse aa assuring him that he need never hope to enjoy the institution's hospitality-���his absence of hair assured him
of that Anarchists there are whose hair
and whiskers lead each other a merry
chaee as to honors for length and
breadth, but a bald anarchist Is a sight
never witnessed by tbe oldest inhabitant
Criminals there are with shaggy hirsute
appendage sufficient to supply ample
"stuffing" for a full size mattress��� but
a bald hold up man or second story operator doesn't hopped once ln a life time.
Should you be passing your bank at
midnight and notice a shiny pated individual monkeying with the vault combination, go home to sweet, refreshing
sleep, feeling sure that every dollar in
the safe's strong box will be there at
sunrise.
So what care we if the fly in August
makes a polo rink of the top of our head
���we're honest men and can prove it too,
by magistrate Riley.
What care we If the gay soubrette
singles us out in the front row and guys
us���we have the laugh on her. If she
Isn't already crazy, the chances are she
hasn't far to go, while we are as free
from the fear of ending up In the bug
house as if we were enjoined by a permanent Injunction.
Hoch, the bald head,
Skldoo the hair tonic.
WHY HE DID NOT RESIGN.
Sir William Wlghtman held office In
the old court of Queen's Bench for beyond the prescribed time, and at last, on
the eve of the "long vacation," he took
a sort of farewell to his brother judges.
However, wh��n the "morrow of All
���Souls" came around he turned up smiling at Westminster Hall. "Why,
Brother Wlghtman." said Sir Alexander
Cockburn, "you told us that you intended to aend in your resignation to the
lord chancellor before the end of August." "So I did/! aaid Sir William, "but
jrhen I went home and told my wife she
said: 'Why, William, what on earth do
you think we can do witb you messing
about the house ail day.' 60 you see 1
was obliged to come down to court
again."���Dundee Advertiser.
WAGES OF StlN.
Anyone who lightly says that our rich
lawbreakers escape scot-free has but to
remember the presidents of the three
big insurance companies. The most fortunate of them all Is John A. McCall,
who died after but a few months of intense mental suffering. James W. Alexander ls wrecked in mind and body.
Richard A. McCurdy no longer dares to
mingle with his former associates and
friends. He knows that everybody who
recognizes him points to him as a violator of trust, a greedy robber ot widows
and orphans. And Depew? No more
public dinners; no more interviews in
the press; no moro boards of directors
listening to hie sallies of wit; no more
orations in the (Senate. Has John D.
Itockefeller come through hie ordeal
unscathed? Let no one imagine it-
New York Evening Poet.
SUITED HIS CASE EXACTLY
Tbe Christian Register tells this story
of an Episcopalian rector, who, traveling ln the southern states, met a native,
also, by his profession, an Episcopalian.
"Who confirmed you?" asked the rector.
"Nobody.    What's that?"
"But didn't you tell me you were an
Episcopalian?"
"Oh. yes," said the old man, "and I'll
tell you how lt Is. Last spring I went
down to New Orleans visiting. While I
was there I went to church, and I heard
'em say they had left undone them
things they'd oughter done, and dono
them things they hadn't oughter done,
��*ad I bald to myself, 'That's just my fix
too.' I found out that was an Episcopal
church, and so I've been an Episcopal
ever since."
A NEGRO PRAYER.
The recent earthquake brings to mind
the similar disaster in Charleston 20
years ago, when among other supplications for divine succor that of a negro
preacher bears recording. With his
eyes turned toward heaven, and hands
clasped reverently, he made the following petition:
"Oh, Gawd! you have seen fit to visit
us with this terrible affliction, and now
we ask you to come an' help us; come
you'self, an' doan't sen' you Son, for dis
ain't no child's play."
VANCOUVER'S BiEST KNOWN
RATEPAYER.
(Canadian Graphic)
Vancouver is the only city in Canada
able to claim Kipling as a ratepayer.
Seventeen years ago the author of The
Day's Work on his only visit to Canada
invested in lots 1 and 2, block 157, district lot 264A. He has paid taxes regularly ever since. So far as ls known he
has never kicked on his assessment or
protested against the rate. Recently he
refused to sell.
GEMS OF THOUGHT.
The true rule in business is to guard
and do by the tb'ngs of others aa they
do by their own.���Hindoo.
Kings persecute persons, priests opinion. Without kings, men muat be safe;
and without priests, minds must be free.
���Lytton.
Mary Baker Eddy, the greatest female
Jesus that the world haa ever known,
says that spiritual rationality and free
thought are the accompaniments of approaching Science, and cannot be put
down. They will emancipate humanity
and supplant doctor's pills.
AN OBLIGING TRAVELER.
Marshall Wilder was talking about the
new type of Atlantic liner���the huge,
broad-beamed boat, with elevators, grill*
room, gynasium, restaurant and roof
garden.
"These luxurious and steady ships,"
he said, "are more popular because they
are more comfortable than the slim
recordbreakero, that roll in a calm sea
worse than the new type does In a gale.
"The new type promises to abolish sea-*T
sickness.   Pirates, boarding it, wouldn't
find such wretched, limp, pale passengers as they used.
"A pirate, you know, boarded once a
record-breaking liner.
"As, armed to the teeth, he clambered
up the side, he saw a passenger leaning
over the rail.
" Throw up your hands!' the pirate
shouted fiercely.
"The passenger with & wan t^.u* replied:
"'I think I did about ten minute*
ago.'"���^Mcago Inter-Oceaff.
LACK OF TT5E.
An Englishman who had his doubts
about "Irish wit" asked a friend, accustomed to go to Ireland yearly on fishing
trips, if he had ever \x,et any not specially prepared for the English market
"As I was going down to the fishing
station on the morning of my arrival,"
he answered, "an old fellow came along
the road who, on a former visit, bad
done me several little services. And
how is Michael? I asked,   approaching
him.   'Sure, It's Mr. V exclaimed my
friend recognizing me, 'And how bave
things been with you since I saw yon
last Michael?' Without a moment's hesitation he answered: 'Sure, the cork*
screw's got rusty since your honor waa
here.'"���New York Tribune.
THE MINER'S WILL
An addition to tbe literature of curious wills comes from the Arctic gold
fields of Canada. A miner died at the
headwaters of the Stewart river in the
Yukon territory. On a piece of birch
bark he wrote his last testament, bequeathing his valuable claim on tbe river to his nieces. A companion who waa
with him in his last moments said: "Wa
had no paper, and ao the man wrote big
will on a piece of bark, and a friend and
I signed as witnesses," 10
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
PANDORA'S BOX
In most modern civilized cities the cry
of the times is "the lid Is on." In Van-
cover the Ud is "off." The flat ba* gone
forth that vice must be suppressed, and
to that end every house of assignation
is to be closed. Those of ua who have
spent half a century on thia mundane
sphere have heard the cry before, and
seen the result There are few cities in
England where the advocates ot social
purity have not at one time or another
forced the issue to a test, and ot course if
the law is invoked there can be no question of tbe illegality of legalized immorality. On tbis whole question The Week
has very decided views and is not afraid
to express them. In theory vice in any
form is reprehensible and should be suppressed; it is the privilege of every citizen to invoke the law against it There
is not one right thinking man In the
community who does not admit ita evils,
nor one who can be found to stand up
and defend it. All are agreed that the
"social evil" is rightly named, and that
to get rid of it is a public duty. One
might go further andp oint out how its
material diminution would go far to
solve some of the most serious problems
of-natter day civilization, including race
suicide. But how is it to be effected? Tbe
problem is as old as the hills. Ancient
history, sacred and profane, tells ot
fruitless attempts to stay the plague, and
of the greater abominations that resulted. The "Modern Babylon" crusade
started in London more than thirty
years ago by W. T. Stead produced but
a temporary lull in tbe seething tide of
vice and in addition, as social reformers
well know, developed the cult of Cleveland street. Is Vancouver prepared to
face that? The social evil is like a handful of mud: hoW it in tbe palm of your
hand and you can inspect and control it.
���Shut your fist and squeeze it and it
squirts out between your fingers and
spreads all around, dirtying everything
it touches. This has always happened,
and mayhap, always will. We sympathize witb those whose conscientious
-scruples impel them to drastic action,
their position is logical, and on religious
grounds unanswerable. On utilitarian
grounds their policy is disastrous, and
like every other ebb will only result in
a higher flood tide. In the present constitution of society suppression is impossible, diversion Outy result*. It is
the greater evil we fear. Our social reformers are beginning at the wrong
end. Let them labor and preach and
-write for, yes, and illustrate, greater
simplicity of life, and less extravagance
ln living. Let them advocate and render easy early marriages; there will be
found there the only proximate solution
to this vexatious problem, with all that
it involves. Unfortunately the advocates
of reform themselves no longer lead
the simple life, and Pastor Wagner has
few imitators.���The "Rev." Bill Blake-
more, in The Week.
Masculinity and feminity make love
poaaible; they give to love much of Its
intensity and inspiration, its bittersweet hopes and fears, doubts and assurances, it color   and   creativenets(   its
beauty and delight Yet love is more
tban all these. Sex attraction is a stepping stone to the realization of love in
tbe highest, when that which was sundered and separate becomes at last united and the sense of oneness arises out
of the struggle of erst diverse and divided souls for unity. This goal, too, is
suggested by the likeness between friend
ship and love.���Paul Tyner.
Religious people often pray very heartily for the foregiveness of a "multitude
of trespasses and sins," as a mark of
humility, but we never knew them admit any one fault in particular, or acknowledge themselves in the wrong in
any instance whatever. The natural
jealousy of self-love is in them heightened by the fear of damnation, and they
plead "Not Guilty" to every charge
brought against them with all tbe conscious terrors of a criminal at the bar.
It is for this reason that the greatest
hypocrites In the world are religious hypocrite*.���Hazlitt.
to whicb our souls are cut and over
which we have as lltle control as over
our statures or temperament We are
born Calvlnists or Methodists or Catholics, or Whigs or Tories. The mind has
its natural affinities and repulsions. Its
door opens as by a secret spring at the
knock of certain truths, and is faat bolted
against others to which the next mind
again open* We read arguments in
favor of certain views to which we are
opposed, and they have no weight with
us; our minds do not open to them, or
if they enter for a moment, they are
quickly hustled.out by other considerations which have the precedence there.
We are housed In our opinions, and we
resist being turned out of doors antl
having another and different roof built
over our heads.���John Burroughs.
Remember that tbe true struggle of
life ia not to achieve what the world
calls success, but to hold that Essential Self inviolate which was given you
to mark your identity from all other
souls. Against this precious possession
���this Veriest You���all winds blow, all
storms rage, all malign powers contend.
As you hold to this or suffer it to be
marred or taken from you, so shall be
your victory or defeat.���The Papyrus.
I know I am restless, and make others
so;
I know my words are weapons, full of
danger, full of death;
(Indeed, I am the real soldier;
It is not he, there, with his bayonet, and
not  the  red-striped   artillery-man;)
For I confront peace, security, and all
the settled laws, to unsettle them;
I am more resolute because all have denied me, than I could ever have been
had all accepted me;
I heed not, and have never heeded either
experience, caution, majorities, nor
ridicule;
And the threat of what is called Hell is
little or nothing to me;
And the lue of what is called heaven
little or nothing to me.
���Walt Whitman
is
Calvinism was one and the same thing
in Geneva, in Scotland, ln Old and New
England. If there was a wedding, they
had a sermon; If a funeral then, a sermon; If a war, or smallpox, or a comet,
or cankerworms, or a deacon died���still
a sermon: Nature was a pulpit; the
church warden or tithing-man was a
petty persecutor; the presbytery, a tyrant; and in many a house ln country
places the poor children found seven
sabbaths In a week.���Emerson.
We come by our opinions and beliefs
upon most subjects by a slow and obscure process. We think we are guided by the light of reason, but as a rule
we are not. There is some determining
force tbat goes before reason. This determinating force is our idlosyncrsy, natural bent, or predisposition, the pattern
I would rather go to the forest, far
away and build me a little cabin���build
it myself���daub it with clay, and live
there with my wife and children; and
have a winding path leading down to the
spring where the water bubbles out, day
and night, whispering a poem to the
white pebbles, from the heart of the
earth; a little hut with some hollyhocks at the corner, with their bannered
bosoms open to the sun. and a thrush In
the air like a winged joy���1 would rather
live there and have some lattice work
across tbe window so that the snn-light
would fall checkered on the babe ln the
cradle���I would rather live there, with
my soul .erect ancl free, than in a palace of gold, and wear a crown of Imperial power, and teel tbat I was superstition's cringing slave, snd dare not speak
my honest thought.���Robert G. Ingersoll.
JAPANESE CIVILIZATION.
As Illustrating his claim that the Japanese are a more civilized people than
the Americans, a gentleman at a recent
Boston dinner table cited professor
Morse's statement that if. in a Japanese
city, one picks up a stone to throw at a
dog the dog does uot run, because he has
never had a stone thrown at hlm and
does no tknow what the action means.
Manifestly. If such a state of universal
gentleness anel kindness prevails ln Japan that not even a stone is thrown at
a dog by a boy, there must be a high
and thorough civilization permeating all
classes of the population. This argument may not be accepted as complete
by sociologists, who would doubtless
maintain that it requires something else
than gentleness and humanity to make
civilization. But certainly the fact Is
to be taken as an excellent item of evidence In making out a case of high civilization for the Japanese. And it is a
significant fact that It was reserved for
our own European-American civilization
to Introduce the completest refinement of
cruelty to animals.���Listener, in Boston
Transcript.
*������BBIB��*��ll��Br**ll-e*������(��^i��"."**e*^-***^,**W��
The way of tha transgressor may be
hard, but did you ever hear of that
travelled by his women kin?���Atchison
(I^an.) Globe. .    m _   ^.... LOWERY'S OLAIM
U
THE POISON GIRLS
A private Calcutta letter to a member
of the aristocracy tells of elaborate precautions being taken by tbe government
to guard royal visitors to India against
"poison girls and poison men." These
dangerous creatures, which Nathaniel
Hawthorne immortalized in his Rappa-
clnls' Daughter, are supposed to be able
to kill a person by breath or touch and
the Indian government has no more succeeded in exterminating them than infant marriage* and other Indian peculiarities.
Indian medicine men and priests knew
long before professor Koch and other
European alienist* that the persistent
consumption of poisons makes the body
immune against poisoning. Accordingly
potentates, priests and others who bad
occasion to wish the death of certain
persons every little while, kept on hand
a number of poison fed individuals to
send to tbe persons that they wished to
do away with. Both boys and girls
were trained for this murderous office,
principally girla
The Indian princes caused beautiful
and healthy female children to be put
under the care of physicians and medicine men soon after they were born. The
medicine men proceeded as follows: To
begin with, they strewed the floor under the baby's cradle with dried helmet
flower, or monk's hood, that Is such from
which the deadly poison, aconite, had
been partially extracted. After a few
months an unprepared monk's hood was
placed under the cradle and in vases
In the baby's chamber. Later the fresh
flower was Installed, and baby was allowed to play with lt and suck it.
Still later a mild solution of aconite
was added to baby's milk and other
food after a graduating scale. As the
little bodies became more and more used
to the poison, the doses were increased,
and usually when a girl was 10 or 12
she could eat aconite In the same quantities as some arsenic eaters devour that
poison. It is a fact, though, that few
human natures can stand the aconite
treatment. One is told of an Indian
prince who succeeded only in raising
only one poison girl out of more than a
hundred. But this poison girl was so
venomous that nobody snd nothing could
live ln tbe house she inhabited, both
human beings and animals dying from
breathing the same air as she.
This particular poison girl whom nature had endowed with all the graces
liable to capture man's heart, was used
by the Indian prince at various times to
murder pretenders by a single kiss, to
rob his enemy's army of its leader, to
kill off Inconvenient relatives and officials. It will be remembered that, according to tradition, Alexander the Great
came near falling a victim to a poison
girl, who approached him in the guise
of a harpist and singer. A priest in
Alexander's tent recognized the fatal
odor, and begged Alexander on his knees
to refrain from touching her until his
suspicions could be tested. The king
eent for two young slaves and commanded them to kiss the pretty girl. Both
died Instantly of the touch of her lips.
Alexander ordered tbe girl to be beheaded and the body to be burned ten miles
from the spot. The story goes that tbe
executioner and his assisatnts died soon
after performing their bloody work.
As there is much  dissatisfaction in
India owing to the famine and to the
jealousy of the native princes, the government fears that, some attempt might
be made by a poison girl on Wales or
the princess.   The country, It Is said, Is
full of fanatics, liable to resurrect the ancient weapon, and the native princes are
practically  uncontrolled in their dominions.    Who knows, says the government whether not more than   one   is
keeping poison girls or poison men on
hand to kill the future emperor of India?   Hence elaborate precautions have!
been taken from the start, and Wales,
who is not of a courageous nature, promised to do as advised.    Consequently
neither he nor his wife will allow a native to approach them nearer than 10
feet.    They are served by  the people
they brought from England exclusively.
Even the crews of the trains they travel
In is made up entirely of white men
and white women,     as   to the native
princes, only such whose loyalty is beyond doubt will be received, and presents
and  tributes from  princes and  people
must not be accepted direct    A special bureau of chemists has been engaged
to Investigate jewelry and silk, even gold
and silver presented to their highnesses.
In this connected the story of Sultan
Mahmud Bigarrah, who reigned in India
Irom 1459 to 1511, is recalled.   All the
chroniclers agree that Mahmud was one
of the most dangerous poison men that
ever lived.    Me could kill a person by
simply breathing upon him or her, and
daily indulged In a certain poison diet.
His harem  was    3000    to  4000    heads
strong, and every morning in the year
one of his wives was found dead by his
stile.    It was death to touch his linen,
and out of consideration  for  his servants he burned his own clothes daily.
Mahmud had eaten poison from his earliest youth, according to the chroniclers.
MIGHT BE SO
R. B. Kerr seems to think that women
would welcome polygamy. He says they
would because they wish their children
to be all that is desirable, and in that
way they could choose the best men. I
think he is wrong in both premises. I
do not thing womei�� as a class would
welcome polygamy. I have never known
a woman who considered her unborn
child in any degree. Most women do not
marry because they wish to bring superior children into the world. They marry
for almost any other reason than that
If women had the choice of the world,
the majority would not exercise any
more judgment in the choice of a mate
than they do now. Most of them would
choose men of great wealth. Most women are ignorant. To an ignorant woman a brainy, thoughtful man is not attractive, any more than an educated,
refined, thoughtful woman is attractive
to an ignorant, sensual man. The truth
is, the majority of men and women are
about on a level mentally. When all
women have advanced   sufficiently   so
that they will consider their unborn
children as they should, I fancy the
men will be superior, too. Of course,
there are many evils practiced by many
of the countries where the majority believe in monogamous unions, but tbat
doesn't prove that polygamous marriage
is the ideal union for men and women.
Ideal home life is possible only; it is
the result only of a monogamous marriage. It is only ideal home life that
can produce ideal individuals. So polygamy wouldn't ever be a good thing.
Now people are not sufficiently advanced
to gain the benefit of the system without the evil, and when the world shall
have become advanced it will not need
it It will have something better then,
ideal monogamous marriage.���Annie
Sweet in Truthseeker.
A LIGHT CAT
I se ethat the secretary of the .Society
for the Prevention of -Cruelty to Animals is issuing an appeal to the public
to make ample provision for their cats
before they go holiday-making���a thing
which thousands of unfeeling people neglect to do. They turn their cats out Into
the street, and sometimes lock them up
in empty houses with insufficient food
and drink. It is sheer cruelty in either
case. The obligation on those who keep
cats is to treat them with kindness.
Which reminds me of the attenuated
cat which one day stolled into a Dublin butcher's. "Micky," demanded the
butcher, "didn't I tell ye a month ago
to fade that cat wide a pound of mate
a day ontil ye had her fat?" "And so I
am," replied Mickey. "I'm just after
feedin' her wid a pound." "Has that
cat ate a pound this morning?" "Yes,
sir." replied Mickey. "I balave ye're
not speakin' a wurrd av the truth," observed the butcher. "Bring me that cat
and bring me the scales. "I'll weigh the
darling." He did, and the cat scaled just
a pound. "There," was Mickey's triumphant response, "didn't I tell ye she'd
had a pound." "All right, me bhoy,"
said the butcher, as he caught Mickey
by the collar, "there's the pound av
mate on the scale right enough, but
where the divil is the cat "���Nomad's
Weekly.
Until every soul is freely permitted to
investigate every book, and creed, and
dogma for itself, the world cannot be
free. Mankind will be enslaved until
there is mental grandeur enough to allow each man to have his thought and
say. This earth will be a paradise when
men can, upon all these questions, differ,
and yet grasp each others hands aa
friends. It is amazing to me that a difference of opinion upon subjects that
we know nothing with certainty about,
should make us hate, persecute and despise each other.
Christians tell me that they love tbeir
enemies, and yet all I ask is���not tbat
they love their enemies, not that they
love their friends even���but that they
treat those who differ from them witb
simple fairness. We do not wish to be
forgiven, but we wish Christiana to ao
act that we will not have to forgive them*,
���Ingersoll. 11
LOWERY'S CLAIM
THIB TIE THAT BINDS
Impelled by a mild curiosity,   I  waa
"among those present" ait tbe much-advertised  mass meeting called   by tbe
preachers to protest against easy divorcee, ot any, except for adultery.   Probably 200 people were there, and **v*
failure of tbe "general public" to show
up in larger numbers revealed lack of
Interest that must bave been discouraging to the promoters of tbe movement   It waa a very tame affair, and
its effect on tbe great underlying forces
of society that produce result* will be
about aa potent aa a f eatber in a gale of
wind.   Two judge* ftom our superior
courts  were  there by invitation,  and
while both are orthodox Christiana, tbey
did not agree with tbe preachers tbat
divorces should be limited to the scriptural grounds alone, and one of tbem
went ao tar a* to express doubt tbat
air marriages were God-ordained affair*.
This thought reminded me ot a remark
once made by an old y t/eacher whose experience in marriage bad been very unpleasant, and   whose   observation   had
been critical and extensive.  Said he, "If
only happy marriages are made In beaven moat of them muat bave been made
in tbe other place."   When a man and
woman have been united by the marriage ceremony tbe preachers repeat with
much soles salty and unction, "What God
bath joined together, let no   man   put
asunder," but when we atop to consider
some marriage*, for instance where a
man Is forced to marry a girl be bas
wronged, by tbe persuasive influence of
a shotgun, or aome rake and debauchee
bas deceived a young and Innocent girl
into taking him for a husband, a sense
of the ludicrous attends tbe remark or
affirmation.   At this mass meeting the
preachers asserted and reasserted that
marriage is a divine institution, though
when It became such we are not informed.   But it is certainly not a Christian
Institution, for marriage in some form
exists in every nation and every tribe
of human beings on tbe globe.    Marriage is a natural union of tbe sexes inspired by love, whose mission is to people the world; and our prehistoric ancestors no doubt   selected   tbeir mates
and had some form of ceremonial attachment; but their mode* of living were
purely natural, and ao are ours today,
and tbe mating of men and women la no
snore divin ethan anything else they do.
Let us get that idea out of our beads
and use a little common sense in the
matter.  Marriage being a natural union
ot tbe sexes, plus aome form of ceremony. It is very evident tbat mistakes
can be made ln marriage, and when they
are it ia folly of the rankest kind for gov
ernment or soeiety to deny rectification.
To bold mismated people ln bondage all
their days is a crime against nature,
and there are no higher laws jn the universe than nature's laws.   Let ua respect tbem, and wa muat lt we are to
bave tranquil minus and   good health.
There ia nothing more   destructive   to
both than mismating  In marriage, and
when that tact la discovered by experience���the only way lt can be���artificial bonds should be broken, not only
for tbe good ot the Individual, but society likewise, for what ia bad and injurious for tbe unit of society is for tbe
whole.
Holding men and women together
when tbey cordially bate each other and
feel a natural aversion tbat nothing can
overcome, Ib one of society's gigantic
mistakes. Some day this tact will be
apparent to all, but not until tbe idea
is destroyed tbat marriage is a divine institution, presided over by providence
who does tbe mating.
The remarkable increase of divorces
everywhere and the tremendous number
of separations without divorces shows
tbat men and women are unhappy; that
tbey are uncongenial, and do not belong
together, and the day bas gone by when
any rational person will admit that restrictive laws embody the solution or
remedy for these conditions. Love Is
the only thing that should bold men and
[women together in marriage, and when
that dies, tbey damn their own souls
'and curse their progeny, if they have
any, by keeping up associations tbat nature protest* against.
Men and women who love each other
have no use for divorces, for love, strong
and true, ie the moat cohesive force tbat
exists, and death would be preferable to
separation. Therefore, tbe divorce question simmers down to this: Shall men
and women be force dto live together
when and where a natural discord and
aversion exists that makes life nothing
but protracted misery and wretchedness?
Na And all efforts to prevent tbe attainment of freedom by those mismated
in marriage can find no defense in reason or common sense.���Channtng Severance, In Los Angle* Record.
A SAD ENDING.
A young clerk grown up in tbe employ of a prosperous German grocer, was
by reason of bis ability and knowledge
ot all the details, virtually entrusted
witb tbe management of the business,
and, although given frequent advances
of salary, began to feel that his service*
were absolutely Indespensable and not
properly appreciated from a mon��y
point of view. He laid the matter before
his employer, placing particular stress
on what a difficult matter lt would
be to operate the business without him.
This claim was admitted by tbe employer, who enquired further.
"But Cbon, vat If you should die?"
"Oh, then you would bave to get along
without me," remarked John.
After a few minutes' deep thought the
employer looked up at John and aaid:
"Veil. Chon, chust gonslder yourself
deat"   Harper's Weekly.
When a fact can be demonstrated
force ls unnecessary; when lt cannot be
demonstrated, an appeal to force ls infamous. In the presence of the unknown
all have an equal right to think. In my
judgment, every human being ehould
take a road of hia own. Every mind
should be true to Itself���should think,
investigate and conclude for itself. This
la a duty alike incumbent upon pauper
and prince. Mental slavery la mental
death, and every man wbo baa given up
hia intellectual freedom iB tbe living
coffin of bis dead soul. I want no beaven for which I must give my reason; no
happiness in exchange for my liberty,
and no Immortality that demands tbe
surrender of my Individuality.���Ingersoll.
POWDER AND PADS.
That woman haa been the same ln all
ages ln ber efforts to ensnare the unsuspecting male by artificial aids is proved
by an old English statute, passed 236
years ago by parliament So far-reaching was the havoc wrought among masculine hearts by the devices of cunning
females tbat the men were forced to
seek protection of the law, as ia shown
by the statute In question, which reads
a* follows:
"That all women, of whatever, age.
rank or profession, whether virgins,
maids or widows, that shall from and after the passage of this act impose upon
and betray into matrimony any of his
majesty's male subjects, by scents,
paints, cosmetics, waahea, artificial
teeth, false hair, Spanis wool, Iron stays,
hoops, high-heeled shoes or bolstered
hips shall Incur the penalty of tbe law
now In force against witchcraft, sorcery
and snch like misdemeanors, and that
the marriage upon conviction, shall stand
null and void."
Judging by the forceful wording and
specifications of minute details, lt seems
that some of the members of parliament had been "stung."���New York
Press.
IGNORANCE OF THE BIBLE
"What Is the meaning of   the   word
Easter?" said John Drew at a club.
No one could answer tbe question and
Mr. Drew, with a frown, went on:
. "Nobody reads the Bible now. The
public's ignorance of the Bible and of
Biblical things ls amazing. A Biblical
allusion nowadays Is an unlntelllblble as
a Green allusion.
"Not long ago at a dinner I got Into
a Biblical argument. When the argument was over a young lady said:
" 'I enjoyed that discussion splendidly.
But, you know, I always thought that
Sodom and Gomorrah were man and
wife!'
"Another young lady commented:
"*Oh, well, I suppose they ought to
have been If they were not'"���Detroit
Free Press. *
On nights so still that field and tree,
And even breezes, listen,
Oh. who will walk a mile with mo
To watch Orion glisten?
For ever must we ape the bee?
For ever seek but honey? r
Oh. who will walk a mile with me
To lose a little money?
���James H. West.
A SURE WASTE.
To gild refined gold, to paint the Illy,
To throw a perfume on the violet.
To smooth the Ice, or add another hue
Unto the rainbow, or with taper light
To seek the beauteous eye of heaven to
garnish,
Ia wasteful and ridiculous excess.     jj, < LOWERY'S CLAIM.
11
WHY WAR MUST BE.
It would be of advantage to those who
believe that they can give the God of
War a knockout blow to read the following quotation from John Stuart Mill:
"But war, in a good cause, ia not the
greatest evil which a nation can suffer.
War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest
of things; the decayed and degraded
state of moral and patriotic feeling
which thinka nothing worth a war is
worse. When a people aro used as mere
human Instruments for firing cannon,
or thrusting bayonets, ln the service and
for tbe selfish purposes ot a master, such
war degrades a people. A war to protect other human beings against tyrannical injustice, a war to give victory to
their own Idea* of right and good, and
which la their own war, carried on for
an honest purpose by their free choice,
Is often the means of tbeir regeneration.
A man who haa nothing which he is
willing to fight for, nothing which he
care* more about tban be does about hia
personal safety, Is a miserable creature,
who has no chance of being free, unless
made and kept so by the exertions of
better men than himself. As long as justice and Injustice have not terminated
their ever renewing fight for ascendency
in the affaire of mankind human beings
must be willing when need is to do battle for the one against the other."
Washington said: "To be prepared
for war ls one of the most effectual
means of preserving peace."
Lincoln aaid: "With malice toward
none, witb charity for ail, with firmness
in right, a* God gives us to see the
right let us strive on to finish the work
we are In."   That worl-f. was war.
None of these men was cruel, and their
words will live forever. War will dls-
appear when all other evils disappear.
THE PLAIN MAN IS THE HAPPIEST
"The happiest, man in the world Is the
common, everyday chap who makes his
own living, pays   his own bills, has a
little money as he goes along, but doesn't
strive to get a corner on the output, and
la a slave neither to ambition or society."
sensibly remarks the Emporia Progress.
He loves God and his fellow man. thinks
"there Is no place like home." the haven
of rest, prefers the company of his wife
and children to that of any one else.
never has to sit up at night to poultice
his consicence, believes In the doctrine
of live and let live, and when he en-
countera one of the needy he doesn't
stutter with his pocket-book.   The plain
man is happy because he is satisfied,
does not spend the best part of his life
yearning for things four sizes too big
for him.���Ex.
WHY THUNDER SOURS MILK.
To many persons the curdling of milk
ln a thunder storm is a mysterious and
unintelligible phenomenon. Yet the
whole process is simple and natural.
Milk, like most, other substances, contains millions of bacteria The milk
bacteria that in a day of two under natural conditions would cause the fluid to
sour are particularly susceptible to electricity.   Electricity inspirits and invlg*
orates them, affecting them as alcohol,
cocoalne or strong tea affects men. Under the current's Influence they fall to
work with amazing energy, and instead
of taking a couple of days to sour the
milk, they accomplish the task completely in half an hour.
It la not tbe thunder in a storm that
sours milk; it is the electricity in the
air that does it. With an electric battery it is easy, on the same principle, to
sour the freshest milk. A strong current excites the microbes to super-microbe exertions, and in a few mintues
they do a job that under ordinary conditions would take tbem a couple of
days.���New Orleans Times-Democrat
DROP YOUR HAMMER
When you feel mean and just about
ready to hammer read the following
poem that I have taken from an exchange:
Put the hammer in tbe locker;
Hide tbe sounding-board likewise;
Anyone can be a knocker;
Anyone can criticize.
Cultivate a manner winning,
Though it hurts your face to smile,
And seems awkward in beginning;
Be a booster for a while.
Let the blacksmith do the pounding;
That's the wsy he draws his pay;
You don't get a cent for hounding
Saint and sinner night and day.
Just for solid satisfaction
Drop a kind word in the slot,
And I'll warrant you'll get action
On your effort on the spot
Kiudness every time beats knocking;
Mirth is better than a frown;
Do not waste your time in picking
Flaws with brothers who are down;
And it Isn't so distressing
If you give a little boost
To the man the fates are pressing
When the chicks come home to roost.
and helpfulness of human sympathy.
Down south the funeral in a neighobr's
family Is our own common sorrow and
no business prevents our rendering such
loving service as makes us fell that we
are neighbors indeed and in truth. Let
us go back home where human sympathy helps us to bear trouble, and
where sorrow and joy are felt as if
they belonged to us as well as to them."
WHEN TH' CONFRBNCB IS
When th' conf'rence is, Maw, she goes
An' gets us all some bran' new clo'es,
And fixes th' house up jest as nice
An* Paw, he grumbles about th* price-
But what Paw says don't cut much ice,
'Cause Maw, 'lows she don't wanter be
Ashamed of tb' house, er Paw, er me,
When tb' preacher-mens   come;    an���
great Gee Whiz!
We've hustlln' times when   th'   conf'rence is.
When th' conf'rence Is, some strange
man stays
j Aroun* th' house for days an' days,
i An' Maw, she talks to bim awful sweet,
i An' gives 'im tb' bestest things to eat,
An' me and Paw, we take a back seat.
He calls Paw "Brother Smith," you see,
An' Paw looks jest as foolish at me,
'Cause Paw don't want no church in his
But he has ter   go,   when  th'   Conf'r
enoe Is.
When th' conf'rence Is, Maw makes us
chase
The rooster-chickens all over th' place,
An' Paw, he runs bissef mos' to death,
An' cusses hor'ible under his breath;
An' I jest have t' keep as straight,
An' ev'ry meal I 'ave t' wait,
An' take it all roun', it's a muss I hate;
For me an' Paw have plenty of biz.
But not much fun,   when   th'   conf'rence is!���Dr. J. B. Wilson.
Yes, the old world would be brighter
If you'd kindle friendship's flame
And thus make the troubles lighter
Of the man against the game.
Send your grouch on a vacation,
Give your grumbling tones the shake,
And with grim determination
Throw your hammer in the lake.  .--
A CITY WITHOUT A HEART.
A pretty and touching story is told of
the lamented Henry W. Grady, Georgia's great pournallst and orator. At
one time he and his wife were stopping
ln New York with a view of locating in
that city. One day a tiny coffin was
taken from a dwelling adjoining his
boarding house. He asked the landlady
the child's name, how long it had been
sick and where the funeral would be;
to all of which she answered: "I am
sure I don't know. It's no funeral of
mine." Grady turned to his wife and
said: "Let's go back to Georgia. I do
not wish to live in any place where your
neighbor's heart tan't break because
of the death of a child, and you are too
engrossed in your own affairs to go and
tenderly make them feel the sweetness
IN  THE  NORTH.
The following is a rather funny conversation to hear at an aftpr-diiiner chat
tn a mining camp:
Cheechaco���Did you ever cut hay with
a scythe?
Hayseed Juggler���Yes, when I was
back to home.
Cheechaco���How many acres can you
cut in a day? ,
H. J.���Well, I remember onct in one
day I cut four acres of timothy bay
which averaged four ton to the acre. I
could have cut twice the quantity in the
same time only it wasn't a very good
day for cutting bay and besides, when
leaving the field In the evening, I noticed
that the blade of the sothe had been put
on backwards.���Atlln Claim.
* ��� aw-
If abuses are destroyed, man must destroy them. If slaves are freed, man
must free them. If new truths are discovered, man must discover them. If
the naked are clothed; if tbe hungry are
fed; if justice is done; if labor is rewarded; if superstition Is driven from
the mind; if tbe defenceless are protected, and if the right finally triumphs,
all must be the work of man. The grand
victories ot tbe future must be wen \>t
man, snd mart ��toft*t^ftfer��oftt
: u
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
THE DEPARTING PARSON
(To my friend Rev. W. M. Mackeracher)
Some feller dropped the word last nigbt.
Down at  "Poker Bill's"
"The parson's goin' ter pull up stakes
And quit these bloomln'  bills."
The boys all looked up sudden-like
At the feller where he sot
And Tommy Roadley dropped his band
An' forgot to take tbe pot.
"Yas." says the feller, kinder s prised
At tbe way we took the news,
"Year's up. and he's goin1 ter shake
Tbe dust from off his shoes.
He's ga-oln' away back east," says he���
"Boys," chipped in old George Fobs,
"Let's cash in."   And then we fell
TO reckonin' up tbe loss,
"Pop" Lowery 'lowed he'd bet a stack
Tbat tbe camp'd never see
A squarer parson pull bis coat
Er throw a packer's  "T"
'".Scribed   for  the  'Claim'   when  he fust
come.
Planked down the good hard dough,
land, ding it, boys, I  kinder hate
Ter see tbe feller go."
"Doc" Rogers chipped a bean and said:
"The proper thin* to do.
Afore the parson packs his quilts
And  strikes   fer  prospeoks   new,
Is ter give the cuss a good send off."
"I'm In on that" says Pete,
"We'll 'pint Dave King the poet, .
An' the hull durn gangll treat."
Well, Sunday night we gathered ln,
At the old Hotel Slocan,
Fer er  reg'lar old-time  blow-out
We trotted out our man
And made him listen to the truck
Our poet said he writ.
Which, If my memory serves me right,
Was 'bout like this, to wit
"We've watched  you purty close, young
man,
Since you dropped yer pack down here,
And stated In a sermont
That you'd come to stay a year.
But we felt a mite suspicious like.
As foiks Is apt f feel.
When a  "varaity chap' from  way down
east,
Sets in to take a deal.
"Tbem days tbe gang didn't  take much
stock
In missionary chaps.
And we sort 'er steered eround you���
There's where we lost,  perhaps���
Fer we couldn't see how a beardless kid,
Tbat had just got out 'er school,
Could preach and live in a mining camp
And stick to the Lord's eight th rule.
"We've  heerd tell since, that when  you
sot ln
The game was running low;
The church debt loomed up mighty high
And the spirit didn't flow;
The Sunday night collections them days,
Was 'bout as slim
(As the Sunday mornin"   attendance,
Which was almighty slim.
"But it wa'nt long 'til it got eround
That yer  preach in'   wa'nt bad;
That them that didn't hear ye
Might some day wish they had;
That yen ���ftrusk eat from th' shoul-Ssf
And laid down the good old fucks,
That every man's religion
Is   recorded  ln   his   acts.
"That the man who has a ready hand
To help his fellow man,
Has struck the paystreak of God's love
An' can save lt a pan.
You didn't seem ter give a���er���
That ls. you didn't care,
How rough an' tough a man might look
If  his heart beat  on the square.
"That charity ls a kingly grace,
If It assays what it ort���
The kind  that thinks no evil thing
And hears no bad report���
And though you were vuung and chipper-
like,
It didn't take long ter see,
That the heart that beat beneath yer vest
Was putry mlddlln' free.
"'Long 'bout spring o' th* year you come,
You struck you pick one night
In a mighty powerful sermont
That made 'em see the light.
And it wa'nt long till half the gang
Was a-goln' to church, by gum.
And a-AUin' up yer button box
When the thing eround 'em come.
"Then  *8cotty'  led, and  It  wa'nt long
'Til '.Sandy' follered suit
The gang It couldn't a-been more 'sprisett
Had lt heerd old  Gabriel   toot
'Doc'  Rogers  took a hand'bout  then,
And the boys nigh lost their grip.
When the   three   was 'lected deacons,
But they never raised a yip.
"We've seen yer. day by day, go on
In the way yer ort ter go.
Runnln' yer tunnel ter tap the ore
On th'   ledge  that we  well   know
Is th' one we all must look fer
If we ever strike lt rich
On the mountain over yonder,
Er up,  I don't   know   which.
"No use ter say now what you've done,
Since yer dropped  yer  park  down  here
And stated  tn a sermont
That you'd come to stay a year;
The record's writ in a higher place.
But we'll say right here ln lieu.
That you've got the gangs best  blessln'
To carry away wlth-you."
must be added the earnings of the millions of able-bodied men in army and
navy who are withdrawn from productive industries and are supported by
taxed peoples.
Since 1850 the population of the world
has doubled; Its Indebtedness, chiefly
for war purposes, has quadrupled. It
was e'ght billions fifty years ago, it is
thirty-two billions today.
The year 1900 added nearly another
thousand millions to the war debt of the
world. This about equals the annual
cost of boots, shoes, and bread In the
United States.���Lucia Ames Mead.
He went away; we've heerd tell since,
���He's  savin'  souls���Quebec  province.
DAVID  W.  KING.
Kaslo, Slocan Mining Camp. 1896.
THE COST OF WAR.
A million dollar bills packed solidly
like the leaves In a book make a pile 276
feet high. One thousand million dollars,
tbe price which Europe annually pays
for armaments in time of peace, equal a
pile of dollar bills over 52 miles high.
This expenditure for the supposed prevention of war represents one thousand
million days' labor at one dollar a day,
and thiB. be It remembered, every year,
to enable each nation merely to hold Its
own.
A second pile of dollar bills over 52
miles high represents the annual payment for Interest and other costs of past
wars.
To these Inconceivably large amounts
A DEAD ONE.
Breathes there a man with a soul ar
dead,
Who never to himself has said:
"My trade of late ls getting bad;
I'll try another 10-inch ad?"
If such there be go mark him well;
For him no bank account,shall swell,
No angels watch the golden stair
To welcome home the millionaire.
The man who never asks for trade
By local line or ad displayed
Cares more for rest than worldly gain,
And patronage but gives him pain.
Tread lightly, friends;    let    no    rude
sound
Disturb his solitude profound,
Here let him live ln calm repose.
Unsought, except by  men he owes,
And when he dies, go plant him deep.
That naught may break his breathless
sleep
Where no rude clamor may dispel
The quietude he loves so well.
���livening Capital News.
REFLECTION OF A BACHELOR
Generally tbe man who sneers at tho
chap who parts his hair in the middle
hasn't any.
Women think a man is a good husband
when he will go with his wife to buy
hcr hats.
If a man pours a lot of water ln his
whiskey he can always make a woman
think he isn't getting so much.
It will be noticed that when young
couples mean business they don't go out
in automobiles; they stick to buggy riding.
If there was a reason for a girl to love
a man she wouldn't
Being good doesn't pay, but the worst
of lt is neither does being bad.
No matter what end of the ladder of
success is up, the room is always at tho
bottom.
CAUTIOUS.
"Young man." said the old lady with
eyeglasses In the drug store, "be you a
regular clerk here?"
"Yes. ma'am; I'm a regular clerk."
"Be you registered?"
4KYes, ma'am."
"Know all about putting up prescriptions?"
"Yes, ma'am."
"Never make no mistakes?"
"No, ma'am."
"Well, I guess I'll trust you. Gimme
five cents' worth of camphor;"-^Milwaukee Sentinel. LOWERY'S CLAIM.
DIFFERENT HERE.
While John Burns. Will Croks, Keir
Hardle, Will Thorne and other labor
leaders In the English parliament are
busy at Westminister, leglelatlng for
an Immense empire, "upon which the
sun never sets," their wives at home are
probably scrubbing, cooking, sewing and
attending to the many details of housework that usually fall upon the wives
of working men.
About fifty members of the present
parliament were elected upon the labor
ticket, and most of them are actual work
Ing men, unlike members of the American congress. British lawmakers receive
no salary, and the labor members must
be supported by tbe various labor organizations.
This means that their Incomes are
limited. As a rule, tbey live In very
modest homes, In unfashionable neighborhoods. Usually the housework and
the care of children devolve upon their
devoted wive*.
It ls said that, when Mr. Burns, some
months ago. visited the king to receive
his commission aa a member of the cabinet Mrs. Burns waa at home cheerily
scrubbing the floor*
For monuments and headstones write
to the Kootenay Marble Works, Nelson,
B. C.
16
quart or two of ooapsuds."
The boy brought the suds, the old mail
sprinkled them over the ground, and
then he in turn, began to dig. It was
amazing. Here, where the boy before
had not found a single worm the old man
now discovered them in dozens.
WHY DESTROY THEM?
Why should w.e desire the destruction
of human passions? Take passions from
human beings and what is lett? The
great object should be not to destroy
passions, but to make them obedient to
tbe Intellect To Indulge passion to the
utmost ls one form of intemperance, to
destrop passion is another. The reasonable gratflcatlon of passion under the
domination of the intellect ls true wisdom and perfect virtue.���Ingersoll.
HOW TO FIND FI8H BAIT.
The boy wanted some worms for bait
He had selected a promising spot, a
shady and low lying knoll, but. though
he had been digging now for fifteen minutes, not a single worm had his spade
turned up.
"Here, sonny." said the old angler,
"take this chunk of soap and make me a
Cranbrook
Hotel
Cranbrook, B.C.
THE STINGIEST MAN ON RECORD
An exchange telle of the three sting-
est men on record. The first will not
drink water unless lt comes from a
neighbor's well; the second forbids his
family to write anything but a small
hand, as it wastes ink to make large
letters, and the third stops the clock at
night to stop the wear and tear on the
machinery. All of them refuse to take
a newspaper on the ground that it is a
terrible strain on the spectacles to read.
The Reception Hotel
IN CAMBORNE
Olves   all   Its   patrons  the  purest  food,
drink and cigars.
JAMES LINDSLEY, Proprietor
The Fernie Ledger
FERNIB,   B.   C.
Is the best newspaper In the Crow's Nest
Pass coal region.   Two dollars   a   year.
D.  V.  MOTT,  Editor.
When you want a monument or headstone write to the Kootensy Marble
Works, Nelson. B. C.
Thousands of
THE HOTEL SLOCftN
THREE FORKS, B.C.
Is the leading hotel of the city. Mountain trout and game dinners a specialty.
Rooms reserved by telegraph.
HUGH NIVHN. Proprietor
S. J. Mighton
CRANBROOK,   B.  C.
Has the largest stock of Pipes, Tobaccos,
Cigars and Smokers' Sundries in the interior of B. C.
Mail orders receive prompt attenUon.
THE
People
Is convenient to all depots, telegraph
offices and banks in ths city. Special attention paid to tourists, commercial and
ottrwise. The cuisine Is excellent and all
guests receive courteous attention. Touch
the wire when, you want rooms served.
Hoggartb & lolling, Proprietors
Kootenay Engineering Works
Nelson. B. O.
Founders, Machinists and Iron Worker* Makers ot tbe Crawford Aerial
Tram; Castings. Builders Materials,
Mill and Mining Machinery.
visit the* Nelson Fslr this Fall,
and one or two of them may miss
looking    ,
At The
Big Furniture
Store
near tho Bauk of Montreal.   It is
owned by
D.J.Robertson&Co.
KOOTENAY SALOON
SANDON,   B.C.
Has a line of nerve bracers unsurpassed
tn sny mountain town of the great west.
A glass of aqua  pura given    tree   with
every shot of spirits menu.
PACIFIC COAST SEEDS
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAi. TREES,
GREENHOUSE PLANTS, Floral Work,
Home industry.   Catalogue free.
HENRY'S NURSERIES
Seed House and Greenhouses,
3010 Westminster Road, Vancouver, B.C.
P. 0. Box 4lt
a C TRAVIS
MANAGER.
BLUE  PRIZE.  HENRY VANE. COLUMBUS and HAVANA ARK CIGARS
Are  Union  Made Cigars, made by W.   P.
Kll-bournc  & Co..   Winnipeg,  and  sold  on
the road by GEORGE HORTON.
ig
i H
Pitfier & Lei&er
Victoria, Bole Agents.
Munro'a Old Highland
and Whlteley's Liquor
Whiskies are the best
Chas. Burt
Agent, Nelson.
tf
H
m
m
rn
Hi
c
rt
The Windsor Hotel
OF  GRAND FORKS
Caters to miners, mechanics and smelter-
men. 1
A. B. SLOAN, Manager, la
LOWERY'S CLAIM.
THE DEPARTING PARSON
(To my friend Rev. W. M. Mackeracher)
Some feller dropped the word last night.
Down at  "Poker Bills ���
"The parson's goin' ter pull up stakes
And quit these bloomln'   hills."
The boys all looked up audden-Iike
At tbe Teller where he sot
And Tommy Roadley dropped his band
An' forgot to take the pot
"Yes," says the feller, kinder s prised
At the way we took the news,
"Year's up, and he's goin' ter shake
Tbe dust from off his shoes.
He's ga-oin' away back east,"  says he���
"Boys," chipped ln old George Fosa.
"Let's cash In."   And then we fell
To reckonin* up tbe loss,
"Pop" Lowery 'lowed he'd bet a stack
Tbat the camp'd never see
A squarer parson pull his coat
Br throw a packer's  "T"
"'Scribed   for  the  'Claim'   when   he fust
come.
Planked down the good hard dough,
lAnd, ding It, boys, I  kinder hate
Ter see the feller go."
"Doc" Rogers chipped a bean and said:
"The proper thing to do.
Afore the parson packs his -quilts
And  strikes  fer  prospeoks   new,
I* ter give the cuss a good send off."
"I'm in on that," says Pete,
"We'll 'pint Dave King the poet.
An' the hull durn gang'11 treat."      A
Well, Sunday night we gathered in,
Ait the old  Hotel Slocan.
Fer  er  reg'lar old-time   blow-out.
We trotted out our man
And made him listen to the truck
Our poet said he writ.
Which, If my memory serves me right.
Was 'bout like this, to wit
"We've watched you purty  close, young
man,
Since you dropped yer pack down here,
And stated In a sermont
That you'd come to stay a year,
But we felt a mite suspicious like.
As folks ls apt C feel.
When a  "varsity chap.' from way down
east.
Sets In to take a deal.
"Tbem days  the gang didn't take much
stock
In missionary chaps,
And we sort 'er steered eround you���
There's where we  lost,   perhaps���
Fer we couldn't see how a beardless kid,
That had Just got out 'er school,
Could preach and live in a mining camp
And stick to the Lord's eightth rule.
"We've  heerd tell since,  that when  you
sot ln
The game was running low;
The church debt loomed up mighty high
And  the spirit didn't  flow;
The Sunday night collections them days,
Was 'bout as slim
As the Sunday mornin'  attendance,
Which was almighty slim.
"But lt wa'nt long 'til it got eround
That yer  preachin'   wa'nt bad;
That them that didn't hear ye
Might some day wish they had;
That veil Sirusk out from th' shouldsf
And laid down the good old facks,
That every man's religion
Is   recorded  ln   his   acts.
"That the man who has a ready hand
To help his fellow man.
Has struck the paystreak of God's love
An' can save it a pan.
You didn't  seem ter give  a���er���
That is, you didn't care.
How rough an' tough a man might look
If  his heart beat  on the square.
"That charity is a kingly grace,
If lt assays what it ort���
The kind  that thinks no  evil thing
And hears no bad report���
And though you were >oung and chlpper-
like,
It didn't take long* ter see.
That the heart that beat beneath yer vest
Was peltry middlin' free.
"'Long- 'bout spring o' th* year you come,
You struck you pick one night
In a mighty powerful sermont
That made 'em see the light.
And it want long* till half the gang
Was a-goln' to church, by gum.
And a-fllUn* up yer button box
When the thing eround 'em come.
"Then  'Scotty'  led, and  It wa'nt long
'Til  'Sandy' follered suit
The gang it couldn't a-been more 'sprised
Had it heerd  old   Gabriel   coot
'Doc'  Rogers  took a  hand'bout  then,
And the boys nigh lost their grip.
When  the  three  was 'lected deacons,
But they never raised a yip.
"We've seen yer. day by day. go on
In the way yer ort ter go.
Runnln' yer tunnel ter tap the ore
On th'   ledge  that we  well   know
Is th' one we all muat look fer
If we ever strike lt  rich
On the mountain over yonder,
Er up,  I  don't   know   which.
"No use ter say now what you've done.
Since yer dropped  yer  pack  down  here
And stated ln a sermont
That you'd come to slay a year;
The record's writ In a higher place.
But we'll say right here In lieu,
That  you've got the  gang's best   blessln'
To carry away with you."
He went away;  we've heerd tell since,
���He's savin'  souls���Quebec  province.
DAVID  W.   KING.
Kaslo, Slocan Mining Camp, 1896.
must be added the earnings of the millions of able-bodied men ln army and
navy who are withdrawn from productive industries and are supported by
taxed peoples.
Since 1850 the population of the world
has doubled; Its indebtedness, chiefly
for war purposes, has quadrupled. It
was eight billions fifty years ago, it is
thirty-two billions today.
The year 1900 added nearly another
thousand millions to the war debt of the
world. This about equals the annual
cost of boots, shoes, and bread in the
United States.���Lucia Ames Mead.
IS
TH�� COST OF WAR.
A million dollar bills packed solidly
like the leaves In a book make a pile 276
feet high. One thousand million dollars,
the price which Europe annually pays
for armaments in time of peace, equal a
pile of dollar bills over 52 miles high.
This expenditure for the supposed prevention of war represents one thousand
million days' labor at one dollar a day,
and this, be it remembered, every year,
to enable each nation merely to hold its
own.
A second pile of dollar bills over t>2
miles high represents the annual payment for Interest and other costs of past
wars.
To these inconceivably large amounts
A DEAD ONE.
Breathes there a man with a soul sr
dead,
Who never to himself has said:
"My trade of late is getting bad;
I'll try another 10-inch ad?"
If such therO be go mark him well;
For him no bank account .shall swell,
No angels watch the golden stair
To welcome home the millionaire.
The man who never asks for trade
By local line or ad displayed
Cares more for rest than worldly gain,
And patronage but gives him pain.
Tread lightly, friends;    let    no    rude
sound
Disturb his solitude profound.
Here let him live ln calm repose,
Unsought except by men  he owes.
And when he dies, go plant him deep.
That naught may break his breathless
sleep
Where no rude clamor may dispel
The quietude he loves so well.
���Evening Capital News.
REFLECTION OF A BACHELOR
Generally the man 7/ho neers at thc
chap who parts his hair in the middle
hasn't any.
Women think a man is a good husband
when he will go with his wife to buy
her hats.
If a man pours a lot of water In his
whiskey he can always make a woman
think he isn't getting ho much.
It will be noticed that when young
couples mean bueiness they don't go out
In automobiles; they stick to buggy riding.
If there was a reason for a girl to love
a man she wouldn't
Being good doesn't pay, but the worst
of lt ls neither does being bad.
No matter what end of the ladder of
success is up, the room ie always at tho
bottom.
CB����M����f*-*^...��i.*^^e^��-^W^��W^HHI^i��
CAUTIOUS.
"Young man." said the old lady with
eyeglasses In the drug store, "be you a
regular clerk here?"
"Yes, ma'am: I'm a regular clerk."
"Be you registered?"
'KYes. ma'am."
"Know all about putting up prescriptions?"
Yes, ma'am."
"Never make no mistakes?"
"No, ma'am."
"Well, I guess I'll trust you. Gimme
Ave cents' worth of camphor ."-^Milwaukee Sentinel. LOWERY'S CLAIM.
DIFFERENT HERE.
While John Burns, Will Croks, Ketr
Hardie, Will Thome and other labor
leaders in the English parliament are
busy at Westminster, jegHlilatlngi for
an Immense empire, "upon which the
sun never sets." their wives at home are
probably scrubbing, cooking, sewing and
attending to the many detailB of housework that usually fall upon the wives
of working men.
About fifty members of the present
parliament were elected upon the labor
ticket, and most of them are actual work
Ing men. unlike members of the American congress, British lawmakers receive
no salary, and the labor members must
be supported by the various labor organizations.
This means that their Incomes are
limited. As a rule, tbey live In very
modest homes. In unfashionable neighborhood* Usually the housework and
the care of children devolve upon their
devoted wive*
It ls said tbat. when Mr. Burns, some
months ago. visited the king to receive
his commission aa a member of the cabinet. Mrs. Burns was at home cheerily
scrubbing tbe floors.
For monuments and headstones write
to the Kootenay Marble Works, Nelson,
B. C.
16
quart or two of coapsuds."
The boy brought the suds, the old man
sprinkled them over the ground, and
then he ln turn, began to dig. It was
amazing. Here, where the boy before
had not found a single worm the old man
now discovered them in dozens.
WHY DESTROY THEM?
Wfhy should w.e desire the destruction
of human passions? Take passions from
human beings and what is left? The
great object should be not to destroy
passions, but to make them obedient to
the Intellect. To Indulge passion to the
utmost Is one form of intemperance, to
dest rop passion is another. The reasonable gratflcation of passion under the
domination of the intellect ls true wisdom and perfect virtue.���Ingersoll.
THE STINGIEST MAN ON RECORD
An exchange tells of the three sting-
est men on record. The first will not
drink water unless it comes from a
neighbor's well; the second forbids his
family to write anything but a small
hand, as it wastes ink to make large
letters, and the third stops the clock at
night to stop the wear and tear on the
machinery. AU of them refuse to take
a newspaper on the ground that it is a
terrible strain on the spectacles to read.
The Reception Hotel
IN CAMBORNE
Gives   all   Its   patrons  the  purest  food,
drink and cigars.
JAMES LINDSLEY. Proprietor
Tiie fernie Ledger
FERNIE.   B.   C.
Is the best newspaper In the Crow's Nest
Pass coal region.   Two dollars   a   year.
D.  V.  MOTT,   Editor.
HOW TO FIND FI8H BAIT.
Th* boy wanted some worms for bait
He had selected a promising spot a
shaoy and low lying knoll, but. though
he had been digging now for fifteen minutes, not a single worm had his spade
turned up.
"Here, sonny." said the old angler.
"take this chunk of soap and make me aj
Cranbrook
Hotel
Cranbrook, B.C.
Wlien you want a monument or headstone write to the Kootenay Marble
Works, Nelson. B. 0.
Thousands of
People
Is convenient to all depots, tetegrspn
offices and banks In the city. Special attention paid to tourists, commercial and
oterwlse. The cuisine is excellent, and all
guests receive courteous attention. Touch
ths  wire when, you  want   rooms  served.
visit the* Nelson Fair this Fall,
and one or two of them may miss
looking    i
THE HOTEL SLOCAN
THREE FORKS, B.C.
Is the leading hotel of the city. Mountain trout and game dinners a specialty.
Rooms reserved by telegraph.
HUGH NIVEN. Proprietor
S. J. Mighton
CRANBROOK,  B. C.
Has the largest stock of Pipes, Tobaccos,
Cigars and Smokers' Sundries in the interior of B. C.
Mail orders receive prompt attention.
TiJKOOTENAY SALOON
SANDON,   B.C.
Has a line of nerve bracer* unsurpassed
in any mountain town of the great west.
A glass of aqua pura given   free   with
every shot of spirits menu.
I I I ���!������     .HI II I H
PACIFIC COAST SEEDS
FRUIT AND ORNAMENTAL TREES,
GREENHOUSE PLANTS, Floral Work,
Home industry.   Catalogue free.
HENRY'S NURSERIES
Seed House and Greenhouses,
3010 Westminster Road, Vancouver, B.C.
Hoggarth & Rollins, Proprietors
Kootenay Engineering Works
Nelson, B. O.
Foundere, Machinists and Iron Worker* Makers of tbe Crawford Aerial
Tram; Castings, Builders Materials,
Mill and Mining Machinery*
B. 0. TRAVIS
P. 0. Box 498 MANAGER.
At The
Big furniture
Store
near the Bank of Montreal.   It is
owned by
D.J.Robertson&Co.
SO
:.P
:a
���BLUE  PRIZE.   HENRY  VANE. COLUMBUS and HAVANA ARK CIGARS
Are Union Made Cigars, made by W. P.
KUbournc  &��� Co..   Winnipeg,  nnd   sold  on
the road by GEORGE HORTON.
:M
e
tf
Fitter & Leiser
Victoria, Sole Agents.
Munro's Old Highland
and Whlteley's Liquer
Whiskies are the best
Cfias. Burt
Agent, Nelson.
tf
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The Windsor Hotel
OF  GRAND FORKS
Caters to miners, mechanics and smelter-
men. 1
A. B. SLOAN, Manager. It
LOWERY'S CLAIM
DEAR LITTLE FELLOW
Tbe small boy bated the dark, and hia
mother was trying to cure him of hia
fear.
"Now, Tommy," ahe said, aa she tucked hlm in for tbe night, "you know who
is always with you even in the dark."
"Well I don't want a man; I want a
woman." was the reply tbat took the
mother's breath away.
Virtue is tbe subordination of the passions to the intellect It is to act in accordance with your highest convictions.
It doe* not consist In believing, but in
doing.���Ingersoll.
Everything ln Christianity that ls
true isnt new; and everything in lt that
Is new isn't true.���Ingersoll.
Twelve back numbers of LOWERY'S
CLAIM, and a copy of Float are sent
postpaid to any address in this world
for ONE DOLLAR. Buy a bunch and
strengthen the band that ghta the world
About Float.
Float la not a periodical, It Is a book
oontatoing M illustrations, all told, and
la filled witb sketches and stories of
western life. It tells bow a gambler
cashed In after the flush days of Sandon; bow it rained in New Denver long
after Noah waa dead; how tbe parson
took a drink at Bear Lake in early
-nays; bow justice waa dealt ia Kaslo
In 'M; bow the saloon man out prayed
tbe women ln Kelamasoo, and graphically depicts the roaming* of a western
editor amongst tbe tenderfeet in tbe
eent belt It contains the early history of Nelson and a romance of the
Silver King mine. In It are printed
three western poems, and dosens of ar-
ttde* too numerous to mention. Send
tor on* (before It la too late. The price
la 3*5 centa, postpaid to any part of the
world.   Address all letters to
R. T. LOWIBRY. Nelson, B. a
���
For particulars about headstones and
���monuments write to the Kootenay
Marble Works, Nelson, B. C.
For one dollar twelve back numbers
of Lowery's Claim are sent to any address postpaid.
A blue mark here Indicates that your
subscription is due, and that the editor
would like to aee your money.
thp mrrrnPT hottt
IIUj IUvIIIju HUlijJj
Still retains Its supremacy as ths best
hotel in ths Kootenay*
OSTERMOOR   MATTRESSES, ��
CLEAN  LINEN,
GOOD COOKING.
Excellent hunting ln season. Good trout
fllsblng In th sElk river and neighboring
stream*
Address all communications  to
Thomas Crab.ui, Hanagtr
MICHEL,  B.  C.
Starkey & Co.
NELSON, B.C.
Wholesale Dealers In Produce and
Provisions
3T
M
^LLLlilllilllllJLUlIllllllt
taCOUIACE m* WUtTRV.
THORPE'S
GINGER ALE
Is Equal to Any Made ln ths World
Factories at
Viotoria
NELSON       Vancouver
*TTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT TTTTTC
FRUIT In 10 and 30 acre Blocks
I A aTA.cs. 0N KOOTENAY LAKSi
sL/IAr-L/O      For sale on easy terms.
J. E. ANN ABLE
NELSON. B.C.
F. F LIEBSC
MERCHANT TAILOR
SILVBRTON. B.C.
f'MZ
HOTELS OUT WEST
Th. Eado Hotel!; tiBVa
to ths city.        COCKLE * PAPWORTH.
**��������� '   ������������������������a
Tremont House ����"<& tt 2fr��
lean and European plan. Nothing yellow
about the house except ths gold la the
safe. MALONB  A TRBG1LLUS.
Newmarket Hotel & tha6u ��K
Ists and millionaires visiting New Denver, B. C HENRY STEGK.
St. Elmo TiutK, ��Tnt "" ,n
w*MW *MWm        era*** OmAMA. V iieMlltefi JS.       V-*
JAB.  DAWSON.  I'rop.
J. D. ANDERSON
Civil  Engineer snd  Provincial  Land
Surveyor
TRAIL, B.C.
P. BURNS & CO.
Shops In all leading town*   Contracts
solicited to supply armies and railroads.
HEAD OFFICE
Calgary; Alberta.
The Strathcona
Hotel
Is situated on a alight eminence, just a block from die busy
scenes on Baker Street, and is within easy touch of everything in the city.   From ita balconies can be aeen nearly
all the grand scenery that surrounds the beautiful
city of Nelson.   Few hotels in the great west
equal the Strathcona, and tourists trom
. every land will find within Ita portals
all the essentials tbat create pleasant memories within the
mind of those who '/T-'-v.* ���*���/*
*
travel .<*.-������-.   -
.*
*e.<k   .���
B. TOMKINS, Manager,
NELSON, RITISH COLUMBIA
A**++*******w**w+A**^^
tZSkrnm
Ma

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