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BC Historical Newspapers

Leader-Advocate Oct 23, 1923

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Array A   WEEKLY
PAPER    FOR
A   WAKING
Lea
vocate
VANCOUVER,   B.   C,  FRIDAY     OCTOBER  26,  1923
Five Cents
PATRONIZE
South Vancouver
MARKET
Thursdays
and
Saturdays
Nailing the Colours
CAREFULLY PREPARED STATEMENTS TO
IRON INDUSTRY EVIDENCE OF ITS ORGANIZED   CHARACTER.     TIME   FOR   BRITISH
COLUMBIA TO SIFT THE CHAFF.
The question as to whether the East, with its interlocking financial, niahufacttiTing and transportation in-
terests, shall be permitted to maintain its stranglehold
on Western Canada has often been raised, frequently
challenged, hut more rarely flung hack into their teeth.
The greal hulk of the manufacturing plants, til" the
larger sort, are, in actuality, but Canadian branch houses
of American concerns. The)- have shown great wisdom
in establishing these branches—they edivence business
astuteness—but their soul is American.. This by .no
means is intended to inter that therefore that soul is
mishapen, corrupt, or anything of thai sort, but to state
that IT tS NOT CANADIAN.
In this Province we have several instances of important development projects which are American in their
entirety, A splendid thing for the Province, of course—
hul alter all—the profits that arebcing accumulated are
filling American pockets—the people of this Province
wlio are connected with them having to be content with
-Till'. MINIM LAI  WAGE.
Take for instance the Granby Consolidated Mining,
Smelting and Power Company, operating ils own coal
mines on Vancouver Island and smelting plant and coke
ovens at Anyox.
\\ hile is is difficult to discover really sound reasons
for an opposition from officials of this organization  to    allegations  in   Victoria, -Mr.  Munro comes  forward and
the proposed  Iron ami Steel  Plant of Coast Range Steel     blissfully announces that his company has produced pig
pecific proposal and the necessary stamina to push it
j  Virough in the lace of the shadow of the east.
dr. Munro is general manager of the Granby Com-
being appointed to that  post alter that  company
urnished an outstanding example of incompetence
in.JFngineering practice in   British Columbia.
It was the (iraubv Company which saddled the coals
British Columbia with much of tin- calumny concern-
ig their coking quality. It was (he Granby Company
which saddled the Mining Industry of B. C, with an experimental lemon in the shape of a l.omax Coke Oven—
against all good practice—charging upon the coking coal
of British Columbia the cost of installing an untried and
never previous!}- built coking oven—resulting in a loss of
several million dollars—and—finally-—in the discharge of
(he official responsible for it.
ll is the general manager of this company who said
British Experts differ with him. I le also teils us that ru's
on September 11, 1923, "Coast Range Stee!% has not a
chance in a million of success"—you will note that the
company and similar industries are throwing away
thousands of tons of iron ore in the tailings and waste*
If Mr. Munro imagined he was giving us some new
information, he is sorely mistaken. Engineers operating
for Coast Range Sleel Limited have taken samples of
this "waste" to England—it has been analyzed—and its
value determined—-and the British people suggest that
Coast Range Steel, when operating, should lake this
"waste" from Anyox FREE OF CHARGE and pay
them something about 10c per ton to boot—and use it in
making their iron.
There are any number of furnaces in Europe and America using similar iron concentrates—and now, on October 11 lb, just one short mouth after making his sweepin
Limited—carrying as it does the absolute endorsement
and active support ol the foremost experts in this trade
to be found in the Empire—it is not difficult—knowing
the seat of Government to be in the American East—to
lind reasons for the spectacle of having prominent officials of this corporation taking public leadership against
ibis enterprise.
We use the terms spectacle advisedly—ami believe
that the one example we quote below is ample justification  for the term.
Mr. II. S. Munro was one of those who participated
in the deliberations of the Victoria Chamber of Commerce, whose Iron Committee, with its personnel dominated
by agents ol eastern steel interests, lias joined the ranks
of the supine clamourers for a steel plant of some sort —
who lack  the courage to thoroughly examine any one
1x6—1x8—1x10, No. 3 Shiplap
2x4—2x6—2x8, No. 3
In specified length, $14.00 per M. ft.
1x3—4 to 7 ft. V Joint and Flooring,
Nos. 1 and 2      -      $30.00 per M. ft.
1x4—4 to 7 ft. V Joint and Flooring,
No. 3 -     $25.00 per M ft.
No. 2 SHINGLES
Bundle 30c
EDGINGS
Double load . $4.50
INSIDE FIR
Single load . . $4.00
MILLWOOD . $3.50
LET  US   ESTIMATE  ON  YOUR   LUMBER  REQUIREMENTS
wwwm^1*1
KCANADIAHW<
U.-t1' OFERAi
ERNLUMBER CO. LIMITED
MILLS. B.C.
'YARDi:i.4905OHTARIOJTlHIZVICTORIAR0A0
PH0NE$:FRASER4IHIGHLAND 126
iron on a small scale—that whether it can de done on a
commercial scale remains to be seen—but that his technical staff is WORKING HARD IX HOPE that it will
be so.
We want to say this—IF GRANBY-'S TECHNICAL STAFF IS PERMITTED TO FRITTER AWAY
VALUABLE TIME IX [NVESTIGATING WHAT
ENGINEERING SCIENCE HAS ALREADY THOROUGHLY DEMONSTRATED [T.WILL FURNISH
ANOTHER EXAMPLE OF FAULTY ENGINEER-
[NG PRACTICE.
We want to say further--1 F SUCH PROCEDURE
REPRESENTS THE MATURE JUDGMENT OF
GRANBY CONSOLIDATED—ITS- OFFICIALS DO
NOT THEREBY ENHANCE THEIR AUTHORITY
T() PR( )X( )UNCE JUDGM ENT ()X ENGINEERING
PROPOSALS WHICH LEADING BRITISH EXPERTS CI,ATM To BE WITHOUT EQUAL IN
MERIT.
Mr. Munro also informs us that a furnace to handle
a 400-ton daily output of this "waste" will cost under
$100,000. We are willing in this instance lo give Mr.
Munro the benefit of a typographical error—if he so desires it- but the facts are that an additional cypher to
that  figure would be nearer the truth.
Let us XAll, THE COLOURS TO THE MAST.
SHALL WE TUIHI.Y SUBMIT TO A CONTINU-
\NCE OF EASERX   AX!)   AMERICAN   DOMINANCE   FOSTERED   BY  THIS SORT  OF   PROPAGANDA?
on by the Provincial  Department  of     The time of drying is determined by
Agriculture it was proven conclusively   the condition of the nuts, the tempera-
thai even a lute spray applied after
the fruit was harvested was of considerable benefit to the trees, espec-
lallj when compared with trees which
vero given no treatment. While ihe
results  were  much  less  satisfactory
lure of the air and the general weather conditions. Ordinarily, they may
be expected to lake around three days
to dry.
The hesi test lo determine when dry
nougll is lo bre;ik open a nut, try the
then whore an early spray was applied   meal  with the teeth.    If the meat is
Blill even the late application of nor-
il' air. WOS Worth while. A late spraying Is hetier than none. And then
in-,i year plan to prune carefully, culling out all cankers, and in the late
summer or fall spray on time.
Apple Anthracnose can be controlled absolutely. Just prove it for yourselves.
PROVINCIAL  POTATO SHOW
VICTORIA,  B. C.
November  12 to  17.
• The 2nd Annual Provincial Potato
Show will be held in the Arcade Building. Victoria, November 12 to 17, 192,1.
This show is lo be held under the
auspices of the Provincial Department
of Agriculture in Co-operation with the
Victoria Potato Growers' Association
and Chamber of Commerce.
That the Province of British Columbia is well adapted to the production
of large crops of high-quality potatoes
is fully conceded. A more general
use of good seed, the growing of
standard varieties, and more care in
grading would result in better markets. The object of this Potato Show
is to encourage the raising of good
potatoes and to bring to the attention
of the public the necessity for planting only high-grade seed.
This is an opportunity for producer
and consumer to get together and discuss matters of vital Importance. II
is hoped I hat not only potato-growers
bin all those interested in the potato
industry will make an effort to atlend
this Second Annual Provincial Potato
Show.
A Potalo Growers' Conference will
be held in connection with the show;
and i( is expected that leading potato
authorities in the United States and
Canada will take part in the meetings.
The following is a tentative outline of
the subjects which will be discussed:
"Potalo Disease."
"Experimental Work with Potatoes."
"Grading of Potatoes."
"Soils. Fertilizers, and notations tor
Potatoes."
"Storage and Storage Houses."
"Potalo Certification."
"Organization and Marketing."
An ofllcial programme of proceedings during the week of the Provincial
Potato Show and Seed Exhibit will be
distributed later.
A full lisl of prize donors will be included therein.
During Ihe show a display of specially prepared dishes of potatoes with
recipes for each will be on exhibition
brittle all over and nol soft, then the
drying has been carried sufficiently
far lo ensure that the mils will keep.
II mils have been handled quickly
titid carefully, as suggested, they
should develop the full line "nutty"
flavor and run no risk of spoiling
through the absorbing of too much
moisture during the storage period. It
is just as well, however, as an additional precaution, to see that the nuts
are kept in a fairly dry place, since
the developing of mould at any stags
is apt to ruin the flavor. The resulting high class product is worth all the
extra time and attention given to the
proper harvesting and drying.
B.C.F.G.A. THIRTY-FOURTH
ANNUAL   MEETING,   CHILLIWACK
January  16th  to     18th,   1923.
Since there has not been an opportunity to call a meeting of the Executive of the B. C. F. G. A. for some
time, at which meeting the dates for
the next convention would have been
arranged, it has been thought, best to
select tentative dates for the next convention. Unless there Is a later announcement, then, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. January l(i, 17 and IS
will be the dates.
To the best of our knowledge these
dates will not conflict with any other
convention already arranged for. Unless there are changes in plans, the
Farmers' Institute Convention will he
held in Victoria, January 22nd and the
B. C. Dairymen's Association Convention will be held in the same city on
January 23rd ami 21th. The week before, then, should be entirely free from
conflicts and should be a convenient
time for Ihe assembling of the clan.
WOOD'S
Have a Shipment of
Choice Alberta Meats
1 DOZ. NEW LAID EGGS
1 tb. WOODS BUTTER ....
1   lb.  AYRSHIRE   BACON
No. 1  STEER BEEF
Round Steak 20c and 25c
Sirloin Steak 25c and 30c
rhe   methods   lo   employ   in   conking   Rl^ steaks 12|/jc
Pot  Roasts
Rump Roasts
Prime Ribs
Oven   Roasts
8c. 10c and 12'/2c
  18c and 20c
  15c and 20c
   12c and  15c
Boneless Stew Beef, 2 lbs. for    ... 25c
various varieties and the value of the
poialo in the daiy diet will be explained.
Machinery displays and seed exhibits of all kinds are also being arranged.
An Illustrated  lecture    on    Central | LOCAL BABY LAMB
British    Columbia   and addresses    on ; Lamb Stew   17c
"Seed Production" will be given dur-   S.ioulders Lamb       26c and 28c
ing Ihe Potato Show week in addition   Loins Lamb  35c
to subjects already referred to. Legs Lamb   38c and 40c
For prize list and further particulars LOCAL MUTTON
write   to   C.   Tlce,   Potato   Specialist. ' B w/     and  15c
Department of Agriculture, Victoria,       shou|ders Mutton   20c and 25c
j Loins  Mutton 28c and  32c
HARVESTING AND DRYING OF      j Leg  Mutton        32c and 35c
WALNUTS FINEST ALBERTA GRAIN-FED
  PORK
While there are not  a great many | Front Leg Pork   18'/2c
English Walnuts being grown at pre-   Centre Roasts Pork 20c and 22c
Bent  In li. C, there is no reason why   Loins Pork    28c
the trull  Of the trees already ill exis- , Side Pork 25c
leiice should  nol   be properly handled   Hind  Leg Pork         28c
so that  ihe resulting crop will  be of   Pigs Heads   6c
besl  eating quality. MILK-FED VEAL
In  order  to  ensure  lines!   flavored,   Vea| Stew 12'/2c—17c
besl   keeping  nuts,   considerable  care   shoulders Roast Veal 15c and 20c
should be given lo Ihe harvesting and    Lojn Roa8t Veal   25c and 28c
curing of the crop. ; Leo Roast Veal 22c
As to harvesting: No nuts should be   Ve,|  steak 20c and 25c
removed from the tree until they are
|usl i "inly to fall naturally. A common custom  is  I" make three lo five
FALL SPRAYING  FOR COAST
GROWERS
The grower of apples on the Coast
is quite apt to feel that, with the
wonderfully clear Fall weather which
has prevailed during September and
early October, I here would be no real
need iii spray his apple IreeB as a
preventative measure against the Apple Tree Anthracnose. This disease,
however, is bo regular in appearing
that ii never pays in run the risk of
leaving the trees unprotected In the
hope of Bavlng the cost of applying a
protective coaling lo Ihe trees.
One thorough spraying with the pro
per material, applied before the Fall
RESTAURANT
FISH and CHIPS
SPECIAL  DAILY  35c  LUNCH
26th and Main Street
RECORDS & BOOKS
EXCHANGED
4207 MAIN STREET
Next to Show
rains begin, will prove fully effective
agaiusl this disease. Even an application as early as August is far in be
preii'iieil io a spray applied alter Ihe
ruin.-, begin except for Ihe fad that it
causes a staining of the fruit,
I'n prevenl the damage from Apple
Tree Anlhrancnii.il', all pans of the
Irees, especially ihe trunk and branches should in' thoroughly sprayed
with a line misty spray, using what
is commonly known us Bordeaux Mix-
lure in ihe proportion of 1-4-40. This
material can he made at home with
little difficulty. (Directions for making this spray material can be obtained from ihe Provincial Spray Calender for 1B23, or by writing to the
Provincial   Plain   Pathologist, .1.    W.
OUR OWN MAKE
Woods Little Pig Sausage
pickings, each   lime picking  up  from WOOdt B».f S™8haKfle
he    ground    those   that   have   fallen Fresh Mmce. 2 lbs.
naturally,   although   occasionally    H P"'e ,B«   DrlPPmS
mlghl he worth while lo give the trees , Pure Li""a „.-.,«
a Sllglll   shaking to bring down those DAINTY DISHES
nuts  which  ii   lofl   mi  the  Iree would Lamb Hearts, 2  lbs.
have fallen shortly.    Nuts which have Veal Hearts
[0  In-  elllbbed  off  Ihe  tree,  or which Beef  Brains
fall  only  after a  severe shaking, are Calves  Liver
never as good as those which are al- Lamb Liver
lowed to slay on iiniil fully ripe. Beef Liver
Walnuts should be gathered as soon Pork  Liver,  3 lbs. for
as  ripe and   placed  ill  the drier with Beef Hearts, each
as lillle time Intervening as  possible. Smoked   Meats,             Ayrshire   Bacon,
To allow walnuts lo lie on the ground peamM|   Bacon,         Breakfast   Bacon,
for   several   days   nol   only   causes   a Smoked Hams and Smoked Picnic
Btalnlng of the shell, bin is apt to result in the developing of mould on the We have everything in the
Inside. Cooked Meats
Having   harvested   the  mils    they heinz PICKLES
should   he   quickly   and   thoroughly i
cleaned with brushes and water lo re- j j|QGS'   SPECIALS  — Choice  Corned
move any dirt   and  fibre, leaving the geef an(j  Corned   Pork
shell  clean  and  attractive.    The use
of  chemicals   lo   bleach   Ihe   shells   is i Fresh  and  Cured  Tongues
nol   in be  recommended, since occas-I   Fresh  Killed Chickens, 25c and 30c
Local  New  Laid  Eggs
20c
. 15c
25c
15c
20c
25c,
. 15c
. 10c
. 2Jc
. 15c
..  10c
25c
20c and 25c
Easham, Court   House.  Vancouver.)
Whether the Fall weather has been j tonally with varieties where the null
fair and free from rain or not; wheth-   does nol   become properly sealed, the
el'   the   trees   were  splayed   last,  year   acid could enter the shell and damage
or  not,  makes  little difference  with  ihe flavor and quality of the meal,
the  disease.    When   the   rains  Anally       As   In   drying.      The     washed   nuls \
do come, Coasl apple frees should be I should be spread nut in a thin layer
thoroughly protected by a coaling of on slatted  traye and exposed to hot '
this ilordeaux   Mixture,    one  single j air. preferably moving air, which has
spraying applied on time thoroughly i a temperature of around 95 to LOO de-
covering all   parts   with a completeI grees,   If the temperature runs below
coaling of spray, can guarantee prac-1 0B degrees  the nuts will  be apt to
tically perfect  protection of all apple  dry loo slowly and develop mould.   If
lues against this disease.    And If the J the temperature Is allowed to go much j
rains do come before the .spraying has ; above  106 degrees  there is danger of i
been done, what then? the answer is   nverdrying,  causing a change  In  the;
-Spray. ! color of the meal as well as producing
lu a series of experiments  carried , a rancid Uavor. |
FAIR. ',..950
FREE   DELIVERY
Open 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
"SERVICE"  IS OUR  MOTTO
WOODS
Meat Market
3240 Main Street
At 16th Avanue
wwmn CAGE TWO
v A n c o u v e m   L I A b E k - A B v 6 c A f 1
Friday,   October  26,   1923
Tta  L2 attar-Advocate
A Weekly Newspaper published every
Friday in Vancouver
"Vancouver First"
A. J. England
N. "H.  Boden
-     Editor
Publisher
Printed at the Boden Press. 30th and
Main Street, Vancouver
PHONE FAIRMONT 6020
Subscription Rates    •   -   $2.00 Yearly
By Mall—Payable In Advance
w        ■ — 	
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1923
PLANT INVENTORS
New Varieties of Plants May be Registered with the Canadian  Horticultural Council.
you will be glad to come into direct
contact with this Committee in order
to help It achieve its purpose.
From now on it will be possible for
any horticulturist in Canada who has
originated a new variety of plant to
have control over it in a way very
similar to that in which patent rights
entitle a person to control an invention.
Should you happen to know of any
material, or better, any person who is
working with plant material that in
your opinion should be registered
through this Plant Registration Bureau. I should greatly esteem your interest in letting me know of such a
person."
In addition lo Ihe general statements here made, if any further details are desired by any of our members who might be thinking of registering a new fruit, or who wished
more information on the subject, Pro-
lessor Buck will be pleased to correspond with such members.
lamEl
For many years plant breeders
both professional and amateur have
dreamed of the day when they would
be placed on a plane with other inventors and their new creations recognized as capable of receiving the
protection of patents. As a preliminary step towards this final objective
a number of the foremost horticulturists in Canada have recently, through
the Canadian Horticultural Council,
established a system of plant recording and registration.
Previous to the organization of the
Plant Registration Bureau of the
Council the proposed system was discussed in detail with, and heartily endorsed by Hon. W. R. Motherwell,
Dominion Minister of Agriculture. The
possibility of securing legislation covering the patenting of plants was
taken up and it was pointed out that
it was the desire of the Council to
first adopt the proposed scheme on a
voluntary basis with a view to determining definitely, through experience,
the nature of the legislation which
would be necessary. The Council was
assured that when the recommendations for plant patent legislation were
made they would receive the utmost
support.
The Plant Registration Bureau is
now functioning and is ready to receive applications for recording and
registration of new varieties, hybrids
and species of plants, trees, shrubs or
vines which are propagated vegeta-
tively.
Arrangements have been made with
the Internaitonal Federation of Professional Horticulturists—an Organization of the Horticulturists of practically all European countries for the
recognition of the recordings and registrations of the Council. These will
therefore be published in the accepted
horticultural publications in both Canada and Europe and the ownership of
the new creations thereby established.
The small charge for accepted recordings is to cover the cost of the publications.
~ The representative for this province
on the Plant Registration Bureau is
Professor F. E. Buck of the Department of Horticulture, University of
British Columbia. It might be just as
well to quote here Mr. Buck's own
statement, made to your Secretary,
regarding the new Bureau:
"It appears to me to be an opportune time to give some publicity to
this scheme of plant registration, and
as you are prominently connected with
horticultural effort in the Province, I
trust I am correct  in assuming that
"Pioneer Trails" True
Picture of Early West
David Smith Builds Town  Exact Replica of One of Period for His  —
Photodrama
Historically correct are the settings
used in "Pioneer Trails," a Vitagraph
special production, which will be exhibited at the Globe Theatre starting
Monday next. For many weeks before production was begun, the Research Department of Vitagraph was
busy checking scenes in the film and
obtaining information and descriptions
of buildings and towns of the gold
rush period of '49 for use in "Pioneer
Trails.'
The Burnt Boot Saloon in the picture is an exact replica of the famous
"El Dorado," a saloon and gambling
den of the days of the early fifties.
The bar and dance hall are exact
copies of this famous place.
The street scenes were made in a
town built to duplicate In every detail
the manner of construction of those
days. The mangy road with Its pine-
board dwellings caused many old-timers to marvel at the exactness of reproduction.
David Smith, who direrted "Pioneer
Trails" insisted that every detail be
correct before he began filming the
picture. He required the town and
sets to reflect the spirit and life of
Ihe West thoroughly so that there
would be no need for sub-titles to
carry over the impression of the early
days which should be shown in actual
scenes.
He spared no expense In the building of the city and furnishing of the
lnterors of the structures with furniture and knick-knack In vogue during
the period portrayed. Considerable
difficulty was met with in obtaining
these relics of the past and many
items  used  had  to  be  purchased  at
enficteii
of the Future
ANADA
ing to
is endeavor-
regain her
after-the-war stride
in the midst of many
difficulties, — debt,
deflation and depression being
some of them.
Quack remedies and academic
theories beset her path on every
side. Some suggest that our debt
worries can best be eased by going further into debt. Others
preach blue ruin, decry their own
country and indulge in mischievous propaganda generally,
while still others look for a new
social order or some miraculous
sign to indicate a better coming
day—all this in apparent forget-
fulness of the fact that just as
there was no royal road to win
the war, there is now no royal
road to pay for it or regain our
former buoyancy, vigor and confidence.
Some are leaving Canada hoping to escape taxation, only to
find there is no escape anywhere.
In seeking for easy remedies too
many of us overlook the fact
that the greatest remedy is honest, hard work faithfully and
intelligently performed, accompanied by old-fashioned thrift.
It takes time, it takes patience,
it takes grit. But every Canadian
knows in his heart that Canada
is coming through all right.
Our Experience Proves It
Look back over the path Canada
has trod.  The French Colonists, cut
off from civilization by 3,000 miles
of sea, faced a continent—a wilderness—without the aid of even a
blazed trail. They had to fight savages, frosts, scurvy, loneliness and
starvation.
The United Empire Loyalists subdued an unbroken forest in one
generation, growing their first wheat
amid the stumps and snags of the
new clearing.
The Selkirk settlers came to Manitoba when the prairie was a buffalo
pasture, and grew wheat where none
had grown before and where those
who knew the country best at that
time said wheat never would grow.
To-day the Canadian prairies grow
the finest wheat in the world.
In proportion to population Canada
stands to-day among the wealthiest
nations in the world, with average
savings on deposit per family of $600.
Canada's foreign trade per head of
population stands amongst the highest of the commercial nations, being
$192 per capita in 1922-23, as compared with $135 in 1913-14, the
"peak" year before the war.
New Opportunities for
Canada
In Canada, although prices in the
world markets fell below war level,
our farmers reaped last autumn the
largest grain crop in Canadian history, and Canada became the world's
largest exporter of wheat, thus in
large measure making up for lower
prices.
Last year, Great Britain, after an
agitation extending over thirty years,
removed the embargo on Canadian
cattle, and a profitable and practically
unlimited trade is opening up for
Canadian stockers and feeders.
"The 20th Century belongs to
Canada"—if Canadians keep faith.
The next article will suggest practical opportunities for profit making
on our Canadian farms.
Have Faith in Canada
Authorized for publication by the
Dominion Department of Agriculture
W. H. MOTHERWELL. Minister.   Dr. J. H. CRI8DALE, Deputy MUJitcr.
W^IIIIIaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaia:^
9
FOR  THE   BEST
FAMILY GROCERIES
—  TRY  —
BROCK   GROCERY
4806 MAIN STREET
The Corner Shoe Shop
All Kinds of
BOOT AND SHOE  REPAIRS
Promptly Blxeouled
All Hand Work
Satisfaction  Guajartied
F.  BRISSETT - PROP.
Cor. 29th and Main 8t.
■
GLOBE ELECTRIC
T.  E.  Barwood
Electrical   Contractors
Wiring        Fittings        Motors
Bells and Repairs
Estimates Given
Rei. 4403 Jamea St. Fair. 4815L
South Van. Poultry Supply
4172  MAIN  STREET
DRESSED    POULTRY
Fresh Eggs, Poultry, Rabbits,
Dressed Fowl at Reasonable Prices
Phone Fairmont 3071
The Square Deal Wood
Coal and Transfer
WOOD     OF     ALL     KINDS
Promptness Our Motto
PHONE  FAIRMONT 4291L
S. ROHR
FOR 1AQOAQE DILIVERY
AND LIGHT MOVING
-air. 4284R 127 34th AVE. E.
Shop Phone
Fairmont 5043
Hcuse Phone
Fairmont 4043L
£. L. Armstrong
Sheet Metal Worker
Now is the Time to Get Your
Furnace Repaired or a New
One Installed
Let  me  solve  Your  Heating   Problen
Estimates   Free
4216  MAIN   STREET
ACEEYLENE
WELDING
REPAIRS OF ALL KINDS
ANY MAKE OF CARS
MODERATE   PRICES
GAS
GREASES
OILS
almost   prohibitive  prices  because  of
their rarity
Actors and actresses used in the
scenes were chosen because of their
resemblance to types commonly found
in that period. The castliiK director
put In several days studying photographs of persons figuring In early
Western days to enable correct selection of types needed. Historical museums furnished much of the Information necessary in this work.
Larry  Searmon    will    furnish    the
comedy attraction on the above bill
and  Manager  Wallace,  Ihe  newly-appointed manager of the Globe  prom-'
lses    his    patrons   an   exceptionally I
strong programme.
WHICH IS THE BEST WEEK
YOU   EVER   LIVED?
South Vancouver Wood Yard
WE GIVE YOU THE BEST WOOD
AND  QUICKEST   DELIVERY
Fraser 212      Fraser & 51st
BROCK GARAGE
4802 Main St.    Phone Fair. 5543
Agnes Beatrice Lums den
TEACHER   OF   SINGING
Will accept a limited number of
Junior Pupili
8TUDIO—4522   QUEBEC   8TREET
Phone   Fairmont   725R
Answer: Ne\t week. Start it by
going to church.
Mountain View Methodist Methodist
Church.
11 am.—"The Driving Power of
Life."
2.30—Sunday School and Study
Class.
7,30 p.m.—"Four great words in the
British Empire"' thai will save the
world from chaos and defeat."
Anthem—"What are these Brayed In
white?" r
Solo—Mr. Lome Grant.
Community singing.
We had a good day last Sunday.
Come Willi Ihe crowd this week. The
best yet.
MISS R. ANDERSON
Pupil of the
Toronto Conservatory of Music
TEACHER  OF PIANO
Special attentlou paid to beginners
4817 ELGIN  ST. Fair. 1564L
Arthur Wi?mer
Watchmaker, Jeweler
and Optician
French Ivory, Cut Glass, Silverware, Clocks and Jewelery
231/    MAIN    STREET
Phone Fair. 966
CLARKE the   Jeweler
4148 Main Street
MUNICIPAL MAEKET
AT HORTICULTURAL HALL
43rd and Fraser Open Thursdays and Saturdays
I-
The Municipal Market is Again in Operation Two Days Weekly-- Thurs. Sat.
The Way To Health
HERBS, ROOTS, BARKS,  PROPER  DIET, SPINAL ADJUSTMENTS,
(Chiropractic),  MASSAGE, ETC., ARE THE  MEANS TO
HEALTH   WHEN   SICK
H. N0WELL, M. H. D. C. S. P.
(Sanipractic  Physician)
Uses the above   methods as  each  case  requires
OFFICES:  35-6-7 P. BURNS BUILDING 18 HASTINGS 8T., W.
Between Pantages and B. C. Electric
11 to 12 a.m. 1  to 5 p.m. Phone Seymour 8733
TO RESTORE HEALTH IS MY BUSINESS
Chiropractic
T.  E.  DAVIS,   D.C.
Palmer School Graduate
4134 MAIN ST.
At  25th  Avenue, South  Vancouver
Office   Hours,  10  A.   M.  to  6   P.   M.
Phone Fair. 3781R
Appointments  Arranged
CONSULTATION   FREE
A  NEATLY WRITTEN
AND   CAREFULLY   WORDED
SHOWCARD
Will Soon  Pay For Itself
Don't ketp your old card
doing service until
They  have  lost their freshness
and the public take no interest in them
Get your wants supplied by
W. H. NEWMAN
2 81       51st       AVENUE        E.
— Phone —
Fraser 358X1
New Shoe Repair
4609 MAIN ST.
LET  US  SAVE  YOUR  SOLE8
LADIES $1.50
GENTLEMEN $2.00
With every pair or men's shoes soled
and   heeled   1   tin   of  Waterproof  Oil
given  free
FISH AND CHIPS
LIGHT  LUNCHES
4207   MAIN   STREET
Next to Show
Gilbey's "SPEY
ROYAL" is the
choicest Scotch
Whisky obtainable
at any price. There
are many brands
of Scotch Whiskies
being offered to
the public, some at
higher prices, but
no matter how
n uch you pay you
cannot get anything finer than
"SPEY ROYAL."
Gilbey's
Spey Royal
SOLD AT ALL
GOVERNMENT LIQUOR
STORES IN B. C.
SCOTCH
WHISKY
This advertisement Is not published or displayed by the Liquor
Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia Friday, October 26, 1923
v-fc
        ill -     II-        H
VANCOUVER LEADiR.ADVCCATK
■
PAGE THREE
Choice Meats and Poultry
__ AT 	
Colbournes Market
We have all  kinds of Cooked  Meats for your
Picnics.    Also Corned Beef, Pickled Ox Tongues,
Fish, Butter, Etc.
CHOICE LOCAL VEAL AND LAMB
PHONE US YOUR WANTS
26th Ave. and Main      Phone Fair. 1640
Prompt Delivery
Auctioneer    W.   Wood   Appraiser
FOR
SECOND-HAND FURNITURE of every kind
See Our Large and Varied
Stock of Household Requirements
OFFICIAL   MARKET   AUCTIONEER
5885 FRASER STREET Phone Fraser 505
■I I I I I I I M I I I I I I I I 1-1 I I I I I I I 1 I I I |..|..|..|-|..|..|..|..|..|. I I I I I I I I I I I I I
THE   THEATRES
Ml I I I I l-M 1 I I I I I 1 H I 1 I I I I I I | | | | 11 I 1 1 I 1 I I I I 1 H-H-H III
Bert's Taxi and
Transfer Service   —   —
WOOD AND COAL
Owing to an expected shortage of coal this winter
our advice to you is to order your supplies now and
avoid disappointment later.
Night or Day - Fair. 4346
Night        - - Fair. 3638X
Night        - - Fair. 787 R
D. C. Weston pro g        4173
W. J. Brennan op       Main St.
ALL   SIZES
BRING YOUR COATS
TO
The Singer Machine Store
J. RITCHIE 2412 MAIN ST.
Agent for Below Broadway
THE SINGER SEWING MACHINE CO.
CIRCULAR LETTERS,
MULTIGRAPHING,
ADDRESSING,
MAILING,
ETC.
A to Z
Publicity Services
SEY. 7054
1411  DOMINION BUILDING,
VANCOUVER, CANADA
DREAMLAND   THEATRE
26th    AVENUE    AND     MAIN    ST
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY—OCTOBER 26 and 27
MABLE   BALLIN   FEATURING  "MARRIED   PEOPLE"
Comedy—Forohy's   Nut   Sunday.    Serial   Starting—"Buffalo
Special 5 Cent Matinee on Saturday for Children
Bill"
MONDAY AND TUESDAY—OCTOBER 29 and 3(5
THOMAS   MEIGHAM   FEATURING  "A   PRINCE  THERE  WAS"
Comedy—"Watch   Your  Neighbour"
WEDNESDAY  AND THURSDAY—OCT.  31,  NOV.  1
MARY   CARR   FEATURING   "SILVER   WINGS"
Century Comedy
FRIDAY  AND   SATURDAY—NOVEMBER  2  and   3
GEORGE  MELFORD  FEATURING  "GREAT  IMPERSONATION"
Comedy—Chester Conklin  in  "Pulman   Bride"
Also 2nd  Episode of "Buffalo   Bill"
as Queen I sa belle; Gareth Hughes, as
Lazarillo; and Adolphe Menjou as Sal-
luste.
All lour roles are Important parts
of the story and give ample scope
for the ability of these players. Herbert Brenon, who produced the picture
paid careful attention to Ihe (Hails of
dress,, cusloni and manners of the
period which made the seventeenth
century history in Spain so elaborate
and magnificent.
There will be the usual news reel
and comedy elc, and concert numbers on the Grand Organ and Symphony Orchestra, under the leadership of Mr. Calvin Winter.
Thurston's
Meat Market
FAIRMONT  119
PRIME STEER BEEF, LOCAL LAMB,
DAIRY  FED  PORK,  No. 1  VEAL
Pot Roasts, from, per fb  10c
Oven Roasts, from, per tb. 15c
Round Steak, per It).     25c
Shoulder Steak, 2 lbs. for . 25c
"Dumbells" Return
To the Orpheum
That famous company of overseas
entertainers, comprising fifteen •members of the Original Dumbells and
now known to the theatre-going public as the "Originals," will open at the
Orpheum Theatre Monday, October
29th, for two days with their famous
new revue, "Rapid Fire." This noted
organization comes to Vancouver with
a highly established reputation, having appeared here every season for
the past lour years in "Biff, Blng,
Bang," "Dumbells Revue of 1922," and
last season in "Full O' Pep." The new
production is under the personal direction of Leonard Young who will
be remembered as the "Duchess," and
who last season directed Montreal's
Community players. "Rapid Fire" is
said to be the most perfect and elaborate of the series of soldier revues presented in Canada the past four years.
A circus scene, as hugely funny as
the boys have ever been, serves as an
opening prologue to introduce them In
different characters and is followed
by a screamingly funny take-off on
Tutankhamen—In the Valley of the
Kings—with "Red" Newman as the
long dead King Tut; Jimnile Goode
and Bob Anderson follow in "Shieking
In Egypt" with the famous quartette
appearing first in a group of Scottish
numbers and later in a magnificent
East Indian scene wherein they present Ihe Indian Love Lyrics. There
are twenty-five brand new numbers
comprising every form of entertainment, of special not being a marvellous scene at Catherines Court, here,
Jock Holland, more ravishingly feminine than ever, sings "When Catherine Ruled," resplendent in a gown of
silver sequins with purple velvet, together with magnificent settings and
lighting effects, this number is particularly noteworthy. Alan Murray, Ted
Charter, Charlie McLean, Fred Fen-
wick, Don McLean, Ivor Ayre, Percy
Campbell, and a brilliant new female
impersonator. Gene Pearson, are outstanding members of the new revue
"Rapid Fire."
' The Brass Bottle"
At the Strand
"The Brass Bottle," Maurice Tor-
neur's fantastic comedy drama from
the novel of the same name by F.
Anstey, English author, will be the
First National screen novelty featured
at the Strand Theatre next week.
Interpreted by an all-star cast, including Harry Myers, Ernest Torren-
ce, Charlotte Merriam and Barbara
La Marr, the story revolves around
the adventures of a struggling young
architect who releases a genie from a
brass bottle in which he has been confined for many thousand years. The
genie in gratitude for his mease
showers the architect with favors
which, owing to the circumstances and
the change of customs during the
period of the genie's imprisonment,
prove embarrassing.
The story is an extraordinary intermingling of modern London and
King Solomon's court of six thousand years ago: the genl, with all his
powers of materialization, accomplishes the seeming impossible with a
wave of lis hand, but unfortunately is
unfamiliar with the needs of modern
times. The story is one that can besl
be told by the marvels of photography.
It is described as a delightfully refreshing tale with many a smile and
all of the splendor of the days of old.
It is hailed as the screen innovation
of the year. In addition to the players already mentioned others prominent in the cast are 'Pally Marshall,
Clarissa Selwyn, Ford Sterling, Aggie
Herring and Ed Jobson.
Included with the above feature will
be the regular comedy picture, the
Strand News Magazine and the musical portion by the Strand Concert Orchestra. There will also be a classical dance performance by Miss Kath-
erine Morris, "Premier Danseuse" of
Vancouver.
Splendid BUI At
Pantages Theatre
Next week's bill at the Pantages
Theatre will be headlined by "The
Midnight Marriage," a musical comedietta with an all star cast, featuring
diet Freeborn and Billie Barrows.
The programme will include tuneful
songs and pretty dances Interspersed
with comedy dialogue. The niusival
programme will include the following
exclusive numbers: "While We Were
Dancing," If Only One Remembers"
and "Wedding Bells," while harmonious effects and gorgeous settings
including the much-talked-of radium
productions and a wealth of dazzlnig
costumes will beautify the offering.
Prosper and Maret, popular college
athletes, will offer one of the cleverist
gymnastic performances of the season. Both are recognized as premier
artists and without doubt present the
best novelty of its kind on the Pantages circuit.
Billy Baker and Eddie Rogers will
offer their new seasons sucess, entitled "Just a Couple of Good Men," a
laughable programme of comedy dialogue mingled with comedy and parody songs, presented in an inimitable
style.
Ward and Raymond, popular favourites with the vaudiville fans, will
offer their latest, "Hello," a smart
and breezy programme of comedy patter interspersed with songs and dances.
Diaz and Powers, a young man and
a pretty maid, will offer a very artistic and somewhat thrilling novelty
"Frolics on the Wire." The act will
Include fast dancing on a silver thread
high in the air.
George La Shay, a well-known musical artist, will offer a varied programme of marlmbaphone numbers,
including classical, popular and jazz
selections.
Pantagescope will present a new
Century Comedy and the latest Aesop's Fables Animated Cartoon.
HAM—BOLOGNA—CORNED      BEEF
Prompt Delivery
4334 Main St.
''Merry-Go-Round''
At Dominion
Manager   Winning   Secures   One   Of
This Season's Best  Photoplays.
Freight Rates
take an annual toll of $100,000,000.00 from the
people of the west for iron and steel products.
BriUsh Columbia
spends over $8,000,000.00 every year on iron
and steel products, and uses 650 tons daily.
Coast Range Steel Limited
plans a 500-ton blast furnace as the first unit
of an industry to take care of this demand in
the home market.
WHY   NOT   BUILD   UP   B. C?
■H-l-H I 1 ■!'I II I I I 1 I I I I !"!■ 1 IfrH-HH I I 1 I 1 I 1 I I I I II I I
WHEN   HAVING   YOUR   HOUSE
Moved or Repaired Don't Forget the
PACIFIC   COAST   HOUSE   MOVERS
Excavating and Concrete Work
We  Specialize in House Raising
and Moving
213 Orpheum Bldg.—Sey. 9072
Res.  Phone 4064R—150  28th Ave.  E.
Big Feature
At the Capitol
"The Spanish  Dancer," to be the at-
raction next week—Antonio Mor
eno, hero of the picture, has
a   novel   role
He
FRESH KILLED MEATS
Attractive Prices
H.    MOTT
5909 Fraser St.
HIGHEST PRICES PAID
FOR USED FURNITURE
AND STOVES
Empire Furniture Co.
4242 Main St. Pair. 3140
FOR SALE
or Exchange
for Vancouver property
Two   quarter   sections   near   Lang,
Saskatchewan
Good home In best part of Saskatoon
owned a palace and a suit of
pajamas
Antonio Moreno, featured player in
Pola Negri's new star picture, "The
Spanish Dancer," a Herbert Brenon
production for Paramount , which
comes lo the Capitol Theatre next
week, woke up one morning to find
that all he owned in the world was a
palace and his night attire. It was
made of fine silk and had a monogram
and coat of arms embroidered on Ihe
ROBERTSON'S
GROCERY
TRY ROBERTSON'S GOOD TEA
SOc and 60c per to.
4493 Main St.        Fair 3843
C.    F.   MYERS
Organist and Choirmaster St. Peter's
Church, South Vancouver
TEACHER   OF   PIANO,   ORGAN,
THEORY, SINGING
Pupils prepared for Examinations
Special attention to Beginners
Studio Phone
3510 SOPHIA ST. Fair.
Vancouver, B. C. 5770L
The Hodgson Plumbing and
Heating Co. Ltd.
Plumbing, Heating and
Sheet Metal Work
Jobbing a Specialty
1174 Burrard St., Vancouver
Phone Sey. 2412
Tutor to London College of Pianoforte
Tuners
Member of Pianoforte Tuners'
Association
F.  E.  MARKHAM
EXPERT PIANO TUNER
4907 Quebec St., South Vancouver
Piano Taught Phone Fra. 42X3
Many years with Chappell & Co.
~W~ A. GOOaf
PIANOS TUNED and  REPAIRED
First Class Work
(652 QUEBEC ST. Fair. 1M3Y
Reynold'sMotorCartage
Haulage Contractors
Fireproff Storage,    Furniture and
Piano  Moving—Padded Van;
Packing and Shipping,  Express
and Baggage
527 Dunsmuir Street
Phone Sey. 1036
Res. Phone: R. Wilkinson, Fra, 250RT
A.   B.   BROKERAGE
G. H. Batcheier-L. J. Armstrong
Estate   Agents   Notary   Public
Fire  and Plate Glass
Insurance a Specialty
5704 Fraser St., Fra. 107
"Merry-Go-Round,"    the    Universal j
Super-Jewel screen production at the
Dominion Theatre, is a love story in |
every sense of the word.
It makes no difference what its |
length may be, or how big the cast,
or how thrilling the spectacle scenes,
it is a love story, sweet and compelling, with its tragc, bitter elements—
realities of an unpleasant world—but
with the whole drama softened as by
the magic touch ol some divine understanding of human love.
It tells of Vienna, the great prewar I
days and the dark, dismal ones which
came   with   the  conclusion  of  peace.
The lovers are Agnes, a little girl who I
is  one  of  the  slaves  of  the  Prater.
Vienna's Coney    Island,    and    Count   .^	
Franz.    The latter  naturally  Is quite
unattainable   for   a   peasant   girl;   al   an<1 w|nds up In a general burlesque.
least, respectably. participated in by all members of tho
Mary Philbin, prophesied as one of   company, which would do credit to a
the   biggest   feminine   possibilities  of.N„w york wintp|. ^^
the film  future, Is the girl,    Norman
Kerry is the man, and the balance of i
the cast includes George Hackalhorne,
[South Hill Sheet Metal Works
FURNACE WORK
EAVE  TROUGHING
GENERAL   TINSMITHING
Corner Fraser and 51st Ave.
Phone Fraeer 287
Not more than an Inch behind the
Inimitable Trlxle, if that much, conies
Cesare Gravlna,  Edith  Vorke,  Lillian ] Owen MoGlveney, the famous chnraei
front, but the  fact remained, it was f Sylvester, Anton Vaverka, Al Edmund-' er actor, in a lightning change preset!-
Ten  acre  market  K'rden   2  miles
from   Winnipeg;   In   high   state   of
cultivation.    Comfortable house, new
stables,   etc.
Apply
- 4601 Main St.
Phone Fair. 5020
not precisely  fashionable  wear  for a'
stroll through the strees of the City.
However, it all look place in the i
reign of King Phillip IV. of Spain, and
Moreno was reviving an incident in
the life of lion Cesar de Kazan, a
leading character in the Paramount
piclure which Pola Negri says is the
strongest story in which she has ever
appeared.
While Don Cesar sleeps, his creditors enter the ancient mansion of
his fomily and carry off everything it
contains. Caesar awakens in time to
utter voluble protest as they ruthlessly steal th sheets from under him.
"The Spanish Dancer" is a costume
picture with a very strong story of
love, intrigue and human Interest running throughout. The character of
"Maritana" gives Pola Negri the greatest opportunity she has ever had since coming to America.
Dorothy Wallace, Splttlswood Alt-
Bracy, George Seigmann.
and  other  most  capable
ken, Sidney
Dale Fuller
artists.
The comedy offering will be "Dog
Sense," a novelty film enacted entirely
by "dumb animals" and their antics
are extremely humorous. The regular
Dominion News Reel and Mr. Neless
supplying Ihe musical portion on thei^y
grand organ will go toward the pre- cork
.sentatlon of a 11)0 per cent, bill at
this popular playhouse.
Trixie Friganza
at the Orpheum
Trlxle Friganza heads the all-star
bill which opend at the Orpheum Wednesday. But the only reason she
heads It Is because she is Trixie
Heading a strong supporting cast Friganza. The whole thing is a pro-
are Wallace Beery, who plays the part digal outpouring of mirth and talent
of King Phillip IV; Kathlyn WllllamB,     which   doesn't   falter   for   a   moment thing not far from hysterics.
tation of the "Death of Nancy Slkes"
episode in "Oliver Twist," which is
absolutely unique.
Ray   Hughes,   in   "The   Fall   Guy,"
falls all over the slage in a dell and
convincing  manner which  Is  his,  all
his own. He is accompanied by "Pam"
a  slunning  young woman,  whom  the
audience  falls  for almost  as hard as
Dotson is a colored—hot a bin in
■dancer and monologlst, with    i
line all his own.    Ted Lorraine, Jack
Mlnto and Mile. Marie Andre present
a  marvelous  Interpretation  of "Mon
Homme," the  famous  French Apache
song, and remarkable dancing all the
way through.    John Miller and James
Mack, as "The  King  Uoys"  look  the
audience by storm.   Towa and D'llor-
tys, assisted  by a wonder dog, stag"
a  unique Juggling act.     And,  Anally,
comes  the  grand   revue,   participated
In by most of Ihe members of the bill,
called "The Wager," which sent Wednesday night's audience away In somu-
<1 t»AGE   FOUR
VANCOUVER   LEADER.ADVOCATE
Friday, October 26,  1923
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY SPECIALS AT
McL
OUR WINTER STOCK OF HOSIERY IS
ALREADY HERE. QUALITY THE BEST ON
THE  MARKET.    PRICES  MOST  REASONABLE.
Girls' and Boys' Stockings 35c, 45c, 50c, 75c
Ladies'  Heavy Cotton  Stockings, pair   35c
Ladies' Lisle Stockings. In black, brown, Navy
and   grey,   pair 50c  to  75c
Ladies' good heavy Cashmere Stockings, colors
black, brown, grey, polo, camel and grey; regular price 90c. On sale Friday and Saturday
at, pair  . 75c
Ladies' Silk Stockings, all sizes, and every color.
Prices  range  from,  pair 75c to $1.50
Ladies' and Children's Vests in great variety in
winter weights. See them. You will find the
prces  right.
Ladies' Vests in no sleeves, short sleeves and
long sleeves. Prices begin at 25c, 40c. 50c, 65c,
75c, $1.00, $1.25. $1.50. $2.00 and $2.50
Ladies' Bloomers, pair 50c, 60c, 75c, 85c, 90c pall'
Ladies'   Combinations—All   Prices   Reduced
LADIES'   GLOVES—See   Windows
McLEOD
At 16th and Main     -:-
Guaranteed   rjood   S.tcfic   Gloves,   sizes   6,   QV?<   7,
and   7|/2,   pair ,15c   and   $1.25"
Colors black, fawn,  brown  and  grey
Als^i  Gauntlet  Suode  Gloves,  pair $1.50
This Glove will  give  perfect satisfaction.
4-PLY YARNS AT RIGHT PRICES
Spindle Yarns known as Baldwin. Purple Heather,
all colors, It.     .  $2.50
DR. SMITH LITTLE
DENTIST
Fair. 212 25th Ave. & Main St.
Open evenings by  appointment
Ball Yarn, in 1-oz, or 2-oz. weights, per oz.
19c
We have all colors and can replace in two hours
notice   if  necessary
MEN'S   FURNISHINGS   AT   REDUCED   PRICES
Penman's make Combinations, gar. $2.50 and $3.50
Tiger   Brand   Combinations,   gar.  $3.00  and   $5.00
We  have all  sizes  in  these  goods  and  guarantee
values
Underwear  in  the 2-piece  garment
Garment "$1.00, $1.50 and  $2.50
SPECIAL  FOR  FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
$2.00 all Wool Ribbed Underwear for men. all
sizes, per garment   $1.50
Men's Socks in great variety, 25c, 35c, 50c, 60c,
65c. 75c and $1.00. Be sure and see our Silk
Socks   at  $2.00
& McLBOE
Next to Drag Store
Among the many replies to the everlasting, and to some people ever interesting, question "Does Poult ry-
Farming Pay?" are: Yes; no; ii all
depends if you have ample capital, if
you work hard, have the business instinct, the right breed, the knowledge
of scientific feeding, and so on and
so forth, until the enterprising seeker of advice from many persons gets
thoroughly mixed.
Now, if any of these replies fitted
the enquirer who only asked once and
went his way all might be well, but
the chances of this are a hundred to
one, the result being that many people who would succeed get too dis-
Pay?" which applies to everyone is:
"tt depends entirely on yourselfJ.' If
you have not got the personal element
of success to put into it, no matter
how big your capital, or how wonderful your farm, lor you poultry-farming
does not pay; while the right personality, even with every conceivable
handicap, will somehow achieve things
and for him Poultry Does Pay, as
would anything else that he chose to
take up.
How to Invest Capital.
Here a reader may say: "But how
about capital? Personality will not
pay for plant and stock." Well, perhaps it won't, if the idea is to start
off with a ready-made farm that is to
bring in an Immediate income. But
is it certain to bring in an income?
This question of capital is an important and very knotty point for which
no rule can be laid down. One man
with plenty of capital may fail by
launching out far beyond his capabilities, while if he had had to work up,
bit by bit. witli money dilliculiies
simply compelling him to use his own
inlative and do his very besl, he would
have succeeded, while 10 another man
living on Ihe edge of a financial precipice is harassing to a degree, and
financial security means everything 10
him. Or again, £2,000 laid out by the
wrong person, without the principal
elements of success, would bring in
less than £200 laid out by someone
else.
And in reply lo Ihe probable question "What are the pricipal elements
of success?" let me say that these
render it essential for the would-be-
poult ry-farnier to have ambition to
want money; not casually to want
money on the "ii would be very nice
to have plenty" lines, but really to
want it and be determined to get it;
and last, bul by no means least, the
ability to think for himself and to go
on thinking all the time.
Encouragement for  Small  Capitalists.
It wil probably be encouraging to
the majority of would-be poultry-
farmers to know that the smaller the
capital the better one will do in the
end, whether one is suited lo the work
or not.    II you are suited to the work,
UNIVERSAL
Grocery
3851 MAIN STREET
Mcintosh Red Apples, box   $1.30
Jonathan Apples, box  $1.05
Grimes Golden Fancy Quality, box  $1.65
Mcintosh Fancy Quality No. 1, box $1.90
Peameal Bacon, as cut, per lb 32c
Ayrshire Bacon, sliced, per lb 25c
Universal Tea, per lb 53c
Picnic Hams, per lb 18c
Fresh Pork Sausage, per lb 25c
Sunmaid Seedless Raisins, 2 lbs 25c
Cream Cheese, 3 pkts 25c
First B. C. Storage Eggs, per doz 40c
B. C. Sugar, with $2 purchase, 10 lbs $1.02
Brookfield Creamery, per lb 44c
Universal Creamery, per lb 42c '
Alberta Creamery, per lb 41c
Alberta Creamery, 3 lbs $1.20
Laundry Starch, 4 pkgs 25c
Corn Starch, 4 pkgs 25c
Prices subject to change without notice
Fair. 5000     Free   Delivery
although starting on a big enough
scale lo bring in an Income to live on
may do so I lie first .'ear. it cannot go
on, as the experiences of gradually
working things up, noting mistakes in
a small way, and remedying them, will
have been missed, and no business
man can be safe without this foundation knowledge, as any time mistakes
may be made on a large scale.
So. Instead of parting with al! your
available cash; with the idea of high
Inleresl returns, pul aside a sufficient
sum lor housekeeping and personal
expeusi s tor a year, and then slarl
in a small experimental way, and In a
few months' time you will nol only
have "got the hang" Of how Ihings
go and what is needed, but you will
have found out how you can use your
time and your capacity for work to
ihe best advantage, and by the end of
a year be able to branch out rapidly
and in the right directions with your
remaining capital, and uo doubt have
quite a good bit lo add lo it from the
profits of your small experimental
venture, But even if you have made
no profit, owing to many inisial.es,
you will have gained knowledge, experience, and iiieas which are of the
utmosl value for Ihe future, and under
these conditions poultry-farming can
pay and pay well.
Bul If you find al the end of the
year lhal you have made uo progress
In any way, ii will not be because you
have not. spent enough money, but
because you are nol suited to tin
work and cannot make it pay, and in
that case you are in a better position
to leave off with some available capital at your command. Therefore,
whatever the amount of your capital,
to spend one-third on plant, and stock
for the first year is sound policy,
whether your future is to be success
or failure.
The reason why there is any question as to whether poultry pays is because the energy, enterprise, and
brains thai are always pul Into oilier
businesses are spldom pul Into poultry
farming. Supposing a lazy youth
wanting a soft job wenl Into a grocery
business, failed, ami then went about
saying grocery 'lid nut pay—-would
anyone take notice?   Of course they
would   inn ;     yet     should     Unit   same
youth hold forth as in ins opinion ol
ihe pi mil., el a poultry farm, nearly
everyone would listen and believe, it
Is a strange phenomenon that the personal factor wiih regard to poultry-
farming is rarely considered. Vei
there is plenty of proof of it in the
reallj successful farms that ate always run by keen business methods,
without" which any oilier business or
profession would collapse in these
days, e\eu more quickly than a poultry farm.
The Personal  Factor.
Who oyer heard of a prospective
doctor or lawyer going round asking:
Hoes being a doctor pay, or does the
law pay? Or a would-be shopman
wondering whether keeping a shop
pays?   The questions are always: Can
I make il pay? Am I clever enough?
and so on. Why then, is the business
ol poultry-farming supposed lo run itself, and be blamed as a non-paying
concern if 11  does not?    This general
idea is, Indeed/ a n markable one
and until Ihe true facts are realized
the whole country will go on missing
an industry of which only foreigners
CROWDER
HAS IT
4809  MAIN  STREET
"The living voice affects men
more that what they read."—
Pliny, the Younger. I
Your voice conducts your business.
Directions that you give personally are
quickly and accurately executed, because your associates cannot fail to
understand, Each Inflection has a
meaning for them.
Remember the telephone when you
would coiiier wiih those Interested
with you in business. Ho not trust
the cold written word—send your
A'Oice, yourself by long distance telephone.
BRITISH   COLUMBIA   TELEPHONE
COMPANY
B. C.  MEAT riARKET
4538 MAIN STREET        Between 29th and 30th
SPECIALS  FOR  SATURDAY
POT  ROASTS, from     10c
STEW  BEEF ...........      12|/2C—15c
FRESH  MINCED  BEEF  12'/2c—15c
VEAL   ROASTS,  from    18c
STEW  VEAL   12|/2c—15c
BUTTER—Alberta Specials, 1   tb. 43c;  2 lbs. 85c;  3 lbs. $1.25
PHONE FAIR. 4873
Free Delivery
Classified Ads.
USE JOHN   BULL  EGG  PRODUCER,
LICE  KILLER AND ROUP OURE.
ITIK WHITE WIZARD COMPOUND
10-15 Washings 25c. Canvassers
wauted, apply 8748 Main Street.
VOll SALE OR EXCHANGE—Property in Okanagan Valley for Vancouver property. I3y owner who Is
moving here, Fair. 871Y.
appear  lo   realise*the   full   financial
value.
A keen business man, now owner1
of one of Ihe most successful poultry I
farms in the country, once said that he
did not particularly care for poultry-
farming, but he went In for it because
il was possible lo make money on it
minimum of capital in a short lime
than  from anything else.
CURRY'S  GROCERY
_^
No. 1 CREAMERY BUT-  J n
TER, per tb  ^UC
PURE  LARD 4\fk
per   fb  CAjZ
No.  1   CHEESE OA
per 11)  «JUC
CREAM ROLLED OATS   or
5 lbs     LoZ
CREAM  OF  WHEAT * A
6-lb. sack   f»UC
ROMAN   MEAL QQ „
pkt      OOC
B. C.  SUGAR rr   ,
5 lbs   OOt
FRESH  GROUND 1A
COFFEE, per lb. 4UC
BULK  TEA Ct\
per   lb  OUC
BULK   DATES -I A
New,   lb lUC
4-tb. Tin  MCCARTNEY'S  Cft
MARMALADE   . DUC
ROBIN  HOOD Aj    or
FLOUR, 49  lbs. Jpl.OD
PASTRY   FLOUR JO
10  lbs.       Hi£C
SHAKER SALT «r*
2  for    UOZ
SUGAR CRISP CORN 1A
FLAKES, pkt  1UC
SHREDDED  WHEAT op
2 for   LoZ
FELS  NAPTHA nr
3 for   LoZ
PALM OLIVE Of*
3 for   LoZ
LIFEBUOY or
3 for    LOZ
RINSO or
3  for          .. idOK.
CLASSIC CLEANSER or
3  for        /LoZ
CURRANTS OA
New   lb. . lL\)Z
26th and Main St.
Fair. 3912
FREE   DELIVERY
THURSDAY'S   MARKET
IN SOUTH VANCOUVER
Business was brisk In the municipal market Thursday. There was a
large supply of bulbs and (lowering
plants, small fruits and raspberry
canes for fall planting.
Eggs were stead} at 66c per dozen
for besl grade, and 40c to 55c for
smaller grades. Russet apples sold
al from 36c to line per flox, better
grade apples at ten pounds for 25c,
and pears .-at eight  pounds for 25c.
Fresh vegetables were offered at 6c
per bundle, marrows and cabbages
10c each;  tomatoes, 80c per crate.
Heel sold at from Sc to 20c per lb.;
prime ribs 15c, lamb I2Vi>c to 25c,
veal 8c to 20c, pork 20c lo 26c, dressed fowls 25c to 35c per lb.
Pish—Salmon, lOc per tb, whole or
15c cut;  cod,  16c;  herring. IS lbs. for]
25c; crabs, 2 for 25c; smoked fish, ISc. ,
Canaries featured the livestock sec-i
lion.    Several  splendid    While    Leghorn cockerels were offered at $2 and .
53 each.    Pullets,  from  75c  to $1.75;
Silver  Spangled   Hamburg  hens,    75c
each;  bantams, 25c.
There was a good supply of general
produce.   •
ROUND STEAK ROASTS  18c lb.
T-BONE ROASTS   25c lb.
SIRLOIN ROASTS   25c lb.
POT ROASTS 10c lb.
OVEN ROASTS      12^ lb.
DAYKINS    MARKET
FREE   DELIVERY
26th and MAIN ST. Phone Fair. 4893
Wood and Coal
"THE BEST POSSIBLE"
(Pitkethly Bros.)
Plowing
FRASER     353R1
Excavating
Teaming
There will be it special anthem and
a special service at St. Peter's Anglican Church on All Saints Festival,
Sunday, October   I.
REPEATING INDUSTRIAL HISTORY
Mrs. Darracott, 68 26th Ave., East
DRESSMAKER and LADIES' TAILOR
Wraps, Suits        and Dresses
In Latest Styles at Lowest Prices
PHONE   FAIRMONT   1353X
Distinctive Remodelling
More than 80 years ago, Cyrus W. |
Field  realized   that   the  world  needed .
a trans-ocean cable, so be spent his
entire fortune of several millions—a !
fabulous  sum  in  those  days—and    a |
do: ■ 5 years ol his lite.   One by one j
bis associates drifted away and des- |
pair loomed, but the doughty old fellow refused  to  be discouraged.    Continued   failures  egged    him    onward.
When he  was about "all in," lie met
a Mr, F, N. Grlsborne, then promoting
an elect tic company In Newfoundland.
Ills company was heavily in debl, but
the joined forces worked with a will.
The result  was our greal oceanic cables,  but  not   uniil alter further failures  had  beset the path of the pair
and  their  syndicate.
The case of Field and his Atlantic
cable reminds one of a similar case
in Vancouver loday where one man
has devoted many years and much
money to the founding of an industry
lhal should revolutionize the industrial life of Western Canada. The
establishmenl ol a steel and iron plant
in II. C. WOUld be, in a sense, as important as the Alln.nl ic cable was lo
Ihe eastern seaboard. Mr. I.andahl
has laced reverses and discourage
incuts that would have chilled any
other man to the bono and left him
embittered, Hut he refuses to be discouraged any more than was Field
'way back in 1850.
Mount Pleasant Music Store
2412 Main St., opp. 8th Ave. Phone Fair. 524
JAS. P. WINTER
YOU   CANNOT   AFFORD   TO   MISS  THIS   SNAP
Type A2 Columbia  Grafonola,  regular    $37.50
20 10-inch Records   regular 75c     15.00
5   12-inch   Records,   regular  $1.50      7.50
Total    $60.00
The Outfit for a few days $30; grab one of these for your summer camp
Phone Your Needs to  FAIR. 524 We Deliver
BATTERY SERVICE
STATION
INSPECTION FREE
28th and Main     Phone Fair. 5623
The history of a later day will likely
show a big blast furnace for B. C, employing thousands, spending millions
Of dollars, and building up a valuable
export trade. We look to that day,
and believe il will dawn with the coming of our needed steel plant.—The
Hook.
A. Woodward
DRY   WOOD
Single  Load     $3.50
2  Loadi    $6.50
Vt  Load     $2.00
52 24th Ave. W.
Phone  Fairmont 4469X Extraot from A Vancouver Weekly Paper
"THE HOOK" . Oct. 19, 1923 - Vol. #1 - #27.
CANADIAN PRESS BLOWS HOT HMD COLD ON TOPIC OF A  B. C. IRON INDUSTRY
Press announces that a find of iron ore in Ontario
"Will moan new era in iron industry," but hore where
we have ninety iron ore deposits adjacent to coal
and tidewater, they raise cry of blue ruin,
What a strange industry is the iron industry in Canada! Judged by the press
propaganda which surrounds it like an aura, it is a business that can thrive anywhere
except in the vicinity of British Columbia, where the ores and the coals are located
and water shipment to world markets is at hand.
During the week the Canadian Press carried a  despatch from Toronto reading as
follows:
"Toronto, Oct. 15 - Provincial geologist officials are on their way to a
point 64 miles north of Sault Ste, Marie, near the southwest corner of
Mississagua Forest Reserve, to examine the reported discovery of a valuable
deposit of high-grade iron assaying 73 per cent. pure.
"At the mines department it is stated that if the find as reported actually
exists, it will mean the opening up of a new era in iron manufacture to
Canada."
We quote from The Sun,.which front-pages the news under a headline "important
Iron Deposits Discovered,"
Last week we disclosed the hidden hand of the U.S. Steel Corporation at work in
China; we showed how press despatches from China were used to prepare the way for the
people of the United States and Canada for intervention by the United States while
contracts with British ironmasters are held up. Now we would like to point out a few
things about the way in which propaganda is used at home.
This reported find of iron ore near the southwest corner of an Indian forest reserve in Ontario is heralded as "opening up a new err. in iron manufacturing in Canada, doubtless because the eastern furnaces would no longer require to import ores
from Virginia.
In British Columbia we have lots of iron ore and lots of coal. When a Dominion
Government geologist reports NINETY districts where iron ore deposits actually occur,
then every influence that can be used: The Eastern '.lining Institute, the mining
journals, the Canadian Manufacturers' Association, and the various agents of the U.S.
Steel Corporation throughout Canada, all join in one long refrain, like that insane
melody which deplores the absence of bananase
They all with one accord and in a loud voice say:
Yes; our ores cannot be smelted.
Yes; our coals ?anr,ot make coke.
Yes; we have no markets at all,
Yes; an iron industry would fail."
Curiously enough, ono of the bodies which came out with a condemnation of the
Coast Range Steel Company s plan whereby British ironmasters would enter this province
was a committee of the Victoria Chamber of Commerce, upon which sat a gentleman who is
the selling representative of U.S. Steel products on Vancouver Island. After hearing
the opponents of the proposal, the committee published a report condemning any attempts
to manufacture iron in B.C. on any but a trifling scale. A week later, after hearing
the facts about the Coast Range Steel project, tho committee withdrew its report, but
the effect of its broadcast publication could not be overtaken,
One of the men who threw cold water on the British iron proposal at the Victoria
ex parte hearing, was the general manager of the Granby Mining and Smelting Company,
But since then he has authorized a statement that his company has sixteen million
tons of iron ore concentrates at Anyox and is contemplating entering the iron and
steel business. *n fact he left the meeting which condemned the proposal of the British ironmasters for the formation of a British Columbian iron and steel corporation,
in order to hasten to New York to consult with his directors in regard to making iron
from their concentrates.
Truly the iron industry is a remarkable industry. The mass of obvious propaganda
and tho opposing voices of foreign interests are too many and loud to create anything
but suspicion.
We need an iron industry in this province more than we need anything else if we
are to advance industrially. No assurances are of more ..leaning than the assurances
of the government that it will do its share to help establish this needed basic
industry here.

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