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The Ladysmith Chronicle Jun 19, 1909

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Array With Which Is Amalgamated the Ladysmith Standard.
\i
VOL.1.
Ladysmith, B. C, Saturday, June 19, 1909.
N<V
The Bio Match
At Esquimalt To-day
K FOOTBALL. .P'W   a   earne
The victoria Times   has the   fob   M,aUls wcel*'
lowing concerning the match at Es
qulmalt today:
/'After one of the longest and hardest soccer seasons on tho Island In
recent years, the championship is at
last to be played. The competing
teams are Nanaimo and Ladysmith,
and the game will be played Saturday afternoon at . the Canteen
grounds, Esquimalt.
"Nanaimo and Ladysmith have met
twice already outside the regular
schedule and have so tar been unable
to decide which Is the better team.
At the end oi the championship series the teams stood -level again and
a deciding match had to be called.
"This was arranged at tbe league
meeting in the Driard hotel Saturday, June 6th last, and as the constitution icalls for the deciding game,
If any, to.be played on a neutral
ground of a club affiliated with the
league, and as Victoria United Is nc
longer affiliated the game went to
the only remaining league ground,
that of the Esquimalt team at tht
Canteen ground.
"The rivalry between tho contesting elevens has all the season been
intense^ and Saturday's game will be
played at boiling point (rom the
start to the end' About the middle
of the season when things looked
good to Nanaimo several of their
players for various reasons left Nanaimo temporarily, and the team
suffered in its contests. Later when
Ladysmith began to make It felt the
championship was going to that
town, Nanaimo got together again
and put a team in the field that upheld the honor of the coal town and
also the best traditions ot island
football.
"Ladysmith was nowise behind in
perfecting her soccer organization,
and turned out a couple ot surprise:-.
when she met Nanaimo ln the chum
plonshlp serieB. Both teams arc
workiug hard as winning teams can
and both will come hero Saturday to
put up the best gamo they can und
with the full determination to win
thc 1908-9 championship of tho inland.
"Both Nanaimo and Ladysmith ui*c*
talking ot going to Calgary after thc
People's Shiold thin year, und if one
team only goer* it will bo the winner
of the game at the Canteen grounds
Saturday next.
"For this reason there is additional interest in the game which with
the championship decision makes lt
the most important soccer match ot
the season."
Tbe following is the line-up tor the
match today:
LADYSMITH.
Ooal— Dougan.
Backs— Rogers, Crosier.
Halves— Fletcher, c.ralngcr, War-
burton.
Forwards— McDowell, McGuire, Adam, Brass, McLeod.
Reserves— Morrison, Christian, Mc-
Kinley.
NANAIMO.
Ooal— Walker.
Backs— Hurren, Hewitt.
Halves— Mosser, Harley, Mitchell.
Forwards— Mossey, Crulckshanks,
Hooper, Mossey, Blundcll.
TYEE flllN CLUB.
The tollowlog Is the result ol the
with   Ladysmith the
Meeting of
Celebration Committee
There was a satisfactory attendance at thc meeting of the celebration committee In thc city hall last
Wednesday evening. After the reading and adoption of thc minutes, the
meeting proceeded to reviso the pro
LACROSSE,
/crdlct ot tho spectators who have
oecn watching the team practice
ihcse last tew nights, 'lhe players
£o ln tor the gamo with a vim and
/Igor that is good to soo. Last night
a large number were at practice. TniSt,1
also Is good to see as lt means that | chopping contest, there being no one
the   local boys aro    going to wear
chose lockets an their watch chains
if at all possible.
gramme.
It was decided to eliminate tho log
s' * .
When In Vancouver Bruce McKelvie
had a talk with Mr. Al. Larwell, of
chc V. A. C. "Forty", as Mr. Larwell is called, wants to send a teair.'
over here1 to show the local enthusiasts bow to play tbe game, lie
chinks the V. A. C. juniorB are able
to demonstrate the fine points
of the game to the bunch here. It is
to be hoped tbat a game can be arranged at an early date.
...
The Extension Giants will be here
on Thursday next for a practice game,
They are inclined to think that their
defeat of a few weeks ago was more
luck than good management and
hope to show that that was the
case by defeating GUlespic'B stick
handlers when they meet.
...
Today is the date on whiuh Vancouver and New Westminster play in-
Lacrosse has come to stay Is the
ulatton is going on as ta the chances of Con Jones' hired hands to do
what the rest of Canada .inder the
guise ot Regina failed to do.
...
The club was unfortunate in Using
the services of "Happy" Wardrop.
"Happy", though light, is a bood
stick handler and a sure shot and his
loss will be keenly felt on the home
line.
present who could Btnto nuthorlta
tively that thero would be any en
tries.
Tho entries for foot racing will
cIobo on June 30th.
Thc time for playing the lacrosse
match was changed from the morning to the atternoon, immediately
after tho baseball match.
The various committees reported
progress, and the programme for
sports and the regatta was declared
complete. Thore have (been some
changes made in the programme
which will appear In full next week.
The following officerB for the day
were appointed:
Time-keeper— P. G. Noot.
Starter— James Deeming.
Referee— Mayor Nicholson.
Judges at Regatta— F. Thick and
Harry Ward.
Reception Committee — Mayor
Nicholson and Aldermen.
^hort Visit of Chicago
Newspaper Men
A party ot Chicago newspaper men
passed through Ladvsmith Thursday
cvctiing and returned to Victoria the
following morning. They were in
charge ot Mr. Dennis,, head ot thc V.
P. It. land department at Calgary,
Mr. It. Marpole and Mr. H. E. Bcasley. The names ot thc gentlemen
composing tho party and tho piCillca-
tlons represented arc: Robert R,
Jonc3, managing editor of the Chicago Inter-Ocean; Samuel E. Riser,
editorial writer of the Chicago Record-Herald; Bruce Barton, associate
editor of the Home Herald and
World's Events;} George Richards, associate editor of the World Today;
Herbert Vandcrhoof, editor of Canada West Monthly;* Frescott Hammond, associate editor of tho Chicago Evening Post and Henry M.
Hyde, editor of thc Technical World
Magazine.
They had not a long stay at Lady-
smitn, but they made the best of
their opportunities to get all the information they could about tbe city.
iIhey auked about the Industries, the
Funeral of Edward
Armstrong To-morrow
The following is a list of the   subscribers to tbe celebration   fund   up
to   date-
City of Ladysmith  $40.00
Hepple & Smith, Grand Hotel. 15.00
P. Winch, Grand Duke, cash ...   3.00
G. Cavin, pair boots     5.00
I McKelvie Bros    1.001
T. Lewis, barber    2.00
Mrs. T. X.  Jones, cigars     2.50
D. Matheson, tailor, value     3.00
Percy Noot,    watch, value  16.00
Dr. Dier, value     5.00
S.  Leiser & Co. valuo  ,10.00
, ...;....-....   5.00
Tomorrow afternoon thc funeral of
Edward Armstrong, who was killed
by falling rock in tho Extension
mines last Wednesday, will tako
placc. Thc funeral will lcavo thc
houso nt 3 o'clock and proceed to
the cemetery. Thc Knights ol Pythias and Ancient Order ot Druldo will
attend In n body.
An Inquest was held this morning
by Coroner Davis, and Inspector
Shepherd'wns present.
Tho testimony of live witnesses wan
taken, and tho body was viewed by
tho jury. Everything pointed to nc
cldentni causes, and a verdict was returned to that effect.
The Injuries to Mr. Campbell, whil*
not very serious, aro very paintul.
His collar bono was broken, and two
I ribs were sheltered. His Injuries nro
ot such a character as to prevent buy
movements of tho body with case.
Mr. J. Armstrong is able to be
around, but tho bruises on his leg
causes him much Inconvenience.
The Knights of Pythlns have issued an Invitation to all other lodges uniting with them for tho decoration service, which had been previously arranged, to attend tho funeral of
isdward Armstrong in a body.
"There's gold in this island, ot
course; that 1*. known. But that
there is gold here ln big 'quantities la
what I strongly suspect and I would
not be surprised to see another great
rush right on this Island ol Vancouver." Such was the statement made
to the Victoria Post Thursday morn.
eighth shoot of the Tyee Gun Club  \Rg by Jafet Lindebcrg, the dlscov-
(!. E. Jells, value .......
Walters & Akenhead,  value
A. E. Palmer, value 	
W. L. Carter, cigars 	
J. A. Knight, value 	
Ladysmith Hdwso Co., prize ... 5.00
tl. Jossup, value   3.50
Mrs.   Crop,  Temperance  House, 2M\
J.  Bicklc,  valuo   2.50
B. B.  Wells   2.00
Mrs. Jarvcnan   2.00
J. Tcuz, Columbia hotel    20.00
Barclay & Conlin   25.00
W.   Siler   2.00
H. Wright, smelter boss   2.00
character of the population and futur*
prospects of the city, and were surprised to find a city of 4,000 people
with bo varied interests represented
and a payroll of $100,000 oneo. They
had never heard much of Ladysmith,
and did not know tbat It was tbe
borne of those who worked In the
Extension mines.
To tho Chronicle they said they
had enjoyed themselves immensely
throughout the trip. They were delighted with the scenery in the Rockies, and went in raptures over the
climate of tbe coast. "British Columbia," said one of the visitors, "Is
only beginning to be known, and
while Canada generally is forging
ahead with remarkable speed thc Pacific coast province is destined to
eclipse all tbe other provinces in
the next fifteen and twenty years."
They   regretted   exceedingly    that
, tney   could not   remain longer, but
10.00' expressed   themselves ' strongly . 1m-
Jj-00 pressed   with the   beauty    ol Lady"-
•■•jj smith and tho surroundings.
Judgment Rendered
in Klein Case
Mr. Justice Irving yesterday hand-1 tlccs, nor of part xv, shall apply to
cd down nis Judgment   in the   case proceedings   under   part   xvl.   Part
of L. C. Klein, of Ladysmith, who
was sent to jail for six months for
keeping a gambling house, His
counsel, George Morphy, appealed by
way ot certiorari and among the
points raisod was thc one that thc
magistrate had refused to read thc
witnesses' depositions ovcr to them,
and it was claimed that they were
inaccurate. There was no stenographer present, and tho magistrate
took down thc evidence in longhand
himself. His Lordship refused to
qluash thc conviction.
The text of thc judgment follows:
*'Mr. Morphy's contentions in that
a magistrate tn dealing with a case
under part xvi is, by virtue ot section 711, bound to tako depositions
in thc manner prescribed by section
li»2. At Hrst I thought that thlB con
tsntion was correct. It seems so reasonable a construction ot the act, and
so desirable a practice for magistrates to observe that one is disposed at
first sight to accept it aa sound, but
section 798 places the point tn a different light.
"Section 798 provides that, except
as specially provided for in sjction9
796 and 797 (which two sections have
nothing whatever to do with the
manner ot taking the evidence) neither the provisions of the act relating
to preliminary inquiries before   jns-
xv relates to summary convictions.
Section 788, subsection 4, therefore,
must be read as authorizing tbe magistrate to proceed 'to dispose ot the
case summarily' without regard to
thc provisions of thc following sections, 682, 711 and 721.
"Tho result is that scct'on 798
relieves the magistrate from thc dutj(
ot reading the depositions over to
thc witness, betore thc prisoner enters
on his defence.
"Although tho conviction cannot b«
questioned becauso thc magistrate did
not read ovcr to thc witnesses their
depositions, 1 think that magistrates
when they aro proceeding under part
xvi, would be adopting a good practice if tbey took tho depositions in
the manner proscribed by section 682, !
reading them to the witnesses in the
presence ot thc accused, nnd dispensing with thc signature only, when
necessary. The other points, raised
on the prisoner's behalf I disposed
of on the argument. The conviction,
therefore, stands."
It is Ukely that Mr. Morphy Will
apply to the Department of Justice
to reduce the length ot sentence.
Klein served over a month before his
second trial, when he was again een-
tenced to six months la jail. He
would thus serve over seven months
for on ofience, the maximum penalty
for which is six months.
Northwest Crop
. Prospects Excellent
Local and General
News Notes
Al.   Mnlile,  New  Western   15.00
J.  A.  Ryan     2.00
Blair & Adam, vuluo       5.00
A. O. Frost     5.00
A. O. Carpenter, Hotel Cecil ... 10.00
W. 13. Morrison, value     5.00
Novelty Opera House     5.00
C. Peterson      5.00
Hop Lee     5.00
Miss  Dnrdazona    4.00
Wright, blacksmith     5.00
Sid GiHord     200
G. Ross, tailor, value     4.00
Ben Woods, tailor, value     4.0
E. Pnnncll     5.00
Jones Hotel   10.00
Extension  Hotel      3.00
Year's subscription Colonist    5.00
Frank Hotel  '.    5
Information has just been received
that Lord Charles Beresford will pay
a visit to Canada in September for
thc opening of the Toronto Exhibition.
All members of Ladysmith Temple
No. 5, Pythian Sisters, arc requested
to meet at 7 p. m. sharp June 2nd,
when the election ot officers will take
place.
lor the watch and the fourth tor the
fob:
J. Meek  22
W. Keserich  , 21
O. Hepple 21
Dr. Dier  20
M. McKinley  16
3, McDonald  IB
BASEBALL.
The baseball boys wore out In good
numbers Thursday evening and a fast
practice gamo was played between
the regulars and Yanmgans, the regulars winning by a score of 4 to 2.
The teams were as follows:
REGULARS.
Clark*, c; Dclcorte, p; Barclay, 1st
base; Mulr, 2nd base; Dclcorte, 2rd
base; Gerard, sb.; Simpson, r'.t.'j Ingham, c. t.j Kerr, 1. (.
YANNIOAN8.
M. Kerr, c; Sanderson, p.; Chris*
tlnn, 1st base; J. Barclay, 2nd base;
Hiimber, 3rd base; Flshor, ss; Thomas, r. *t.; Pace, c. (.; Haworth, 1, t.
There will be lull practices on
Monday and Wednesday at 6 o'clock,
nnd a practice match lor Friday to
nice .f to flu, against the
Oeo. Roberts, value     2.50
Jos.   Cart-wright   15.00
H.  Hughes,  valuo      4.50
,T.  Stewart, value     5.00
D. J. Johnson     2.50
W.  Sneddon     2.00
Canadian Bank ot Commerce... 10.00
D. Conway, customc     5.00
II. Thornley     2.50
John Tha   10.00
V. B. Harrison     2.50
Nicholson & Weaving     5.0011908.
Wlnnlpog, June 18.—The Manitoba
Frco Press yesterday issued its annual June crop report in purt as follows:
"When thc first crop report ot 1909
was issued on May 1 it showed thnt
seeding operations were nt least two*
weeks, behind those ot 1908. Thc June
crop report, issued a month and a
day later, shows that the .two weeks
have been made up, and that, except
l in a very tew cases, thc crop is as
far advanced and in as good, if not
'octtcr condition that it was on June
16, 1908. Thc May report lodlcatod
tbat there would be little, if any, increase in wheat acrcago, and thc re
cent report confirms this, (or, spcak-
ing broadly of the provinces, there
is practically no more land sown to
whoat. than there was last year. This
however docs not mean that tho crop
ot 1909 will not ho larger than In
Thc Indications, nro strongly .in
A number of Vancouver firms have
telegraphed lor copies of plans and
specifications for tne electric lighting
plant, with tho object of submitting
ton'deru.
A company has been formed in
England, under the title of B. O.
Fruitlauds, Ltd., with a capital ot
$1,500,000, having aa chairman tha
Earl of Erroll. The main object Is
the purchase for tho purpose ot resale ot some 6400 acres ot tru't-
ylelding land In the Thompson valley.
Next Wednesday afternoon at five
o'cIock Anitrcw L-loko will be united
in marriage to Miss I5tttc Allsopp nt
the Mctnodist Church, by ltcv. lt.
Wilkinson.
j Attention Is directed to thc advertisement in another column can-
' celling all permits for burning rub-
! hish. In future permits will not bo
l issued verbally, but signed by the
mayor.
All officers and members of the
Pythian Sisters arc requested to
meet at Mrs. Orossnn's First, avenue,
tonight, at 8 o'clock to make arrangements for the decorations tomorrow.
The fire brigade was called out thla
afternoon at 3 o'clock to Third avenue and Methucn street. The bush
on thc E. & N. lands was being
cleared off, and the lire got beyond
the control of thc Chinamen who
who wore looking attor it. The blaze ,
was soon checked, but It will rcqi'ire
watching yet.
Thc highly   honorable position   of
president of   the   Brlt.Uh   Columbia.
Wholesale   Grocers'    Exchange    haa
fallen to Himon Leiser, head of eno
ot the   pioneer   wholesale    giocery
houses in tho province nnd president
of thc Victoria Board of Trade. The
annual  meeting of   the   association I
was held this year tn tho   Board oil
Trade rooms, at Victoria, yesterday, f
It 1« cutrtomary   to   alternate   tho I
presidency between thc two chief cl-1
tics ol tbe province, and Mr. Lotser|
hold   tho vice-presidency last   year,
moving up nt, this meeting
erer of Nome and now ono of the officials ot the Pioneer Mining Company, the largest operator ln the
Nome district. Asked what he considered would be thes best way to
prospect the taland systematically
Mr. Llndcberg said at once*. "By
boat, cruising around the coast and
running up all rlversi and streams.
The old metbid ot the pick, the pan
nnd the cradle Is the only way to
prospect. It has boon used for years
nnd always will be."
Many of the globos on the gravos
at the cemetery have, boen broken by
dogs that have followed funerals and
gained entrance to the burial grounds.
On the occasion ot a recent funeral
there wero five dogs ln the cemetery
grounds, and during the services at
the grave they wandered around
and destroyed everything tn sight.
Ono would think that a man had'
more respect lor the dead than to
permit his dog to follow him to a
funeral.
The Arrow LakcB Lumber Company's mill went Into operation lor
the season last week with a force ot
Alllstcr     1.00
T. Waskctt     5.00
R. Gear, value     2.50
J. Russell     2.00
W. Porter, milkman     2.00
Vancouver   Island   Cigar Company, value 	
Fred Fisher 	
F. S. Clark 	
Louis Groquel, milkman	
S. Roeddlng, prize 	
R, W. Williamson ....'.   2.50
6.50
2.50
2.5C
2.00
Nanaimo.
Mahrer & Co    5.01
Wilkinson & Graham,   Central
Hotel     5.00
Joe Fox, Windsor Hotel     6.00
Wilson Hotel, valuo     6.50
Union Brewery 25.00
Rummlng Bros 10.00
J.  Booth,  valuo     6.60
Lndysmith Lumber Co 10.00
Enterprlso Cigar Co., value ...   6.60
Nanaimo   Herald   (ono   year's
subscription)   value     6.00
Nanaimo Frco Press ,(one year's
subscription value    6.00
favor of thc yield being greater per
acre. Tho land was better prepared,
the seed sown was generally ot a
better nunlltv, nnn up to the present
timo the crop line had almost perfect weather. A continuation ot the
samo favorable weather conditions
should make for a ytold ot from two
to throe bushels pcr acre greater
than last year. Thore has been no
damage trom Juno frosts and up to
the present time there has been sufficient rain, though reports indicate
that rain now would be very general,
ly acceptable. With a shower every
other day from now until the end ol
June, at least 75 per cent, ot the
crop Bnould be ln tho shot blade during the flrst week ot July, and ready
for the binder from August 8 to 12.
Thc reports Indicate that the oat
crop is ln an exceptionally good condition and that there Is an Increase
of acreage of about 25 per cent. Tne
harley acreage seems to be increased
about 10 to 15 per cent., while there
is n marked decrease in flax. The
really only unsatisfactory crop appears to be winter wheat. The references to It nre limited, but none
ol them shows the progress that
should bo expected nt this dato. The
winter wheat crop has not, however,
very Important tactor tn
GARDEN PARTY.
Anxious eyes have been turned Irom
all parts ot Canada, during tho past
tow wookB, towards the prairie provinces, and It is the best kind of news
that recent despatches from the great I become a
wheat producing sections of the West'the wheat, fields ot the west as yet.
now disclose. Present indications j Speaking broadly, tho June crop is
point, to a banner crop, and lt Is ex-1 satlrfaotory and warrants the coun-
pected that tho price of wheat will try at large ln looking forward to a
bo higher this tall than It has been, bountiful harvest to be reaped at a
The W. 0. T. U. will meet next
Monday evening tn thc mission room
ot tho Trosbytcrlan church at .7-80.
All members arc rctiuested ',to attend,
Thc delegates will give their report
of thc recent convention.
Mr. Dennis Harris, ol Victoria, wns
in thc city yesterday making a survey ot tho lot donated for the hos
pltal. He also surveyed thc lot on
the corner ot High street and First
avenue tor the new Bank ot Commerce building.
Sheriff Richards has been appointed receiver of the estate of A. Howe,,
a Chemainus butcher, In order that
the book debts may be collected.
Sydney Child made the application
on behalf of Goodacre & Sons, the
execution creditors.
Mr. Wesley Earl, ot this city received word yesterday ot the drowning of his lather at Smith's Falls,
Ont. Tho deceased waa slxtT-siven
years ot age, and was an old , and
respected resident. His wltc predeceased htm Six months.
Tho council will in all probability
put down a cement walk on Roberts
street from Mr. W. E. Morrison's
store to connect with the walk nt
the postofflce. Mr, Mclean is prepared to settle the mattor with the
council on abasia that will bo lair
The gurdcu party hold by thc la-l
dies of St. John's church nt the re-l
sidenco of Mrs. Hill on Wednesday!
waa voted by all who attended tobel
one ot thc most pleasant and suc-f
cc8sful In thoir experience.
Many clrcumstnnccB combined to
render the attendance small, but]
those who wore present were liberal!
spenders nnd wont oway tccllng notl
only that tbey had received tliolq
money's worth, but also that thosi
who had not come bad missed oneol
the most pleasant lunctions ot the]
season.
The grounds were gnyly decorati
with bunting, tings and Chinese lanterns and presented an cihlllntlnfj
appearance. All of thc stalls wen
pretty and successful. The candy!
tabic wns in charge of Miss MeblueJ
and the Misses Hill, and nod alargJ
number of. patrons. It was prettily]
decorated • with festoons ot pink ancj
white muslin and cream roses.
Mrs. Wm. Brown presided over
lancy work booth which was next :
order, and by her tasteful arrange!
merit of the goods, soli the majc|
part ot tbe Guild's work.
Ice cream, drinks, and strawberrlel
which were dispensed W Mrs. Bourn!
and Miss ThornM were ns popular,a|
ever.
Tno dainty tea table ot Mrs. Jes]
nup, Mrs. Mclhtyrc and Mrs. A
brotio attracted numbers; whilst
thc end of tho grounds Mrs. Wattf
and Miss Kttto conducted a mo
successful and amusing "BntfAng" an|
guessing contest,
Tne band was, unable to be preset]
on account ol the unfortunate
dent at the mines.
Tho net proceeds were in the vldij
lty ot atty dollars. THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
$200.00 CASH
And $10 per month will purchase a Fine Six-Roomed *
House on a Good Corner Lot in a choice portion of the city.
The price of this property is very low as it must
be sold. Take advantage of this opportunity and
you will save paying rent.
JOHN STEWART
Notary Public Conveyancer
LADYSMITH, B.C.
THE ALLEGED HUMORISTS.
"Would you got married, it yon
wcro mo?" "I don't believe I could
—if I wore you."
Ho—I always havo my evening dinners served a la carte. She—From
one of those night lunch wagone, I
suppose.
"Mabel accepts moro rings from
men than any girl I know." "I don't
understand." "She's a telephone
operator."
Whyto—So you went to that specialist tor yoilr rhwimatlsm. Did he
give you relief? Browne—He relieved
me of ten dollars.
THE CANADIAN BANK
OF COMMERCE
Head Olfice  •  • Toronto
CAPITAL $10,000,000: REST $6,800,000
Bonk Money Orders
ISSUED AT THE KOLLOWIXO BATES!
S.1 aud under         -          - 3 edits
Over $5 and not exceeding $10, 0      "
"   $10      "       "           $30, 10      "
'•   $30      "      "          $50, 15     "
These orders are payable at par at any office in
C inuda of a Chartered Bank, except in the Yukon
and at the principal banking points in the United
Slates. .    -       ...
They ar-> negotiable at $4:90 to the £ Bterling in
Great Britfin and Ireland. They form an excellent method of remitting small sums of money
v. ith aifetv and at small coat and may be obtained without delay at any office of the Bank.
LADYSMITH BRANCH   I.. M. de Gex. Manager
THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
Published by Carley & Carley at Ladysmith, B. C.
every Wednesday and Saturday.
H501 Year in Advance, 25c Per Month
Advertising Rates on application.
Editorial Comment.
One of thc pressing roj' iiiirements of
Ladysmith at the prenent ti...e is a
provincial jail. Not that there is an
increase in crime, but there is an
place worthy ot the name of house of
detention in which to keep prisoners
till they are sent to the Institution
at Victoria.
LADYSMITH LODGE, NO. 2, K.of P.
The officers and members of above
lodge arc requested to meet in the
lodge room on Sunday, June 20th, at
two o'clock for the purpose of attending the funeral of our deceased
brother, Edward Armstrong, from
his residence, Gatacre street and
fourth avenue. Sojourning Knights
are cordially invited to attend.
By order,
8. MOTTISHAW, K.   of
R. & S.
R. 1VEY, C. C.
Walton—Are you Burc thnt the
Smythcs haven't any children? Dal-
ton—Why of course not. Mr. Smythe
Is worth more than (*>750,000.
"Do you consider a chauffeur worth
two hundred dollars a month? "Well,
the last one I had ran away with my
wife, and you knew my wife, old
man."
a suitable season ot cogitation)—Yer
hens is dead, Mr. Cittlly.
Tho story goes that tho present
Duke of Atholl devlBed a moBt original method of seed-sowing. On one
portion of his property are Borne Inaccessible rocks, which have been
guiltless of a green leaf for centuries
Some ancient cannon happened to *UsJ
near at hand, and -by the duko's order this was charged with : ;n cannis-1
ters tilled with soeds of hi rdy planta
nnd shrubs and fired Btraight into
the cracks in tho rocks. A little soil
had collected there, and the experiment is said to have been crowned
With   3UCCCSS.
dignity of the lieutenant-governorship, an office which requires that Its
incumbent be possessed ot ample private means.
In pursuance of thc policy ot Hon.
R. McBride since he first went into
office to visit the different parts of
the province as often as possible to
learn the wants of the people, the
premier, in company with Hon. T.
Taylor, Is now making a trip through
the Stmilkamcen country and the
Kootenays. The premier is very popular in the interior, and his reception in every place visited shows
that his popularity is not waning,
but rather on thc increase.
Tlie name ot   Mr. Fred Wade, K.
0., of Vancouver, is suggested In connection with   the   exalted office   ot
lieutenant-governor,   which will   become vacant through the resignation
of Hon. James Dunsmuir.  No doubt
the appointment would be a popular
one.  The     Vancouver    "Province,"
though   holding   opposito   political |'
views, Bays of Mr. Wade, that   for
over a quarter of a ceutury bo   has
been a prominent flptre in the  political and public spirit ol Canada. He
'""! fitted lc'.: .•••ii taken a  leading
fart in all the public movements ot
Canadt> ta whatever part ol tbe country he has made his home.   Through*
o*ut tbe west he Is known, from  the
Great Lakes to Dawson City, as one
al the most energetic .supporters  of
every movement, large or small, having for Its object the betterment ot
existing social conditions.   Mr. Wade
Is essentially a man ol the west where
he has spent thc greater portion   ol
hie life.  He understands the west as
possibly lew men do and that is no
mean qualification when the office of
lieutenant-governor ol British Oolnm-
bia Is under consideration.  In addition Mr. Wade is a man ol   wealth
It is unfortunate, at least so far
as Ladysmith is concerned, that the
representatives ot the Chicago papers now vtslting'the coast cities were
not allowed more time to see tho city. As a matter of fact, they only
remained here a few minutes, and as
their visit had not been announced
beforehand, there was no deputation
at the train to meet then. These
Chicago editors speak to two or
three million pcoplo every day
through thc editorial and news columns of their papers, nnd a word or
two from them with regard to Ladysmitli and the great advantages it
offer? investors would prove of inestimable benefit. Up to the present
time tho outside world hns not learned that Ladysmith possesses unequalled advantages for thc develop-
ment of a big iron and steel industry, and other undertakings of a like
character, nor can this even be made
known except through the columns of
newspapers circulating In centres
where men have money to Invest in
such cnterprisea. However, the few
citizens who were privileged to meet
the moulders of public opinion (rom
Chicago made the beBt of thc few
minutes nt tbeir disposal to give
them some valuable Information with
regard to the growing importance
of Ladysmith from an industrial
point ot view.
"I admires a man," said Uncle Eb-
en, "dat, keeps hopin' foh de best.
But I doesn't like to see him sit dowil
and coll it a day's work.*'
A woman in northern Missouri has
sued an editor because, in writing the
obituary of her hustand, be stated
"he had gone to a happier home."
A woman died, and at tho funeral
tier husband said to the undertaker:
"What carriage shall I ride in to tho
cemetery?" The undertaker said tho
husband should ride in the carriage
with his late wife's .relatives. "But
T don't like them; I don't speak to
them," the husband said, indignantly. The undertaker said: "You asked me what was the proper thing. I
have told you, but you may do aB
you please." Thereupon the,husband
said resignedly: "Well, I will do as
you say, if you insist upon it, but I
give you notice right now that it
will spoil my day."
John W. Coburn, President and Managing Director.
i
The Ladysmith Lumber Co.,
Limited.
MANUFACTURERS OF  ALL KINDS OF
Rough and Dressed Fir Lumber,
Red Cedar, Shingles and Lath
LADYSMITH, BRITISH COLUMBIA
St. Petor—What makes you so busy?'
Recording Angel—Taking the names
of Victorians who are still insisting
that they have no taxable property.
Hykcr—You don't seem to be worrying any about your failure In bus!-*
ncss. Pyker—Oh, no; that's one ot
the things I have turned over to my
creditors.
Myer—There goes the widow Naggs.
They say she drove hcr husband to
an untimely grave. Oyer—Well, that
isn't so bad. She might have made
him walk there.
tl!?2§   Pharmacy
I    ALL THE STAPLE DRUGS
ALWAYS IN STOCK.
I    PRF-      'TIONS PROMPTLY   |
Aa       no. •
$ R. G. JESSUP, Prop. I
We have just received another shlp-
wn t of those
Colorings in Wall Paper
Call and see them. They are going fast.
A full line of, Paints and Varnishes
in stock.
Picture Framing done on shortest
notice. Bring your pictures and look
over our mouldings. I
HARRY KAY,
First
Avenue
Ho—Oh, please, Wile. Jeanne, do
not call me Mr. Durand. She (coyly)—Oh, but our acquaintance is so
short. Why should I not call you
that? "Well, chiefly because my
name is Dupont."
jBenodick—That luminous paint is a
splendid invention. Singleton—What
do you use lt tor? Benedick— Wc
paint thc baby's face so we cau give
him a drink in tbe night without
lighting the gus.
Clyde Fitch in a kindly letter to a
young and unknown playwright, said:
"I liked your play; I thought it promising, but in tiic first act you imitated Ibsen, in the second you imitated Pinero, and in the third and
fourth you imitated Uarrie. This will
never do. Imitation in art Is always
bad. It suggests the shabby man
who ns be sipped a glass of beer looked in the mirror behind the bar and
muttered to hlmBelf: 'Here I am
wearing a railroad president's shoes,
the trousers of a senator, the hat of
a millionaire banker, the vest of a
Newport society leader and an ambassador's coat, and yet, in Bpite of
it all, I look U.'te a tramp."
We have the largest assortment of
Spring and
Fancy Suitings
to be found in the city.
S       PRICES  RIGHT
D. 1. Matheson
MERCHANT TAILOR
Gatacre st.,   Ladysmith, B. C.
He (after the refusal)—Had I been
rich, perhaps your answer would
have bcon Iquitc different. She— Perhaps. He—Out poverty is no crime.
She-Oh, yes, it is—and the punishment is hard labor.
"So, my dear madam, you will not
consider for a moment Mr. Porcman's
wish to sec you to ask your daughter's hand?" "I will not," answered
Mrs. Maluprop, firmly, "And you
may tell hi... this iB my automaton."
"My daughter ia positively delighted with her new piano,', said Mrs.
Ncidore; "she'B u.uite familiar, you
know, with ail thc classic composers—" "Familiar?" exclaimed Mrs/
Peppery, "why bIio's positively flippant."
Kiiberl & McAdie
Undertaking Company
PRACTICAL EMBALMERS
First class Hearse supplied in Ladysmith.
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
Telephone No. 2G2 and 180
P.O. Box 735    -      -    Nanaimo
Her mother—Docs your husband
take yon Into his confidence regarding his business nftnirs? Young wile
—Oh, yes; ho did so only thiB morning. When I asked him to let me
havo tiu for a new gown bo said he
was very sorry, but business was so
bad just now he couldn't possibly do
It.
Corporation of the City of
Ladysmith
Electric Lighting riant Installation.
Tenders nre respcctlully called for
thc complete installation and' equip
ment of an Electric Lighting Plant
for tho municipality of the city of
Ladysmithf
Plans and specifications on file in
the olllce.ofthe city clerk, 'lenders
to be in by June 28th, 0 p. m. (unless otherwise specified).
Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted, t
N.  A. MORRISON,
C. M. IT.
•>^<'V'>vv'>.^->.>.;'.;..;..;..>.;..;..>.>.;..;. .;..;..;..^.;..;..;..;..;..;..;..;.<..><«X',.^<,^*t*
4 9
Two Good Local Buys
4 House and Lot on Roberts St. and 6th Ave.   $525. 4
4 X
I Store on Roberts St.,   near 4th  Avenue.   *400 4
I   McKELVIE BROS.,   f
| Real Estate |
i First Avenue, Ladysmith &
i i
r ** o**^* *•$• *j* *** •** **• •j* •** ♦** **• •*♦ *j» •J»*5******* •♦• *** *•• •♦* .♦***•**•* ************ ••*••* ***•♦**** •s5**s5**5**** *5**5* *$• *<i^ "S***?* i
Corporation of the City of
The Gentleman Farmer (anxiously)
—What ln the world, Uncle Totterly,
do you suppose Is tho matter with my
1 is? Why, this morning I found six
ot them lying on their backs, cold
i " stiff, with their feet sticking up
in their air.  The Ancient Man (atter
TENDERS.
Tenders will be received up to 5 p,
m. Monday, 21st Inst., tor the laying
of sldewalk's'trom Post Office, Esplanade, to Baden-Powell- street, and
from PoBt Office to First avenue, re
epccttvoly.
For further Information call at
the office of the city clerk.
N. A. MORRISON,
O. M. O,
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦■♦♦♦♦«>«>♦«>♦♦♦♦«>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»
100 Pairs IOO Pairs::
• >
100 Pairs of Trousers
To Be Cleared Out at GREATLY REDUCED
PRICES.     $1.75   PER  PAIR and up.
i   G. 0. ROSS, First Avenue   ;:
IOO Pairs 100Pairs::
Novelty Theatre
Masonic Building, Ladysmith
New Programme
Monday and
Thursday
PERFORMANCES AT 7:30 AND 8:45 P. M.
Admission: IOc and 15c
Matinee Prices 5c and IOc
ESQUIMALT & NANAIMO RAILWAY COMPANY
Lands for Sale
Agricultural, Timber and Suburban ,Lands for sale.
For prices and location apply to the Land Agent at
Victoria or the District Land Agent at Duncan.
Town Lots and cleared Suburban acreage for sale
at Ladysmith.   Apply Land Agent, Victoria, and-
Townsite Agent, Ladysmith.
■ au- r ■ ntn'tMmmMt^mmmm THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
READ!   CONSIDER!   ACT!
Extensive advertising in large Newspapers, in
Ut go Cities coats large sums of money. We are
■atiBfied with small advertising, in a small paper,
for small money. This enables us to place our
goods before our customers at a price to match
moat incomes.
CHAS. PETERSON
Furniture Store
Ladysmith
Transfer
Stables
Light and heavy teaming.
Furniture and piano moving
a specialty.
Nicholson & Weaving
PROPRIETORS
Telephone 1.
Wagons
I Sell T. I. Trapi & Co's
Celebrated Wagons
During the season we have sold a large numbci
of wagons, implements ami logging trucks.
Everything carries a guarantee-
R. WRIGHT
Duller Street
I      DRINK
! U. B, c.
9
4     AND BOHEMIAN    §
BEER
! UNION BREWING CO., Ltd
NANAIMO, B. C.
T
iJ..J..J..*..J«.J«J.J..J..J..J..*«J..J1.»J..J«»JmJ..J..J..J..J.
Ice  Cream
AT
Carter's Store
Ice Cream lOo a piste.
Express and Teaming
Wood for Sale.
P. INKSTER, phone 06
D J. Jenkins successor to A.E. Hilbert
HHbert Undertaking Parlors
1,3 and 3,Bastion St.,Nanaimo
Phone 124     P. 0. Box 1
Canada and Latin America
Now and again complaints are
heard that some of Canada's leading
financiers are investing capital in
Cuban, Mexican, and Latin American undertakings, instead ot turning
it into their own great western heritage, where—as such critics say with
good reason—thero are innumerable
opportunities tor profitable Investment, and a far greater measure ot
security. But, in such cases, it is
to hear both sides, and to be able to
strike n balance of tho arguments tor
and against a poliry ot Investment
which mnst now bo regarded as established. In the course ot a recent
conversation with Sir William Van-
Home, who may perhaps be said to
have inaugurated that policy, the
arguments ln Its favor were marshal'^
ed with telling force. To begin with,
all the talk about "sending money
out of Canada" Is sheer nonsense. It
would not be more nonsensical to
complain about sending wheat out oj
Canada, when the western wheat
crop is exported. The equities owned by Canadians, domiciled in Canada, as a result at their investments
in Latin America, are worth more
than the' money paid for them—just;
as thc price of a bushel ot exported
wheat exceeds the cost ot production I
and marketing, giving a succession
ot profits to Canadians—and the dividends are paid to Canadians, and
presumably spent in Canada. Moreover, it must be remembered that the
Canadian promoters of Latin-American undertakings have generally obtained the assistance of British and
European capital, and have thus
been able to obtain for their country what mny be described as the
middleman's profits. Looking turtle
er Into thc matter, there arc seen to
be very good reasons, altogether
apart from tho question of immediate profits, why Canada should have
business connections with thc great
Latin-American communities, front
Mexico down to Argentine and Chile.
The, City Market
R. WILLIAMSON,   Prop.
Wholesale aad Retail.
MEATS and VEGETABLES
Ladysmith, B. C.
A. Litt
If she is to become a commercial
Great Power, if hcr commerce Is to
become world-wide, and to be secured by a proper geographical distribution, she must follow the example ol
England, and extend hcr investments
into overy suitable field. Trade follows the investor's sovereign or dollar as surely as it follows ta flag
And of all undeveloped quarters ot
thc globe, Latin America is most obe
viously her proper sphere of commercial influence, il only'because Canada
is really a half-Latin community
horsolf.
Canada is now recognized by the
British capitalist as the best field for
investment which Is open to him.
But Latin America is really the second best field, and tbe English Investor (who will never be persuaded
to put all his eggs into a single basket, even if that basket be marked
with a big "C" as a sign of its reliable coostruction) will begin to recognize the fact as soon as the mesmerising effect at South African minf
ing developments passes away. When
this comes to pass, it will be vastly
to Canada's advantage if she is in a
position to act financially and commercially as middleman and mediator between Great Britain and Latin
America. In point of fact, that is
the great end which Sir William Van
Home and other Canadian statesmen-capitalists have kept steadily in;
view from the beginning.
Americans, the only possible rivals of Canadians in this sphere, do
not care to travel, much less reside
for a part of thc whole yoar, In thc
land that once formed Spain's Colonial Empire. They do not care to be
"too far from thc Bowery," an the
saying is. When they do resort to
Latin America, they are unpopular
for several reasons. In the first
place, the Spanish-American war is
remembered against thcm;l nobody
cares to see their mother-country,
even if at time acting like a   step-
^"people Back of
'5unsWac/ur^
mother, beaten in an unequal combat. Secondly, Americans do not
understand the Latin-American peoples, and, what is much resented,
have always done their utmost to
give t hem an evil reputation—with
thc object, no doubt, ol asserting a
supposed right to interfere in their
politics for tlio material advantage of
thc United States, under cover of
that strange political fiction, the
Monroe Doctrine. As a matter ot
fact, these people are not given over
to the rule of hasta manana, a philosophy at lite based on procrastination. In Cuba and M«xico, for example, the business man is at his office by eight o'clock; the manual laborer is as regular in his habits and
as hard-working as any Anglo-Saxon
wage-earner, and, a very important
consideration, is not a victim to
the vice of drunkenncs, of all
vices the most vexatious and costly!
to employers. The fact that the Cu-|
ban railways are operated tor 50 per
cent, of their revenue, which is a
better result thau can be shown by
any other railways in the
new world, is a pretty good proof of
the foregoing assertion. Again, the
stories ot lawlessness and l&sincEs,
and contempt for life and property;
which almost Invariably originate
from American sources, are generally
without foundation In fact. Sir Wm.
Van Home is able to give a number
of instances of wildly mendacious reports of the kind. For example, he
was staying on one occasion in the
capital of Guatemala, when, according to news items in American and
British journals, wholesale executions were taking place there. As a
matter of fact, nobody was executed
there ut all, thc city being as peaceful as Toronto or London at the
time. Io the opinion of Sir William,
financial setbacks in thc Latin American communities have been the result, much more often than not, of
the intrigues and misdeeds of Euro- j Stations*!*,
pean adventurers.
as n
Sunshine Furnace is thc triumph of sixt
one years' experience—growth from a small
tinshop to 16)4 acres of floor space, from a half dozen
artisans to 1,500, from an annual wage sheet of $4,000
to one of $670,000, from a capital of energy to one of
$3,000,000, from obscurity to recognition as Largest
Makers of Furnaces in the British Empire.
Sunshine^*.
was placed on the market (he first furnace to be wholly and    a
selely designed by a Canadian Company. 0  t^
We employ a consulting staff of furnace experts, who are f
continually experimenting with new ideas in order that Sunshine „
Furnace shall not have to travel on its past reputation for ™
goodness.
We buy materials in such large quantities that its quality is
guaranteed to us. We have our own testing rooms, so that supervision of construction ir. cxerriscd down to the finest detail,
MXlaryfc   ]
For Sale By Ladysmith Hardware Co., Ltd., Ladysmith
ARE YOU READY
TO PAINT OR
PAPER?   WHEN YOU
READY WE ARE.
PICTURE FRAMING
A SPECIALTY.
ARE
S. ROEDDING
Paperhangier and Art Decorator..
High Street.
,
Lending
Library
ALL
We i
IE LATEST NOVELS,
large stock ot Fancy
Fowl for
the Farm
CLEANING,   PKISSS1NU   AND
REPAIRING.
Charges moderate.
All work   left at   McCallum's 2nd
•venue, near Fire Hall, will receive
prompt ateentlon.
Meat in highly nitrogenous, and
supplies the hens with elements that:
are lacking in grain. Lean meat'
such as waste scraps trom the butcher, liver, etc., will cost but littio
compared with the increased number
ot eggs that will be secured. When
only grain is fed the hens will be unable to convert it Into eggs unless
balanced by foods ot a more nitrogenous character.. Although the price
of meat Is apparently high, yet one
egg more a week from each hen will
be sufficient to pay tor the luxury
afforded them.
The cause of many of the ailments
of young chicks Is cold; that Is, they
have been chilled nt some time. A
cold night, sudden change In temperature of damp weather, though not
noticeable at that time often affects
young chicks, and they get chilled
even, if only for a short time. In a
few days the bowels arc affected and
the trouble Is wrongly attributed to.
the food. It- should be borne. In
mind, then, that young chicks should,
never be allowed to become chilled,
and that they should have plenty ot
warmth at all times.
It the droppings are collected dally, mixed with equal bulk ot land;
plaster and stored In barrels they
will be In excellent condition tor use
in the garden when required. The admonition to keep them dry should
not be followed, If allowed to become dry ln the poultry house, portions soon reach an Insoluble condition, but if collected daily and
kept somewhat damp (not wet) they'
will not lose ammonia, and will give
better results when applied to the
soil.
During tbe past when prices of
farm products) were low and but a
baro profit was made, many farmers
havo found tho well-filled egg basket
a source for cash when snow covered
the ground and no receipts were pos-
ble unless Irom the cows. Yet tho
fowls are relegated to a secondary
position on the farm, although they
are capable of giving a larger profit
ln proportion to capital invested
than are larger stock, Thero Is a
largo amount of food that can ba
utilized for poultry that would be
wasted without their aid, and the
farmer will find that any attention
, bestowed on his fowls during the cold
period ot the year, when other work
is not progressing will be returned
by them tour-told. Hundreds ot
small flocks are to be tound ln the
suburbs of cities and towns, and It
Is possible that the number ot fowls
raised   by those who have   limited
facilities equals tho poultry raised on
farms. The main difficulties aro
those of annoyance from intruding
flocks of neighbors and the Inclinations of some fowls to disregard
fenceB. Thc best breed tor suburban
purposes is thc Plymouth Rock, as
they arc easily confined—a tour toot
fenco Is high enough—mid they arc
contented In confinement. They rank
ns excellent layers, though they
should not be ted too heavily on
grain, but should ho made to work
and scratch In litter, in this way
securing exercise and'promoting egg
production.
THE VALUE OF GOLD.
No Boom at
Prince Rupert
HARRY HUGHES
There is   more rubbish   talked   on
There arc tew evidences at Prince
Rupert ol a "boom." No buildings
nre under way on any ot the high-i
priced lots on Second avenue" and
McBride street, aud us fur as can .be
lenrnod from resident contractors,
nono arc likely to be commenced in
tho near tuturc. Thc men who paid
tour times the worth,of thc lots they
purchased arc taking a breathing
spell before they begin spcuding money    on   buildings.   All    told,
Portland Hotel
GOOD   BOARDING.
BILLIARDS AND POOL.
Barclay  &  Conlin,
Proprietors
Shoe Repairing
on bunatngs. All tola, on
the relation ot gold to commodity Thurs(lay a(ternoon there were tour
values than upon any other subject' „ (rnmo bulwlnB8 umlcl. way on
given among men. Yet there is no- lota purcllaBca nt pe Vancouver sale,
thing really   simpler,   provided   tl» tne total cost 0, whlch will not „.
character of this relation is remembered. Gold has been chosen ns the
standard of value and medium of exchange because ot its rarity and indestructibility, and the relative values of everything else are measured
ln terms of It. Instead of saying
that a bushel ot wheat Is worth two
bushels of oats, we say that a bushel of wheat is worth a dollar or pennyweight of gold, which Is what a
dollar is, and a bushel of oats Is j
worth fifty cents, or halt a pennyweight. It wheat goes up to a dollar and ten cents, and oats to fifty-
five cents, their values in relation to
ono another have not changed ono
lota. If all prices rlso the value ot
no commodity has changed. It is
gold, by which they are measured,
which has changed. One of the best
excuses for the adoption of gold as
a standard is because ot all commodities, It in the most stable, for two
reasons, one because Its durability
keeps a great stock in hand, the other because its rarity prevents sudden
Increases ln 'quantity.—Winnipeg Telegram.
"I understand that Crimson Gulch
has a newspaper," "Yes," answered
Broncho Bob. "But the fellows round
hero is so sensitive that they dasn't grafting
cccd ?2,000. David J. Ilnys, who is
thc sales agent of the Grand Trunk
Pacific Town & Development Co.,
Ltd., at Prince Rupert, this morning
reported that ln two days (Thursday
and Friday) the sale of lots to residents of Prince Rupert aggregated
$135,000. As these sales were made
to men who expect to do business ln
Prince Rupert, it is more than likely some of them will, ln the near tu'
ture, begin erecting buildings in
which to do business. There is a
feeling ot hostility against the outsiders who bid lots away beyond
their value, and as most ot these
blddors picked Second avenue and
McBride street as the future buslneub
center ot the town, residents who
have purchased lots through the local sales agent of the townsite company are planning to make Sixth i
street tbe business center, claiming |
that lots on Second and Third avenues, for a block on each side ol
Sixth street, will lie central for business for many a long day. These
men are on the ground, have businesses established, and If thoy pull
together they will accomplish what
they have set out to do. But they
will have to adopt a broad-gauge
policy and keep the sell-seeking,
crowd   on   back   benches,
I am ready lo repair Boots   and
Shoes.     Satisfaction Guaranteed.
FRANK    SriNATO,
Corner Third ave. and High street,
near Queen's Hotel.
GRAND HOTEL
CONVENIENT
COMFORTABLE
Excellent Boarding
HEPPLE~&_SMlTi:.
Proprietors.
ESQUIMALT AND
NANAIMO RAILWAY
Double Train
Service
3 1 2        4
10.00    0.00    VICTORIA    12.05 18.35
18.4S   11.57   LADYSMITH    0.00 15.58
19.25   12.35     NANAIMO      8.15 15.15
L. D. CHETHAM,
Dist. Pass. Agt.
*0 *a 'viwpiA
PUBLIC NOTICE.
This is to notify the public that
I, James Rowe, will not be responsible for any debts contracted by my
wife, on and, after this date, wit now
my will ten permission. Any accounts uoinst me should be sent ln
nt once.
JAMES ROWE,
Ladysmith, Juna IC, 1909.
print anything about 'em." "Hat Prince Rupert has a gang of sell-
editorial staff must have many dlf-1 seekers, so Intensely selfish in every
cultlcs." "Mister, that ain't any | thing, that it is doubtful11 their pro-
editorial    atafl.    That's a    suicide tfta[onl „• willingness to work   for
c,ub*         ^^ the common good will be accepted at
' TT* par.  However, The Empire, from Its
tarras^Tatdf %?U& J-- «■*■.- *■ *-J ™
this measure imposes is unjust. It, Fraction mineral claim, is not Intor-
makes the offender pay twice. It is ested in the aggregate ot the town
like an  Incident thnt   occurred   one; lot snleg) otncr than m tat cBcct tnc
night ln a Pennsylvania restaurant.
A patron, dining ln the restaurant
with his wife, said to the waiter,
when his bill wan brought: "Walter,
ono Item Is wrong here. Wo didn't
have three platen ol soup. We only
had two.' 'Pardon me, boen,' said
the   waiter.   'You forgot the   plate
payment of such large sums ot money has on the general welfare of tbe
town, and the fight that is on between tbe "outsiders" nnd tho "insiders" will be watched and truthfully reported from week to week.—
what I spilled over the lady's dress.' I Prince Rupert Umpire.
"LAND REGISTRY ACT."
Lot 2,   Block   29 (Map   703   A)
In the matter of an application tor
a Duplicate Certificate of Title to
Town of Ladysmith.
Notice Is hereby given that lt  is
my intention  at  the  expiration  of
one month from the date of the first
publication hereof to issue a Duplicate Certificate ot Title to said land
issued    to   William  Beverldge   and
Henry Relfel on the 3rd day of November, 1902, and numbered 8203 C.
8. Y. WOOTTON,
IWgistrar-Ueneral ot Titles.
Land   Registry   Office,  Victoria, B
0„ tha ftth .lav o' AsiU, UN.
Ladysmith Waterworks
NOTICE
On and after this date
water consumers must not
sprinkle streets or roads.
The following rules will
govern gardens and lawns:
Below 3rd Avenue—In the
morning from 7 to 10 o'clock.
Above 3rd Avenue—In the
evening from 5 to 8 o'clock.
Dated June 9th 1909.
J.J. Bland,
Superintendent ot Waterworks
Ladysmith Bakery
Company
Cales ol every; description, tana
and plain. CancUei of all kinds
Fruit ot all kinds. Fresh broad ever
dd*-
Reasonable prices. Come and sa
our line* and leave your orders. W
giv* careful attention.
Hop Lee, Prop.
Esplanade ttrect,   Ladyimith.
Hens for Sale
One Hundred Hens for
sale. Apply D. Davies,
Rancher,  near Ladysmith.
Leave orders at Robert's
Butcher Shop.
■   TRANSFER OP LICENSE.
Notice is hereby given tbat It is
my intention to make application to
tho Board of Commissioners ot the
City ot LadyBtntth at their next* regular meeting for a transfer of the
retail liquor license now held by me
in respect 'to the premises known as
the Pilot Hotel, situate on Lot 9,
Block 126, tn the City ot Lndysmith,
from myself to Alexander Thomas.
J. R. THOMAS.
Ladysmith, 25th May, 1909.
AU kind* o> Clock and Watt* »*•
Ulrts    ^■-"'■'."•t.tini Uuar*i)V,a'f r .
Reasonable Prices.
Knelish Watches a Specialty.
]. R. Easton
Practi*".! Watchmaker.
AM »«* •-"  «f, M. V»»i.hN' (rf/'-i
will lectin) I***   t rttoetMn.
Chong Kee
Laundry
Wishing and Ironing p. .aptly attended
to.
MtatU.
V«V. THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
How the Law Reads
Opinions diiter radically the world difficulty ot producing such evidence •
over as to what constitutes a breach-is, ot course, practically insurmount-,
of promise. In some parts of the able, nnd such cases are rarely tried.
United States the laws refuse to re-'As may be imagined, the Btiletto is-
cognize any breach of promise case a more common way of deciding sue*
tnd a man may become engaged and' disputes.
disengaged as often as he likes   with j    Tho best of all countries, from tbe
impunity. | plaintiffs point of view, iB England.
In some states, again, enormous The law greatly favors thc abused
damages may be awarded on the barest evidence. The attitude of the law
toward the man wha changes his' would bo laughed out of court In al
mind alter popping the question in most any other country. A curious
il fterent countries also differs widely, light on the strictness ot the law is ■
although as a general rule the faith- afforded In two recent) decisions where |
less man is likely to have rather the'damages were granted for $50,0(10,
Letter ot it. against the editor ot a   matrimonial j
There are fewer breach of promlBe paper and in n misunderstanding be-
cases in France than in any   other rtween a   well-known actres'B and the
country.   Tne    French   law   requires eldest son of an earl.
the plaintiff to prove in court   that
party and a   verdict is often reached
and damages paid on evidence which
Bhe has    suncrcd  a   pecuniary   loss
l.y   her   fiancee's   change   of   mind.
'throughout   France a   bride   almost
iuvariably    has   a "dot,"   large   or ] toriana
small,    and   tho   fart   is likely    to'
i
weaken her case.   Thc same law has
cj.*cn adopted in Austria and Holland,
where the number of such cases is
proportionately very small, A simpler and more direct method is, of
course, for thc relatives of the .plain-
tilt to take the law into their own
hands.
In Germany an elaborate method
of announcing the betrothal practi-
ly puts an end to all breach of promise cases. As soon as a couple become engaged the pair visit the public town hall and declare their willingness to marry, and Bign, with
witnesses, a series of documents
which render a change of mind on thd
HISTORY OF PLAYING CARDS.
It has been claimed by many his-
that the French invented
them, about the fourteenth century
or later, nnd that they were made to
play games with to amuse the French
court nnd people. Nothing could be
farther from the truth than this ac-!
count of their origin and purposes.
If they were so invented, why is lt;
that the court cards bear upon their 1
faces oven to this day, not only the
likenesses of ancient kings, queens]
and courtiers of Egypt, but also secret symbols of the maji and priests
of iBis? These symbols havo been
handed down nnd reproduced by each
generation of engravers and printers, I
as it were unconsciously. The wandering tribes of Gypsies have preserv-,|
cd the secrets of cards as emblems of
man's part   practically   out of   thc planetary  motion,   time, etc., wlth-
question.
When either party wishes to withdraw from this agreement the pair
again visit the town hall and another series of documents are form-ally
signed, witnessed and sealed. The
authorities then determine the question of compensation for injured feelings, if there be any, It is not uncommon tor the man  to claim   thc
out having preserved the higher
knowledge that enables us to explain
why and how it is that they have
theso properties. Richmond is of the
opinion that playing cards had their
origin even farther back than Egypt.
Even upon the Island of Atlautls, a
remnant of what was ence an immense continent now covered by the
ocean.   But, lot   this be as lt. may,
and symbolical reference to time,
planetary motion and tho occult calculations and mysteries of the magi.
Thus the fifty two cards correspond
to the weeks in n year. The court
cards to the months and signs of tho
sodiac. Hearts in the first quarter
symbolize spring, also love and'
friendship; clubs in tbe second tiuar-!
ter, also knowledge, learning, religion, heat, temper, quarrels, law-,
suits, etc.; diamonds in tho third
quarter symbolize fall, when the
crops are gathered and sold, and
therefore represent wealth, power und]
trade; spades rule in the fourth quar- j
ter, and stand Ior winter, cold, dark- j
ness, death, hardship, labor, etc.
Every aspect has its ruling or emblematic card, and every day and
years its ruling card, even the miu-|
utcs have each a card called the mint
uto card of time. In anclont times
tbey only recognized three hundred
unci sixty-four dayn to tbe year, the'
odd day being regarded as waste
time and used up in pleasure ami
amusement. Now, as each card rillco]
a day under each of tbe seven planets during tbe year, you can see tbat'
they exactly 1111 out tho year, seven
times lifty-two making three hundred
and sixty-lour. Seven has always
been a sacred number among all na-
tions and in all religions, the center,
bo to speak, of all symbolic numbers.
Seven is also the center of each of
the four suits of cards, whether;
counting Irom the king or from the'
ace. The thirteen cards ol each suit
are also astronomical and indicates
among other things, knowledge ol
good and evil. It is singular says
Mr. Richmond, hut it is a fact, that
many times inventors anl manufacturers have endeavored to introduce
cards with a change in thc emblems
used, but in every case tbey have
mot with a failure.
G. W. DUNN.
Railway Expansion
damages which commonly amount to. they   were   used   by the   Ggyptinn
one-fifth of the marriage dowry. priests   in their sacred astronomical
Still another method Is followed In! mysteries,     as    abundant    evidence
Teacher—"I wonder what your
mother would say ii she knew how
backward you are in geography?"
Girl—Ob, my mother says alio never learnt Jogtry, and she's ajiarrled;
and Aunt Sally snyo shc never learnt
jogiry, and she's married; and you
did and you ain't.
Italy, to the consternation of any
possible plaintiff. The law requires
the person suing for breach of promise, of whichever sex, to produce a
written promise to marry from the
defendant, otherwise the cane is Instantly    thrown    out of court.   The
shows. They regarded them as sacred emblems ot astronomical time
and combinations of the solar system. SayB Amnion: The religion ot
the Egyptians was wholly based on
astronomy and these cards were constructed  with pertect   mathematical
Miss Ellen Terry, at a reception in
New York, talked about thc lnnnm-1
crable women who asked her to help
them to get on the stage. "The fact
is," she said, "every women under
SO believes she is an actress. And
evory actress," she added, "believes
die is under 30."
The railway development of Western,Canada is shown by the estimate
of $85,000,000 to be spent in actual
construction work during tho current
year. This is only a rough estimate
but it Will not be widely nBtray when
the totals can be accurately determined. The construction work laid put
by the Canadian Pacific is tbe most
costly and calls tor the expenditure
ol over $20,000,000. James J. Hill
Hill will spend $15,000,000 on the
Great Northern and subsidiary corn-
panics in Western Canada, and thc
work projected will make a fourth
trunk system across the prairies
westward from Winnipeg. Thc Canadian Northern intends to spend
somo $11,000,000, part of which will
be for tho extension of its main line
toward tbe Pacific coast. A like
amount will bo spent by the Grand
Trunk Pacific on its main line between Winnipeg and the Pacific
Coast, but a largo part ol the money
used by this company during 1909
will be on its branch lines. The Rail- j
way World, one ot tbe leading Amer- j
ican journals in its special field, puV
lisbes these figures and notes the ex-!
pansion they indicate in Canadian
railway construction, It is such statistics and estimates that show how
rapidly a uew nation is awakening
into Hie in what was till recently an
almost unknown land. This so-called Loom in railway building, almost
startling ns it is in aggregate estimate, Is barely keeping pace with the*
substantial development of the country served.
In every surveyed district settlement has preceded the railways, and
settlers are crying out Impatiently
for the promised meads of reaching
markets. Wherever thero Is a prospect of railway extension the homesteader Is on thc spot, ready to furnish bin share of business where
transportation enterprise does its
part. The railway expansion may
with propriety,be designated a boom,
but tbe word must not be used in
its disparaging sense. Thc substantial growth ot the country served
promises abundant returns on the
railway investments now freely mudo
The ambitious projects of the Dominion arc justified alike by the Immediate and future prospects of substantial development. Railway enterprise on such a scale would be
alarming in a country less richly endowed with   natural resources,    but
Canada, is merely coming to her own
and making proper use of the wealth
she has inherited.—Toronto Globe.
ODDS AND ENDS.
W. Bourke Cockran at a St. Patrick's Day dinner,, told a story of an
Irishman who was talking about the
cast of Baring Gould whose obituary
was recently printed ;by mistake, Mr.
Gould still being happily in circulation: "So," said the Irishman,
"they've printed the funeral notice
av a man that ain't dead yet, hov
they? Faith, an' it's a nice fix he'd
be in now il he wns nan o' thim people lhat belaves iverytblng they see
in the papers."
A Scotch minister and his triend
coming from a wedding, began to
consider the state in which their potations at the least had left them.
"Sandy," said tho minister, "just
stop a minute till I go ahead. Perhaps I don't walk steady and th*
guid wife might remark something
not right." He walked ahead for a
short distance, and then called out:
"How is it? Am I walking straight?'
"Oh, aye," answered Sandy thickly,
"yere a' recht—but who's that wi'
ye?"
President Hadley, of Yale, not long
ago entertained at dinner the son of
one of his classmates, the youth being a Yale freshman. Thc conversation turned to football, and what
the president had to say on the subject was news to the freshman, who
realized the fact with considerable
surprise. He listened for some time,
and then said to Mrs. Hadley, condescendingly enough' l"Do you know,
Mrs. Hadley, that only illustrates
the old saying that one can loam
something of anybody."
S. J. GIFFORD
Livery, Peed and Sale
Stables
EXPRESS WORK A SPECIALTY
WOOD FOR SALE
First, Avfinufi.
Phone 58.
A.JARVINEN
Photographer
First Class   Photos.
rJoilerv on First Avmnn.
T. E. Sullivan
Plumbing, Gas and Steantfitting.
Prices Reasonable.
First Avenue, near New West.vn hotel
Singer and Wheeler & Wilson
Saint-Saens, tlie French composer,
during his visit to Chicago made a
brief addreBS on America at a dinner
party. "The American business spirit," he said in the course of this address, "1b an excellent thing. To it,
undoubtedly, America's unexampled
prosperity Is due. But I think that
this spirit la f.o...ctlmcs carried too
far. For instance, in a hotel barber
shop yesterday I asked the barber if
he had ever heard a certain celebrated pianist. 'No sir,' be replied emphatically. 'These pinnistn never
patronize me nnd so I never patronize them.* "
SEWING MACHINES
If you are thinking of buying a sewing machine call
and see um stock cf ±cr.
soiled machines at reduced
prices to clear.
A. E. PALMER
FIRST AVENUE
F. C. Fisher
TEACHER OF MUSIC
Studio in Williams' Block.
Have Your Houses Plastered
For Terms apply to
C. HINE, Plasterer, etc., Ladysmith, P. 0.
4
Cement Sidewalks a specialty.
=The Canadian National Holiday Will Be Celebrated at"
LADYSMITH, T
, JULY 1,1909
Field Sports, Lacrosse, Tug-of-War, Regatta,
Indian  Canoe Races, Trap Shooting, Etc.
GRAND *|   AAA    IX]     PP|7FQ FINE
ATTRACTIONS     -P ■ jV/UU    111     KKI/.LO     PROGRAMME
Come and Join in the Greatest Dominion Day Celebration Ever Held on Vancouver Island
wixs. j i xtmmTirrmmriM* m*t '■
EXCURSION RATES ON THE E. & N. RAILWAY f HE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
Boots and
Shoes
The Celebrated
AHREN8  BOOTS  ATtD   SHOES,
Every Pair Guaranteed or will be
replaced with another pair. In Men's
Boy's and Girl's. The Best- School
Shoes in Town. Also Children's Wash
Ing Suits and Sailor Blouses, and
Strachan Hats.
DON'T JTORGHT THE STORE!
J. J. Thomas
HIGH STREET
Made to Order
I sell the
Semi-Ready Clothing
Every piece is guaranteed
to fit, and the price no
higher than ready made
clothing.
B. L WOOD
First Avenue
Boxi73
Phone 43
For Meats
OF ALL KINDS, SAUSAGE A
SPECIALTY, LEAVE ORDERS
AT
Geo. Roberts'
Meat Market
Cor. First Ave. and Roberta Street.
LADYSMITH.
For the Warm Weather
A new Stock of
Summer Undervests
and Hosiery
-AT-
Miss Uren's
LIVERY STABLE
ft. ft. WELLS, Proprietor
Hsok, Express, Livery and Feed Stable
DRAY WORK AND FURNITURE
MOVING.    WOOD FOR SALE
, Phone 62
First Avenue        -       Ladytmllh, B. C
Fresh Vegetables
Grown by White Labor
Green Onions, Spinach,
Lettuce, Rhubarb.
E. Pannell
ARE YOU GOING TO BUILD
a fence or a house, It so consult me
as I can save you money on lumber,
Having purchased a low truck. I
am prepared to move furniture, and
jjlanoe.
For any teaming consult
THORNLEY
a.'AnvfUiiTH   -- 11* EHQMELfk
Memories of  a
Bohemian Club
How many people havo Blghed [or
and continue to sigh for tho disappearance of the old-fashioned, unpretentious literary club ot the past?
All such will be keenly Interested in
the late Mr. David Masson's "Memories of a London Club" in the pages of "Blackwood's Magazines," It
wa3 in 1841 that Mr. Masson was escorted'by George Henry Lowes to a
house at the foot of Northumberland
street. "In an upper room of thiB
house I found a number of men seated, some on chairs, some on wooden
benches, talking and smoking—not
moro than twenty, perhaps, altogether." This formed the nucleus ot the
Museum Club, which ln Its turn was
transmuted into thc "Our Club" ot
these charming reminiscences,
DOUGLAS JERROLD.
Through all the vicissitudes ot this
club one man of letters remained its
dominating personality until his
death. This personality was Douglas
Jerrold, whom Mr. Masson met tor
the first time in 1844. "He was a
little man," he writes, "with a>
stoop, and a very striking face' an
aquiline, eager look; with fair hair,
which he would sometimes dash aside
with his hands—altogether, a man
like a little Nelson, with his courageous look. He was, when I first
Knew him, at the height ot his fame
and reputation, alter having bad a
bard and struggling life—flrst as a
middy in our Navy, then, after the
peace, ns printer in a London printing office. With his theatrical connection—his father hud been jnanager
of n small .provincial thoatre—he took
to writing for various smaller theatres, and by this time he was known
as the author of various plays and
novels, as a magazine writer, nnd a
writer in newspapers." On one occasion a member sent the club boy
downstairs tor a newspaper or a |\ook
and shouted after him, "I suppose
you can read!" This instantly roused Douglas Jcrrold's anger, and he
turned on that member exclaiming,
"Sir, you have a coarse mind!"
THE   TROUBLE   WITH   DICKENS.
On a very different occasion Douglas Jerrold exhibited thc same large-
minded generosity. It was nt u dinner in thc old Garrick Club ut which
Jerrold and Dickens found themselves sitting nt different tables,, and almost exactly back to back:
It was while our dinner was going
on that my neighbor at table—I
think-- Hnmstodc—remarked to mo
that it was rather awkward they
should be so seated, there having
been n quarrel between them arising
out of the thcatrlcnl performances
given in aid of some Dramatists'
Fund; so thnt tbey had not spoken
to each other for some considerable
time. Certainly, nil,the while tho
dinners were going on, thero was no
communication between Jerrold anil
Dickens; and it looked ns it that
would be the case throughout thc
evening. But suddenly Jerrold wheel
cd round in bis chair, clapped Die*
kens on the shoulder, and Baid, ,mitc
audibly, "Charlie, my boy, bow aro
you?" On which Dickens wheeled
round too, holding out both his
hands to Jerrold in most cordial reconciliation, but had left it to Jerrold, as the older man to make the
first overture.
This incident was typical both   of
Douglas Jerrold aud Dickens.
THACKERAY'S IRISH FRIEND.
On Douglas  Jcrrold's death Thackeray succeeded to tho unchallenged
leadership   of "Our Club,"   "At   all
our meetings,"   writes Mr. Masson,
"at tho   Garrick and   at Our Club,
Thackeray   always seemed  to mc—in
spite of his light humor, and his habitual   nick-name   of 'Thack' among
his triends—to be a man apart; a sad
and  highly   sensitive    man, a  man
with whom nobody could take a liberty."  An  Irishman, however,   once
I took a most audacious literary liber- i
ty with thc author of "Vanity Fair.".
1 Thackeray, out of good nature,   in-
j duced  the editor   of "Fraser's"   to
I print a  paper   by this   Irish friend,'
j who was in very low water.   A week
' or  two   afterwards   thc    editor  ot'
"FrnBer's"  informed Thackeray that1
the article had been stolen verbatim
from another periodical:   "I was   of
course grentlj annoyed,"  said Thackeray to Mr. Masson, "and indeed ex-
, cessively angry; and I thought, 'Well, I
j I must cut the fellow for ever; there's
j no getting on with him.'   I took the
! clipping with me. and went straight
I to my friend's rooms, intending   to
blow him up, onco for all, nnd  have1
done with   him.   I showed him   the;
clipping,   and declared his behaviour
to have    been scandalous.   What do
you think bo did?  Ho laughed in my
face, and treated thc whole affair as
a joi'c!   That's how iny  Irish triend
served mo; but oh! he was tho nicest
friend,   the dourest, most delightful
Icllow, I ever knew in thc world.
A JACOB'S LADDER.
' Thackorny then wont on to speak
seriously of his knowledge of the Tr-
1 ish character and his appreciation ot
' thc Irish people. "And among other
things, ho said (here wus one most
likeable quality that ho had observed in them, and it was this: that
there never would be found an Irishman anywhere so low down but
there wns some other Irishman, still
lower down, depending on him, and
whom ho wns assisting." Mr. Mas-
son suggested that in this thero was
no groat difference between tho Irish
and thc Scotch, "for it might be said
of the Scotch (I said I preferred to
be put In thc reverse way) that there
was no Scotsman anywhere in thc
world so high up, but there was
some other Scotsman, still higher up
whom he waB looking up to, und be.
Ing helped by; that, in (act, to blend
his observation and mine, tho world
might be said to bo a kind, of Jacob's
ladder, with ascending and descending angels upon it." The creator ot
Mr, Blnnio laughed, and the talk elided.
Late Stories of
George Bernard Shaw
MILES OF CHEAT' BATTLESHIPS.
) MMMOMMMMMNOM
It
Surprises
Her
tilt*        (0rr**6nT
when tho housewife visits our stove and sees tho array ol dollcacioi for lice
table that sho can procure for Hindi a small amount of monuy at one store,
Fresh canned fruits, vegetnles, and toothsome hams, htioon and everything in
iancy and staple groceries at prices to suit the economical,
GEAR'S IDEAL GROCERY
Scott's Building, First Avenue.
A pageant of unmatched magnificence and a lesson of infinite importance will be presented to the citizens
ot London toward the close of July.
The combined fleets of the Atlantic
and the home waters, after maneuv-
criog in the North sea, will steam
to Southend nnd from that water
gate of the capital will extend in almost unbroken line to the heart of
London. Nearly forty mileB of battleships and cruisers, with their multitude, of smaller craft, will stretch
like a mighty arrow,along the Thames and the point of the arrow, form
ed of torpedo boat3 and destroyers,
will lie in the shadow of parliament,
while the shaft, of battleships and
cruisers, is prolonged to the Nore.
This display, the like of which has
never been witnessed in any capital,
will follow upon the review at Spit-
head when delegates to the
imperial press conference will see thil
strength of that navy on which the
security of the empire depends. Having gratified the eye and stimulated
the patriotism or journalists from
over the seas, thc fleet under Admiral May, will proceed to Margate and
give to that popular resort an attraction that should probe Irresistible.
Then comes the visit to London on
or about July -17. Three days later
tho lord mayor and all the members
of tha corporation of the city will
pay an official visit to the fleet at
Southend and will be thc guests of
the admiral. For the entertainment
of the city fathers, a mimic battle
will be fought at the mouth of tho
Thames. Next day this visit will be
returned by the fleet and a thousand
bluejackets will lunch at the Guildhall with the lord mayor ns their
host. Aud in order that the people
may have a share in thc welcome tho
sailors will march to the Guildhall
liy it route that will give opportunity for popular demonstration.
On Thursday, July 22, tho tour;
teen admirals and as many offlccrs
ns can be spared Irom flic ships will
lunch ut the Guildhall. In proof oi
its hospitable designs, the corporation has voted for those noval entertainments a sum ol $10,000.
This, shortly, is the program of nn
historic event that will enable both
pnrliameot and the people to realise
what is the strength and meaning of
our navy.
Two bnttle squadrons, in which nre
four Dreadnoughts, the mightiest engines of war, with twelve other battleships of enormous power, two
cruiser squadrons, swift and strong
to destroy, and an armada of destroyers and torpedo boats and submarines— these arc tho component
parts of the pageant. The appearance of these leviathans ot tha deep
at our doors should be an object
lesson and nn inspiration.
COOKED
PRESSED
Corn Beef
Chicken and Veal at all times
E. &. N. RAILWAY
■M^»MsMMjai»MWMW*«^»M..iM     IMIIIIMl        III     I Ml      m\
Special Excursions
ACCOUNT OP
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition
Round Trip Tickets will be issued to Victoria June 16,
return limit June 20th. July 4, return limit 7th, rate
$2.80. /
L. D. CHETHAM,
D. P. A.
J. ft.  Ryan
BUTCHER
Pure Ice Cream
Constantly
On Hand
Tobaccos, Cigars,  Etc.
Bestquality of Confectionery
Miss Bardozona
Get Ready for the Summer by
Having Your House Painted
Best materials only used.
Big stock of wall paper on
hand.
PRICES THE LOWEST
J. E. Smith
^"-itiiBc-
The Censor's objection to Blanco
Tosnet has made Mr. Bernard Shaw
once more the most-tnlked-of man ot
the hour, and a tew stories concerning this very original writer will be
apropos. A well-known ,ttctor-manj
ager tolls of a visit he once had trom
Mr. Shuw, who was anxious to read
him a play. "G. B. S." put his
band into his breast pocket and produced a small notebook, ' which he
placed carefully on the table. Then
he dived into another pocket and
brought out another notebook. He
proceeded to ransack his pockets, in
fact, until he had brought to light nc
less than seven small notebooks,'
which he placed in a row upon the
table. "That's the play," he said!
complacently. "I always write my;
plays on the tops ot 'buses, so 1
have to use notebooks."
"0. B. S." has a dislike for ■
the. conventional that must make his
life hardly worth living. He has ev-,
en expressed his hatred for the harmless white collar. "The only man
who ought to wear a white collar,"
he once said, "is the negro." In
the day time, continued Mr. Shaw,
he himself walked about in a collar
that was not white. The sight ot
himself in the hideous combination
of a white collar against his flesh
would give him greater pain than the
utter contempt of the English public
as it passed by bim. Among "G. B.
a.'s" other dislikes, are tobacco and
doctors.
(Mr. Shaw's unconventionally is no
new thinr, nnd even as a voung man
he was   known   for his  originality.
When he first began to write theatre
cal criticisms he had a great objee- j
tion to dress clothes, and turned upi
one night at a fashionable theatre in
day attire,   At thc entrance to   the |
stalls.ho was politely stopped   by pii
attendant.     "What   do   you   object
to?"   asked   Mr. Shaw; "thc   velvet
jacket?"    Tho     attendant     nodded.
"Very well,"  exclaimed "B.  B.  8." j
not in the least abashed, "I will re-
movo it," and ho took a step forward
in his   shirt sleeves.   "Here,     thatj
won't do!" exclaimed the attendant
In  groat alarm.   "Won't do?"    said
Shaw,   "Ho you  think  I  am   going
'to take  off any more?"  Whereupon,!
ho replaced   his coat   and promptly |
lott the theatre.
vies meant to get to the top If there
was the least lability to warrant such'
a rising.
The "Parson" was one ot the 6rst
men to recognise thc ability of "Jim'
Jeffries. It was before the big whito
man became champion that. Davies in
an interview remarked:
"Jeffries-is thc greatest fighting m*«
chine that the wond has ever know-l
or ever will know."
Davies is about sixty years old. He
never told his exact age.i He was as
shy about that as an old maid. He
was born in Ireland, and thc first
fight he ever witnessed was in Kil-
larney. The battle was bare knuckles
between nn Orangeman and a Catholic. jYoung Davies possessed himself
of $25 of his father's money and bet
on the Catholic. He won, and from
that time on he followed tbe pugilisV
tic game.
Church Services.
CHURCH OF ENGLAND.       .
Matins— 11 a. m.
Avensong— 7 p. m.
Sunday SchoolW 2.30. p. in.
Preachers—Morning,    Rev.   R.    J.
Boweni'-evening,, Rev. G. M~Ambrose
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Sunday Services at 11 a. m. and tl
p. rn. Bible Class and SumHy
School at 2 p. m. Prayer meeting
Wednesday at 7 p. n\.
METHODIST CHURCH.
Epworth League meets at tlie close
of the Sunday evening service.
Prayer meeting Wednesday at 7.30
p. m.
Sabbath Services: Morning, 11 a.
m; evening, 7 p. m.; Sabbath school
and Bible class, 2.30 p. m..
R. WILKINSON, Pastor
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Sunday services: At 8 a. nv, low
mass. '-At 10:30 a. in., hic,h mass.
M 2 p. in., Sunday school. At 7
n tn,, evening service and Benediction.
Wise—Now, he's got what I call
'horse sense' Asciim—How, for Instance?   Wise—Ho never bets on one.
1p CLASSIFIED ADS Ir
IW PER WORD ■ W
Advertisements under this head
one cent per word per iBSue, payable in advance.             ._. „.	
ueiv
Some years ago, before he was as
famous as ho la today, Mr. Shuw met
a young lady at a dinner-party who
said that shc could read character
from writing. Mr. Shaw denied belief in her powers, and said, that any
rate she  could  not  read characters
from typewriting. Now it happened 7„"death it was a comtort to re-
thnt tho host had just got a typo-iember that brothers were ready to
writer, and the young lady offered t j uccor the helpless ones left behind,
bo put to the test. The machine wasnd aBt»- Breifter comfort to look
._       , .,    _,, ,,, .jrward to the beatific Vision ot   a
brought, and Mr. Shaw, picking out[eavenly pathcr
the letters one by one, wrote his Jeremy Taylor, South, Lord Clar-
flrst name. Then he discovered thatndon, nnd Leigh Hunt were quoted
he had only used capital letters; so0 sho*  the beauties   of friendship,
.,,,,      .     .,,  .   „„„„   .     _,...„l"! latter quotation being tho   well
shifting to the lower case, he wrote flwm „Abot   mn Mb__^„
his last name. Then he handed the lyhp ,,aumi.i.i |<rMi»|<« «»> unel
result af his companion.  This   was '
what she read: "BERNARD shaw."
"It's as plain as anything," she said
with a smile. "It is your idea that
though there are a good many: Shawi
In the world, they are an undistinguished lot. You alone are Bernard
3haw, and your name is great."
Not long since, Mr. Shaw found
that he was unable to fulfill an engagement to speak In public, and It
was announced from the platform
that the doctor had forbidden him ti>
venture out ot doors, and that therefore he could not lea. his bed, A
Press agency immedlntolv wired to
Mr. Shaw for more information on
the subject, and received the following reply: "Kindly inform the public thnt I am dead, It will save mc
a great deal ot trouble— Bernard
Shaw."-M. A. P.
Parson Davies
Reported Dying
Chicago, June 17f-"Parson" Davies, who Is said to be tn his last
Illness at the home of his sister here,
while his old partner, Pat Shcedy, Is
sorlously ill in New York, wns formerly one of tho bcBt known figures
of the squared circle. '
John L. Sullivan, Jake Kiirnln,
Peter Jackson, "Jack" Dempsey,
"Jack" Burke, Evan Lewis, and!
"Jim" Hall wcro all managed at
somo time or other hy "ParBon" Da-i
vies and the timo when they we^
managed bs him was tbe time when ,
ther achieved tame. To be under D«v
FQEND-A Red Cillie Dog. Owner
can have same by applying to
Frank Torest, Gatacre street, and
paying for this advert
LOST.
LOST — Between Roberts street,
Third avenue and High street,
book, entitled "Pun Doctor."
Please return to Mrs. Bwart, High,
street.  $1.00 Reward.
TOR SALE.
POR SALE-Brown and White Rabbits. Fifty Cwita each. tApply Mm
John Stevr<ut*t
POR SALE—White Leghorn eggs for
setting. Bull Leghorns and Black
Minorcas. (2.50 a setting. Apply
Mrs. Laird.
POR 8ALE—Express wagon ln perfect order and harness. Apply Arthur Howe, Chemainus.
FOB SALE—Pour roomed house In
good locality ln Extension, B.
0.   Apply Ike Storey.
PIANO FOR SALE.-Upright Grand
Dominion Piano in first class condition. In use only a short time.
Apply Mrs. Bernard, Union Brew-
ery, Ladysmith,
WANTED.
WANTED*-* girl to assist in light
housework. Apply Mrs. Mmbol-
laml, First avenue, Lndysmith,
_____ <
Dr. R. B. Dier
Surgeon Dentist
ALL WORK_»jUABANTEeO THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
How the Law Reads
Opinions differ radically thc world
over as to what constitutes a breach
ot promise. In some parts of the
United States the laws refuse to recognize any breach of promise case
and a man may become engaged and
disengaged as often as he likes with
impunity.
In some states, again, enormous
damages may bo awarded on the barest evidence. Thc attitude of the law
toward the man wha changes his
mind after popping the question in
d flerent countries also differs widely,
although as a general rule the lalth-
lcss man Is likely to have rather the
better of it.
There are fewer broach of promise
cases in France than in any other
country. Tne French law requires
the plaintiff to prove in court that
she has suficred a pecuniary loss
by her fiancee's change of mind,
'throughout France a bride almost
invariably has a "dot," large or
small, and. the fact is likely to
weaken her case, Thc same law has
lj.*en adopted in Austria and Holland,
where the number of such cases is
proportionately very small, A simpler and more direct method is, of
course, for thc relatives of the .plaintiff to take the law into their own
hands.
In Germany an elaborate method
of announcing the betrothal practi-
ly puts an end to all breach of promise cases. As soon as a couple become engaged the pair visit the public town hall and declare their willingness to marry, and sign, with
witnesses, a series of documents
which render a change of mind on the*
man's part practically out of the
question.
When either party wishes to withdraw from this agreement the pair
again visit the town hall and another series of documents are formally
signed, witnessed and sealed. The
authorities then determine the question of compensation for injured feelings, if there be any, It is not uncommon for the man to claim thc
damages which commonly amount to
one-fifth of tbe marriage dowry.
Still another method is followed in
Italy, to the consternation of any
passible plaintiff. The law requires
the person suing for breach of promise, ot whichever sex, to produce a
written promise to marry from the
defendant, otherwise the case Is instantly    thrown   out of court.   The
difficulty of prodnclng such evidence
I is, of course, practically insurmountable, and such cases are rarely tried(
As may be imagined, the stiletto is
a more common way ol deciding bucK
disputes.
The best of all countries, from the
plaintiff's point of view, is England.
The law greatly favors tho abused
party and a verdict is often reached
and damages paid on evidence which
would bo laughed out of court in almost any other country. A curious
light on the strictness ot the law is
| afforded in two recent decisions where
damages were granted for $50,000
against the editor of a matrimonial
paper and in a misunderstanding between a well-known actress and tlio
eldest son of an carl.
HISTORY OF PLAYING CARDS.
It has been claimed by many historians that the French Invented
them, about the fourteenth century
or later, and that they were made to
play games with to amuse the French
court and people. Nothing could be
farther from the truth than this account of their origin and purposes.
If they were so invented, why is it
that the court cards bear upon their
faces even to this day, not only the
likenesses of ancient kings, queens
and courtiers of Egypt, but also secret symbols of the majl and priests
of Isis? These symbols have been
handed down and reproduced by each
generation of engravers and printers,
as it were unconsciously. The wandering tribes of Gypsies have present
cd the secrets of cards as emblems of
planetary motion, time, etc., without having preserved the higher
knowledge that enables us to explain
why and how it is that they have
theso properties. Richmond is' of the
opinion that playing cards had their!
origin even farther back than Egypt,
Even upon the Island of Atlantis, a'
remnant of what was once an immense continent now covered by the |
ocean. But, let this be as it. may,
they were used by the Ggyptian
priests in their sacred astronomical
mysteries, as abundant evidence
shows. They regarded them as sacred emblems of astronomical time
and combinations of the solar system. Says Ammon: Thc religion ol
the Egyptians war, wholly   based on
and   symbolical  reference   to  time,
planetary motion and tho occult calculations and mysteries of the magi.
Thus the fifty two cards correspond
to   the weeks in  a year.   The court
cards to the months and signs of tho
zodiac.   Hearts   in the   first quarter
symbolize   spring,     also    love   and
triendship; cluli3 in the second liuar-
ter,   also   knowledge,   learning,   religion, heat, temper,  quarrels,   lawsuits,   etc.; diamonds   ln   the third
quarter   symbolise   tall,     when   the
crops are    gathered and   sold,   and
therefore represent wealth, power mid !
trade; spades rule In the fourth p.uar- j
ter, and stand Ior winter, cold, dark- j
ness,   death,    hardship,   labor,   etc.;
i Every aspect   has its ruling or em-
| blematic   card,    and every   day   and
'years its ruling card, even tho miti-|
I utcs have each a card called the min?
uto card o! time.   In ancient times
I they only   recognized   three hundred
and Sixty-four days to the year, the
odd day   being   regarded   as   waste
time and   used up In   pleasure   and;
amusement.   Now, as each card rules
a day under each of the seven planets during the year, you can see that'
they exactly lill out the year, seven!
times ilfty-two making three hundred
and   sixty-four.   Seven   has   always
been a sacred number among all na- j
tions and in all religions, the center, I
so to speak, of all symbolic numbers. |
Seven is also the center of each   ot
the   four  suits   of   cards,    whether;
counting from the king or from the'
ace.   The thirteen cards of each suit]
arc also   astronomical and indicates
among   other things,   knowledge   of
good and evil.   It is   singular   says
Mr. Richmond, but it is a fact,  that
many times inventors anl manufacturers have endeavored to Introduce
cards  with a change in the emblems
used,   but in every   case they have
met with a failure.
G. W. DUNN.
Railway Expansion
The railway dovelopmout of Western ^Canada is shown by the estimate
of $85,000,000 to be spent in actual
construction work during tho current
year. This is only a rough estimate
hut it will not be widely astray when
tho totals can be accurately determined. The construction work laid put
by tlie Canadian Pacific is the most
costly and calls for the expenditure
of over '$20,000,000. James J. Hill
Hill will spend $15,000,000 on tho
Great Northern and subsidiary corn-
Canada is merely coming to her own
and making proper use of tho wealth
sho has inherited.—Toronto Globe.
ODDS AND ENDS.
Teacher—"I wonder what your
mother would say ii she knew bow
backward you are in geography?"
Girl—Oh, my mother says she never learnt jogfry, and she's warried;
and Aunt Sally says sho never lenrnt
jogiry, and she's married; and you
did and you ain't.
astronomy and these cards were constructed   with  perfect   mathematical
Miss Ellen Terry, at a reception in
New York, talked about tho innum-1
crable women who nnked her to help
them to get on the stage. "Thc tact
is," she said, "every women under,
30 believes she is an actress. And
every actress," she added, "believes
die is tinder 30." i
panics in Western Canada, and tho
work projected will make a fourth
trunk system across the prairies [
westward from Winnipeg. Thc Canadian Northern intends to spend
somo $11,000,000, part ot which will
be for tho extension of its main line
toward tlie Pacific coast. A like
amount will be spent by tho Grand
Trunk Pacific on its main line between Winnipeg and the Pacific
Coast, but a large part ot the money
used by- this company during 1009
will be on its branch lines. The Railway World, one of the leading American journals in its special field, puV
lisbes these figures and notes the expansion they indicate in Canadian
railway construction. It is such statistics and estimates that show how
rapidly a new nation is awakening
into liie in what was till recently an
almost unknown land. TMb so-called boom in railway building, almost
startling as it is in aggregate estimate, is barely keeping pace with tho
substantial development of the coun-j
try served.
In every surveyed district settlement has preceded the railways, and I
settlers are crying out impatiently
for the promised mentis ot reaching'
markets. Wherever there Is a pros-:
pect of railway extension the homo-'
stender is on the spot, ready to fur-!
nish his share of business where;
transportation enterprise does its
part. The railway expansion may
with propriety,bo 'designated a boom,
but the word must not he used in
its disparaging sense. The substantial growth of the country served
promises abundant returns on the
railway investment!! now freely mado
The ambitious projects of tho Dominion arc justified alike by the immediate mid future prospects of substantial development. Railway enterprise on such n scale would bo
alarming In a country less richly endowed with    natural resources,   but
W. Bourke Cockran at a St. Patrick's Day dinner,, told a story of an
Irishman who was talking about the
cast of Baring Gould whoso obituary
wns recently printod ;by mistake, Mr.
Gould still being happily in circulation: "So," said tho Irishman,
"they've printed the funeral notice
av a man that ain't doad yot, hov
they? Faith, an' it's a nice fix he'd
be in now if he was wan o' thlm people that belaves iverythlng they see
in tho papers."
A Scotch minister and his friend,
coming from a wedding, began to
consider thc state in which their potations at the feast had left them.
"Sandy," said the minister, "just
stop a minute till I go ahead. Perhaps I don't walk steady and the
guid wife might remark something
not right." He walked ahead for a
short distance, and then called out:
"How is it? Am I walking straight?'
"Oh, aye," answered Sandy thickly,
"yere a' recht—but who's that wi1
ye?"
President Hadley, of Yale, not long
ago entertained at dinner the son of
ono of his classmates, the youth being a Yale freshman. Thc conversation turned to football, and what
the president had to say on the Bub
ject was news to thc freshman, who
realized the fact with considerable
surprise. He listened for some time,
and then said to Mrs. Hadley, condescendingly enough1 l"Do you know,
Mrs. Hadley, that only Illustrates
the old saying thnt one can learn
something of anybody."
S. J. GIFFORD
Livery, Peed and Sale
Stables
EXPRESS WORK k SPECIALTY
WOOD FOR SALE
First AvenuB.
Phone fid.
A. JARVINEN
Photographer
First Class   Photos.
follow nn First Avmui.
T. E. Sullivan
Plumbing, Gas and Steamfittint
Prices Reasonable.
First Avenue, near New Western hotel
&
SEWING MACHINES
If you are thinking of buying a sewing machine call
and see uui stock cf ±c;.
soiled machines at reduced
prices to clear.    -
A. E. PALMER
FIRST AVENUE
Saint-Saenn, tho French comprser,
during his visit to Chicago mado a
brief address on America at a dinner
party. "Thc American business spirit," he said In the course of this address, "is an excellent thing. To it,
undoubtedly, America's unexampled
prosperity is due. But I think that
this spirit is so...ctlmes carried too
■far. For instance, in a hotel barber
shop yesterday I asked the barber If
ho had ever heard a certain celebrated pianist. 'No sir,' he replied emphatically. 'These pinnlstit never
patronize mo and so I never patronize thorn.' "
F. C. Fisher
TEACHER OF MUSIC
Studio in Williams' Block.
Have Your Houses Plastered
For Terms apply to
0. HINE, Plasterer, etc., Ladysmith, P. 0.
Cement Sidewalks a specialty.
The Canadian National Holiday Will Be Celebrated at-
LADYSMITH, T
, JULY 1,1909
field Sports, Lacrosse, Tu<j-of-War, Regatta,
Indian  Canoe Races, Trap Shooting, Etc.
0BAND     $1,000 IN PRIZES moSS*
ATTRACTIONS
Come and Join in the Greatest Dominion Day Celebration Ever Held on Vancouver Island
• ■-*!>**■>" +
EXCURSION RATES ON THE E. & N. RAILWAY THE LADYSMITH CHRONICLE
Boots and
Shoes
The Celebrated
AHRBNB  BOOTS   ASD   SHOES,
Every Pair Guaranteed or will be
replaced with another pair. In Men's
Boy's and Girl's. The Best* School
Bhoes In Town. Also Children's Wash
Ing Suits and Sailor BIousob, and
Btrachan Hats.
DON'T FORGET THE STOREf
J. J. Thomas
HIGH STREET
Made to Order
I sell the
Semi-Ready Clothing
Every piece is guaranteed
to fit, and the . price no
higher than ready made
clothing.
5. L. WOOD
First Avenue
Boxl73
Phone 43
For Meats
OF ALL KINDS, SAUSAGE A
SPECIALTY, LEAVE ORDERS
AT
Geo. Roberts'
Meat Market
Cor. First Ave. and Roberts Street.
LADYSMITH.
For the Warm Weather
A new Stock of
Summer Undervests
and Hosiery
-AT-
Miss Uren's
LIVERY STABLE
B. 5. WELLS, Proprietor
Hack, Express, Livery and Feed  Stable
DRAY WORK AND FURNITURE
MOVING.    WOOD FOR SALE
\ Phone 62
First Avenue        -       Ladycmilh, B. C
Memories of  a
Bohemian Club
How many people havo sighed for
and continue to sigh for tho disappearance of the old-fashioned, unpretentious literary club of the past?
All such will be keenly interested in
the late Mr. David Masson's "Memories of a London Club" in the pages of "Blackwood's Magazines." It
Was in 1844 that Mr. Masson was escorted by George Henry Lcwcs to a
house at the foot of Northumberland
street. "In an upper room of this
house I found a number of men seated, some on chairs, some on wooden
benches, talking and smoking—not
more than twonty, perhaps, altogether." This formed tho nucleus of the
Museum Club, which In its turn wns
transmuted into the "Our Club" of
these charming reminiscences,
DOUGLAS JERROLD.
Through all the vicissitudes of this
club one man of letters remained its
dominating personality until his
death. This personality was Douglas
Jerrold, whom Mr. Masson met for
the first time in 1844. "He was a
little man," he writes, "with a
stoop, nnd a very striking facej an
aquiline, eager look; with fair hair,
which he would sometimes dash aside
with his hands—altogether, a man
like a little Nelson, with his courageous look. He was, when I first
anew him, at the height of his fame
and reputation, after having had n
hard and struggling life—first as a
middy in our Navy, then, after the
peace, ns printer in a London printing office. With his theatrical connection—his father had been manager
of a small provincial theatre—he took
to writing for various "smaller theatres, and by this time he was known
as the author of various plays and
novels, as a magazine writer, and a
writer in newspapers." On one occasion a member sent tho club boy;
downstairs for a newspaper or a Hook |
and shouted after him, "I suppose!
you can read!" This instantly roused Douglas Jcrrold's anger, nnd be.
turned on that member exclaiming,1
"Sir, you have a coarse mind!"
THE   TROUBLE   WITH   DICKENS.
On a very different occasion Douglas Jerrold exhibited thc same large-
minded generosity. It was at u din- i
nor in the old Garrick Club at which
Jerrold and Dickens found themselves sitting at different tables,, and nl-,
most exactly back to back:
It was while our dinner wns going
on that my neighbor at table—I
think-- Hnmstcde—remarked to mo
thnt it was rather awkward they
should be so seated, there having
been a quarrel between thorn arising
out of the theatrical performances
given in old of some Dramatists'
Fund; so thnt they had not spoken,
to each other tor some considerable
time. Certainly, nil,the while tbo
dinners wcro going on, there was no.
communication between Jerrold ami
Dickens; and it looked ns if that
would be thc case throughout the
evening. But suddenly Jerrold wheel
cd round in his chair, clapped Dickens on thc shoulder, and said, .mite
audibly, "Charlie, my boy, how are
you?" On which Dickens wheeled
round too, holding out both his
hands to Jerrold in most cordial reconciliation, but had left it to Jerrold, as the older man to make the
first overture.
This incident was typical both of
Douglas Jerrold and Dickens.
THACKERAY'S IRISH FRIEND.
On Douglas Jerrold's death Thackeray succeeded to the unchallenged
leadership of "Our Club." "At all
our meetings," writes Mr. Masson,
"at the Garrick and at Our Club,
Thackeray always seemed to me—in
spite of his light humor, and his habitual nick-name of 'Tback' among
his friends—to be a man apart; a sad
and highly sensitive man, a man
with whom nobody could take a liberty." An Irishman, however, once
took a most audacious literary liberty with the author of "Vanity Fair."
Thackeray, out of good nature, Induced the editor of "Fraser's" to
print a paper by this Irish friend,
who was in very low Water. A week
or two afterwards the editor of
"Fraser's" Informed Thackeray that
the article had been stolen verbatim
from another periodical: "I was of
course grontlf annoyed," said Thackeray to Mr. Masson, "and Indeed excessively angry; and I thought, 'Well,
I must cut the fellow for ever; there's
no getting on with him.' I took the
clipping with me. and went straight
to my friend's rooms, intending to
blow him up, once for all, and have
done with him. I showed him the
clipping, and declared his behaviour
to have been scandalous. What do
you think lie did? He laughed in my
face, and treated thc whole affair as
a Joke! That's how my Irish friend
served mc; but oh! he was tho nicest I
friend, thc dearest, most delightful:
fellow, 1 ever know in the world.
A  JACOB'S  LADDER, '
Thackeray then went on to speak
seriously of his knowledge of the Irish character and his appreciation of
tho Irish people. "And among other
things, ho said there was one most
likeable quality that ho had observed In them, and It was this: that
there never would be found an Irishman anywhere so low down but
there wns somo other Irishman, still
lower down, depending on him, and
whom he was assisting." Mr. MaB-
.ton suggested that tn this there was
no great difference between thc Irish
and the Scotch, "lor It might he said
of the Scotch (I said I preferrod to
ho put in tho reverse way) that there
was no Scotsman anywhere in the
world so high up, but there was
somo other Scotsman, still higher up
whom he V'as looking up to, und be.
lnghelpod by; that, in [act, to blend
his observation and mine, thc world
might be said to bo a kind of Jacob's
ladder, with ascending nnd descending angels upon it." The creator of
Mr. Diiinio laughed, and thc talk end-'
cd,
Late Stories of
George Bernard Shaw
MILES OF GREAT'BATTLESHIPS,
> M«IN9MMIMfMIMN
Fresh Vegetables
Grown by Wie Labor
Green Onions, Spinach,
Lettuce, Rhubarb.
E. Pannell
ARE YOU GOING TO BUILD
a fence or a house, if so consult me
aa I can save you money on lumber
Having purchased a low truck. I
am prepared to move furniture and
pianos.
For any teaming consult
THORNLEY
 KAMtWIBB.,.--   -   .PHONE 6.
It
| Surprises
Her
when tho housewife visits our store ond sees tlio array of dellcucici for her
table thnt sho can procure for suuh a small amount of monoy at one store,
Fresh canned fruits, vegetates, and toothsome hams, baoon and everything in
fancy and staple groceries at prioes to suit ths economical.
1 GEAR'S IDEAL GROCERY
Scott's Building, First Avenue.
A pageant of unmatched magnificence and a lesson of infinite importance will be presented to the citizens
of London toward the, close of July.
The combined fleets of the Atlantic
and the home waters, after maneuv-
eriog in the North sea, will steam
to Southend and from that water
gate of the capital will extend In almost unbroken line to the heart of
London. Nearly forty miles of battleships and cruisers, with their multitude, of Bmaller craft, will stretch
like a mighty arrow,along the Thames and the point of the arrow, formed of torpedo boats and destroyers,
will lie in the shadow of parliament,
while the shaft, of battleships and
cruisers, is prolonged to the Nore.
This display, the like of which has
never been witnessed in any capital,
will follow upon the review at Spit-
head when delegates to the
imperial press conference will see th«
strength of that navy on which the
security of the empire depends. Having gratified the eye and stimulated
the patriotism of journalists trom
over the seas, thc fleet under Admiral May, will proceed to Margate and
give to that popular resort an attraction that should probe irresistible.
Then comes the visit to London on
or about July 17. Three days later
thc lord mayor and all the members
of tha corporation of the city will
pay an official visit to the fleet at
Southend and will be thc guests of
tho admiral. For the entertainment
of the city fathers, a mimic battle
will he fought at the mouth of the
Thames. Next day this visit will be
returned by the fleet and a thousand
bluejackets will lunch at tho Guildhall witli thc lord mayor as their
host. And in order that tlio pcoplo
may have a sharo in the welcome tho
sailors will march to thc Guildhall j
by u route that will give opportunity for popular demonstration,
On Thursday, July 2a, tho four;
tccn admirals and as many officers
us can be spared from the ships will
lunch at the Guildhall, hi prool of
its hospitable designs, the corpora-
lion has voted for these naval cn
tcrtHiinncots a sum of $10,0011.
This, shortly, is the program of nn
historic event that will enable   both
I parliament and the people to realise
what is the strength aud meaning of
our navy.
Two battle squadrons, In which arc
four Dreadnoughts, tlie mightiest engines of war, with twelve other battleships of enormous power, two
cruiser squadrons, swift and strong
to destroy, and an armada ot destroyers and torpedo boats and submarines— these nro tho component
parts of the pageant. Tho appearance of these leviathans of tha deep
at our doors should be an object
lesson nnd nn inspiration.
COOKED
PRESSED
Corn Beef
Chicken and Veal at all times
E. 8,. N. RAILWAY
Special Excursions
ACCOUNT OP
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition
Round Trip Tickets will be issued to Victoria June 16,
return limit June 20th. July 4, return limit 7th, rate
$2.80. /
L. D. CHETHAM,
D. I'. A.
«S  m,i«K*i.     iMtt-«
J. A.  Ryan
BUTCHER
Pure Ice Cream
Constantly
On Hand
Tobaccos, Cigars,  Etc.
Bestquality of Confectionery
Miss Bordozona
The Censor's objection to Blanco
Posnct has made Mr. Bernard Shaw
once more the most-talked-of man of
the hour, and a tew stories concerning this very original writer will be
apropos. A well-known actor-manager tells of a visit he once had [rom
Mr. Shaw, who was anxious lo read
him a play. "G. B. S." put his
hand into his breast pocket and produced a small notebook, ' which he
placed carefully on the table. Then
he dived into another pocket and
brought out another notebook. He
proceeded to raii6nck his pockets, in
fact, until he had brought to light no
less than seven small notebooks,
which he placed in a row upon the
table. "That's the play," be said
complacently. "I always write my
plays on the tops of 'buses, so I
have to use notebooks."
5* *   •
"G. K. 3." has a dislike for
the. conventional that must make his
life hardly worth living. He has even expressed his hatred for the harmless white collar. "The only man
who ought to wear a white collar,"
he once said, "is the negro." In
the day time, continued Mr. Sha***,
he himself walked about in a collar
that was not white. The sight ot
himself in the hideous combination
of a white collar against his flesh
would give him greater pain than the
utter contempt of the English public
as it passed by him. Among "G. B.
S.'s" other, dislikes, are tobacco and
doctors.
• • »
|Mr. Shaw's unconventionally is no
new thin*;, and even as a voung man
he was known for his originality.
When he first began to write theatric
cal criticisms he had a great objection to dress clothes, and turned up
one night at a fashionable thetit:e in
day attire. At thc entrance to the
stalls.he was politely stopped by »n
attendant. "What do you object
to?" asked Mr. Shaw; "the velvet
jacket?" . The attendant nodded.
"Very well," exclaimed "B. B. 8."
not in the least abashed, "I will remove It," mid be took u step forward j
in his shirt sleeves. "Here, that
won't do!" cxcliilmcd the attendant
in great alarm. "Won't do?" snld
Shuw. "Po ynu think I am going
1.o tako off uny more?" Whereupon,
he replaced his coat and promptly
lelt the theatre.
a a  a
Some years ago, before he was as
famous as ho Is today, Mr. Shaw mot
a young lady at a dinner-party who
said that shc could read character
from writing. Mr. Shaw denied belief in her powers, and said that any
rate she could not read characters
from typewriting. Now it happened
thnt thc host had just got a typewriter, and the young lady offered tj
le put to the test. The machine was
brought, and Mr. Shaw, picking out
the letters one by one, wrote his
flrst name. Then ho discovered that
he had only used capital letters; so
shifting to the lower case, he wrote
his last name. Then he handed the
result af his companion. This waul
what she read: "BERNARD shaw.'
"It's as plain as anything," she said
with a smile. "It is your idea that
though there are a good many: Sbawj
in the world, they are an undistinguished lot. You alone are Bernard
Shaw, and your name is great."
Not long since, Mr. Shaw found
that he was unable to fulfill an engagement to speak In public, and it
was announced from the platform
that the doctor had forbidden him ty
venture out of doors, and that therefore he could not lea. his bed. A
Press agency lmmedirit«lv wired to
Mr. Shaw for more information on
the subject, and received the following reply: "Kindly inform the public that I am dead. It will save mc
a great deal of trouble— Bernard
9haw."-M. A. V.
vies meant to get to the top if there
was the least lability to warrant such'
a rising.
Thc "Parson" was one of the first
men to recognise the ability of "Jim'
Jeffries. It was before the big whito
man became champion that David in
an interview remarked:
'' Jcffrics-is the greatest lighting m*«
chine lhat the world has ever known
or ever will know."
Davies is about sixty years old. He
never told his exact agc.i He was as
shy about that as an old maid. He
was born in Ireland, and the first
fight ho ever witnessed was in Kil-
larney. Thc battle was bare knuckles
between nn Orangeman and a Catholic. |Young Davies possessed himself
of $25 of his father's money and bet
on the Catholic. Ho won, and from
lhat timo on be followed the pugllisV
tic game.
Church Services.
CHURCH OF ENGLAND.       <
Matins— 11 a. m.
Avensong— 7 p. m.
Sunday SchoolW 2.30. p. m.
Preachers—Morning,    Rev.   R.    J.
Bowen^evening,, Rev. G. M-Ambrose
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH.
Sunday Services at 1.1 a. m. and (I
p. m. Bible Class and Sumhy
School at 2 p. m. Prayer meeting
Wednesday at 7 p. nv
METHODIST CHURCH.
Epworth League meets at the close
of the Sunday evening service.
Prayer meeting Wednesday at 7.30
p. m.
Sabbath Services: Morning, U a.
m; evening, 7 p. m.; Sabbath school
and Bible class, 2.30 p. m..
R. WILKINSON, Pastor
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH.-
Sunday services: At 8 a. m., lew
mass. *At 10:30 a. m., high mass.
(it 2 p. in., Sunday school. At 7
p iu., evening service and Benediction.
Wise—Now, he's got what I call
'horse sense.' Ascum—How, for instance?   Wise—He never bets on one.
1CCLOTDADS1C
IW PER WORD ■ W
Advertisements under this head
one cent per word per issue, payable in advance.
ruuftu,
Get Ready for the Summer by
Having Your House Painted
Best materials only used.
Big stock of wall paper on
hand.
PRICES TH& LOWEST
POUND—A '.Kit Cillie Dog. Owner
can have same by applying to
Frank Torest, Oatacre street, and
paying for this advert
LOST.
LOST — Between Roberts street,
Third avenue and High street,
book, entitled "Pun Doctor."
Please return to Mrs. Ewart, High,
street,  $1.00 Reward.
POR SALE.
POR SALE-Brown and White Rabbits. Fifty cuts each. SApply Mr*
John Stewirt.
FOR SALE—White Leghorn eggs for
setting. Buff Leghorns and Black
Minorcas. $2.50 a setting, Apply;
Mrs. Laird.
J. E. Smith
.....nt     ■    .    .^.-itf.B.n.
Parson Davies
Reported Dying
Chicago, June 171—"Parson" Davies, who is said to tie in his last
Illness at the home of his sistor here,
while his old partner, Pat Shcedy, Is
seriously ill in New York, wns formerly one of the best known figures
of the squared circle. '
John L. Sullivan, Jake Kllraln,
Peter Jackson, "Jack" Dempsey,
"Jack" Burke, Evan Lewis, and
"Jim" Hull were all managod at
somo time or other by "Parson" Davies and tho time when they woro
managed by him was tbe time when
tht*^c^Ute^am»^T|}b« under Da-
FOR SALE—Express wagon In perfect order and harness. Apply Arthur Howe, Chemainus.
POR SALE—Pour roomed house ln
good locality in Extension, B.
C\   Apply Ike Storoy.
PIANO FOR SALE.-Cprlght Grand
Dominion Piano in first class condition. In use only a short time.
Apply Mrs. Bernard, Union Brew-
ery, Ladysmith, •
WANTED.     .
WANTED-A girl to assist in light
housework. Apply Mrs. Mtiihol-
lnnd, First avenue, Ladysmith.
Dr. R. B. Dier
Surgeon Dentist
ALL WORIt_QUARANTCEI> fHEUDYSMITHCHRONlCU
4444444449999449444444444444449949494449499
k Picklish Question!     j
Are You Fond of Pickles?!
T
9
9
9
9
4
4
We carry a varied line of Pickles, Sauces and
Relishes comprising only the best brands.
LIPTON'S PICKLES—Walnuts, Mixed Chow Chow, Picalille, Cauliflower,
Okerklns and Onions, 35e a bottle.
Mrs. Leas Onion Pickles, per bottle  25o
Upton's mixed and Mustard pickles, per botUe  25o
C 4 B Pickles- _ pint bottle  20c
C 4 B Pickies, 1 pint  bottle  3,r>c
C 4 B Walnut Pickles, 1 quart bottle  65c
tlaUard's English "icklo with Piquant Sauao, por bottle  40c
Spanish Queen Olives, per bottle  — 35j
Selected Olives, (finest) quart bottle       75o
Sweet Pickle Relish,  per bottle  Sue
Sterling Horse Radish, per bottle 25c
Dcukes Salad Dressing per bottle 7fic and  40c
French  Capers, per bottle  25c
Celery Salt, por bottle  16c
Curry Powder por botllu  26e
Qillard's appet/.ing Sauce, 2 bottles for ! 256
Lea aud Porrina   Worobester Sauce, pcr bottle 66c aud  35c
French prepared mustard, 2 bottles  25c
Blue Label Ketchup, _xr bottle  38o
Sweet S'iied Mango Ckutrey, per bottle  36c
White and Malt Vinegar in bottles or bulk.
The hist brands of Salad and Lucca Oil.
All Fruits in Season
BLAIR & ADAM
Biq Special in    The Vancouver -s-an|- Cigar
y '        Company
Two-Piece Suits
We are making a special
of these suits.
By going through our stock
we find we have too many
on hand so «re selling them
at a sacrifice.
All suits from $10.00 to
$13.50, to be cleared at $7.50
a suit.
W. E. Morrison
for Warm Weather Goods
Formerly Gold & Johnston, of Victoria, are introducing a new brand
of Cigars to be known  as tbe
"V. I."
Try Them.
Local and General
News Notes
The Indies of the Presbyterian
Church will hold an ice cream festival on thc evening of June 24.        *
Tea rooms for Indies or gentlemen. Short order ur sandwiches'
always ready at Hoon*.''.*. •
1 i mcet your friends and be right
at home, while in Victoria, stay at
uih Rainier Hotel, George ilurggy
proprietor. •
Finest Ice Cream in the city at.
Hooper's, tbe most select ■ u.-lor
on the Island. Everything of the
best quality In Confectionery,       *
The ladies of the Presbyterian
church will give a Tuwu social on
Wednesday evening, June 23rd.
Strawberries and ice cream will be
served and thc band will bo In attendance. •
T.) moot, your triends and be right
at home, while In Victoria, stay at
the Rainier  Hotel,    George    M\ *gy
proprietor. t •
Summer
Underwear
We have a large assortment of Men's Summer
Underwear and will be pleased to have you call
and inspect it.
B. V. D. ATHLETIC Underwear, short sleeves
and knee drawers at $1.50 a suit.
Penman's number 22, two thread BALBRIGGAN
Underwear at $1.25 a suit.
EGYPTIAN SANITARY MESH Underwear at
$1.25 a suit.
Other lines in plain and fancy Balbriggan at
$1.00 a suit.
C. E. JEFFS
• ••••••••^••••••••••* • ••,#•••••••••••••••••«
Prices That Mean Business
There must be a reason-
why our trade keeps growing and why young men
come here past all the other
stores.
We have really handsome clothing tor'begin
with, and surround the selling with every possible
courtesy, and whe.ij it
comes to down-right good
values you'll travel a long
way before you find anything to
EQUAL THESE PRICES
Be as I'een as you please
for the moneys worth.
Don't take anything for
granted, but investigate
and compare. Do as we
do, insist on quality and
style along with fair prices!
Our aim is to make one
purchase bring another
and you can depend on
getting value for your
money.
Simon Leiser &Co.,Ltd
We carry in stock the leading sizes
| suitable for Camping.
TENTS!
HAMMOCKS!      HAMMOCKS!
Complete Stock.
PISHING TACKLE
i
1
• *
Our stock Is well assorted in all the: j
|leading lines suitable for these wa-::
::ters, etc. We are offering special^
:: values in Fishing Rods.
The
Ladysmith Hardware Co., Ltd.
W^HW^W«r-r-r»^H-H-W-W^-!^H^^S^^H^H^^^«^-
A Handsome Premium of White and Sold Chinaware
5>
*5*
onadian
Wheat
Makes
Will 3e Found in Every Package of
B. & K.  CANADIAN WHEAT FLAKES
ASK. YOUH UUOUGR- He will tell you about it anil show you samples.
As for the FLAKES -there Is nothing finer manufactured anywhere,     They are
'!>. & K." goods and this is sutliciciit to prove, the quality.
The Brackman-Ker Milling Co., Ltd.
Local and General
News Notes
Mr. J. J. Blaod went down to Victoria this morning.
Mr. Bruce   McKelvie   lias returned
from a business trip to Vancouver.
Mr, Gladstone Poster, ot Crewe &
Poster, Nanaimo, is in Uie city today,
Mr. Hurry Hughes Is in Vancouver
this week attending the annual meet.
Ing of thc Grand Lodge A. K. & A.
M.
The Presbyterian garden party next
Wednesday afternoon and evening will
l,e held ln the vacant portion of the
church lot.
There Is a great scarcity of labor-
ingmen in Ladysmith at the present
time. One man has been three or
lour days trying to get someone to
do some jobs, but so far has not succeeded.
Rev. R, J. Bowen, formerly In
charge ol St, Julio's* Mission here,
is in the city ond will, occupy thc pul
pit iu that church tomorrow morning. He is now lecturer for thc Bible Society,
Owing to the increase of buslaens
at this point, tenders will be called
tor an addition ol 40 feet to the B.
& N. railway freight sheds. The present shed is crowded with freight und
the Congestion is increasing.
Mr. Harry Vollmprs, the boufbuild-
cr at Cowlchan Gap, brought ln a
motor boat yesterday, which he has
recently built.
Mr. Arthur Broaksbank lelt Thursday morning for Port"" Esslngton,
where he will onter the employ of
Cunningham ft Sons,
The football team left for Victoria
this morning, to piny Nanaimo at
Ei|:iulmalt this afternoon. They wero
accompanied bv a number of tho local enthusiasts.
R. J. McPhec, one ol the best
known mining operators In the Koot-
enny, died at Spokane last Sunday
Irom an attack of-bronchial asthma.
He had a large circle of friends ln
the Kootenay who will sincerely regret his death. Mr. McPhee was
born ln Prince Edwurd Island sixty
years ago and was of unmixed Highland descent.
Rev. Mr. Millur nnd Mrs. Millar,
ol Nanaimo, were presented Thursday ultcrnoon With n beautiful cut
glass set by thc Young Pcoplc-s
Christian KndeaVor Society. Mr. and
Mrs. Millar leave shortly lor Alberta..
CARD OP  THANKS.
Mr. and Mrs. T. Webley desire to
thank those who assisted them and
extended sympathy In their recent bei
reavement. The blow was severe, but
considerate friends did everything
they could lessen Its effects on
those left behind.
NOTrCK.
All memhero ot tho various 'branches of the Knights of Pythias and I.I
O. O. F., who intend participating!
ln the decoration ceremonies are re-,
quested to meet in tho lodge room,
on Sunday,   20th   Inst., at 2 p. m.;
Now is the time to enjoy
yourself with one.
Knight's Book Store
SOLE AOENTS.
Superior Hard Enamel
Souvenir Goods: I have a large
assortment of Hemsley's extra fine
Hard Enamel Goods. Theso goods
arc only sold to the Jewelery Trade
a lower grade being provided for the
general  trade.
Call and inspect thoso Souvenir
Goods. They are a work nf art.
Souvenir Spoons, Belt Pins, Maple
Leaves,  Etc.,  Etc.
Our Watch repair work is ever la-
creasing, why? because when we repair a watch It is done thoroughly,
you get satisfaction. Estimates given
Mi nil work.
P. 0. NOOT
WATCHMAKER
AND
JEWELER
NOTICE.
All pormits (or burning rubbish,
etc., are hereby cancelled. The penalty provided for violations ot this
rlctly enforced.
a$aa?aaJa.*a.J«AaVJaAa*»a*aaJaa2.aJa.Ja«{«aM
!
4
T
A
Warm
Weather
Specials
i
LADIES' SUMMER VESTS
Regular   3*>u                Special   'A'po
25c                     --loo
20o      .             • ■      Wo
MEN'S BALBRIGGAN UNDERWEAR
Zimmcr Knit Brand, silk Anith.
SPECIAL ISOo each.
BLOUSES
Sje our leader in a Ladle's Blouse,
Values up to $1.60, SPKC1AL 85c
each.
MEN'S CANVAS SHOES
(bwil valuo at jl.SS, SPECIAL
85c a pair.
CHILDREN'S STRAW NATS
Some of these were worth aa high
as SUM each, SPECIAL 50c each.
BOYS' SCHOOL SHOES
the gotxl and strong kind.    SPECIAL $1.00 a pair.
LADIES' PARASOLS
A Traveller's Ret of Samples lo
choose from, not two alike,   Fiiun
35o up,
BOYS' BLOUSES   \
Made ont of good strong Galla-
tea.   SPECIAL No each.
Walters & Akenhead

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